PictureThis
camera identify
Use App
tab list
Home Identify Application
English
English
繁體中文
日本語
Español
Français
Deutsch
Pусский
Português
Italiano
한국어
Nederlands
العربية
Svenska
Polskie
ภาษาไทย
Bahasa Melayu
Bahasa Indonesia
Get App
This page looks better in the app
care_about care_about
About
care_basic_guide care_basic_guide
Basic Care
care_advanced_guide care_advanced_guide
Advanced Care
care_scenes care_scenes
More About How-Tos
care_seasonal_tips care_seasonal_tips
Seasonal Tips
care_pet_and_diseases care_pet_and_diseases
Pests & Diseases
care_more_info care_more_info
More Info
care_faq care_faq
FAQ
care_new_plant care_new_plant
New Plant Care

How to Care for Sand Dollar Cactus

Sand dollar cactus is a popular ornamental cactus originating from Mexico and the USA. It has been a popular houseplant for almost 200 years and is available in many hybrid forms. Sadly, it is now very rare to find in the wild and is classed as ‘vulnerable’ on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List, largely due to its collection for ornamental sale.
symbolism

Symbolism

Maternal Love, Endurance, My Heart Burns with Love; Grandeur, Warmth, Enduring Love
Water
Water
Every 3 weeks
Sunlight
Sunlight
Full sun
Sand dollar cactus
Sand dollar cactus
Sand dollar cactus
Sand dollar cactus
Sand dollar cactus
care_basic_guide

Basic Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterDetail

How to Water Sand dollar cactus?

Sand dollar cactus is a drought-tolerant plant that does not require frequent watering. Water thoroughly when the soil is completely dry. When potted, water slowly, wait for water to flow out the bottom, and then pour the excess water from the tray to avoid water accumulation.
Spring, summer, and fall are its growing seasons. Water once or twice a week to keep the soil slightly wet. In winter, water less; just keep the soil from drying excessively; usually once a week. Besides, water with rainwater or distilled water rather than tap water.
Tap water contains a lot of calcium, magnesium, and other mineral salts. Long-term use tends to cause soil compaction. Avoid splashing water on its stem when watering to prevent rotting.
Cultivation:WaterDetail
waterreminders

Never miss a care task again!

Plant care made easier than ever with our tailor-made smart care reminder.
What's the best method to water my Sand dollar cactus?
Another tip when watering this species is to water it from the bottom. This is for the proper absorption of water to the roots, enabling it to circulate the nutrients from the soil towards its whole body. When you accidentally spill water at the top part, this can cause the development of diseases and fungi.
Use sprinklers when you have irrigation systems. Get the small sprinklers if you have Sand dollar cactused in your garden. It's best to get the revolving ones that allow you to change the water delivery patterns whenever you need them. Avoid turning on the sprinkler on windy days. Make sure to use the soak and dry method regardless if the Sand dollar cactus is in a pot or your garden. This will evenly distribute the moisture across the root systems resulting in healthier growth.
Some owners might want to get a built-in drainage system for their succulents. This is where layers of porous materials like recycled glass or hydro stones are placed beneath the soil. They will generally be a reservoir for excess water, so it's important not to pour too much water into these built-in systems.
Read More more
What should I do if I water my Sand dollar cactus too much/too little?
When you see that the Sand dollar cactus begins to turn yellow, know that this can be caused by underwatering or overwatering. When the soil is too wet, then there might be the presence of fungal infections. You should allow everything to dry, and you should not overwater.
Also, the browning and dropping symptoms indicate that your plant is getting too much moisture and water. If there's not enough water, the indication can be seen with the yellow tips that can begin to form on stems and branches.
When you're still in the process of buying the Sand dollar cactus, make sure to ask first if the soil is properly draining or sandy. When the topsoil does not properly drain, there's a chance that the plant will likely not receive enough water in the future.
Another thing is that the Sand dollar cactus tends to die when it's constantly getting overwatered and if it's receiving too much rain if planted outside. Use rainwater or distilled water whenever possible as the plants don't like many minerals in their drink.
You can see the squishy stems, drooping growth, and discolored parts that are all signs of too much moisture. It's critical to give the species time to recover and allow the pot to dry. Transfer it to a different container to avoid root rot and prevent it from dripping. If planted outside, you can also transfer it into a pot, especially in the winter, to help it recover.
Read More more
How often should I water my Sand dollar cactus?
Most of the time, you only need to water your succulents once every two to three weeks in the summer and spring. During the winter and fall, reduce the watering or avoid this as this plant tends to become dormant.
Let the soil dry completely, and it's always a good idea to lean on the side of underwatering rather than overwatering. When they are in the pot, water deeply at intervals to encourage healthier soil growth.
When they are planted outdoors, never water them lightly as this will result in more shallow root growth. Wait for a few weeks and only give them a drink when the soil around them is too dry.
Read More more
How much water does my Sand dollar cactus need?
Water this succulent efficiently and make sure to cover the entire pot. Set a saucer at the bottom of the pot so the roots will get enough moisture. When you see that the soil begins to saturate, take out the saucer immediately. The holes in the pot and the amount of soil will determine the frequency and the quantity of water you should give your plant. A can of water is often more than enough for the Sand dollar cactus especially if they are planted in pots.
When you plant them in the garden or outdoors, you need to include the rainwater they receive. About an inch of rainwater is more than enough to last them for a few weeks, so refrain from watering. When they are outside, you need to water them in the morning with about a gallon of water after you see that the soil is bone dry so the sunlight can help evaporate the excess moisture.
Read More more
Why is watering my Sand dollar cactus important?
Watering the Sand dollar cactus will help transport the nutrients that it needs from the soil to the rest of the plant. Without enough moisture, the Sand dollar cactus won't remain healthy or might even become malnourished. Watering should be done when you see some signs that the plant is thirsty. When you're in doubt, you should never overwater as this can be a way to kill them.
The best way to water them is the soak and dry method. When you see that the soil becomes too dry, you should soak them in water until you see that the pot is dripping with water underneath. Then, go for weeks without watering to give the soil a chance to rest.
Read More more
How can I ensure that i'm watering my Sand dollar cactus adequately?
Before you give this plant a drink, it's always a good idea to check the soil's moisture levels by poking your finger in it or using a moisture meter. This will tell you whether the soil is already too dry or if there's still moisture. It's a technique used by owners of smaller potted plants to know whether it's time to water or not.
Assess the needs of your Sand dollar cactus and know that it requires watering every two weeks during the summer. You can go as far as three weeks in the hot season before watering this, but in the fall or winter, there should not be any water at all. Allow the soil to dry between irrigations. They can be grown in greenhouses and other warm spots indoors and thrive well. When your plant is getting too much light, you can increase the watering frequency as long as you see that the soil is dry. They can also be grown outdoors, where you will need to water them less. Give it enough water once every three weeks; this should be more than enough. Don't rely alone on irrigations and sprinklers to reach their bases. Use a soaker hose that will hit the ground and spread the water. Make sure it won't hit much of the body of the plant as this can result in diseases.
Read More more
Should I adjust the frequency of watering my Sand dollar cactus according to different seasons or climates?
Sand dollar cactus is very tolerant of drought. This means that you don't need to water them very often. Watering frequency should also depend on the climate where you live. In a dry environment, you can make the watering conditions adapt well to your plants' needs. When they are in their early flowering stages, you might want to increase watering to help them grow. When they are receiving enough sunlight, water only in the morning. Specifically, they can be watered once every 10 to 14 days during the summer. You can increase this frequency during times of heat waves and make sure to mist the base from time to time lightly. When it's too cold, you can cut back on watering or once every 21 to 28 days when it begins to cool down.
Read More more
Should I adjust the watering frequency during the different growing stages of my Sand dollar cactus?
When you've just repotted the plant, you should wait for a week before you can water your Sand dollar cactus. When it's time to water them, be generous until you see the water coming out of the potholes but don't make it a deluge. When they have already grown and received medium light, you might want to water them once every 2 to 3 weeks since they are very tolerant to drought.
In the winter, you will further need to cut back on watering. The ideal time is to water it once every 3 to 4 weeks as long as the soil does not feel too dry. Winter is their resting season, so they don't consume a lot of energy or grow at this time.
If you grow the plants outdoors, rainwater can be another excellent alternative when you want to hold back on watering. When you live in an area where you don't get much rain, water at least once every three weeks to prevent the soil from drying too much.
In humid locations, there's no need to water a lot. When keeping the Sand dollar cactus indoors, you won't have to keep the moisture high, especially if the plant does not receive too much sunlight. When there's too much moisture and not enough light, this can spell disaster for the succulents.
Read More more
What should I be careful with when I water my Sand dollar cactus in different seasons, climates, or during different growing periods?
The Sand dollar cactus growing outdoors can thrive with rainfall, but when it’s planted in a pot, you need to be careful while Sand dollar cactus is still in the growing stage. One way to prevent overwatering is to check the top bottom inches of the soil for moisture. Once again, you need it to be dry so you can water it again. If you're unsure of the amount and the frequency, especially during the growing phase, go with underwatering and slightly increase it when you see a need. It's always a good idea to take a picture of the Sand dollar cactus and note how it looks after watering it. You can take things further by using moisture meters or hygrometers to check the air and soil moisture. These tools are available from various shops and can be valuable when you want to know the readings for humidity and water.
Read More more
Should I water my Sand dollar cactus differently when I plant it indoors vs outdoors?
Know that these plants can survive for weeks without any water. This is because they have water storage capacity that can conserve water for a long time. so it will conserve enough water to stay alive even if they are in the wild.
When they are fully grown, water them less since they can survive without water compared to when they were small. You need to give them time to get used to your climate and growing conditions before watering them. If they are indoors, keep them in indirect light and water them less frequently. Avoid using cold water during the winter and months, and you might be overwatering when the plants are located indoors. Give this a rest, especially during the winter and fall.
When they are outdoors, refrain from watering too much. They should be able to get enough humidity, moisture, and rainfall that will keep them alive. Only water when you see that their leaves are becoming droopy and yellowish. Always lean on the side of underwatering as the Sand dollar cactus is very tolerant to dry conditions. They don't like wet feet and might wilt when you water them too much.
Read More more
left right
Cultivation:FertilizerDetail

