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How to Care for Amur Maple

The deciduous tree of amur maple has fragrant white flowers that change into a brilliant orange-red color in autumn. It grows fast but lives long, and the flowers don’t show until the tree matures. It grows at the edges of bogs and open forests and requires just a moderate amount of maintenance.
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Symbolism

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Water
Water
Every 1-2 weeks
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Amur maple
Amur maple
Amur maple
Amur maple
Amur maple
care_basic_guide

Basic Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterDetail

How to Water Amur maple?

The amur maple prefers the soil to be kept moist, especially during the summer, because dry weather can cause its leaves to scorch and even fall off in severe cases. During the summer, in addition to watering the roots, foliage can be sprayed during the evening to increase the humidity.
  • In the summer, seedlings growing in pots may need watering twice a day, in the morning and the evening.
  • In the spring and fall, watering should be carried out depending on the actual conditions. Watering can be reduced slightly as the temperature drops in the fall, which will help the leaves to change color.
  • In the winter, it is only necessary to ensure that the soil does not dry out.
Attention should be paid to the watering of seedlings grown in gardens during the early stages. At later stages, water should be supplied according to the weather, that is if there is no rain for more than two weeks in the summer.
Cultivation:WaterDetail
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What's the best method to water my Amur maple?
You might want to put a garden hose at the plant base to ensure that you're promoting excellent root development. Avoid directly spraying the leaves, and know that the leaves will require more watering if they are outdoors and facing direct sunlight. You can also use bubblers that you can put on to each plant to moisten the roots. Also, use soaker hoses that can cover the entire garden or bed when adding or removing plants to push the roots deeply. Drain any excess water and wait for the soil to dry before watering. Water at ground level to prevent diseases. On a sunny day, you might want to spray the entire bush with water. Whether potted or in-ground, please remember Amur maple prefers deep watering over light sprinkling.
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What should I do if I water Amur maple too much/too little?
An overwatered Amur maple can start to have leaves that turn yellow, drop off and wilt. The plant can also look dull and unhealthy, with signs of mushy stems. When they are beginning to show these signs, it's best to adjust your schedule whenever possible.
The wilting can also be a sign of under watering as well. You might see that the leaves begin to turn crispy and dry while the overwatered ones will have soft wilted leaves. Check the soil when it is dry and watering is not enough, give it a full watering in time. Enough water will make the Amur maple recover again, but the plant will still appear dry and yellow leaves after a few days due to the damaged root system. Once it return to normal, the leave yellowing will stop .
Always check the moisture levels at the pot when you have the Amur maple indoors. Avoid overwatering indoors and see if there are signs of black spots. If these are present, let the soil dry in the pot by giving it a few days of rest from watering.
Overwatering can lead to root rot being present in your plant. If this is the case, you might want to transfer them into a different pot, especially if you see discolored and slimy roots. Always prevent root rot as much as possible, and don't let the soil become too soggy.
You should dig a little deeper when you plant your Amur maple outdoors. When you check with your fingers and notice that the soil is too dry, it could mean underwatering. Adequate watering is required to help the plant recover.
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How often should I water my Amur maple?
The Amur maple likes deep and infrequent watering. You would want to soak them in a gallon of water each time, especially when they are planted in pots. The water storage of flower pots is limited and the soil will dry out faster. Watering is required every 3 to 5 days when living in a cold region. Water it early in the morning when the soil is dry, outdoors or indoors. You can also determine if watering is needed by checking the soil inside. When the top 2-3 inches of soil is dry, it is time to give the plant a full watering. During hot days, you may need to check the moisture daily, as the heat can quickly dry out the soil in the pot.
Irrigation of the soil is also required if you have a garden. When you live in a hot climate, you might want to water once a week. Only water when you notice that about 2 to 3 inches of soil become too dry outdoors or indoors. Consider the amount of rainwater on the plant and ensure not to add to it to prevent root rot.You may not need additional watering of the plants if there is a lot of rainfall.Amur maple generally grows during spring and fall. When they are outdoors, you need to add mulch about 3 to 4 inches deep to conserve more water.
You need to water the plants more frequently in sandy soil because this type tends to drain faster. However, with the clay one, you need to water this less frequently where you could go for 2-3 days to dry the plant and not develop any root rot. You could mark the date on the calendar whenever you water and when you notice that the leaves are starting to droop. This can mean that you might be a day late.
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How much water do I need to give my Amur maple?
The Amur maple generally needs about a gallon of water each schedule,With the potted plants, you might want to water them deeply until you see that the water is dripping at the bottom of the pot. Then, wait for the soil to dry before watering them again. You can use a water calculator or a moisture meter to determine the amount you've given to your plant in a week. Provide plenty of water, especially in the flowering period, but let the moisture evaporate afterwards to prevent root rot.
If Amur maple is planted outdoor with adequate rainfall, it may not need additional watering. When Amur maple is young or newly planted, make sure it gets 1-2 inches of rain per week. As Amur maple continues to grow, it can survive entirely on rainfall. Only when the weather is too hot, or when there is no rainfall at all for 2-3 weeks, then consider giving Amur maple a full watering during the cooler moment of the day to prevent the plant from suffering from high heat damage. Additional watering will be required during persistent dry spells.
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Should I adjust the watering frequency for my Amur maple according to different seasons or climates?
The Amur maple needs outdoors come from rain, with only persistent dry weather requiring watering. Throughout the spring and fall growing seasons, the soil needs to be kept moist but not soggy, and alternating dry and moist soil conditions will allow the Amur maple to grow well. Throughout the summer, hot weather can cause water to evaporate too quickly, and if there is a lack of rainfall, you will need to water more frequently and extra to keep it moist.
Usually, the Amur maple will need less water during the winter. Since the Amur maple will drop their leaves and go dormant, you can put them into a well-draining but moisture-retentive soil mixture like the terracotta to help the water evaporate quicker. Once your Amur maple growing outdoors begins to leaf out and go dormant, you can skip watering altogether and in most cases Amur maple can rely on the fall and winter rains to survive the entire dormant period.
After the spring, you can cultivate your Amur maple and encourage it to grow and bloom when the temperature becomes warmer.This plant is not generally a fan of ponding or drought when flowering. You must ensure that the drainage is good at all times, especially during the winter.
When the plant is in a pot, the plant has limited root growth. Keep them well-watered, especially if they are planted in pots during summer. They don't like cold and wet roots, so provide adequate drainage, especially if they are still growing.
It's always best to water your Amur maple’s diligently. Get the entire root system into a deep soak at least once or twice a week, depending on the weather. It's best to avoid shallow sprinkles that reach the leaves since they generally encourage the growth of fungi and don't reach deep into the roots. Don't allow the Amur maple’s to dry out completely in the fall or winter, even if they are already dormancy.
Don't drown the plants because they generally don't like sitting in water for too long. They can die during winter if the soil does not drain well. Also, apply mulch whenever possible to reduce stress, conserve water, and encourage healthy blooms.
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What should I be careful with when I water my Amur maple in different seasons, climates, or during different growing periods?
If planting in the ground, Amur maple mostly relies on rain. However, if there is no rainfall for 2-3 weeks, you may need to give proper consideration to giving the plants a deep watering. If watering Amur maple in summer, you should try to do it in the morning. A large temperature difference between the water temperature and the root system can stress the roots. You need to avoid watering the bushes when it's too hot outside. Start mulching them during the spring when the ground is not too cold.
The age of the plants matter. Lack of water is one of the most common reasons the newly planted ones fail to grow. After they are established, you need to ease off the watering schedule.
Reduce watering them during the fall and winter, especially if they have a water-retaining material in the soil. The dry winds in winter can dry them out, and the newly planted ones can be at risk of drought during windy winter, summer, and fall. Windy seasons mean that there's more watering required. The ones planted in the pot tend to dry out faster, so they need more watering. Once you see that they bloom less, the leaves begin to dry up.
Potted plants are relatively complex to water and fluctuate in frequency. Always be careful that the pot-planted plant don't sit in the water. Avoid putting them in containers with saucers, bowls, and trays. Too much watering in the fall can make the foliage look mottled or yellowish. It's always a good idea to prevent overwatering them regardless of the current climate or season that you might have. During the months when Amur maple begins to flower, you might want to increase the watering frequency but give it a rest once they are fully grown.
Give them an adequate amount of water once every 3 to 5 days but don't give them regular schedules. Make sure the soil is dry by sticking your finger in the pot, or use a moisture meter if you're unsure if it's the right time. Too much root rot can cause them to die, so be careful not to overwater or underwater regardless of the climate or season you have in your area.
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Why is watering my Amur maple important?
Watering the Amur maple helps transport the needed nutrients from the soil to the rest of the plant. The moisture will keep this species healthy if you know how much water to give. The watering requirements will depend on the weather in your area and the plant's soil.
The Amur maple thrives on moist soil, but they can't generally tolerate waterlogging. Ensure to provide enough mulch when planted on the ground and never fall into the trap of watering too little. They enjoy a full can of watering where the water should be moist at the base when they are planted in a pot to get the best blooms.
If they are grown as foliage, you need to water them up to a depth of 10 to 20 inches so they will continue to grow. If it's raining, refrain from watering and let them get the nutrients they need from the rainwater.
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Cultivation:FertilizerDetail

How to Fertilize Amur maple?

Potted seedlings should be given slow-release fertilizer only. For seedlings grown in gardens, fertilizer should be applied three times a year: once in the early spring, once in early summer for the growth period, and once in the fall.