How to Fertilize Sand dollar cactus?

In growing seasons (namely spring, summer and fall), fertilize sand dollar cactus once a month with liquid fertilizer. No fertilizer is required in winter. A small amount of slow-release fertilizer can be well mixed into the soil when repotting in spring or fall.
Use nitrogen fertilizer during seedling and phosphate-potassium fertilizer before and after blooming. The fertilizer concentration should be as low as possible. It would be better to apply low-concentrate fertilizer several times rather than to use a high concentration. If the base is yellow and grows slowly, the cause may be excessive fertilizer, and fertilization should be immediately stopped.

Fertilizer

Often found growing in rock gardens and used in xeriscaping, Sand dollar cactus adds plenty of interest and texture to the area. It is a slow-growing plant, and this affects its care. Sand dollar cactus does not require a lot of nutrients to thrive. Knowing when and how to feed your specimen will help ensure you get years of enjoyment from your plant. Fertilizing Sand dollar cactus adds nutrients to the growing medium. Even though it does store water and nutrients, applying plant food during the growing season helps support healthy growth. Fertilizing can also encourage mature specimens to produce blooms in the growing season.
While all plants benefit from additional nutrients, Sand dollar cactus only needs a light dose of fertilizer during the growing season. The frequency of fertilization should be 1-2 times a year. It is suggested to fertilize your Sand dollar cactus in the spring and autumn, but not in winter&summer when it is dormant. Be careful with repotted plants, you will want to reduce the amount of fertilizer. It’s also a good idea to wait a couple of months after repotting before you start applying fertilizer. It’s best to use a liquid plant food formulated for succulents and cacti when you are fertilizing Sand dollar cactus. Dilute the fertilizer with water to half-strength. You do not want the fertilizer building up in the soil. Apply the fertilizer to the base of the plant and water thoroughly, ensuring any excess moisture drains from the container or seeps into the ground.
It is easier to use liquid plant food when you are fertilizing Sand dollar cactus, but granules are another option. Follow the directions on the packaging, making sure you dilute liquid fertilizers to half-strength. Whether you are using granules are liquid plant food, always apply it to the soil. Cover the granules with a thin layer of soil and water regardless of the type of plant food you are using.
Over-fertilizing Sand dollar cactus is a common problem with new and experienced gardeners. The plant has low nutritional needs and it’s easy to apply a little too much fertilizer. Over-fertilizing Sand dollar cactus can burn the plant’s sensitive roots resulting in its slow decay. Without its root system, the plant cannot absorb nutrients and moisture.
Like most plants, Sand dollar cactus has a dormancy period and it is when you want to stop the applications of fertilizer. In the summer and winter, the plant ceases growing, and it is when you want to stop applying fertilizer. It’s also a good idea to cease fertilizing for the first couple of months after repotting in the spring.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
qrcode
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
close
Cultivation:FertilizerDetail
Why do I need to fertilize my Sand dollar cactus?
Fertilizing Sand dollar cactus adds nutrients to the growing medium. Even though it does store water and nutrients, applying plant food during the growing season helps support healthy growth. Fertilizing can also encourage mature specimens to produce blooms in the growing season.
Read More more
When is the best time to fertilize my Sand dollar cactus?
While all plants benefit from additional nutrients, Sand dollar cactus only needs a light dose of fertilizer during the growing season. The frequency of fertilization should be 1-2 times a year. It is suggested to fertilize your Sand dollar cactus in the spring and autumn, but not in winter&summer when it is dormant. Be careful with repotted plants, you will want to reduce the amount of fertilizer. It’s also a good idea to wait a couple of months after repotting before you start applying fertilizer.
Read More more
When should I avoid fertilizing my Sand dollar cactus?
Like most plants, Sand dollar cactus has a dormancy period and it is when you want to stop the applications of fertilizer. In the summer and winter, the plant ceases growing, and it is when you want to stop applying fertilizer. It’s also a good idea to cease fertilizing for the first couple of months after repotting in the spring.
Read More more
What type of fertilizer does my Sand dollar cactus need?
It’s best to use a liquid plant food formulated for succulents and cacti when you are fertilizing Sand dollar cactus. Dilute the fertilizer with water to half-strength. You do not want the fertilizer building up in the soil. Apply the fertilizer to the base of the plant and water thoroughly, ensuring any excess moisture drains from the container or seeps into the ground.
Read More more
How do I fertilize my Sand dollar cactus?
It is easier to use liquid plant food when you are fertilizing Sand dollar cactus, but granules are another option. Follow the directions on the packaging, making sure you dilute liquid fertilizers to half-strength. Whether you are using granules are liquid plant food, always apply it to the soil. Cover the granules with a thin layer of soil and water regardless of the type of plant food you are using.
Read More more
What happens if I fertilize my Sand dollar cactus too much?
Over-fertilizing Sand dollar cactus is a common problem with new and experienced gardeners. The plant has low nutritional needs and it’s easy to apply a little too much fertilizer. Over-fertilizing Sand dollar cactus can burn the plant’s sensitive roots resulting in its slow decay. Without its root system, the plant cannot absorb nutrients and moisture.
Read More more
left right
Cultivation:SunlightDetail

What Are the Sunlight Requirements for Sand dollar cactus?

Sand dollar cactus is a heliophilic plant and needs sufficient sunlight for its growth and blooming. It can be placed on the outdoor balcony or in the garden without shade. However, long-time exposure to blazing sunlight should be avoided in hot summer, when it needs to be shaded or cooled a little to prevent high temperatures from damaging it.
Cultivation:SunlightDetail
lightmeter

Know the light your plants really get.

Find the best spots for them to optimize their health, simply using your phone.
How much sunlight does Sand dollar cactus need to grow?
Sand dollar cactus should get at least 6 hours of sun per day, and preferably more. An actual minimum number of hours can vary depending on the intensity of sunlight and other environmental factors, but it is unlikely that the Sand dollar cactus will get too much sunlight. They do fine with up to 14 hours of sun per day.
Read More more
What type of sunlight does Sand dollar cactus need?
Sand dollar cactus needs a lot of bright sunlight. As full-sun plants, they can thrive when given direct light or bright indirect sun. Some types may be able to survive with partial sun, but more sunlight is generally better.
Read More more
Should I protect Sand dollar cactus from sun exposure?
Sand dollar cactus usually grows in some of the hottest, sunniest places in the world and is well adapted to that kind of environment, so it does not need to be protected from the sun. However, you should be careful about making a sudden move into a very sunny location if your Sand dollar cactus is not used to it. Plants need time to adapt to different conditions, so start by moving this plant into the sun for a couple of hours at a time each day, then gradually lengthen the amount of sun exposure. Once adapted, most types of Sand dollar cactus will be fine in full sun and don't need protection.
Read More more
What will happen if Sand dollar cactus doesn't get enough sunlight?
Without enough sunlight, Sand dollar cactus will fail to thrive and grow. Common symptoms of inadequate sunlight include pale coloring, wilting leaves, and leaf drop. Sand dollar cactus may also exhibit etiolation (also called legginess). This condition occurs as the plant attempts to stretch toward the light source, leading to a sparse appearance and weak stems.
Read More more
What will happen if Sand dollar cactus gets too much sunlight?
Sand dollar cactus may develop shades of red, pink, or orange as a means of protection from excess sunlight, so many people like to cause mild sun stress to these plants during the summer. This is not harmful, and they will revert to their normal coloring when light levels decrease from autumn to spring.
If moved too quickly into direct sun, Sand dollar cactus can suffer from sunburn. This looks like white or brown spots on the uppermost leaves that have been exposed to the most sun. A sunburned plant should be moved to a shadier location and watered if needed. Sun-damaged leaves can be removed, and should be replaced by new growth over time.
Read More more
Does Sand dollar cactus need special care about sunlight during its different growth stages?
As with most plants, younger Sand dollar cactus will be more sensitive to strong sunlight and heat than a mature specimen. They should also be protected from direct sun immediately after being transplanted, either by a shade or by keeping the container in a shadier location until the plant is established and putting out new growth.
Read More more
Are there any cautions or tips for sunlight and Sand dollar cactus?
It is best to water Sand dollar cactus in the morning, particularly during the summer months. If water sits on the leaves or in the crown of the plant, it can burn the plant when the water heats up. It’s also best not to water in the evening, since cooler overnight temperatures slow evaporation and fungi or bacteria can develop in the moist conditions.
Sand dollar cactus grown in pots should be rotated occasionally to keep them growing symmetrically. Plants will normally grow toward the light source, so they can develop much more quickly on one side than the other if they are not rotated.
If Sand dollar cactus is allowed to get dusty, it will not be able to access sunlight to create energy. The dust acts as a barrier, so the plant may show signs of inadequate light even if it’s in a sunny location. Keep the leaves and stems clean by wiping them periodically with a damp cloth to avoid this issue.
Read More more
left right
Cultivation:PruningDetail

How to Prune Sand dollar cactus?

Sand dollar cactus does not require much pruning. Remove withered flowers and branches so the plant uses nutrients on healthy growth.
Cultivation:PruningDetail
close
care_advanced_guide

Advanced Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail

What is the Ideal Temperature Range for Sand dollar cactus?

Sand dollar cactus is distributed throughout tropical, subtropical, and semi-desert regions with scarce rainfall, intense sunlight, and hot temperatures. The optimum temperature for growth is 20 to 35 ℃. Lower than 10 ℃ or higher than 35 ℃, growth slows and dormancy begins. The air humidity should not be too high and the environment should be well-ventilated. Avoid high humidity and accumulated water.
Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail
What's the ideal temperature for your Sand dollar cactus?
It is more suitable to keep the Sand dollar cactus in a particular range of conditions. Temperatures the same as 75-90℉ (25-32℃) are ideal for it. During the early winter season, the temperature shouldn't go below 75℉(25℃) for Sand dollar cactus. You can even move it indoors as it will have better protection from the extremes.
Despite that, the Sand dollar cactus can survive in some extreme temperatures. Sometimes can survive in low temperatures like 50℉ (15℃), but it is not ideal. You should bring it inside if winter conditions are expected outside.
Read More more
How should I adjust the temperature for my Sand dollar cactus during different growing phases?
Sand dollar cactus has different growing phases. In the first stage, the dormant seed grows and transforms into a seedling. The dormant seeds need the appropriate conditions in their surroundings to grow as their seeds need a temperature of 75-90℉ (25-32℃) to germinate. The ideal time to make it grow vigorously is during the summer, as the most suitable temperature is around 85℉(30℃). You can adjust the placement of your Sand dollar cactus from indoors to sunlight during the hot summer months to receive enough sunlight.
Read More more
How can I keep my Sand dollar cactus warm in cold seasons?
It's advisable to bring your Sand dollar cactus indoors to avoid the harsh winter conditions. People opt to buy different types of grow light to provide enough sunlight for the plant. However, if your home is not extremely dark, it is not essential to buy these lights. Keep your plants where they will get the most sunlight possible. There should be sufficient light to keep the Sand dollar cactus thriving in winter. If you have several Sand dollar cactus, then keep them rotating so that they all receive enough sunlight.
Avoid placing your Sand dollar cactus too close to the window if you live in northern areas with frigid weather. The cold may be extreme to them, due to which they might get damaged.
Read More more
What happens to my Sand dollar cactus when the temperature is too high or too low?
Your Sand dollar cactus can grow better in summers and do better in warm temperatures 90℉(32℃) but you should protect it from temperature extremes during hot climates.
However, during winter, it is better to keep your plant dry. Sand dollar cactus do well in temperate climates having temperatures between 75-90℉ (25-32℃). However, some gardeners can expose their Sand dollar cactus to extreme temperatures causing stress in their plants. While high temperatures ranging between 90℉ and 95℉(32-35℃) can help maintain the deep colors for Sand dollar cactus, you must be careful when trying out such experiment. During the hot summer season extremely high temperatures can burn your Sand dollar cactus damaging their stem and root system. During the hottest time of the day (when the temperature is extremely high), consider relocating your plant to a shaded place or protect them with a shade cloth.
Read More more
How should I adjust the temperature for my Sand dollar cactus in different seasons?
In summers, high temperatures make the growth of Sand dollar cactus slowed down to survive in too hot a temperature.
As the cooler periods and rainfall begins, the Sand dollar cactus starts growing. If the place you live in has hot summers and warm winters with more rainfalls, you aren't required to change anything.
However, if you live in a place with cold winters, you should let your Sand dollar cactus grow more in summer and rest in winter. It is because there is not enough sunlight for Sand dollar cactus to grow in winter.
You can help your Sand dollar cactus enter dormancy if you live in a place with cold temperatures by decreasing the temperature to 50℉ to 75℉ (15℃ to 25℃).
Read More more
How can I keep my Sand dollar cactus warm without a heating pad?
To withstand freezing temperatures outside, as a solution, you can insulate your Sand dollar cactus with frost cloths, row covers, tents etc. You can also mulch your Sand dollar cactus with small rocks. Mulching the Sand dollar cactus soil will provide warmth to your plants and will not let you over-water the plant.
Read More more
How can I protect my Sand dollar cactus from temperature damage?
Sand dollar cactus is adapted to sunlight and requires sufficient sunlight for healthy growth. You can place it in an outdoor environment without any shade. However, Sand dollar cactus shouldn't be kept for a long time in the blazing sunlight in the hot summer when it requires to be put under shade so that extreme temperature doesn't damage them. If the winter is extreme in our area, you must keep your Sand dollar cactus indoors to keep them away from frost.
Read More more
What are the tips and precautions for keeping my Sand dollar cactus at the right temperature?
Increase water and fertilizer during the growth of plants in spring and summer. Prevent your plant from receiving too much sunlight. To cool plants, spray water around them when the temperature is exceptionally high but don't put water on their stem.
Read More more
left right
Cultivation:SoilDetail

What Soil is Best for Sand dollar cactus?

Sand dollar cactus grows best in fertile, gravel-rich, water-permeable soil with a pH value of 6-7. The culture soil formula often used is 60% vermiculite + 20% coco coir or peat moss + 20% sandy soil. A small amount of organic potting soil can also be added. Lightweight culture media such as vermiculite can be added to improve the air permeability of the soil. Eggshell powder or vermicompost can also be added to increase the soil fertility.
Roots of sand dollar cactus are very sensitive to oxygen deficiency. If the soil is poorly permeable to air and water, root rot can set in. It's easy to judge permeability: when watering, water should pass through the medium quickly, rather than stop at the soil surface and slowly seep down. Repot and loosen the soil every year to ensure the air permeability of the soil.
Cultivation:SoilDetail
Cultivation:PropagationDetail

How to Propagate Sand dollar cactus?