Fertilizer

It can be somewhat easy for a novice gardener to overlook Amur maple since these plants don't often produce showy flowers. However, the incredible leaf shapes and textures of Amur maple plants can make them as ornamentally appealing as any other plant in your garden. Growing Amur maple outdoors in your garden is not extremely difficult to do, but there are some insights that you must keep in mind while you care for this plant. Within your maintenance routine, correct fertilization will be crucial.
Regardless of which kind of Amur maple you own, regular fertilization will help you grow a plant that has great overall health. The proper supply of nutrients leads to more vigorous growth and can help your Amur maple be more resilient to tough growing conditions while also gaining a better ability to fight off diseases and pests. The foliage of your Amur maple is one of its most attractive features, which is why you should do all you can to keep it intact. Again, this means creating and adhering to a regular fertilization schedule that is specific to your Amur maple. Doing so will prompt your Amur maple to develop leaves with a deep color and a lush overall look.
The first time that you should fertilize your Amur maple is during the late winter or early spring. This type of fertilization gives your Amur maple all the nutrients it needs to resume healthy growth once the weather gets warm enough. It is also beneficial to many Amur maple to provide an additional fertilizer feeding during early fall if you in a warm climate region. Fertilizing in early fall not only adds additional nutrients to the soil, which your Amur maple will use in the following growing season, but it also helps your Amur maple be a bit more hardy and capable of surviving the winter cold without experiencing foliage damage. Earlier fertilisation will ensure that the new branches have enough time to grow to withstand the cold winter.
In most cases, the most important nutrient for a Amur maple is nitrogen, but that does not mean that phosphorus and potassium are unimportant. On the contrary, your Amur maple likely needs a decent amount of all three main nutrients, which is why a balanced fertilizer, such as a 10-10-10, can work well. However, a more nuanced ratio of nutrients often leads to optimal growth for a Amur maple. Often, fertilizers that are a bit higher in nitrogen work a bit better. For example, a ratio of 10-6-4 can often work well. When fertilizing, you can use a granular fertilizer or a liquid-based one. At times, a Amur maple may also need
To fertilize your Amur maple using a granular fertilizer, all you need to do is sprinkle the fertilizer on the soil at the correct time. The slow-release nature of granular fertilizer will release nutrients into the soil slowly over time. As is usually the case, it's best to water your Amur maple, at least lightly, before applying fertilizer. As an alternative, you can use a liquid fertilizer, but this is less common. To use this approach, mix your fertilizer with water, then pour the water onto the soil around the base of your Amur maple. At times, it is beneficial to perform a soil test before fertilizing to see if you will need to alter the pH at all.
Overfertilization is always a risk when you are feeding a Amur maple. Overfertilization is especially likely if you feed this plant at the wrong time of year, feed it too often, or feed it without watering the soil first. When overfertilization takes place, your Amur maple may begin to develop brown leaves. Your Amur maple can also show stunted growth in some cases. On the other hand, it is also possible that too much fertilizer can prompt your Amur maple to rapidly produce too much new growth, much of which will be weak and prone to breaking. Weak new wood can also detract from the overall form and structure of your Amur maple.
There are a few times during the year when you should not fertilize your Amur maple. The first time occurs during the early and mid-winter months, during which time your Amur maple will be dormant and in no need of feeding. It is also unwise to fertilize this plant during the late spring and all of the summer. During that time of year, the weather will likely be hotter and can be much dryer as well. Both conditions make it more likely that your Amur maple will have a very negative response to fertilization. To avoid such issues, stick to a fertilization schedule that involves feeding exclusively during early spring and early fall.
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Cultivation:FertilizerDetail
Why do I need to fertilize my Amur maple?
Regardless of which kind of Amur maple you own, regular fertilization will help you grow a plant that has great overall health. The proper supply of nutrients leads to more vigorous growth and can help your Amur maple be more resilient to tough growing conditions while also gaining a better ability to fight off diseases and pests.
The foliage of your Amur maple is one of its most attractive features, which is why you should do all you can to keep it intact. Again, this means creating and adhering to a regular fertilization schedule that is specific to your Amur maple. Doing so will prompt your Amur maple to develop leaves with a deep color and a lush overall look.
Read More more
When is the best time to fertilize my Amur maple?
The first time that you should fertilize your Amur maple is during the late winter or early spring. This type of fertilization gives your Amur maple all the nutrients it needs to resume healthy growth once the weather gets warm enough.
It is also beneficial to many Amur maple to provide an additional fertilizer feeding during early fall if you in a warm climate region. Fertilizing in early fall not only adds additional nutrients to the soil, which your Amur maple will use in the following growing season, but it also helps your Amur maple be a bit more hardy and capable of surviving the winter cold without experiencing foliage damage. Earlier fertilisation will ensure that the new branches have enough time to grow to withstand the cold winter.
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When should I avoid fertilizing my Amur maple?
There are a few times during the year when you should not fertilize your Amur maple. The first time occurs during the early and mid-winter months, during which time your Amur maple will be dormant and in no need of feeding.
It is also unwise to fertilize this plant during the late spring and all of the summer. During that time of year, the weather will likely be hotter and can be much dryer as well. Both conditions make it more likely that your Amur maple will have a very negative response to fertilization. To avoid such issues, stick to a fertilization schedule that involves feeding exclusively during early spring and early fall.
Read More more
What type of fertilizer does my Amur maple need?
In most cases, the most important nutrient for a Amur maple is nitrogen, but that does not mean that phosphorus and potassium are unimportant. On the contrary, your Amur maple likely needs a decent amount of all three main nutrients, which is why a balanced fertilizer, such as a 10-10-10, can work well.
However, a more nuanced ratio of nutrients often leads to optimal growth for a Amur maple. Often, fertilizers that are a bit higher in nitrogen work a bit better. For example, a ratio of 10-6-4 can often work well. When fertilizing, you can use a granular fertilizer or a liquid-based one.
Read More more
How do I fertilize my Amur maple?
To fertilize your Amur maple using a granular fertilizer, all you need to do is sprinkle the fertilizer on the soil at the correct time. The slow-release nature of granular fertilizer will release nutrients into the soil slowly over time. As is usually the case, it's best to water your Amur maple, at least lightly, before applying fertilizer.
As an alternative, you can use a liquid fertilizer, but this is less common. To use this approach, mix your fertilizer with water, then pour the water onto the soil around the base of your Amur maple. At times, it is beneficial to perform a soil test before fertilizing to see if you will need to alter the pH at all.
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What happens if I fertilize my Amur maple too much?
Overfertilization is always a risk when you are feeding a Amur maple. Overfertilization is especially likely if you feed this plant at the wrong time of year, feed it too often, or feed it without watering the soil first.
When overfertilization takes place, your Amur maple may begin to develop brown leaves. Your Amur maple can also show stunted growth in some cases. On the other hand, it is also possible that too much fertilizer can prompt your Amur maple to rapidly produce too much new growth, much of which will be weak and prone to breaking. Weak new wood can also detract from the overall form and structure of your Amur maple.
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Cultivation:SunlightDetail

What Are the Sunlight Requirements for Amur maple?

The amur maple has a certain requirement for sunlight and prefers a partially shaded area. In cases of exposure to direct sunlight in the summer, the leaves of most varieties will wither, so shading is required. As the plants get older and their root system grows, this condition will be less of a problem. A few varieties will tolerate exposure to direct sunlight, such as ‘Beni Maiko’ and ‘De Shojo’. Some weeping varieties can also tolerate exposure to direct sunlight, such as ‘Ao Shidare’.
Sunlight conditions will directly affect the ornamental appearance of amur maple leaves. In the spring, sufficient sunlight will make the maple leaves more vivid, while in cases of insufficient sunlight or partial shading the leaf color may fade. During the fall, sunlight can also affect the leaf color. For potted plants, full exposure to sunlight is recommended during the spring and the fall, with partial shading in the summer.
Cultivation:SunlightDetail
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How much/long should Amur maple get sunlight per day for healthy growth?
For healthy growth, make sure that Amur maple receives at least 3–6 hours of sun each day. This is actually a minimum requirement—most plants that can handle part sun can also thrive in full sun, but because they require less light for photosynthesis, they are more flexible than plants that require full sun or part shade.
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What type of sunlight does Amur maple need?
Amur maple does best with exposure to full or part sun. They will perform best with direct morning light, but in summer they need protection from the strong afternoon sun. In temperate environments, too much hot afternoon sun can burn the leaves, damaging the plant's appearance and health.
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Can sunlight damage Amur maple? How to protect Amur maple from the sun and heat damage?
Amur maple planted indoors can easily be damaged by direct sunlight when it's moved outdoors. The best way to prevent sunburns from overexposure is to move pots gradually from a shaded area to a brighter spot, gradually. But even plants that are acclimated to the summer sun can be damaged by extreme heat. In a heatwave, it is important to keep the soil consistently moist so that plants can cope with excessive levels of heat. Moving plants in containers to areas with afternoon shade or erecting a shade cloth over them can protect sensitive Amur maple during extreme weather events.
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Does Amur maple need to avoid sun exposure? / Should I protect Amur maple from the sun?
While bright morning sun and some full sun exposure can be highly beneficial for Amur maple, the harsh, hot midday sun of summer can be too much to handle.
If planted in the ground, the summer sun will usually ramp up slowly enough through the season for Amur maple to gradually adapt to its intensity. But a potted plant that has been indoors or in a protected location will often suffer injury when placed suddenly into a location where the direct summer sun reaches it in the hottest part of the day.
To protect this plant from the brutal afternoon summer sun, plant or place it in an understory location where it is shaded at midday by taller trees and plants or by a building or landscape feature.
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What will happen if Amur maple gets inadequate sunlight?
When Amur maple receives too little sun, they may become pale green or display drooping, yellow leaves. While some leaf drop is normal, if leaves are dropping but no new ones are growing in to replace them, it is a sign that something is wrong. If Amur maple receiving inadequate light does manage to grow, the new growth is often spindly, pale, and prone to insect infestation. Paying attention to these signs and changing the lighting conditions of the plant will make a significant difference.
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Does Amur maple need special care about sunlight during its different growth stages?
Tender, new leaves are especially sensitive to sunburn. Bearing this in mind, very young Amur maple and when it's in a strong growth phase, such as in late spring and early summer, will be more sensitive to harsh sun and heat than the mature one or those in a more dormant fall growth stage. Amur maple fresh from a nursery is also usually not prepared for strong full sunlight and must be introduced to it slowly.
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Are there any cautions or tips for sunlight and Amur maple?
Recently transplanted Amur maple will often experience a bit of shock and will need to be cared for carefully, either shaded from bright afternoon sun or placed in a protected area. On very hot days, you may see the leaves of Amur maple drooping—this is usually nothing to worry about. Plants will send the water in their leaves down into their roots to protect them from burning. However, if the leaves are still drooping in the evening or the next morning, the plant needs water. Always avoid watering during the hottest times of day, as sunlight can hit wet leaves and scorch them easily.
Amur maple that has been underwatered will be weaker than that with consistently moist soil. This can leave it with weak roots that are unable to protect the leaves on hot, sunny summer days by diverting water away from the leaves. Care for an underwatered plant by giving it a long, deep watering and then allowing the top two inches of soil to dry out before the next watering. Even if it loses its leaves, if cared for properly it will grow new ones.
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Cultivation:PruningDetail

How to Prune Amur maple?

Pruning is mainly used to enhance internal ventilation, improve shoot formation, promote growth, and for shaping. The common approach to pruning is to remove any old or weak branches, remove any branches that disrupt the shape of the tree, and remove any branches that cross other branches. Pruning is used to control the plant according to the required height and shape. Generally, this follows the "Y-type" pruning method.
It is possible to prune a amur maple throughout the year, but the coldest winter months should be avoided to prevent damage to the plant. Major pruning to shape a maple can be performed following defoliation in the fall, or prior to leaf growth in the spring. It is recommended to prune in the fall because withered and full buds can be easily distinguished.
According to the shaping plan, you can prune any withered buds and keep the full ones, thus making your tree healthier. For pruning in the summer, diseased, weak, or dead branches can be removed, mainly to enhance the tree's ventilation.
If grown as a potted plant, the roots can easily occupy the entire flowerpot due to the limited space. This can make a amur maple prone to aging if an old flowerpot is not changed. It is recommended that old roots are pruned during the dormancy period, that is, cut off any old, coarse, diseased, and weak roots.
Cultivation:PruningDetail
Is pruning necessary for my Amur maple?
Despite having a relatively fast habit of growth, Amur maple does not require very much pruning. It is not necessary to routinely prune this tree, however, it does require some pruning every once in a while. Pruning can be done to tidy this tree up and remove any diseased or damaged foliage. Or Amur maple can be pruned for shaping.
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When is the best time to prune my Amur maple?
Amur maple should be pruned as needed. Typically, these trees should be pruned to remove any damaged, yellowing, dying, or dead foliage. It is also necessary to prune this plant to remove any shoots that are congested or are crossing. The best time to prune Amur maple is between late winter to early spring. This is the period when pruning causes the least damage to the plant.
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How can I prune my Amur maple?
Pruning Amur maple is a fairly easy task if you know what to look for. To prune these trees, you will need a pair of sharp pruning shears. Using your pruning shears, remove any damaged or diseased parts of the tree. Keep an eye out for any shoots that are becoming congested or are beginning to cross and remove them. Ideally, you should steer clear from pruning any of the tree’s lower limbs. Leaving these intact will allow the tree to have a more natural and open form. Additionally, leaving the lower limbs alone will help to prevent any disease-inducing stress, as well as suckers from forming.
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What should I do after pruning my Amur maple?
There are no special requirements to follow after you have pruned your Amur maple. It is recommended, however, that you dispose of any diseased foliage that has been removed from the tree away from any other plants. This is to avoid spreading the disease to other plants. After pruning your Amur maple, you may apply a fertilizer treatment to encourage faster growth. Do not water the plants immediately after pruning as this can lead to fungal infestation of the plants through the wounds.
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What should I be careful with when pruning my Amur maple during different growing stages?
The best time to prune Amur maple is between late winter to early spring. This is the period when pruning causes the least damage to the plant. Keep an eye out for any shoots that are becoming congested or are beginning to cross and remove them. Ideally, you should steer clear from pruning any of the tree’s lower limbs. Leaving these intact will allow the tree to have a more natural and open form. This will increase ventilation and light, reduce disease infection and allow Amur maple to grow more vigorously. When pruning branches you need to leave the strong ones and remove the weak ones, keeping healthy auxiliary branches that grow outwards at about 45 degrees. Branches that are too angled or too small should be removed. Pruning Saw is required if the branch is more than three quarters of an inch in size, pruning should be done in the direction of the "Branch bark ridge" to the "Branch collar" to allow for good healing. Branches that require a saw need to be pruned using the "three-cut method", which prevents the bark of the branch from tearing and creating cracks in the trunk, which can be detrimental to the recovery of the plant. Finally, you may prefer to just trim off dead or damaged portions of the plant to keep it looking its best as if it's possible. This can be done at any time of year. Diseased or damaged stems should be cut right at the soil line and removed completely.
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Are there any tips for pruning my Amur maple?
The best thing to remember about Amur maple is that they do not require routine pruning. Your tree will likely grow better if you prune it as and when it is necessary and no more than that. Additionally, you should also keep in mind that it is better to leave the lower limbs of this tree alone to prevent stress-induced diseases from attacking your tree. Different diameter branches require different pruning tools. If the tree is too tall, pruning needs to be done safely or by a professional.
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care_advanced_guide

Advanced Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail

What is the Ideal Temperature Range for Amur maple?