In addition to the seeding mentioned above, main propagation methods include division and grafting. To divide, cut off the tip or lateral branches of the stem with a knife and plant it in soil. After a period of time, many small shoots will grow up near the cut. When a shoot grows to proper size, it can be cut off and transplanted to form a new plant.
To graft, select a suitable rootstock. Cut the tip of the rootstock, such as the stem of pitahaya (Hylocereus undatus), and then put sand dollar cactus, with its roots removed, in the center of the rootstock and fix it with a rope. After 1-2 weeks, the two parts grow together and the rope can be removed.

Propagation

Only sow Sand dollar cactus seeds in warm weather, preferably during the later weeks of spring after any danger of frost or dropping temperatures has passed. Even in warm climates, ensure the soil is sufficiently warm, as cooler soil can hinder germination and growth. If you want to sow the seeds earlier, you need to do it indoors for successful germination.
To sow Sand dollar cactus in your growing medium, you don't need many extra tools. Simply put on your gardening gloves and get started!
What you will need:
  • Healthy and full seeds, as the germination rate of such seeds will be higher.
  • Growing medium with potting mix soil, divided into rows.
  • Fertilizer or compost.
  • (Optional) A dibbler or stake.
  • A spray bottle to hydrate the soil.
  • (Optional) A piece of plastic film.
Steps:
  1. Prepare the soil: Mix the soil with organic fertilizer. Fully rotted fertilizer is recommended, and its volume should not exceed one quarter of the soil volume when mixing.
  2. Sow the seeds: Sprinkle the seeds onto the soil and cover them afterwards. Alternatively, use a dibbler or stake to pre-dig holes for the seeds, placing about 3 seeds in each mound. The depth of the soil covering the seeds should be about five times the thickness of the seed.
  3. Space the seeds: Leave a 4-6-inch gap between each seed mound.
  4. Water the soil: After planting, water the soil in the container well to provide enough moisture for the seeds to germinate.
  5. Mulch and maintain: Mulch the surface of the container soil to retain moisture and promote seed germination. Use a spray bottle to moisten the soil when it becomes relatively dry. Continue this until the seeds germinate.
Note: Before seeds germinate, they can be kept in a low-light location. However, after germination, it's important to provide adequate light to the plant to prevent excessive growth.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
qrcode
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
close
Cultivation:PropagationDetail
Cultivation:PlantingDetail

How to Plant Sand dollar cactus?

Sow, plant, or repot in spring or fall when the temperature is 15 to 20 ℃ . Keep air humidity high when seeding. Use plastic film to cover the soil and remove it after the seeds germinate.
Use permeable clay flowerpots for potted plants. Too large a flowerpot accumulates water easily, while too small a flowerpot limits the development of roots. Before planting, expose soil to blazing sunlight and disinfect to kill pathogens.
If planted in the garden, sand dollar cactus prefers an area with full sun and loose soil. Remove all weeds and replace the soil if needed to ensure good water permeability and avoid root rot. Wear gloves or use tongs when planting to prevent your fingers from getting pricked. You can also wrap the plant in a towel to help you move it.
Cultivation:PlantingDetail
Cultivation:HarvestDetail

How to Harvest Sand dollar cactus?

Most fruits of sand dollar cactus are edible. Pick the fruit when they turn red. Avoid food safety issues by confirming the species with experts. Wear gloves or use scissors and other tools to harvest.
Cultivation:HarvestDetail
PlantCare:TransplantSummary

How to Transplant Sand dollar cactus?

The prime season for transplanting sand dollar cactus is between late spring and early autumn (S2-S4), as this is when the plant experiences its strongest growth. Choose a sunny, well-draining location for best results. Always handle sand dollar cactus with care to avoid damaging its delicate body.
PlantCare:TransplantSummary
Cultivation:PottingSuggestions

How to Repot Sand dollar cactus?

Flower Pots
Cultivation:PottingSuggestions
care_scenes

More Info on Sand Dollar Cactus Growth and Care

Basic Care Guide
Explore More
Lighting
Full sun
Sand dollar cactus has a strong preference for abundant daylight exposure which is beneficial for its flourishing growth, resembling its native habitats. The plant can also endure a moderate level of light, although an excessive lack or oversupply of rays can stunt growth or cause sunburning respectively.
Best Sunlight Practices
Temperature
5 43 ℃
Sand dollar cactus is originally native in environments with a temperature range of approximately 68 to 100 °F (20 to 38 ℃). It tends to favour this temperature range, even when cultivated in different environments. Extreme seasonal variations may necessitate adjustments to maintain this preferred temperature.
Temp for Healthy Growth
Transplant
1-2 feet
The prime season for transplanting sand dollar cactus is between late spring and early autumn (S2-S4), as this is when the plant experiences its strongest growth. Choose a sunny, well-draining location for best results. Always handle sand dollar cactus with care to avoid damaging its delicate body.
Transplant Techniques
Feng shui direction
Northeast
The sand dollar cactus aligns agreeably with Northeast-facing spaces, often associated with spiritual growth in Feng Shui. It's round shape, symbolizing a cycle, could invite a sense of completion or advancement in personal growth. However, its resonance with a particular space may differ according to individual perceptions.
Fengshui Details
care_seasonal_tips

Seasonal Care Tips

seasonal-tip

Seasonal Precautions

During peak growth in spring, summer, and fall, increase water and fertilizer. Avoid sunlight exposure in the heat of the summer. Spray water around the plant to cool it down when the temperature is too high, but avoid leaving water on the stem. Avoid water accumulation in the soil. In winter, water it as little as possible or not at all, and stop fertilizer.
seasonal-tip
more

Spring

more

Summer

more

Fall

more

Winter

The plant and similar succulent plants resume growing in the spring after winter dormancy.

more
1
Water the plant once or twice a month when the soil begins drying out.
more
2
An application of a balanced fertilizer every two weeks helps support healthy growth.
more
3
Pruning old growth encourages blooming and branching for a fuller plant.
more
4
Spring is also the time to repot the succulent if necessary.
more
5
Pay attention to the temperature in the early spring, this plant requires warmth and sunlight to resume growing.
more
6
Cutting off a leaf and setting it in a fresh growing medium is an easy way to propagate your plant.

Succulents like this plant are actively growing in the summer.

more
1
Keep an eye on soil moisture levels. Do not allow the soil to completely dry out.
more
2
Continue fertilizing every couple of weeks with all-purpose plant food.
more
3
The plant also requires plenty of sunlight during the day to encourage blooming.
more
4
Prune back the old flowers after blooming at the end of the summer.
more
5
While your plant is actively growing, you can also remove stems for propagation. Place the stem in fresh soil and lightly water it.

While your plant is starting to enter dormancy towards the end of fall, it's still growing for much of the season.

more
1
Continue watering and fertilizing on a regular schedule, but reduce both of these routines as the season winds down and begins reaching dormancy.
more
2
Use an all-purpose fertilizer and water the plant when the soil is dry; make sure to err on the side of dry soil rather than soggy soil.
more
3
Keep making sure your plant receives enough light during this time, particularly during the morning or evening hours, which will help the plant grow well.

During the cold winter months, the plant usually goes into a dormant state.

more
1
Reduce watering your plant in the winter to give it a rest and let it lie dormant. It’s best to keep the plant dry during this season, rather than risk it being soggy.
more
2
Make sure it receives an adequate amount of sunlight, typically in the morning or evening, although it’s not as urgent during dormancy.
more
3
Since these plants don't survive in freezing outdoor temperatures, keep them in sufficiently warm rooms indoors, away from drafts or cold windows.
more
4
For the most part, you can leave these hardy plants to themselves during these colder months.
care_pet_and_diseases

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Sand dollar cactus based on 10 million real cases
Scars
Scars Scars
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Solutions: Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Fruit withering
Fruit withering Fruit withering
Fruit withering
Fungal infection or normal ripening can cause the fruit to dry out.
Solutions: There are a number of appropriate solutions to control fruit withering: Remove any fruit as soon as it shows any signs of infection. Do not compost. Use a fungicide prior to leaf bud and then as per manufacturers instructions throughout the season.
Underwatering
Underwatering Underwatering
Underwatering
Leaves may wilt for a variety of reasons.
Solutions: The easiest (and most obvious) way to address underwatering is to fully hydrate the plant. However, this must be done carefully. A common mistake that many gardeners make is to douse their underwatered plants with water. This can overwhelm the roots of the plant and shock its system, something that can be even more damaging than the lack of water to begin with. Instead, water thoroughly and slowly, taking breaks to let the water slowly saturate through the soil to get to the roots. Use room temperature water, as cold water might be too much of a shock. In the future, shorten the time between waterings. A good rule of thumb is to check the soil around each plant daily. If it’s dry to at least two inches down, it’s time to water. If a container plant is repeatedly drying out very quickly, repotting into a slower-draining container might be a good idea, too.
Scale insects
Scale insects Scale insects
Scale insects
Scale insects are generally 2 to 3 mm across and can be found in a range of colors. They often cluster near leaf veins and can be scraped off with a fingernail.
Solutions: Outdoors, the weather and natural enemies of scale insects (such as lady beetles and parasitic wasps) typically keep these pests at bay. When their numbers become abundant (or when scale insects affect indoor plants), interventions are needed. Here are some options: Dip a cotton swab in 80% isopropyl alcohol and run it over the leaves and stems to remove scale Wash leaves with a mild detergent solution (this also removes honeydew) Inspect plants weekly for additional infestations Use spot treatments of insecticidal soap or horticultural oil Remove the plant if a heavy infestation cannot be eliminated – this will prevent it from spreading to other plants Take steps to control ants that may have been attracted to the insects' honeydew
Caterpillars
Caterpillars Caterpillars
Caterpillars
Caterpillars are fleshy moth or butterfly larvae that come in an array of colors, patterns, and even hairstyles. They chew on leaves and flower petals, creating large, irregular holes.
Solutions: Even though caterpillars are diverse, they all chew on plant parts and can cause significant damage if present in large numbers. For severe cases: Apply insecticide. For an organic solution, spray plants with a Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which specifically affects the larval stage of moths and butterflies. Be sure to coat plants, since caterpillars need to ingest Bt for it to be effective. This will not harm other insects. Spray a chili extract. Chili seeds can be cooked in water to make a spicy spray that caterpillars don't like. Spray this mixture on the plants, but be aware it will also be spicy to humans. Introduce beneficial insects. Release beneficial insects to the garden that eat caterpillars, such as parasitic wasps. For less severe cases: Hand pick. Using gloves, pick off caterpillars on plants and dispose of them in a bucket of soapy water. Dust plants with diatomaceous earth. This powder is harmless to humans but irritates caterpillars. Therefore, it will make it difficult for caterpillars to move and eat.
Fruit rot
Fruit rot Fruit rot
Fruit rot
Soft rot in the fruit can have a variety of causes.
Solutions: Prune out and destroy infected spurs and branches. Correct spacing between plants to reduce wind-born infection. Chemical fungicides may become necessary. Bird deterrents and biological or chemical treatments for insects will reduce fruit damage, making it harder for fungal infections to take hold.
autodiagnose

Treat and prevent plant diseases.