The amur maple has good cold resistance and is able to tolerate low temperatures. The amur maple is native to the margins of forests in China, Japan, and North Korea, so these trees generally prefer a humid environment. Most amur maple plants have shallow root systems, so they should be watered frequently during the summer. For some varieties, a sprayed mist should be provided during the summer to increase the humidity of the air around them.
Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail
What is the optimal temperature for Amur maple?
The best temperature for Amur maple to thrive is 65~80℉(18~27℃). During the primary growing phase, the highest temperature tolerable would be 95℉(35℃), while the lowest tolerable temperature would be 15℉(-10℃). This species is tolerant of low temperatures and will survive freezing winters. The perfect, highest, and lowest temperature range:
Perfect:65~80℉(18~27℃)
Highest:85~95℉(30~35℃)
Lowest:-5~15℉(-20~-10℃) or below
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Should I adjust the temperature for Amur maple during different growing phases?
Research shows that Amur maple will begin to exhibit signs of stunted growth during prolonged periods of higher temperatures, especially during the development of axillary buds and the growth of main shoots. Keeping the temperatures consistent and cooler, around 65℉(18℃), will encourage vigorous growth after germination or transplanting.
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How can I keep Amur maple warm in cold seasons?
Amur maple can withstand freezing temperatures when planted in the ground in areas that don’t get below of 15℉(-10℃) as an extreme temperature during the winter months. But if planted in pots or containers, then their roots must be protected from the winter cold. Do this by wrapping the container in a blanket or bringing it inside where it will be fully protected from the elements.
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What damage will Amur maple suffer if the temperature is too high/low?
Greater harm will come to Amur maple if the temperature is consistently too high versus too low.
If Amur maple gets too hot, seed germination and photosynthesis efficiency is lessened due to hormone triggers caused by heat stress. The plant will show signs through wilting, leaf browning, and potentially death.
If Amur maple gets too cold, plant functions such as nutrient uptake and photosynthesis will cease, resulting in the possible death of the plant. If a single freezing event occurs during the growing season, then a membrane phase transition might occur, which can cause a cease in plant functions and death of the plant.
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What tips and cautions should I keep in mind when it comes to temperature for Amur maple?
Keeping the soil temperature consistent is one of the most important strategies to keeping Amur maple healthy, which leads to successful budding, flowering, and new growth. Do this by consistently watering, adding mulch to bare soil, and planting in the shade.
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How can I keep Amur maple warm without a heat pad?
Due to the cold tolerance of Amur maple, heating pads will not be necessary if planted outside in the ground. If the plant is in an outdoor pot, then bring it inside a heated house and place it in a sunny window during the winter months.
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How can I provide Amur maple with an adequate temperature condition?
To ensure adequate temperature conditions are present, plant Amur maple in an area with partial shade. If possible, use afternoon shade to provide the best protection during the hottest part of the day. This will also result in lower temperatures in the soil due to increased moisture retention. If Amur maple is planted indoors, then keep the container away from windows and out of direct sunlight during the summer months to prevent the soil temperature from spiking daily.
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How can I save Amur maple from temperature damage?
During the summer or times of high heat, give Amur maple extra shade and water to help cool its leaves, roots, and soil. During cold snaps or growing season freezes, cover sensitive budding vegetation with frost cloth or water using sprinkler systems. If it’s only nearing freezing temperatures for a short period, then water during the day several hours before the freeze. If the temperature is predicted to remain below freezing for an extended period, then keep the sprinkler running until the temperature rises above freezing the following day.
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Should I adjust the temperature for Amur maple in different seasons?
Amur maple is a mid-temperature plant that can easily tolerate the typical fluctuations of the seasons and remain a hardy species when planted in maintained landscapes areas, containers, or indoors. Therefore, adjusting the temperature during the different seasons is unnecessary for primary growth. If flowering is stunted or impeded, then allowing the plant to experience a season of winter freeze could help to revive flowering.
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Under what conditions should I stop adjusting the temperature for Amur maple?
If it becomes too difficult to lower the temperature for an indoor plant during the summer, then plant it outside in the ground or in a container. Make sure to plant Amur maple in a shaded location and water often to keep the soil moist.
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Cultivation:SoilDetail

What Soil is Best for Amur maple?

The amur maple does not have many specific requirements for soil. It is a forest native, so it prefers well-drained soil that is rich in humus and slightly acidic. Its main root will extend deep into the soil, but its tiny fibrous roots will be concentrated near the soil surface, so accumulated water in the soil tends to cause root rot.
Cultivation:SoilDetail
Cultivation:PropagationDetail

How to Propagate Amur maple?

Common propagation methods include grafting, taking cuttings, and sowing seeds.
Grafting is the most common propagation method. Seedlings of Acer palmatum or Acer oliverianum are usually selected for the rootstock. Grafted seedlings have strong roots and grow rapidly, but poor affinity is occasionally present in some cases. Seedlings with Acer oliverianum as the rootstock are less hardy.
Cuttings take longer to grow and are mostly used in the production of bonsai.
Sowing seeds is a common way to cultivate new varieties. The hybrid offspring of two different maples are sown and valuable individuals are then selected from the seedlings. The traits of the parents may not be maintained in the selected offspring.

Propagation

Propagating Amur maple by yourself is difficult, but that doesn't mean it can't be done. If you are interested in this, you can read on. Its propagation can be done by cuttings, which is easy to do. Amur maple can be propagated during the dormant season from mid-autumn until late winter. Most people prefer to take cuttings right after leaves drop, but it can be done successfully at other times, provided you avoid taking cuttings during severely cold periods. The beginning and ending of the dormant season are the most likely to be successful. Flash cuttings cannot tolerate the cold environment. If the winter temperatures in your area are low (e.g., below 0 ℃ for an extended period of time), it is recommended that you place the cuttings in a garage or outdoor incubator after cutting. This will help the cuttings to develop roots. When propagating Amur maple, be sure your cutting tool is large enough and sharp enough to cut cleanly through the shoots. Using a dull tool can crush or tear the plant, which can lead to infection and disease.
  1. Sharp garden pruners
  2. Diluted bleach solution or isopropyl alcohol to clean tools
  3. Rooting hormone (optional but recommended)
  4. Deep container(s) with drainage holes for planting
  5. Well-draining planting medium such as pine bark, perlite, or a potting soil mix
Steps: Step 1: Choose healthy shoots that are about as thick as a pencil for your propagation and 6 to 8 inches long, preferably from the previous year’s growth. Once you have identified your cuttings, use disinfected garden pruners to cut off the bud tip and take the remaining branch of the front section about 7-8 inches. If you are not putting them into containers immediately, keep the cuttings moist until you are able to pot them. TIP: Pay attention to which side is up when you are taking cuttings - it can be difficult to tell when there are no leaves Step 2: Prepare your containers by filling them with the planting medium. Adding compost to the soil can facilitate plant rooting. Step 3: Dip the bottom of your Amur maple into rooting hormone, then insert one-third to two-thirds of the cutting into the substrate. Plant them about 2 inches apart. You should be able to plant as many as 10 to 12, depending on your container size. Step 4: Water thoroughly, making sure the potting medium is evenly moist but allowing it to drain. Step 5: Place the containers in a cold, protected location that receives some sunlight. An unheated garage, a porch, or a cold frame work well for this. Leave the Amur maple there throughout the winter. Water occasionally to make sure the soil doesn’t dry out completely, although it can be dryer during the coldest winter months. Start watering more often as days get warmer in the spring. It is recommended that you place the cuttings in a garage or outdoor incubator after cutting if the winter temperatures in your area are low. Step 6: Move the containers outside to a spot that gets partial sun after the last frost. You can expect to see new leaves on your Amur maple around the middle of spring. It’s important to be patient with this process because it is quite slow. In fact, it can take a year or longer for Amur maple to be ready to be transplanted. Luckily there isn’t much maintenance during this time, and the process has a high likelihood of success. Even if your Amur maple is putting out new growth, they may not be ready to be planted into the ground just yet. It is more important that there are plenty of healthy roots growing. The roots should be at least 3 inches long, but many people like to wait until roots start to grow out of the drainage holes to be sure that there is a proper root system. Air layering also works to propagate trees successfully, but the procedure is relatively complicated. Pay attention to the age of the branch you want to propagate to know when to start air layering. If you're working with a branch that is old-growth, preferably from the previous year’s growth, spring is the best time for layering. If your chosen branch is new growth, mid-summer is your best bet. These warm months are the best time to encourage new root growth in your plants. A pencil-thick branch could be a good choice. Since air layering is a little more complicated than other types of layering, you’ll need a few extra tools before you begin the process. Make sure you have everything on hand and then begin!
  1. A sharp, sanitized knife
  2. Peat moss for wrapping
  3. Plastic wrap for wrapping
  4. Rubber bands or twist ties
  5. (optional) aluminum foil
  6. (optional) plant growth hormones
Or you can just prepare air layering pods and a sharp, sanitized knife. Steps: Step 1: Choose a thick upper stem and clear off the leaves around a chosen node. Step 2:Below this node, ring peel the plant to a length of 0.5 to 1 inches, completely stripping the bark of the plant. It is necessary to pay attention to safety of the plant when ring stripping. Step 3: Apply moist (not wet) peat moss to the cut area. Hold the moss in place by tightly wrapping the area with plastic wrap and ties. Apply an extra layer of aluminum foil for sun protection if needed. Step 4: Remove the stem for propagation once the peat moss is visibly filled with roots. Make sure the wrapped moss is moist during rooting. Use a syringe to inject water if you find that the peat moss is already dry. If you have collected seeds from the tree, you can try to propagate the tree from its seeds. Only sow Amur maple seeds in warm weather, preferably during the later weeks of spring after any danger or frost or dropping temperatures has passed. Even in warm weather, make sure the soil is warmed up sufficiently, as cooler soil can hinder germination and growth. You need to do it indoors for a successful germination if you want to sow the seeds earlier. To sow Amur maple in your growing medium, you don't need many extra tools to get the job done. Put on your gardening gloves and get started!
  1. Healthy and full seeds, the germination rate of such seeds will be higher
  2. Growing medium with potting mix soil divided into rows
  3. Fertilizer or compost
  4. (optional) a dibbler or stake
  5. A spray bottle to hydrates the soil
  6. A piece of plastic film (Optional)
Steps: Step 1: Prepare the soil: Mix the soil with organic fertilizer. Fully rotted fertilizer is recommended, and the volume of the fertilizer should not exceed one quarter of the volume of the soil when mixing. Step 2: Sprinkle the plants in the soil and cover the seed surface with soil afterwards. Or use a dibbler or stake to pre-dig holes for the seeds, placing about 3 seeds in each mound. The depth of the soil on the surface of the seed needs to be about five times the thickness of the seed. Step 3: Leave a 4-6-inch gap between each seed mound. Step 4: Water the soil in the container well after planting to provide enough water for the seeds to germinate. Step 5: Mulch the surface of the container soil to moisturize the soil and promote seed germination. Use a spray can to spray the soil with water when the soil is relatively dry. Keep this until the seeds germinate. Note: Before seeds germinate, they can be kept in a low light location. But after the seeds germinate, you need to add light to the plant in time, otherwise it will excessive growth.
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Cultivation:PropagationDetail
Cultivation:PlantingDetail

How to Plant Amur maple?

The best time for planting or transplanting a amur maple is following defoliation in the fall. At this time, the leaves will have fallen off so there is little transpiration and water loss can be avoided. In addition, the root system will still be growing at this time, preparing for regrowth the following spring. Transplanting should be avoided on the coldest days because cold wind can kill some of the shoots and branches. During the winter, in areas that cannot be sheltered from the wind, it is recommended to cover the branches.
Cultivation:PlantingDetail
PlantCare:TransplantSummary

How to Transplant Amur maple?

Transplanting amur maple is best done during late autumn to early winter (S3-S4). This allows amur maple to establish roots in its new location before spring's growth surge. The plant prefers sunny to partially shady areas. If possible, water well before and after transplanting amur maple to minimize stress.
PlantCare:TransplantSummary
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More Info on Amur Maple Growth and Care

Basic Care Guide
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Lighting
Full sun
Amur maple thrives in conditions with ample sun exposure, fostering healthy growth and development. It can also withstand areas getting only moderate exposure. The plant originated in environments abundant in light. Too much or too little light can adversely impact it's health and growth.
Best Sunlight Practices
Temperature
-35 38 ℃
The temperature requirements of amur maple are suited to a temperate climate. It prefers temperatures between 32 to 95 ℉ (0 to 35 ℃). In the winter months, it can tolerate temperatures as low as -22 ℉ (-30 ℃). During the summer, it prefers higher temperatures.
Temp for Healthy Growth
Transplant
5-6 feet
Transplanting amur maple is best done during late autumn to early winter (S3-S4). This allows amur maple to establish roots in its new location before spring's growth surge. The plant prefers sunny to partially shady areas. If possible, water well before and after transplanting amur maple to minimize stress.
Transplant Techniques
Feng shui direction
Southeast
The amur maple harmonizes with Southeast-facing environments due to embodying Wood energy, intrinsic to this direction. Its leaves signify growth and renewal, subtly promoting an aura of calm and balance, an effect beloved in Feng Shui.
Fengshui Details
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Seasonal Care Tips

seasonal-tip

Seasonal Precautions

Ensure the plant is frequently watered during the summer, because if it dries out its leaves may wither and the plant may even lose all of its leaves. For some varieties, it is recommended that seedlings are shaded in the summer. In the winter, plants grown in cold regions of the north should have any new branches protected so as to avoid them being damaged by cold winds.
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Spring

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Summer

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Fall

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Winter

Temperate trees and shrubs like your plant require little care in the spring, but it is the best time for planting.