AI-powered plant doctor helps you diagnose plant problems in seconds.
close
Scars
plant poor
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Scars form when the plant repairs wounds. They can be the result of people or pets passing by and scraping the plant. Once the underlying issue is resolved, the plant will heal but a scar may remain.
Pests and pathogens can also cause scarring. Insects may attack the plant for a meal, resulting in extensive scarring when a few invaders turn into an infestation. Diseases such as fungus and bacteria can weaken the plant, causing brown spots, mushy areas, or blisters that lead to scars.
Scars occur on stems when a leaf or bud has been lost and the plant has healed. The harder tissue is like a scab that protects a wound.
On other occasions, scars can signal problems from environmental conditions, such as overexposure to sunlight or heat. It might surprise you to know that plants can suffer from sunburn, even desert dwellers like cactus!
Solutions
Solutions
Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover.
  1. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes.
  2. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray.
  3. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs.
  4. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Prevention
Prevention
Preventing some sources of scarring is easier than others, but all start with careful attention to your plants once you decide to bring them home.
  1. Review specific guidelines for your plant, including soil drainage, watering, and fertilizer requirements.
  2. Inspect plants before planting and use sterile pots and fresh potting soil or media to limit transfer of fungi or bacteria.
  3. Once established, check your plants regularly for signs of scarring or the presence of pests, as it is better to catch problems as early as possible.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
qrcode
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
Fruit withering
plant poor
Fruit withering
Fungal infection or normal ripening can cause the fruit to dry out.
Overview
Overview
Fruit withering is common on many tree fruits, including apples, pears, peaches, cherries, and plums, as well as fruiting shrubs. It is caused by a fungal pathogen and will result in wrinkled and desiccated fruit.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Here are the most common symptoms in the order that they are likely to occur.
  1. Both leaves and blossom on the tips of branches will go brown and wither.
  2. Gray powdery patches will appear on infected leaves and flowers, and this will be most apparent after rain.
  3. Any fruit that does appear will turn wrinkled and fail to develop.
  4. Branch tips begin to die, progressing back to larger branches, causing general deterioration of the tree or plant.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The withering is caused by one of two fungal pathogens, one called Monilina laxa and the other called M. fructigen. The spores overwinter on infected plant material and are then spread the following spring by wind, rain, or animal vectors. The problem will start to become noticeable in mid-spring, but will increase in severity as summer progresses and the fungus grows. If not addressed, the disease will intensify and spread to other plants in the vicinity.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
qrcode
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
Underwatering
plant poor
Underwatering
Leaves may wilt for a variety of reasons.
Overview
Overview
Underwatering plants is one of the quickest ways to kill them. This is something that most gardeners are well aware of. Unfortunately, knowing exactly how much water a plant needs can be tricky, especially considering that underwatering and overwatering present similar symptoms in plants.
Therefore, it’s important to be vigilant and attentive to each plants’ individual needs.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
As mentioned earlier, overwatering and underwatering present similar symptoms in plants. These symptoms include poor growth, wilted leaves, defoliation, and brown leaf tips or margins. Ultimately, both underwatering and overwatering can lead to the death of a plant.
The easiest way to determine whether a plant has too much water or too little is to look at the leaves. If underwatering is the culprit, the leaves will look brown and crunchy, while if it’s overwatering, they will appear yellow or a pale green in color.
When this issue first begins, there may be no noticeable symptoms at all, particularly in hardy or drought-tolerant plants. However, they will begin to wilt once they start suffering from a lack of water. The edges of the plant’s leaves will become brown or curled. Soil pulling away from the edges of the planter is a telltale sign, or a crispy, brittle stem.
Prolonged underwatering can cause a plant’s growth to become stunted. The leaves might drop and the plant can be more susceptible to pest infestations, too.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Underwatering is caused by, quite simply, not watering plants often or deeply enough. There is a heightened risk of underwatering if any of these situations apply:
  • Extreme heat and dry weather (when growing outdoors)
  • Grow lights or indoor lighting that is too bright or intense for the type of plant
  • Using fast-draining growing media such as sand
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
qrcode
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
Scale insects
plant poor
Scale insects
Scale insects are generally 2 to 3 mm across and can be found in a range of colors. They often cluster near leaf veins and can be scraped off with a fingernail.
Overview
Overview
Tiny, bumpy growths all over the stem of a plant is a classic sign of scale insects. These sucking insects bury their mouthparts into the leaves, fruit, or bark of trees, shrubs, and other plants. Over time, scale insects can severely damage their hosts.
Scale insects are not just one species of insects but instead are a large, diverse group of more than 8,000 individual species, including soft scales (brown soft scale, cottony maple scale, European elm scale) and armored scales (oystershell scale, euonymus scale, San Jose scale). These tiny pests may be between 3 to 10 mm in length and are closely related to whiteflies and aphids.
Despite the differences in size and appearance, the one thing that all scale insects have in common is that they grow beneath a wax covering. This covering looks somewhat like the scales of a fish or a reptile - hence the name. It protects the insect from harm.
Scale insects feed on a wide variety of plants but are most common on herbaceous ornamental plants (both indoor and outdoor) as well as numerous species of shrubs and trees. Scale insects are easy to overlook, in part because they are so small and also because they do not look like actual insects. However, it is important to take action as soon as they are noticed to ensure the health of the plants.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The most obvious symptom is the presence of groups of the insects themselves, which look much like bumpy growths on plants, generally quite small (less than the size of a coin). Scale insects tend to cluster together and appear all at once.
The insects hatch from eggs inside these scales and develop through two growth stages before becoming adults. Once mature, adult females produce eggs that they hide beneath their bodies. These ultimately hatch into tiny crawlers, which are yellow to orange, and begin feeding within just a day or two. They suck sap through their needle-like mouthparts and will excrete a substance called honeydew behind them as they eat.
Since the scale insectss are subtle in appearance, symptoms in the host plants may be the first sign that is noticed. As the insects eat all the plant's nutrients, leaves will drop prematurely, and the growth of plants becomes stunted. Dead or browned leaves might remain for a long period of time on the scale-killed branches.
Sooty mold can also appear on infested plants, growing in the honeydew that the insects leave behind. It is a black fungus that is fluffy and unattractive. The sooty mold growth causes plants to yellow, since it interferes with the process of photosynthesis.
Solutions
Solutions
Outdoors, the weather and natural enemies of scale insects (such as lady beetles and parasitic wasps) typically keep these pests at bay.
When their numbers become abundant (or when scale insects affect indoor plants), interventions are needed. Here are some options:
  • Dip a cotton swab in 80% isopropyl alcohol and run it over the leaves and stems to remove scale
  • Wash leaves with a mild detergent solution (this also removes honeydew)
  • Inspect plants weekly for additional infestations
  • Use spot treatments of insecticidal soap or horticultural oil
  • Remove the plant if a heavy infestation cannot be eliminated – this will prevent it from spreading to other plants
  • Take steps to control ants that may have been attracted to the insects' honeydew
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
qrcode
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
Caterpillars
plant poor
Caterpillars
Caterpillars are fleshy moth or butterfly larvae that come in an array of colors, patterns, and even hairstyles. They chew on leaves and flower petals, creating large, irregular holes.
Overview
Overview
Caterpillars can cause problems for home gardeners. If not managed, these insects can defoliate a plant in just a matter of days. However, home gardeners face a challenge because these caterpillars eventually turn into beautiful butterflies and moths, which are important for pollination and the general ecosystem.
There are thousands of different species of caterpillars and many will only target certain plants. If caterpillars are posing a problem, they can be removed by hand, or gardeners can use insect-proof netting to protect their valuable plants.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Caterpillars are the larvae of butterflies and moths. During the warmer months, butterflies and moths that visit gardens will lay their eggs on the underside of leaves.
When the tiny eggs hatch, the young larvae emerge and start feeding on the leaves of the plant. Depending on how many larvae have hatched, they can easily defoliate the plant in a very short period of time. Caterpillars will shed their skin as they grow, around 4 or 5 times during this feeding cycle.
Symptoms of caterpillars eating plants appear as holes in the leaves. The edges of the leaves may be eaten away as well, and flowers can be affected as well.
Some are easy to see, but others need to be searched for. This is because their bodies are often camouflaged to look like part of the plant. Gardeners need to look carefully along the stems of the plant as well as under the leaves. Also, look for tiny white, yellow, or brown eggs that can be found in groups on the underside of leaves.
Once the caterpillar is fully grown, it transforms into a pupa or chrysalis. Then, after a period of time that varies according to the species, a butterfly or moth will emerge from the pupa and the cycle begins again.
Solutions
Solutions
Even though caterpillars are diverse, they all chew on plant parts and can cause significant damage if present in large numbers.
For severe cases:
  1. Apply insecticide. For an organic solution, spray plants with a Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which specifically affects the larval stage of moths and butterflies. Be sure to coat plants, since caterpillars need to ingest Bt for it to be effective. This will not harm other insects.
  2. Spray a chili extract. Chili seeds can be cooked in water to make a spicy spray that caterpillars don't like. Spray this mixture on the plants, but be aware it will also be spicy to humans.
  3. Introduce beneficial insects. Release beneficial insects to the garden that eat caterpillars, such as parasitic wasps.
For less severe cases:
  1. Hand pick. Using gloves, pick off caterpillars on plants and dispose of them in a bucket of soapy water.
  2. Dust plants with diatomaceous earth. This powder is harmless to humans but irritates caterpillars. Therefore, it will make it difficult for caterpillars to move and eat.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
qrcode
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
Fruit rot
plant poor
Fruit rot
Soft rot in the fruit can have a variety of causes.
Overview
Overview
Fruit rot is quite common, and there are a large number of factors that can lie at the heart of this problem. Symptoms also vary from fruit to fruit and from cause to cause, but in general, one can recognize fruit that is rotten or starting to rot. Many of the most common causes of rotting are related to fungal diseases, which enter the fruit through wounds such as those caused by birds. The disease then spreads outwards from the wound. From there it can spread to neighboring fruit or be carried by the wind to plants further away.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Below are some of the broader symptoms to look out for in cases of fruit rot. If this occurs on just one or two fruit it may just be as the result of a small-scale infection, but if it is widespread then a fungal infection problem is likely.
  1. Small brown spots appear on the fruit.
  2. Brown spots expand, normally in concentric circles and the center starts to go soft and mushy.
  3. Mushiness spreads and grey or brown powdery pustules start to coat the fruit.
  4. Some fruit will drop but others may remain and gradually turn mummified.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Fruit rot is often caused by fungal infection. These fungi overwinter on fallen fruit, and then the spores are spread by the wind the following spring. Birds and sap-sucking insects can also act as vectors. Entry to new fruit is made considerably easier if there are wounds of any kind through which the spores can penetrate the skin. The healthier the tree or plant, the better able it is to defend itself from infection.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
qrcode
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
care_more_info

More About Sand Dollar Cactus

Plant Type
Plant Type
Shrub
Lifespan
Lifespan
Perennial
Spread
Spread
5 to 15 cm
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Spring, Summer
Flower Color
Flower Color
Yellow
Flower Size
Flower Size
2.5 to 5 cm
Plant Height
Plant Height
2.5 to 6 cm

Usages

Garden Use
Though it is a sensitive little plant that requires a lot of care, the sand dollar cactus is still sought by gardeners in desert and Mediterranean climates for its unusual looks and pretty yearly blooms. They are overwhelmingly used in containers, but could do well in a dry succulent garden or desert-themed rock garden.
plantfinder

Find your perfect green friends.

Plan your green oasis based on your criteria: plant type, pet safety, skill level, sites, and more.
care_faq

Common Problems

Why is its fleshy stem thinner and thinner as it grows?

more more
Thin stems may be caused by insufficient sunlight, insufficient water, or fertilizer deficiency. Move the pot to a brighter place, but avoid sunburn. Increase water and fertilizer.

How do I deal with root or stem rot?

more more
Excess water often leads to root and stem rot. Avoid accumulated water in soil. Prune rotten roots and stems and transplant to a new flowerpot in a well-ventilated place. The soil should be loose and air-permeable as far as possible.

Why doesn't my sand dollar cactus ever bloom?

more more
Firstly, it may not be time for the plant to bloom. Time from seedling to blooming can range between 2-20 years or longer. Secondly, the plant may need more sunlight, temperature or fertilizer. Increase the exposure to sunlight and fertilizer appropriately, supplement the fertilizer with phosphorus and potassium, or purchase special fertilizer for promoting blooming of sand dollar cactus.

Why does sand dollar cactus turn yellow?

more more
Sand dollar cactus turns yellow due to overwatering, insufficient sunlight, or pests. Sand dollar cactus does not require much water, and excess water leads to root anoxia and root rot. Generally, it does not need to be watered often. Water it only when the soil is completely dry. Remember to drain the water in the flowerpot tray. Sunlight can be increased, but avoid direct exposure to blazing sunlight to prevent sunburn. Remove a small amount of pests with alcohol. For large infestations, spray pesticide.
care_new_plant

Caring for a New Plant

new-plant
The following pictures and instructions for flower plant are aimed to help your plants adapt and thrive in a new environment.
more
1
Picking a Healthy Flower Plant
check-health

Check Its Health

part-image-bg part-image
Whole Plant
Symmetrical crown, evenly distributed branches, full and compact shape, no excessive growth, close internodes, and uniform leaf size.
part-image-bg part-image
Flowers
Many unopened flower buds are closely attached, without falling off easily when shaken, and show no diseased spots or wilting on the petals.
part-image-bg part-image
Branches
The branches are not withered, and the trunk is free of boreholes or damage.
part-image-bg part-image
Stems
No mold, browning or soft rot at the base of the plant.
part-image-bg part-image
Leaves
Check the inside of the plant, shaded and overlapping areas, back of leaves. Even colour, no yellowing, no brown spots, no crawling insects, no cobwebs, no deformities, no wilting.
health-trouble

Health Troubleshooting

Whole Plant
trouble-image
more 1 Asymmetrical crown or missing, uneven branching: prune the weak and slender branches of the larger portion of the asymmetrical crown, then trim the overgrown larger branches.
trouble-image
more 2 Internodes are longer in the upper part, leaves are sparse and smaller on top: increase light intensity or duration.
Branches
trouble-image
more 1 Dry branches: check if the branch is still alive by peeling back a small section of bark and trim away any dry branches. Watch out for signs of insect infestation inside the branch.
trouble-image
more 2 Bark with holes: inject insecticide into the holes and apply systemic insecticide to the roots.
trouble-image
more 3 Damaged bark: brush on a wound-healing agent, and avoid getting it wet.
Stems
trouble-image
Mildew, browning, or soft rot at the base: place the plant in a ventilated, dry environment and water with fungicide.
Flowers
trouble-image
more 1 Many flowers have already bloomed: lower the temperature in the environment to extend the flowering period. Prune any dying flowers in a timely manner to prevent nutrient depletion.
trouble-image
more 2 Flower bud dropping: keep temperature at 15-25℃, place in bright but shaded area, water frequently, and avoid fertilizing.
trouble-image
more 3 Flower petals have spots or disease: avoid spraying water directly onto the petals.
trouble-image
more 4 Flower wilting: avoid soil that is too wet or too dry. When touching the soil with your finger, it should feel moist but not leave any water traces on your finger.
Leaves
trouble-image
more 1 Uneven leaf color and yellowing: prune yellow leaves and check if there are signs of rot at the base of the plant. Spray with fungicide for severe cases.
trouble-image
more 2 Brown spots or small yellow spots: place the plant in a ventilated area and avoid watering the leaves. Spray with fungicide for severe cases.
trouble-image
more 3 Tiny crawling insects on the back of leaves or spider webs between leaves: increase light exposure and spray with insecticide for severe cases.
trouble-image
more 4 Deformations or missing parts on leaves: determine if it's physical damage or pest infestation. Linear or tearing damage is physical, while the rest are pests. Spray with insecticide.
trouble-image
more 5 Wilting leaves: provide partial shade and avoid excessive sun exposure. Remove 1/3 to 1/2 of the leaves for severe cases.
autodiagnose

Treat and prevent plant diseases.

AI-powered plant doctor helps you diagnose plant problems in seconds.
check-condition

Check Its Growing Conditions

check
Soil Check
Soil should smell fresh like after a rain and no musty odor.
check
Light Check
Check the light requirement of the plant and if it match with planting location.
check
Ventilation Check
Ensure good ventilation.
check
Temperature Check
Ensure outdoor temperature is suitable for plants.
condition-trouble

Condition Troubleshooting

check
Soil
Succulent & cactus soil
Soil smells musty or foul: check the root system for decay, place the plant in a ventilated, dry environment, and water with fungicide.
check
Ideal Temperature
15℃ to 35℃
Temperature is too low: Temporarily move the plants indoors and then to outdoors when temperature is suitable.
check
Ventilation
Well Ventilated
Non-ventilated environment: can lead to root rot, diseases, and flower drop. Place the plants in an airy location avoiding dead spots.
check
Suitable Light
Full sun, Partial sun
Insufficient light: reduce light appropriately during flowering period but not a fully shaded environment. After flowering, move to normal cultivation environment. For plants with long flowering and fruiting periods, provide normal light to avoid shortening.
Transplant recovery: After transplanting, pot plants should be temporarily shaded, then moved to normal light after a week if no abnormal drop or wilting. In-ground plants, shade for a week and then transfer to normal light or just pay attention to watering.
more
2
Adapting Your New Flower Plant
Step 1
condition-image
Repotting
Potted plants - Wait until flowering stage is over before changing pots. In-ground plants - Plant directly taking care not to harm root system or remove soil.
show more show-more
Step 2
condition-image
Pruning
Prune residual flowers, yellow/dead leaves. No other pruning at this time.
show more show-more
Step 3
condition-image
Watering
Water appropriately. Water more frequently for newly transplanted or purchased plants to keep the soil consistently moist for at least 2 weeks. Avoid overwatering, do not water when there is water on your finger after touching the soil. Both underwatering and overwatering can cause plants to drop their flowers or fruit.
show more show-more
Step 4
condition-image
Fertilizing
Don't fertilize just after purchase. Fertilize after 2 weeks using half concentration.
show more show-more
lightmeter

Know the light your plants really get.

Find the best spots for them to optimize their health, simply using your phone.
label
main-image
Sand Dollar Cactus
label-image
Repotting
Repotting potted plants: Wait until flowering ends. Repotting in-ground plants: Be careful not to harm roots/soil.
label-image
Pruning
Prune residual flowers, and yellow/dead leaves. No other pruning at this time.
label-image
Watering
Water new plants more often for 2 weeks. Avoid over/under watering by checking the soil.
label-image
Fertilizing
Don't fertilize just after purchase. Fertilize after 2 weeks using half concentration.
label-image
Sunlight
Long flowering plants need normal light. Shade transplants for a week, then move to normal light.
label
main-image
Sand Dollar Cactus
label-image
Repotting
Repotting potted plants: Wait until flowering ends. Repotting in-ground plants: Be careful not to harm roots/soil.
label-image
Pruning
Prune residual flowers, and yellow/dead leaves. No other pruning at this time.
label-image
Watering
Water new plants more often for 2 weeks. Avoid over/under watering by checking the soil.
label-image
Fertilizing
Don't fertilize just after purchase. Fertilize after 2 weeks using half concentration.
label-image
Sunlight
Long flowering plants need normal light. Shade transplants for a week, then move to normal light.
plant

Botanist in your pocket

plant
plant

App

plant
close
product icon
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
Your Ultimate Guide to Plants
Identify grow and nurture the better way!
product icon
17,000 local species +400,000 global species studied
product icon
Nearly 5 years of research
product icon
80+ scholars in botany and gardening
ad
ad
Botanist in your pocket
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
close
title
Botanist in your pocket
qrcode
Scan QR code to download
About
Basic Care
Advanced Care
More About How-Tos
Seasonal Tips
Pests & Diseases
More Info
FAQ
New Plant Care
Sand dollar cactus
Sand dollar cactus
Sand dollar cactus
Sand dollar cactus
Sand dollar cactus

How to Care for Sand Dollar Cactus

Sand dollar cactus is a popular ornamental cactus originating from Mexico and the USA. It has been a popular houseplant for almost 200 years and is available in many hybrid forms. Sadly, it is now very rare to find in the wild and is classed as ‘vulnerable’ on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List, largely due to its collection for ornamental sale.
symbolism

Symbolism

Maternal Love, Endurance, My Heart Burns with Love; Grandeur, Warmth, Enduring Love
Water
Every 3 weeks
Water
Sunlight
Full sun
Sunlight Sunlight detail
care_basic_guide

Basic Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterDetail

How to Water Sand dollar cactus?

Cultivation:WaterDetail
Sand dollar cactus is a drought-tolerant plant that does not require frequent watering. Water thoroughly when the soil is completely dry. When potted, water slowly, wait for water to flow out the bottom, and then pour the excess water from the tray to avoid water accumulation.
Spring, summer, and fall are its growing seasons. Water once or twice a week to keep the soil slightly wet. In winter, water less; just keep the soil from drying excessively; usually once a week. Besides, water with rainwater or distilled water rather than tap water.
Tap water contains a lot of calcium, magnesium, and other mineral salts. Long-term use tends to cause soil compaction. Avoid splashing water on its stem when watering to prevent rotting.
waterreminders

Never miss a care task again!