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Wait to plant until the soil is warm in a protected area with partial sunlight.
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Deeply water new specimens but leave mature ones alone except in severe droughts.
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3
Fertilize every three or four weeks or apply a layer of compost once in early spring.
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4
Prune back any dead growth and shape the plant.
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If growing in a container, move the plant to a sunny location.

Hot summer temperatures are the reason temperate trees and shrubs like this plant thrive in partially shady areas.

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Increase watering when rainfall is scarce, even with mature specimens. The soak and dry method work best.
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Keep an eye out for pests and diseases and remove any debris from the area.
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Apply another application of fertilizer or compost to the base of the plant.
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Prune back any excessive growth but watch out for newly emerging leaf buds. Try to leave those on the plant for fall growth.

Continue caring for your plant through the fall, when it can add some decoration to gardens or rooms.

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Add fertilizer and cold protection to your plant in the form of mulch to help it survive the colder weather, especially when it’s planted outdoors in colder locations.
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You can plant new shrubs during this season.
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Continue providing established plants with regular watering, soaking dry soil.
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Look out for pests and diseases, including leaf spots and mealybugs.
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Keep the shrubs in a shady locations, but make sure it gets some exposure to bright, indirect light, especially if it’s grown indoors.

While the plant is somewhat dormant during this season, it can also provide some lovely decoration and requires some care to keep it looking its best.

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In the winter, you can take the opportunity to prune away overcrowding, dead, or diseased branches. Dormancy is the best time to perform these tidying tasks.
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Sensitive plants can be brought indoors to overwinter away from frost and cold wind if they’re potted and able to be moved. Otherwise, the plant may do well outdoors in more tropical locations, where the temperature doesn’t plummet so much.
care_pet_and_diseases

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Amur maple based on 10 million real cases
Scars
Scars Scars
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Solutions: Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Fruit withering
Fruit withering Fruit withering
Fruit withering
Fungal infection or normal ripening can cause the fruit to dry out.
Solutions: There are a number of appropriate solutions to control fruit withering: Remove any fruit as soon as it shows any signs of infection. Do not compost. Use a fungicide prior to leaf bud and then as per manufacturers instructions throughout the season.
Black spot
Black spot Black spot
Black spot
Infection by the black spot pathogen causes black spots or patches to appear on leaves.
Solutions: Some steps to take to address black spot include: Prune away any infected leaves, cleaning the pruners between plants with a 10% bleach solution so that the fungus does not spread to healthy leaves. Don't compost pruned plant parts as the spores can linger in the soil for a long period of time - instead, dispose of them in the trash. Use an approved fungicide such as Trifloxystrobin, Chlorothalonil, Maneb, or Myclobutanil. Use a spreader in the fungicide spray to ensure better coverage.
Underwatering yellow
Underwatering yellow Underwatering yellow
Underwatering yellow
A lack of water will cause the leaves to gradually turn yellow starting at the base of the branch while the entire plant appears to wilt.
Solutions: Your plant is very thirsty and needs water promptly. You can revive your plant by giving it water. The easiest technique is to slowly pour water into your plant’s soil so that the whole surface is moistened. If you pour the water too quickly, the water will flow directly through rather than diffusing throughout the soil. If your plant’s pot does not have drainage holes, do not give your plant more than about a third of the pot’s volume of water. If your plant’s pot does have drainage holes, you can add water slowly until the soil is thoroughly moistened and the water flows freely through the pot. If you trim off yellow leaves to improve the plant’s appearance, do not remove more than a third of the plant’s leaves. It may be better to wait until leaves have died and fallen off to remove them.
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Scars
plant poor
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Scars form when the plant repairs wounds. They can be the result of people or pets passing by and scraping the plant. Once the underlying issue is resolved, the plant will heal but a scar may remain.
Pests and pathogens can also cause scarring. Insects may attack the plant for a meal, resulting in extensive scarring when a few invaders turn into an infestation. Diseases such as fungus and bacteria can weaken the plant, causing brown spots, mushy areas, or blisters that lead to scars.
Scars occur on stems when a leaf or bud has been lost and the plant has healed. The harder tissue is like a scab that protects a wound.
On other occasions, scars can signal problems from environmental conditions, such as overexposure to sunlight or heat. It might surprise you to know that plants can suffer from sunburn, even desert dwellers like cactus!
Solutions
Solutions
Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover.
  1. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes.
  2. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray.
  3. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs.
  4. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Prevention
Prevention
Preventing some sources of scarring is easier than others, but all start with careful attention to your plants once you decide to bring them home.
  1. Review specific guidelines for your plant, including soil drainage, watering, and fertilizer requirements.
  2. Inspect plants before planting and use sterile pots and fresh potting soil or media to limit transfer of fungi or bacteria.
  3. Once established, check your plants regularly for signs of scarring or the presence of pests, as it is better to catch problems as early as possible.
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Fruit withering
plant poor
Fruit withering
Fungal infection or normal ripening can cause the fruit to dry out.
Overview
Overview
Fruit withering is common on many tree fruits, including apples, pears, peaches, cherries, and plums, as well as fruiting shrubs. It is caused by a fungal pathogen and will result in wrinkled and desiccated fruit.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Here are the most common symptoms in the order that they are likely to occur.
  1. Both leaves and blossom on the tips of branches will go brown and wither.
  2. Gray powdery patches will appear on infected leaves and flowers, and this will be most apparent after rain.
  3. Any fruit that does appear will turn wrinkled and fail to develop.
  4. Branch tips begin to die, progressing back to larger branches, causing general deterioration of the tree or plant.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The withering is caused by one of two fungal pathogens, one called Monilina laxa and the other called M. fructigen. The spores overwinter on infected plant material and are then spread the following spring by wind, rain, or animal vectors. The problem will start to become noticeable in mid-spring, but will increase in severity as summer progresses and the fungus grows. If not addressed, the disease will intensify and spread to other plants in the vicinity.
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Black spot
plant poor
Black spot
Infection by the black spot pathogen causes black spots or patches to appear on leaves.
Overview
Overview
Black spot is a fungus that largely attacks leaves on a variety of ornamental plants, leaving them covered in dark spots ringed with yellow, and eventually killing them. The fungus is often simply unsightly, but if it infects the whole plant it can interfere with photosynthesis by killing too many leaves. Because of this, it is important to be aware of the best methods for preventing and treating this diseases should it occur in the garden.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Here are a few of the most common symptoms of black spot:
  • The plant has developed small black spots along the leaves.
  • These spots be small, circular, and clustered together, or they may have a splotchy appearance and take up large portions of the leaves.
  • The fungus may also affect plant canes, where lesions start purple and then turn black.
  • The plant may suffer premature leaf drop.
Though most forms of black spot fungus pose little risk to a plant's overall health, many gardeners find them unsightly. Severe cases can also weaken a plant, so it becomes more susceptible to other pathogens and diseases.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Black spot is spread by various types of fungi, which differ slightly depending on whether they are in their sexual or asexual stages.
The fungal spores linger over the winter in fallen leaves and lesions on canes. In the spring, the spores are splashed up onto the leaves, causing infection within seven hours of moisture and when temperatures range between 24 to 29 ℃ with a high relative humidity.
In just two weeks, thousands of additional spores are produced, making it easy for the disease to infect nearby healthy plants as well.
There are several factors that could make a plant more likely to suffer a black spot infection. Here are some of the most common:
  • Exposure to infected plants or mulch (the fungus overwinters on dead leaves)
  • Weakening from physical damage, pest infestation or other infections.
  • Increased periods of wet, humid, warm weather – or exposure to overhead watering
  • Plants growing too close together
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Underwatering yellow
plant poor
Underwatering yellow
A lack of water will cause the leaves to gradually turn yellow starting at the base of the branch while the entire plant appears to wilt.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Your plant’s leaves are turning yellow due to underwatering, the oldest leaves turn yellow first. Leaves yellow from the edges towards the middle. Other signs of underwatering include the soil feeling very dry or pulling away from the edge of its pot.
Solutions
Solutions
Your plant is very thirsty and needs water promptly.
  1. You can revive your plant by giving it water. The easiest technique is to slowly pour water into your plant’s soil so that the whole surface is moistened. If you pour the water too quickly, the water will flow directly through rather than diffusing throughout the soil. If your plant’s pot does not have drainage holes, do not give your plant more than about a third of the pot’s volume of water. If your plant’s pot does have drainage holes, you can add water slowly until the soil is thoroughly moistened and the water flows freely through the pot.
  2. If you trim off yellow leaves to improve the plant’s appearance, do not remove more than a third of the plant’s leaves. It may be better to wait until leaves have died and fallen off to remove them.
Prevention
Prevention
  1. When you get a new plant, research its specific watering needs. Set reminders so that you remember to water your plants consistently. Not all plants are the same, so make sure to differentiate all of your plants in your watering schedule.
  2. You may wish to purchase a commercial soil water meter which has a long probe that you place near your plant’s roots. Be sure to check it frequently and water your plant when the soil water meter indicates that it needs watering.
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More About Amur Maple

Spread
Spread
4.5 to 6 m
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Spring
Flower Color
Flower Color
White
Yellow
Green
Cream
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green
Red
Flower Size
Flower Size
5 to 8 mm
Plant Height
Plant Height
3 to 10 m

Name story

Amur maple
Since the plant has strong vitality and the leaves are featured with fall colors of yellows and bright reds, it is being widely cultivated. Also, it is native to the Russian Far East in the Amur River valley. Therefore, it is called Amur maple.

Usages

Garden Use
Amur maple is one of the most resilient and decorative smaller maples you can grow in a garden, as a specimen tree, an understory tree, in a container, and even in the form of bonsai. The crown is broad, rounded to open, and the small, three-lobed leaves turn various hues of red and orange in the fall. The trunk can take on irregular shapes when growing, making certain specimens additionally attractive.
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Common Problems

Why does my amur maple not change color?

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The change in leaf color is the result of a combination of factors. Generally speaking, leaf color is affected by temperature, sunlight, humidity, and vigor. A good color effect can only be obtained with appropriate changes in temperature, a certain amount of sunlight, and a certain degree of humidity. If there is a sharp drop in temperature, the leaves will simply fall off. The color will fade if there is insufficient sunlight. If there is inadequate humidity, the color will not be bright enough to provide a good display.

Why do the branches look short and stunted?

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This is generally due to poor root growth. The plant takes in insufficient nutrients to grow healthy new branches, so any new branches are short, meaning that an elegant shape cannot be obtained. The roots of newly transplanted amur maple trees generally do not recover, but this situation can be improved by the second year if the amur maple is well cared for.

Why should the leaves be removed in the fall?

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In some regions, the leaves can suffer from leaf burn and margin scorch if exposed to too much strong sunlight during the summer. If no protective measures are taken at this time, the leaf color in the fall will be very poor and the leaves may even fall off in advance, spoiling the ornamental effect. If a maple has severely scorched leaves, some of these leaves may be removed during August and September. It is not recommended to remove leaves from less vigorous amur maple varieties, such as Acer shirasawanum aureum.
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Caring for a New Plant

new-plant
The following pictures and instructions for woody plant are aimed to help your plants adapt and thrive in a new environment.
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Picking a Healthy Woody Plant
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Check Its Health

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Whole Plant
Symmetrical crown, evenly distributed branches, full and compact shape, no excessive growth, close internodes, and uniform leaf size.
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Branches
The branches are not withered, and the trunk is free of boreholes or damage.
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Leaves
Check the inside of the plant, shaded and overlapping areas, back of leaves. Even colour, no yellowing, no brown spots, no crawling insects, no cobwebs, no deformities, no wilting.
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Stems
No mold, browning or soft rot at the base of the plant.
health-trouble

Health Troubleshooting

Whole Plant
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more 1 Asymmetrical crown or missing, uneven branching: prune the weak and slender branches of the larger portion of the asymmetrical crown.
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more 2 Internodes are longer in the upper part, leaves are sparse and smaller on top: increase light intensity or duration.
Branches
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more 1 Dry branches: check if the branch is still alive by peeling back a small section of bark and trim away any dry branches. Watch out for signs of insect infestation inside the branch.
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more 2 Bark with holes: inject insecticide into the holes and apply systemic insecticide to the roots.
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more 3 Damaged bark: brush on a wound-healing agent, and avoid getting it wet.
Stems
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Mildew, browning, or soft rot at the base: place the plant in a ventilated, dry environment and water with fungicide.
Leaves
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more 1 Uneven leaf color and yellowing: prune yellow leaves and check if there are signs of rot at the base of the plant. Spray with fungicide for severe cases.
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more 2 Brown spots or small yellow spots: place the plant in a ventilated area and avoid watering the leaves. Spray with fungicide for severe cases.
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more 3 Tiny crawling insects on the back of leaves or spider webs between leaves: increase light exposure and spray with insecticide for severe cases.
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more 4 Deformations or missing parts on leaves: determine if it's physical damage or pest infestation. Linear or tearing damage is physical, while the rest are pests. Spray with insecticide.
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more 5 Wilting leaves: provide partial shade and avoid excessive sun exposure. Remove 1/3 to 1/2 of the leaves for severe cases.
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Check Its Growing Conditions

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Soil Check
Soil should smell fresh like after a rain and no musty odor.
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Light Check
Check the light requirement of the plant and if it match with planting location.
check
Temperature Check
Check if the current outdoor temperature is too low or too high.
condition-trouble

Condition Troubleshooting

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Soil
Chalky, Loam
Soil smells musty or foul: check the root system for decay, place the plant in a ventilated, dry environment, and water with fungicide.
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Ideal Temperature
-10℃ to 35℃
Outdoor temperature is not suitable for the plant: wait until it's a more favorable temperature for growth.
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Suitable Light
Full sun, Partial sun
Insufficient light: Lack of light can result in fewer leaves and branches, and prevent flowering. Move plant to sunnier spot if possible.
Transplant recovery: After 3 days without severe wilting, slowly increase light to normal levels over a week. If plant droops or sheds leaves, keep it in shade. Once wilting stops, give shade until the plant stands up again. Lots of yellowing and leaf loss mean the light is too low and needs to be increased.
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2
Adapting Your New Woody Plant
Step 1
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Repotting
Plant your plant promptly in its final location or in a new pot, if conditions are suitable. When transplanting, clean the roots of the plant and keep the root system intact. Prune any blackened or rotten roots, spread out a heavily tangled root system, and mix in some well-rotted organic fertilizer. Use permeable soil and water thoroughly after planting.
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Step 2
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Pruning
Remove yellow or diseased leaves immediately. If leaves are crowded and appear wilted or falling off, remove some of them. For bare-root plants, cut off at least half of the leaves. Pruning is not typically required.
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Step 3
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Watering
Increase watering in the first week to keep soil moist. Water when soil is slightly dry, for at least 2 weeks. Avoid over-watering. Do not water when there is water on your fingers after touching the soil.
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Step 4
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Fertilizing
Add a small amount of base fertilizer during transplanting or repotting. No other fertilizer needed for the first month.
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Amur Maple
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Repotting
Plant promptly in final location or new pot. Clean roots, use organic fertilizer, permeable soil, and water thoroughly.
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Pruning
Cut off yellow or diseased leaves and crowded leaves that appear wilted or falling.
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Watering
Water new plants more often for 2 weeks. Avoid over/under watering by checking the soil.
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Fertilizing
Add base fertilizer during transplanting. No other fertilizer is needed for the first month.
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Sunlight
Regular sun exposure for indoor plants. Shade after transplanting/repotting, then gradually increase light if there is no wilting. Increase light if yellowing and leaf drop occur.
label
main-image
Amur Maple
label-image
Repotting
Plant promptly in final location or new pot. Clean roots, use organic fertilizer, permeable soil, and water thoroughly.
label-image
Pruning
Cut off yellow or diseased leaves and crowded leaves that appear wilted or falling.
label-image
Watering
Water new plants more often for 2 weeks. Avoid over/under watering by checking the soil.
label-image
Fertilizing
Add base fertilizer during transplanting. No other fertilizer is needed for the first month.
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Sunlight
Regular sun exposure for indoor plants. Shade after transplanting/repotting, then gradually increase light if there is no wilting. Increase light if yellowing and leaf drop occur.
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Amur maple
Amur maple
Amur maple
Amur maple
Amur maple

How to Care for Amur Maple

The deciduous tree of amur maple has fragrant white flowers that change into a brilliant orange-red color in autumn. It grows fast but lives long, and the flowers don’t show until the tree matures. It grows at the edges of bogs and open forests and requires just a moderate amount of maintenance.
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Symbolism

Love, Longevity Money. Special For Its Sugar And Syrup It Represents Success And Abundance.
Water
Every 1-2 weeks
Water
Sunlight
Full sun
Sunlight Sunlight detail
care_basic_guide

Basic Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterDetail

How to Water Amur maple?

Cultivation:WaterDetail
The amur maple prefers the soil to be kept moist, especially during the summer, because dry weather can cause its leaves to scorch and even fall off in severe cases. During the summer, in addition to watering the roots, foliage can be sprayed during the evening to increase the humidity.
  • In the summer, seedlings growing in pots may need watering twice a day, in the morning and the evening.
  • In the spring and fall, watering should be carried out depending on the actual conditions. Watering can be reduced slightly as the temperature drops in the fall, which will help the leaves to change color.
  • In the winter, it is only necessary to ensure that the soil does not dry out.
Attention should be paid to the watering of seedlings grown in gardens during the early stages. At later stages, water should be supplied according to the weather, that is if there is no rain for more than two weeks in the summer.
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Cultivation:FertilizerDetail

How to Fertilize Amur maple?

Cultivation:FertilizerDetail
Potted seedlings should be given slow-release fertilizer only. For seedlings grown in gardens, fertilizer should be applied three times a year: once in the early spring, once in early summer for the growth period, and once in the fall.
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Fertilizer

It can be somewhat easy for a novice gardener to overlook Amur maple since these plants don't often produce showy flowers. However, the incredible leaf shapes and textures of Amur maple plants can make them as ornamentally appealing as any other plant in your garden. Growing Amur maple outdoors in your garden is not extremely difficult to do, but there are some insights that you must keep in mind while you care for this plant. Within your maintenance routine, correct fertilization will be crucial.
Regardless of which kind of Amur maple you own, regular fertilization will help you grow a plant that has great overall health. The proper supply of nutrients leads to more vigorous growth and can help your Amur maple be more resilient to tough growing conditions while also gaining a better ability to fight off diseases and pests. The foliage of your Amur maple is one of its most attractive features, which is why you should do all you can to keep it intact. Again, this means creating and adhering to a regular fertilization schedule that is specific to your Amur maple. Doing so will prompt your Amur maple to develop leaves with a deep color and a lush overall look.
The first time that you should fertilize your Amur maple is during the late winter or early spring. This type of fertilization gives your Amur maple all the nutrients it needs to resume healthy growth once the weather gets warm enough. It is also beneficial to many Amur maple to provide an additional fertilizer feeding during early fall if you in a warm climate region. Fertilizing in early fall not only adds additional nutrients to the soil, which your Amur maple will use in the following growing season, but it also helps your Amur maple be a bit more hardy and capable of surviving the winter cold without experiencing foliage damage. Earlier fertilisation will ensure that the new branches have enough time to grow to withstand the cold winter.
In most cases, the most important nutrient for a Amur maple is nitrogen, but that does not mean that phosphorus and potassium are unimportant. On the contrary, your Amur maple likely needs a decent amount of all three main nutrients, which is why a balanced fertilizer, such as a 10-10-10, can work well. However, a more nuanced ratio of nutrients often leads to optimal growth for a Amur maple. Often, fertilizers that are a bit higher in nitrogen work a bit better. For example, a ratio of 10-6-4 can often work well. When fertilizing, you can use a granular fertilizer or a liquid-based one. At times, a Amur maple may also need
To fertilize your Amur maple using a granular fertilizer, all you need to do is sprinkle the fertilizer on the soil at the correct time. The slow-release nature of granular fertilizer will release nutrients into the soil slowly over time. As is usually the case, it's best to water your Amur maple, at least lightly, before applying fertilizer. As an alternative, you can use a liquid fertilizer, but this is less common. To use this approach, mix your fertilizer with water, then pour the water onto the soil around the base of your Amur maple. At times, it is beneficial to perform a soil test before fertilizing to see if you will need to alter the pH at all.
Overfertilization is always a risk when you are feeding a Amur maple. Overfertilization is especially likely if you feed this plant at the wrong time of year, feed it too often, or feed it without watering the soil first. When overfertilization takes place, your Amur maple may begin to develop brown leaves. Your Amur maple can also show stunted growth in some cases. On the other hand, it is also possible that too much fertilizer can prompt your Amur maple to rapidly produce too much new growth, much of which will be weak and prone to breaking. Weak new wood can also detract from the overall form and structure of your Amur maple.
There are a few times during the year when you should not fertilize your Amur maple. The first time occurs during the early and mid-winter months, during which time your Amur maple will be dormant and in no need of feeding. It is also unwise to fertilize this plant during the late spring and all of the summer. During that time of year, the weather will likely be hotter and can be much dryer as well. Both conditions make it more likely that your Amur maple will have a very negative response to fertilization. To avoid such issues, stick to a fertilization schedule that involves feeding exclusively during early spring and early fall.
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Cultivation:SunlightDetail

What Are the Sunlight Requirements for Amur maple?

Cultivation:SunlightDetail
The amur maple has a certain requirement for sunlight and prefers a partially shaded area. In cases of exposure to direct sunlight in the summer, the leaves of most varieties will wither, so shading is required. As the plants get older and their root system grows, this condition will be less of a problem. A few varieties will tolerate exposure to direct sunlight, such as ‘Beni Maiko’ and ‘De Shojo’. Some weeping varieties can also tolerate exposure to direct sunlight, such as ‘Ao Shidare’.
Sunlight conditions will directly affect the ornamental appearance of amur maple leaves. In the spring, sufficient sunlight will make the maple leaves more vivid, while in cases of insufficient sunlight or partial shading the leaf color may fade. During the fall, sunlight can also affect the leaf color. For potted plants, full exposure to sunlight is recommended during the spring and the fall, with partial shading in the summer.
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Cultivation:PruningDetail

How to Prune Amur maple?

Cultivation:PruningDetail
Pruning is mainly used to enhance internal ventilation, improve shoot formation, promote growth, and for shaping. The common approach to pruning is to remove any old or weak branches, remove any branches that disrupt the shape of the tree, and remove any branches that cross other branches. Pruning is used to control the plant according to the required height and shape. Generally, this follows the "Y-type" pruning method.
It is possible to prune a amur maple throughout the year, but the coldest winter months should be avoided to prevent damage to the plant. Major pruning to shape a maple can be performed following defoliation in the fall, or prior to leaf growth in the spring. It is recommended to prune in the fall because withered and full buds can be easily distinguished.
According to the shaping plan, you can prune any withered buds and keep the full ones, thus making your tree healthier. For pruning in the summer, diseased, weak, or dead branches can be removed, mainly to enhance the tree's ventilation.
If grown as a potted plant, the roots can easily occupy the entire flowerpot due to the limited space. This can make a amur maple prone to aging if an old flowerpot is not changed. It is recommended that old roots are pruned during the dormancy period, that is, cut off any old, coarse, diseased, and weak roots.
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Advanced Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail

What is the Ideal Temperature Range for Amur maple?

Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail
The amur maple has good cold resistance and is able to tolerate low temperatures. The amur maple is native to the margins of forests in China, Japan, and North Korea, so these trees generally prefer a humid environment. Most amur maple plants have shallow root systems, so they should be watered frequently during the summer. For some varieties, a sprayed mist should be provided during the summer to increase the humidity of the air around them.
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Cultivation:SoilDetail

What Soil is Best for Amur maple?

Cultivation:SoilDetail
The amur maple does not have many specific requirements for soil. It is a forest native, so it prefers well-drained soil that is rich in humus and slightly acidic. Its main root will extend deep into the soil, but its tiny fibrous roots will be concentrated near the soil surface, so accumulated water in the soil tends to cause root rot.
Cultivation:PropagationDetail

How to Propagate Amur maple?

Cultivation:PropagationDetail
Common propagation methods include grafting, taking cuttings, and sowing seeds.
Grafting is the most common propagation method. Seedlings of Acer palmatum or Acer oliverianum are usually selected for the rootstock. Grafted seedlings have strong roots and grow rapidly, but poor affinity is occasionally present in some cases. Seedlings with Acer oliverianum as the rootstock are less hardy.
Cuttings take longer to grow and are mostly used in the production of bonsai.
Sowing seeds is a common way to cultivate new varieties. The hybrid offspring of two different maples are sown and valuable individuals are then selected from the seedlings. The traits of the parents may not be maintained in the selected offspring.
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Propagation

Propagating Amur maple by yourself is difficult, but that doesn't mean it can't be done. If you are interested in this, you can read on. Its propagation can be done by cuttings, which is easy to do. Amur maple can be propagated during the dormant season from mid-autumn until late winter. Most people prefer to take cuttings right after leaves drop, but it can be done successfully at other times, provided you avoid taking cuttings during severely cold periods. The beginning and ending of the dormant season are the most likely to be successful. Flash cuttings cannot tolerate the cold environment. If the winter temperatures in your area are low (e.g., below 0 ℃ for an extended period of time), it is recommended that you place the cuttings in a garage or outdoor incubator after cutting. This will help the cuttings to develop roots. When propagating Amur maple, be sure your cutting tool is large enough and sharp enough to cut cleanly through the shoots. Using a dull tool can crush or tear the plant, which can lead to infection and disease.
  1. Sharp garden pruners
  2. Diluted bleach solution or isopropyl alcohol to clean tools
  3. Rooting hormone (optional but recommended)
  4. Deep container(s) with drainage holes for planting
  5. Well-draining planting medium such as pine bark, perlite, or a potting soil mix
Steps: Step 1: Choose healthy shoots that are about as thick as a pencil for your propagation and 6 to 8 inches long, preferably from the previous year’s growth. Once you have identified your cuttings, use disinfected garden pruners to cut off the bud tip and take the remaining branch of the front section about 7-8 inches. If you are not putting them into containers immediately, keep the cuttings moist until you are able to pot them. TIP: Pay attention to which side is up when you are taking cuttings - it can be difficult to tell when there are no leaves Step 2: Prepare your containers by filling them with the planting medium. Adding compost to the soil can facilitate plant rooting. Step 3: Dip the bottom of your Amur maple into rooting hormone, then insert one-third to two-thirds of the cutting into the substrate. Plant them about 2 inches apart. You should be able to plant as many as 10 to 12, depending on your container size. Step 4: Water thoroughly, making sure the potting medium is evenly moist but allowing it to drain. Step 5: Place the containers in a cold, protected location that receives some sunlight. An unheated garage, a porch, or a cold frame work well for this. Leave the Amur maple there throughout the winter. Water occasionally to make sure the soil doesn’t dry out completely, although it can be dryer during the coldest winter months. Start watering more often as days get warmer in the spring. It is recommended that you place the cuttings in a garage or outdoor incubator after cutting if the winter temperatures in your area are low. Step 6: Move the containers outside to a spot that gets partial sun after the last frost. You can expect to see new leaves on your Amur maple around the middle of spring. It’s important to be patient with this process because it is quite slow. In fact, it can take a year or longer for Amur maple to be ready to be transplanted. Luckily there isn’t much maintenance during this time, and the process has a high likelihood of success. Even if your Amur maple is putting out new growth, they may not be ready to be planted into the ground just yet. It is more important that there are plenty of healthy roots growing. The roots should be at least 3 inches long, but many people like to wait until roots start to grow out of the drainage holes to be sure that there is a proper root system. Air layering also works to propagate trees successfully, but the procedure is relatively complicated. Pay attention to the age of the branch you want to propagate to know when to start air layering. If you're working with a branch that is old-growth, preferably from the previous year’s growth, spring is the best time for layering. If your chosen branch is new growth, mid-summer is your best bet. These warm months are the best time to encourage new root growth in your plants. A pencil-thick branch could be a good choice. Since air layering is a little more complicated than other types of layering, you’ll need a few extra tools before you begin the process. Make sure you have everything on hand and then begin!
  1. A sharp, sanitized knife
  2. Peat moss for wrapping
  3. Plastic wrap for wrapping
  4. Rubber bands or twist ties
  5. (optional) aluminum foil
  6. (optional) plant growth hormones
Or you can just prepare air layering pods and a sharp, sanitized knife. Steps: Step 1: Choose a thick upper stem and clear off the leaves around a chosen node. Step 2:Below this node, ring peel the plant to a length of 0.5 to 1 inches, completely stripping the bark of the plant. It is necessary to pay attention to safety of the plant when ring stripping. Step 3: Apply moist (not wet) peat moss to the cut area. Hold the moss in place by tightly wrapping the area with plastic wrap and ties. Apply an extra layer of aluminum foil for sun protection if needed. Step 4: Remove the stem for propagation once the peat moss is visibly filled with roots. Make sure the wrapped moss is moist during rooting. Use a syringe to inject water if you find that the peat moss is already dry. If you have collected seeds from the tree, you can try to propagate the tree from its seeds. Only sow Amur maple seeds in warm weather, preferably during the later weeks of spring after any danger or frost or dropping temperatures has passed. Even in warm weather, make sure the soil is warmed up sufficiently, as cooler soil can hinder germination and growth. You need to do it indoors for a successful germination if you want to sow the seeds earlier. To sow Amur maple in your growing medium, you don't need many extra tools to get the job done. Put on your gardening gloves and get started!
  1. Healthy and full seeds, the germination rate of such seeds will be higher
  2. Growing medium with potting mix soil divided into rows
  3. Fertilizer or compost
  4. (optional) a dibbler or stake
  5. A spray bottle to hydrates the soil
  6. A piece of plastic film (Optional)
Steps: Step 1: Prepare the soil: Mix the soil with organic fertilizer. Fully rotted fertilizer is recommended, and the volume of the fertilizer should not exceed one quarter of the volume of the soil when mixing. Step 2: Sprinkle the plants in the soil and cover the seed surface with soil afterwards. Or use a dibbler or stake to pre-dig holes for the seeds, placing about 3 seeds in each mound. The depth of the soil on the surface of the seed needs to be about five times the thickness of the seed. Step 3: Leave a 4-6-inch gap between each seed mound. Step 4: Water the soil in the container well after planting to provide enough water for the seeds to germinate. Step 5: Mulch the surface of the container soil to moisturize the soil and promote seed germination. Use a spray can to spray the soil with water when the soil is relatively dry. Keep this until the seeds germinate. Note: Before seeds germinate, they can be kept in a low light location. But after the seeds germinate, you need to add light to the plant in time, otherwise it will excessive growth.
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Cultivation:PlantingDetail

How to Plant Amur maple?

Cultivation:PlantingDetail
The best time for planting or transplanting a amur maple is following defoliation in the fall. At this time, the leaves will have fallen off so there is little transpiration and water loss can be avoided. In addition, the root system will still be growing at this time, preparing for regrowth the following spring. Transplanting should be avoided on the coldest days because cold wind can kill some of the shoots and branches. During the winter, in areas that cannot be sheltered from the wind, it is recommended to cover the branches.
PlantCare:TransplantSummary

How to Transplant Amur maple?

PlantCare:TransplantSummary
Transplanting amur maple is best done during late autumn to early winter (S3-S4). This allows amur maple to establish roots in its new location before spring's growth surge. The plant prefers sunny to partially shady areas. If possible, water well before and after transplanting amur maple to minimize stress.
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More Info on Amur Maple Growth and Care

Basic Care Guide
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Seasonal Care Tips

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Seasonal Precautions

Ensure the plant is frequently watered during the summer, because if it dries out its leaves may wither and the plant may even lose all of its leaves. For some varieties, it is recommended that seedlings are shaded in the summer. In the winter, plants grown in cold regions of the north should have any new branches protected so as to avoid them being damaged by cold winds.
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Spring

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Summer

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Fall

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Winter

Temperate trees and shrubs like your plant require little care in the spring, but it is the best time for planting.

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Wait to plant until the soil is warm in a protected area with partial sunlight.
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Deeply water new specimens but leave mature ones alone except in severe droughts.
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Fertilize every three or four weeks or apply a layer of compost once in early spring.
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4
Prune back any dead growth and shape the plant.
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5
If growing in a container, move the plant to a sunny location.

Hot summer temperatures are the reason temperate trees and shrubs like this plant thrive in partially shady areas.

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Increase watering when rainfall is scarce, even with mature specimens. The soak and dry method work best.
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Keep an eye out for pests and diseases and remove any debris from the area.
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Apply another application of fertilizer or compost to the base of the plant.
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Prune back any excessive growth but watch out for newly emerging leaf buds. Try to leave those on the plant for fall growth.

Continue caring for your plant through the fall, when it can add some decoration to gardens or rooms.

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Add fertilizer and cold protection to your plant in the form of mulch to help it survive the colder weather, especially when it’s planted outdoors in colder locations.
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You can plant new shrubs during this season.
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Continue providing established plants with regular watering, soaking dry soil.
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Look out for pests and diseases, including leaf spots and mealybugs.
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Keep the shrubs in a shady locations, but make sure it gets some exposure to bright, indirect light, especially if it’s grown indoors.

While the plant is somewhat dormant during this season, it can also provide some lovely decoration and requires some care to keep it looking its best.

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In the winter, you can take the opportunity to prune away overcrowding, dead, or diseased branches. Dormancy is the best time to perform these tidying tasks.
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Sensitive plants can be brought indoors to overwinter away from frost and cold wind if they’re potted and able to be moved. Otherwise, the plant may do well outdoors in more tropical locations, where the temperature doesn’t plummet so much.
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Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Amur maple based on 10 million real cases
Scars
Scars Scars Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Solutions: Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
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Fruit withering
Fruit withering Fruit withering Fruit withering
Fungal infection or normal ripening can cause the fruit to dry out.
Solutions: There are a number of appropriate solutions to control fruit withering: Remove any fruit as soon as it shows any signs of infection. Do not compost. Use a fungicide prior to leaf bud and then as per manufacturers instructions throughout the season.
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Black spot
Black spot Black spot Black spot
Infection by the black spot pathogen causes black spots or patches to appear on leaves.
Solutions: Some steps to take to address black spot include: Prune away any infected leaves, cleaning the pruners between plants with a 10% bleach solution so that the fungus does not spread to healthy leaves. Don't compost pruned plant parts as the spores can linger in the soil for a long period of time - instead, dispose of them in the trash. Use an approved fungicide such as Trifloxystrobin, Chlorothalonil, Maneb, or Myclobutanil. Use a spreader in the fungicide spray to ensure better coverage.
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Underwatering yellow
Underwatering yellow Underwatering yellow Underwatering yellow
A lack of water will cause the leaves to gradually turn yellow starting at the base of the branch while the entire plant appears to wilt.
Solutions: Your plant is very thirsty and needs water promptly. You can revive your plant by giving it water. The easiest technique is to slowly pour water into your plant’s soil so that the whole surface is moistened. If you pour the water too quickly, the water will flow directly through rather than diffusing throughout the soil. If your plant’s pot does not have drainage holes, do not give your plant more than about a third of the pot’s volume of water. If your plant’s pot does have drainage holes, you can add water slowly until the soil is thoroughly moistened and the water flows freely through the pot. If you trim off yellow leaves to improve the plant’s appearance, do not remove more than a third of the plant’s leaves. It may be better to wait until leaves have died and fallen off to remove them.
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Scars
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Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Scars form when the plant repairs wounds. They can be the result of people or pets passing by and scraping the plant. Once the underlying issue is resolved, the plant will heal but a scar may remain.
Pests and pathogens can also cause scarring. Insects may attack the plant for a meal, resulting in extensive scarring when a few invaders turn into an infestation. Diseases such as fungus and bacteria can weaken the plant, causing brown spots, mushy areas, or blisters that lead to scars.
Scars occur on stems when a leaf or bud has been lost and the plant has healed. The harder tissue is like a scab that protects a wound.
On other occasions, scars can signal problems from environmental conditions, such as overexposure to sunlight or heat. It might surprise you to know that plants can suffer from sunburn, even desert dwellers like cactus!
Solutions
Solutions
Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover.
  1. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes.
  2. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray.
  3. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs.
  4. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Prevention
Prevention
Preventing some sources of scarring is easier than others, but all start with careful attention to your plants once you decide to bring them home.
  1. Review specific guidelines for your plant, including soil drainage, watering, and fertilizer requirements.
  2. Inspect plants before planting and use sterile pots and fresh potting soil or media to limit transfer of fungi or bacteria.
  3. Once established, check your plants regularly for signs of scarring or the presence of pests, as it is better to catch problems as early as possible.
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Fruit withering
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Fruit withering
Fungal infection or normal ripening can cause the fruit to dry out.
Overview
Overview
Fruit withering is common on many tree fruits, including apples, pears, peaches, cherries, and plums, as well as fruiting shrubs. It is caused by a fungal pathogen and will result in wrinkled and desiccated fruit.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Here are the most common symptoms in the order that they are likely to occur.
  1. Both leaves and blossom on the tips of branches will go brown and wither.
  2. Gray powdery patches will appear on infected leaves and flowers, and this will be most apparent after rain.
  3. Any fruit that does appear will turn wrinkled and fail to develop.
  4. Branch tips begin to die, progressing back to larger branches, causing general deterioration of the tree or plant.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The withering is caused by one of two fungal pathogens, one called Monilina laxa and the other called M. fructigen. The spores overwinter on infected plant material and are then spread the following spring by wind, rain, or animal vectors. The problem will start to become noticeable in mid-spring, but will increase in severity as summer progresses and the fungus grows. If not addressed, the disease will intensify and spread to other plants in the vicinity.
Solutions
Solutions
There are a number of appropriate solutions to control fruit withering:
  1. Remove any fruit as soon as it shows any signs of infection. Do not compost.
  2. Use a fungicide prior to leaf bud and then as per manufacturers instructions throughout the season.
Prevention
Prevention
Preventative measures include:
  1. Ensuring adequate spacing between plants or trees.
  2. Staking plants that are prone to tumbling to prevent moisture or humidity build up.
  3. Prune correctly so that there is adequate air movement and remove any dead or diseased branches that may carry spores.
  4. Practice good plant hygiene by removing fallen material and destroying it as soon as possible.
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Black spot
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Black spot
Infection by the black spot pathogen causes black spots or patches to appear on leaves.
Overview
Overview
Black spot is a fungus that largely attacks leaves on a variety of ornamental plants, leaving them covered in dark spots ringed with yellow, and eventually killing them. The fungus is often simply unsightly, but if it infects the whole plant it can interfere with photosynthesis by killing too many leaves. Because of this, it is important to be aware of the best methods for preventing and treating this diseases should it occur in the garden.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Here are a few of the most common symptoms of black spot:
  • The plant has developed small black spots along the leaves.
  • These spots be small, circular, and clustered together, or they may have a splotchy appearance and take up large portions of the leaves.
  • The fungus may also affect plant canes, where lesions start purple and then turn black.
  • The plant may suffer premature leaf drop.
Though most forms of black spot fungus pose little risk to a plant's overall health, many gardeners find them unsightly. Severe cases can also weaken a plant, so it becomes more susceptible to other pathogens and diseases.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Black spot is spread by various types of fungi, which differ slightly depending on whether they are in their sexual or asexual stages.
The fungal spores linger over the winter in fallen leaves and lesions on canes. In the spring, the spores are splashed up onto the leaves, causing infection within seven hours of moisture and when temperatures range between 24 to 29 ℃ with a high relative humidity.
In just two weeks, thousands of additional spores are produced, making it easy for the disease to infect nearby healthy plants as well.
There are several factors that could make a plant more likely to suffer a black spot infection. Here are some of the most common:
  • Exposure to infected plants or mulch (the fungus overwinters on dead leaves)
  • Weakening from physical damage, pest infestation or other infections.
  • Increased periods of wet, humid, warm weather – or exposure to overhead watering
  • Plants growing too close together
Solutions
Solutions
Some steps to take to address black spot include:
  • Prune away any infected leaves, cleaning the pruners between plants with a 10% bleach solution so that the fungus does not spread to healthy leaves.
  • Don't compost pruned plant parts as the spores can linger in the soil for a long period of time - instead, dispose of them in the trash.
  • Use an approved fungicide such as Trifloxystrobin, Chlorothalonil, Maneb, or Myclobutanil.
  • Use a spreader in the fungicide spray to ensure better coverage.
Prevention
Prevention
Here are a few tips to prevent black spot outbreaks.
  • Purchase resistant varieties: Invest in fungus-resistant plant varieties to reduce the chances for black spot diseases.
  • Remove infected plant debris: Fungi can overwinter in contaminated plant debris, so remove all fallen leaves from infected plants as soon as possible.
  • Rake and discard fallen leaves in the fall.
  • Prune regularly.
  • Water carefully: Fungal diseases spread when plants stay in moist conditions and when water droplets splash contaminated soil on plant leaves. Control these factors by only watering infected plants when the top few inches of soil are dry, and by watering at soil level to reduce splashback. Adding a layer of mulch to the soil will also reduce splashing.
  • Grow plants in an open, sunny locations so the foliage dries quickly.
  • Follow spacing guidelines when planting and avoid natural windbreaks for good air circulation.
  • Use chemical control: Regular doses of a fungicide, especially in the spring, can stop an outbreak before it begins.
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Underwatering yellow
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Underwatering yellow
A lack of water will cause the leaves to gradually turn yellow starting at the base of the branch while the entire plant appears to wilt.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Your plant’s leaves are turning yellow due to underwatering, the oldest leaves turn yellow first. Leaves yellow from the edges towards the middle. Other signs of underwatering include the soil feeling very dry or pulling away from the edge of its pot.
Solutions
Solutions
Your plant is very thirsty and needs water promptly.
  1. You can revive your plant by giving it water. The easiest technique is to slowly pour water into your plant’s soil so that the whole surface is moistened. If you pour the water too quickly, the water will flow directly through rather than diffusing throughout the soil. If your plant’s pot does not have drainage holes, do not give your plant more than about a third of the pot’s volume of water. If your plant’s pot does have drainage holes, you can add water slowly until the soil is thoroughly moistened and the water flows freely through the pot.
  2. If you trim off yellow leaves to improve the plant’s appearance, do not remove more than a third of the plant’s leaves. It may be better to wait until leaves have died and fallen off to remove them.
Prevention
Prevention
  1. When you get a new plant, research its specific watering needs. Set reminders so that you remember to water your plants consistently. Not all plants are the same, so make sure to differentiate all of your plants in your watering schedule.
  2. You may wish to purchase a commercial soil water meter which has a long probe that you place near your plant’s roots. Be sure to check it frequently and water your plant when the soil water meter indicates that it needs watering.
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More About Amur Maple

Spread
Spread
4.5 to 6 m
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Spring
Flower Color
Flower Color
White
Yellow
Green
Cream
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green
Red
Flower Size
Flower Size
5 to 8 mm
Plant Height
Plant Height
3 to 10 m

Name story

Amur maple
Since the plant has strong vitality and the leaves are featured with fall colors of yellows and bright reds, it is being widely cultivated. Also, it is native to the Russian Far East in the Amur River valley. Therefore, it is called Amur maple.

Usages

Garden Use
Amur maple is one of the most resilient and decorative smaller maples you can grow in a garden, as a specimen tree, an understory tree, in a container, and even in the form of bonsai. The crown is broad, rounded to open, and the small, three-lobed leaves turn various hues of red and orange in the fall. The trunk can take on irregular shapes when growing, making certain specimens additionally attractive.
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Common Problems

Why does my amur maple not change color?

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The change in leaf color is the result of a combination of factors. Generally speaking, leaf color is affected by temperature, sunlight, humidity, and vigor. A good color effect can only be obtained with appropriate changes in temperature, a certain amount of sunlight, and a certain degree of humidity. If there is a sharp drop in temperature, the leaves will simply fall off. The color will fade if there is insufficient sunlight. If there is inadequate humidity, the color will not be bright enough to provide a good display.

Why do the branches look short and stunted?

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This is generally due to poor root growth. The plant takes in insufficient nutrients to grow healthy new branches, so any new branches are short, meaning that an elegant shape cannot be obtained. The roots of newly transplanted amur maple trees generally do not recover, but this situation can be improved by the second year if the amur maple is well cared for.

Why should the leaves be removed in the fall?

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In some regions, the leaves can suffer from leaf burn and margin scorch if exposed to too much strong sunlight during the summer. If no protective measures are taken at this time, the leaf color in the fall will be very poor and the leaves may even fall off in advance, spoiling the ornamental effect. If a maple has severely scorched leaves, some of these leaves may be removed during August and September. It is not recommended to remove leaves from less vigorous amur maple varieties, such as Acer shirasawanum aureum.
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Caring for a New Plant

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The following pictures and instructions for woody plant are aimed to help your plants adapt and thrive in a new environment.
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1
Picking a Healthy Woody Plant
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Check Its Health

part
Whole Plant
Symmetrical crown, evenly distributed branches, full and compact shape, no excessive growth, close internodes, and uniform leaf size.
part
Branches
The branches are not withered, and the trunk is free of boreholes or damage.
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Leaves
Check the inside of the plant, shaded and overlapping areas, back of leaves. Even colour, no yellowing, no brown spots, no crawling insects, no cobwebs, no deformities, no wilting.
part
Stems
No mold, browning or soft rot at the base of the plant.
health-trouble

Health Troubleshooting

Whole Plant
Branches
Stems
Leaves
more
more 1 Asymmetrical crown or missing, uneven branching: prune the weak and slender branches of the larger portion of the asymmetrical crown.
more
more 2 Internodes are longer in the upper part, leaves are sparse and smaller on top: increase light intensity or duration.
more
more 1 Dry branches: check if the branch is still alive by peeling back a small section of bark and trim away any dry branches. Watch out for signs of insect infestation inside the branch.
more
more 2 Bark with holes: inject insecticide into the holes and apply systemic insecticide to the roots.
more
more 3 Damaged bark: brush on a wound-healing agent, and avoid getting it wet.
more
Mildew, browning, or soft rot at the base: place the plant in a ventilated, dry environment and water with fungicide.
more
more 1 Uneven leaf color and yellowing: prune yellow leaves and check if there are signs of rot at the base of the plant. Spray with fungicide for severe cases.
more
more 2 Brown spots or small yellow spots: place the plant in a ventilated area and avoid watering the leaves. Spray with fungicide for severe cases.
more
more 3 Tiny crawling insects on the back of leaves or spider webs between leaves: increase light exposure and spray with insecticide for severe cases.
more
more 4 Deformations or missing parts on leaves: determine if it's physical damage or pest infestation. Linear or tearing damage is physical, while the rest are pests. Spray with insecticide.
more
more 5 Wilting leaves: provide partial shade and avoid excessive sun exposure. Remove 1/3 to 1/2 of the leaves for severe cases.
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Check Its Growing Conditions

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Soil Check
Soil should smell fresh like after a rain and no musty odor.
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Light Check
Check the light requirement of the plant and if it match with planting location.
more
Temperature Check
Check if the current outdoor temperature is too low or too high.
condition-trouble

Condition Troubleshooting

Soil
Ideal Temperature
Suitable Light
check
Chalky, Loam
Soil
Soil smells musty or foul: check the root system for decay, place the plant in a ventilated, dry environment, and water with fungicide.
check
-10℃ to 35℃
Ideal Temperature
Outdoor temperature is not suitable for the plant: wait until it's a more favorable temperature for growth.
check
Full sun, Partial sun
Suitable Light
Insufficient light: Lack of light can result in fewer leaves and branches, and prevent flowering. Move plant to sunnier spot if possible.
Transplant recovery: After 3 days without severe wilting, slowly increase light to normal levels over a week. If plant droops or sheds leaves, keep it in shade. Once wilting stops, give shade until the plant stands up again. Lots of yellowing and leaf loss mean the light is too low and needs to be increased.
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2
Adapting Your New Woody Plant
Step 1
condition-image
Repotting
Plant your plant promptly in its final location or in a new pot, if conditions are suitable. When transplanting, clean the roots of the plant and keep the root system intact. Prune any blackened or rotten roots, spread out a heavily tangled root system, and mix in some well-rotted organic fertilizer. Use permeable soil and water thoroughly after planting.
Step 2
condition-image
Pruning
Remove yellow or diseased leaves immediately. If leaves are crowded and appear wilted or falling off, remove some of them. For bare-root plants, cut off at least half of the leaves. Pruning is not typically required.
Step 3
condition-image
Watering
Increase watering in the first week to keep soil moist. Water when soil is slightly dry, for at least 2 weeks. Avoid over-watering. Do not water when there is water on your fingers after touching the soil.
Step 4
condition-image
Fertilizing
Add a small amount of base fertilizer during transplanting or repotting. No other fertilizer needed for the first month.
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Lighting
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Indoor
Indoor
Outdoor
Choose a site here for personalized care tips.
Requirements
Full sun
Ideal
Above 6 hours sunlight
Partial sun
Tolerance
About 3-6 hours sunlight
Watch how sunlight gracefully moves through your garden, and choose spots that provide the perfect balance of light and shade for your plants, ensuring their happiness.
Essentials
Amur maple thrives in conditions with ample sun exposure, fostering healthy growth and development. It can also withstand areas getting only moderate exposure. The plant originated in environments abundant in light. Too much or too little light can adversely impact it's health and growth.
Preferred
Tolerable
Unsuitable
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Artificial lighting
Indoor plants require adequate lighting for optimal growth. When natural sunlight is insufficient, particularly in winter or in less sunny spaces, artificial lights offer a vital solution, promoting faster, healthier growth.
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Indoor plants require adequate lighting for optimal growth. When natural sunlight is insufficient, particularly in winter or in less sunny spaces, artificial lights offer a vital solution, promoting faster, healthier growth.
1. Choose the right type of artificial light: LED lights are a popular choice for indoor plant lighting because they can be customized to provide the specific wavelengths of light that your plants need.
Full sun plants need 30-50W/sq ft of artificial light, partial sun plants need 20-30W/sq ft, and full shade plants need 10-20W/sq ft.
2. Determine the appropriate distance: Place the light source 12-36 inches above the plant to mimic natural sunlight.
3. Determine the duration: Mimic the length of natural daylight hours for your plant species. most plants need 8-12 hours of light per day.
Important Symptoms
Insufficient light
Amur maple thrives in full sunlight but is sensitive to heat. As a plant commonly grown outdoors with abundant sunlight, it may exhibit subtle symptoms of light deficiency when placed in rooms with suboptimal lighting.
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(Symptom details and solutions)
Small leaves
New leaves may grow smaller in size compared to the previous ones once they have matured.
Leggy or sparse growth
The spaces between leaves or stems of your amur maple may become longer, resulting in a thin and stretched-out appearance. This can make the plant look sparse and weak, and it may easily break or lean due to its own weight.
Faster leaf drop
When plants are exposed to low light conditions, they tend to shed older leaves early to conserve resources. Within a limited time, these resources can be utilized to grow new leaves until the plant's energy reserves are depleted.
Slower or no new growth
Amur maple enters a survival mode when light conditions are poor, which leads to a halt in leaf production. As a result, the plant's growth becomes delayed or stops altogether.
Lighter-colored new leaves
Insufficient sunlight can cause leaves to develop irregular color patterns or appear pale. This indicates a lack of chlorophyll and essential nutrients.
Solutions
1. To ensure optimal growth, gradually move plants to a sunnier location each week, until they receive at least 6 hours of direct sunlight daily. Use a south-facing window and keep curtains open during the day for maximum sunlight exposure and nutrient accumulation.2. To provide additional light for your plant, consider using artificial light if it's large or not easily movable. Keep a desk or ceiling lamp on for at least 8 hours daily, or invest in professional plant grow lights for ample light.
Excessive light
Amur maple thrives in full sun exposure but is sensitive to heat. Although sunburn symptoms occasionally occur, they are unable to withstand intense sunlight in high-temperature environments.
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(Symptom details and solutions)
Chlorosis
Chlorosis is a condition where the plant's leaves lose their green color and turn yellow. This is due to the breakdown of chlorophyll from excessive sunlight, which negatively affects the plant's ability to photosynthesize.
Sunscald
Sunscald occurs when the plant's leaves or stems are damaged by intense sunlight exposure. It appears as pale, bleached, or necrotic areas on the plant tissue and can reduce the plant's overall health.
Leaf Curling
Leaf curling is a symptom where leaves curl or twist under extreme sunlight conditions. This is a defense mechanism used by the plant to reduce its surface area exposed to sunlight, minimizing water loss and damage.
Wilting
Wilting occurs when a plant loses turgor pressure and its leaves and stems begin to droop. Overexposure to sunlight can cause wilting by increasing the plant's water loss through transpiration, making it difficult for the plant to maintain adequate hydration.
Leaf Scorching
Leaf scorching is a symptom characterized by the appearance of brown, dry, and crispy edges or patches on leaves due to excessive sunlight. This can lead to a reduction in photosynthetic capacity and overall plant health.
Solutions
1. Move your plant to the optimal position where it can receive abundant sunlight but also have some shade. An east-facing window is an ideal choice as the morning sunlight is gentler. This way, your plant can enjoy ample sunlight while reducing the risk of sunburn.2. It is recommended to trim off any completely dehydrated or withered parts of the plant.
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Temperature
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Indoor
Outdoor
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Requirements
Ideal
Tolerable
Unsuitable
Just like people, each plant has its own preferences. Learn about your plants' temperature needs and create a comforting environment for them to flourish. As you care for your plants, your bond with them will deepen. Trust your intuition as you learn about their temperature needs, celebrating the journey you share. Lovingly monitor the temperature around your plants and adjust their environment as needed. A thermometer can be your ally in this heartfelt endeavor. Be patient and gentle with yourself as you explore your plants' temperature needs. Cherish your successes, learn from challenges, and nurture your garden with love, creating a haven that reflects the warmth of your care.
Essentials
The temperature requirements of amur maple are suited to a temperate climate. It prefers temperatures between 32 to 95 ℉ (0 to 35 ℃). In the winter months, it can tolerate temperatures as low as -22 ℉ (-30 ℃). During the summer, it prefers higher temperatures.
Regional wintering strategies
Amur maple has strong cold resistance, so special frost protection measures are usually not necessary during winter. However, if the winter temperatures are expected to drop below {Limit_growth_temperature}, it is still important to provide cold protection. This can be achieved by wrapping the trunk and branches with materials such as non-woven fabric or cloth. Before the first freeze in autumn, it is recommended to water the plant abundantly, ensuring the soil remains moist and enters a frozen state. This helps prevent drought and water scarcity for the plant during winter and early spring.
Important Symptoms
Low Temperature
Amur maple is cold-tolerant and thrives best when the temperature is above {Suitable_growth_temperature_min}. During winter, it should be kept above {Tolerable_growing_temperature_min}. When the temperature falls below {Limit_growth_temperature}, although there may not be any noticeable changes during winter, the branches may become brittle and dry during springtime, and no new shoots will emerge.
Solutions
In spring, prune away any dead branches that have failed to produce new leaves.
High Temperature
During summer, Amur maple should be kept below {Suitable_growth_temperature_max}. When the temperature exceeds {Tolerable_growing_temperature_max}, the leaves of the plant may become lighter in color, the tips may become dry and withered, and the plant becomes more susceptible to sunburn.
Solutions
Trim away the sunburned and dried-up parts. Move the plant to a location that provides shade from the midday and afternoon sun, or use a shade cloth to create shade. Water the plant in the morning and evening to keep the soil moist.
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Transplant
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How to Successfully Transplant Amur Maple?
Transplanting amur maple is best done during late autumn to early winter (S3-S4). This allows amur maple to establish roots in its new location before spring's growth surge. The plant prefers sunny to partially shady areas. If possible, water well before and after transplanting amur maple to minimize stress.
What Preparations are Needed Before Transplanting Amur Maple?
What is the Ideal Time for Transplanting Amur Maple?
The ideal transplanting period for amur maple is late autumn to early winter (S3-S4). It's because amur maple goes dormant during winter, causing less transplant shock. Transplanting during this period ensures healthy root development in the following spring.
How Much Space Should You Leave Between Amur Maple Plants?
For each amur maple that you plan to transplant, make sure you leave a gap of about 5-6 feet (1.5-1.8 meters) between them. This will ensure each plant has ample room to grow and flourish comfortably. Doing this can also prevent crowding and competition for nutrients.
What is the Best Soil Mix for Amur Maple Transplanting?
Prepare your soil with a mixture of compost and aged manure. This type of soil will be well-draining and rich in essential nutrients for amur maple growth. Don't forget to add a slow-release fertilizer to give your plant a beneficial nutrient boost through its initial development.
Where Should You Relocate Your Amur Maple?
Amur maple loves the sun! Find a location in your garden that gets fair amount of sunlight everyday. However, it can also tolerate a bit of shade. Just make sure it's a spot where your plant will receive at least 6 hours of sunlight daily.
What Equipments Should You Prepare Before Transplantation Amur Maple?
Gardening Gloves
To protect your hands while working with the soil and amur maple.
A Spade or Shovel
Needed for digging holes in the ground suitable for the amur maple's root ball. Select a spade or shovel with a sharp blade to make the job easier.
A Trowel
Smaller than a shovel and is used for transplanting amur maple from pots or trays.
Garden Rake
Helpful to level the soil and break up any large clods of earth before transplanting the amur maple.
Watering Can or Hose
To water the amur maple before and after the transplanting process.
Wheelbarrow or Tarp
Transferring the amur maple from its original location to the new location will be much more manageable with this.
Organic Mulch
The mulch helps to retain moisture after the amur maple has been transplanted.
How Do You Remove Amur Maple from the Soil?
From Ground: Begin by watering around the base of the amur maple so that the soil is moist but not waterlogged. This makes it easier to remove the plant while keeping the root system intact. Next, using a spade or shovel, dig a wide trench around the amur maple, ensuring you're getting the entirety of the root ball. It's crucial not to damage or cut the root system.
From Pot: Water the amur maple if the soil is dry. The next step is to gently tip the pot to one side, supporting the plant with your hand while gently tapping the pot's rim to loosen the soil and roots. If the amur maple doesn’t slide out, you may need to slide a knife around the edges to loosen it.
From Seedling Tray: Ensure the amur maple seedlings are adequately watered. Similar to the pot procedure, gently massage the tray's base underneath each seedling to loosen it. Grasp the amur maple seedling by its leaves (not the stem as it can easily get damaged) and gently pull it out of the tray.
Step-by-Step Guide for Transplanting Amur Maple
Step1 Root Preparation
Before transplanting, soak the root ball of amur maple in a bucket of water until no bubbles surface. This ensures that the amur maple is adequately hydrated for the transplant.
Step2 Digging the Hole
Dig a hole twice as wide and the same depth as the root ball using your spade or shovel. The exact size will depend on the size of the amur maple being transplanted.
Step3 Placing the Plant
Place the amur maple in the center of the hole. Ensure that the top of the root ball is level with the ground.
Step4 Backfilling
Backfill the hole with soil, firming it gently around the base of the amur maple. Be careful not to press too hard to avoid damaging the roots.
Step5 Watering
Water the amur maple generously after the backfilling the hole. It aids in settling the soil around the roots.
Step6 Mulching
Apply a layer of organic mulch around (but not touching) the base of amur maple. It helps maintain soil moisture and suppresses the growth of weeds.
How Do You Care For Amur Maple After Transplanting?
Watering
It's essential to water the newly transplanted amur maple regularly. While the plant is establishing, the soil should remain moist but avoid overwatering that can lead to waterlogging.
Pruning
Regularly inspect the amur maple for dead or damaged wood and prune it as necessary. This helps the amur maple focus its energy on new growth.
Pest Control
Keep an eye out for pests and disease attacks. Should you spot any, invest in suitable organic products to keep them away.
Monitoring Growth
Pay attention to the health and growth of amur maple. If growth seems slow or the plant seems unhealthy, consult with a local specialist or nursery for advice.
Troubleshooting Common Issues with Amur Maple Transplantation.
When is the best time for transplanting amur maple?
The planting sweet spot for amur maple falls between late summer and early autumn, that's season 3 and 4.
What's the appropriate distance to maintain between each amur maple?
Amur maple needs room to grow. Ensure each sapling is planted approximately 5-6 feet apart, or 150-180cm apart.
What should be the soil condition while planting amur maple saplings?
Amur maple loves well-drained soil. While transplanting, make certain the soil is loose, with a slightly acidic to neutral pH level.
Is there a specific depth for planting the amur maple?
The hole you dig should be two times the width of the root ball and equally deep. This way, the amur maple's roots will have room to expand.
What sort of care does amur maple need right after transplanting?
After transplanting amur maple, water the base generously. Keep the soil slightly moist, but not waterlogged, for the first few weeks.
How much sunlight should amur maple get?
Amur maple enjoys full sun to part shade. After transplanting, ensure the plant gets 4-6 hours of sunlight every day.
Do I need to add compost or conditioner before planting amur maple?
Before transplanting amur maple, add generous amounts of compost or soil conditioner. This enhances the soil structure and provides nutrients to the sapling.
What is the watering regime for amur maple after transplanting?
Water amur maple lightly but consistently, ensuring the soil is always moist. However, avoid over-watering as it may lead to root rot.
Should I stake amur maple after transplanting?
Staking isn't always necessary for amur maple. However, if the location is windy, a supportive stake will help the sapling grow straight and strong.
How to ensure the successful transplantation of amur maple?
Ensure an optimal transplantation by choosing the right season, spacing the saplings appropriately, maintaining the soil moisture, and providing sufficient sunlight to amur maple.
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This cookie provides mobile analytics and attribution services that enable us to measure and analyze the effectiveness of marketing campaigns, certain events and actions within the Application. Learn more here.
Lifespan
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