Plant care made easier than ever with our tailor-made smart care reminder.
What's the best method to water my Sand dollar cactus?
more
What should I do if I water my Sand dollar cactus too much/too little?
more
How often should I water my Sand dollar cactus?
more
How much water does my Sand dollar cactus need?
more
Show More more
Cultivation:FertilizerDetail

How to Fertilize Sand dollar cactus?

Cultivation:FertilizerDetail
In growing seasons (namely spring, summer and fall), fertilize sand dollar cactus once a month with liquid fertilizer. No fertilizer is required in winter. A small amount of slow-release fertilizer can be well mixed into the soil when repotting in spring or fall.
Use nitrogen fertilizer during seedling and phosphate-potassium fertilizer before and after blooming. The fertilizer concentration should be as low as possible. It would be better to apply low-concentrate fertilizer several times rather than to use a high concentration. If the base is yellow and grows slowly, the cause may be excessive fertilizer, and fertilization should be immediately stopped.
close

Fertilizer

Often found growing in rock gardens and used in xeriscaping, Sand dollar cactus adds plenty of interest and texture to the area. It is a slow-growing plant, and this affects its care. Sand dollar cactus does not require a lot of nutrients to thrive. Knowing when and how to feed your specimen will help ensure you get years of enjoyment from your plant. Fertilizing Sand dollar cactus adds nutrients to the growing medium. Even though it does store water and nutrients, applying plant food during the growing season helps support healthy growth. Fertilizing can also encourage mature specimens to produce blooms in the growing season.
While all plants benefit from additional nutrients, Sand dollar cactus only needs a light dose of fertilizer during the growing season. The frequency of fertilization should be 1-2 times a year. It is suggested to fertilize your Sand dollar cactus in the spring and autumn, but not in winter&summer when it is dormant. Be careful with repotted plants, you will want to reduce the amount of fertilizer. It’s also a good idea to wait a couple of months after repotting before you start applying fertilizer. It’s best to use a liquid plant food formulated for succulents and cacti when you are fertilizing Sand dollar cactus. Dilute the fertilizer with water to half-strength. You do not want the fertilizer building up in the soil. Apply the fertilizer to the base of the plant and water thoroughly, ensuring any excess moisture drains from the container or seeps into the ground.
It is easier to use liquid plant food when you are fertilizing Sand dollar cactus, but granules are another option. Follow the directions on the packaging, making sure you dilute liquid fertilizers to half-strength. Whether you are using granules are liquid plant food, always apply it to the soil. Cover the granules with a thin layer of soil and water regardless of the type of plant food you are using.
Over-fertilizing Sand dollar cactus is a common problem with new and experienced gardeners. The plant has low nutritional needs and it’s easy to apply a little too much fertilizer. Over-fertilizing Sand dollar cactus can burn the plant’s sensitive roots resulting in its slow decay. Without its root system, the plant cannot absorb nutrients and moisture.
Like most plants, Sand dollar cactus has a dormancy period and it is when you want to stop the applications of fertilizer. In the summer and winter, the plant ceases growing, and it is when you want to stop applying fertilizer. It’s also a good idea to cease fertilizing for the first couple of months after repotting in the spring.
Show More
more
Unlock complete care guides for 10,000+ species
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
Why do I need to fertilize my Sand dollar cactus?
more
When is the best time to fertilize my Sand dollar cactus?
more
When should I avoid fertilizing my Sand dollar cactus?
more
What type of fertilizer does my Sand dollar cactus need?
more
Show More more
Cultivation:SunlightDetail

What Are the Sunlight Requirements for Sand dollar cactus?

Cultivation:SunlightDetail
Sand dollar cactus is a heliophilic plant and needs sufficient sunlight for its growth and blooming. It can be placed on the outdoor balcony or in the garden without shade. However, long-time exposure to blazing sunlight should be avoided in hot summer, when it needs to be shaded or cooled a little to prevent high temperatures from damaging it.
lightmeter

Know the light your plants really get.

Find the best spots for them to optimize their health, simply using your phone.
How much sunlight does Sand dollar cactus need to grow?
more
What type of sunlight does Sand dollar cactus need?
more
Should I protect Sand dollar cactus from sun exposure?
more
What will happen if Sand dollar cactus doesn't get enough sunlight?
more
Show More more
Cultivation:PruningDetail

How to Prune Sand dollar cactus?

Cultivation:PruningDetail
Sand dollar cactus does not require much pruning. Remove withered flowers and branches so the plant uses nutrients on healthy growth.
close
care_advanced_guide

Advanced Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail

What is the Ideal Temperature Range for Sand dollar cactus?

Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail
Sand dollar cactus is distributed throughout tropical, subtropical, and semi-desert regions with scarce rainfall, intense sunlight, and hot temperatures. The optimum temperature for growth is 20 to 35 ℃. Lower than 10 ℃ or higher than 35 ℃, growth slows and dormancy begins. The air humidity should not be too high and the environment should be well-ventilated. Avoid high humidity and accumulated water.
What's the ideal temperature for your Sand dollar cactus?
more
How should I adjust the temperature for my Sand dollar cactus during different growing phases?
more
How can I keep my Sand dollar cactus warm in cold seasons?
more
What happens to my Sand dollar cactus when the temperature is too high or too low?
more
Show More more
Cultivation:SoilDetail

What Soil is Best for Sand dollar cactus?

Cultivation:SoilDetail
Sand dollar cactus grows best in fertile, gravel-rich, water-permeable soil with a pH value of 6-7. The culture soil formula often used is 60% vermiculite + 20% coco coir or peat moss + 20% sandy soil. A small amount of organic potting soil can also be added. Lightweight culture media such as vermiculite can be added to improve the air permeability of the soil. Eggshell powder or vermicompost can also be added to increase the soil fertility.
Roots of sand dollar cactus are very sensitive to oxygen deficiency. If the soil is poorly permeable to air and water, root rot can set in. It's easy to judge permeability: when watering, water should pass through the medium quickly, rather than stop at the soil surface and slowly seep down. Repot and loosen the soil every year to ensure the air permeability of the soil.
Cultivation:PropagationDetail

How to Propagate Sand dollar cactus?

Cultivation:PropagationDetail
In addition to the seeding mentioned above, main propagation methods include division and grafting. To divide, cut off the tip or lateral branches of the stem with a knife and plant it in soil. After a period of time, many small shoots will grow up near the cut. When a shoot grows to proper size, it can be cut off and transplanted to form a new plant.
To graft, select a suitable rootstock. Cut the tip of the rootstock, such as the stem of pitahaya (Hylocereus undatus), and then put sand dollar cactus, with its roots removed, in the center of the rootstock and fix it with a rope. After 1-2 weeks, the two parts grow together and the rope can be removed.
close

Propagation

Only sow Sand dollar cactus seeds in warm weather, preferably during the later weeks of spring after any danger of frost or dropping temperatures has passed. Even in warm climates, ensure the soil is sufficiently warm, as cooler soil can hinder germination and growth. If you want to sow the seeds earlier, you need to do it indoors for successful germination.
To sow Sand dollar cactus in your growing medium, you don't need many extra tools. Simply put on your gardening gloves and get started!
What you will need:
  • Healthy and full seeds, as the germination rate of such seeds will be higher.
  • Growing medium with potting mix soil, divided into rows.
  • Fertilizer or compost.
  • (Optional) A dibbler or stake.
  • A spray bottle to hydrate the soil.
  • (Optional) A piece of plastic film.
Steps:
  1. Prepare the soil: Mix the soil with organic fertilizer. Fully rotted fertilizer is recommended, and its volume should not exceed one quarter of the soil volume when mixing.
  2. Sow the seeds: Sprinkle the seeds onto the soil and cover them afterwards. Alternatively, use a dibbler or stake to pre-dig holes for the seeds, placing about 3 seeds in each mound. The depth of the soil covering the seeds should be about five times the thickness of the seed.
  3. Space the seeds: Leave a 4-6-inch gap between each seed mound.
  4. Water the soil: After planting, water the soil in the container well to provide enough moisture for the seeds to germinate.
  5. Mulch and maintain: Mulch the surface of the container soil to retain moisture and promote seed germination. Use a spray bottle to moisten the soil when it becomes relatively dry. Continue this until the seeds germinate.
Note: Before seeds germinate, they can be kept in a low-light location. However, after germination, it's important to provide adequate light to the plant to prevent excessive growth.
Show More
more
Unlock complete care guides for 10,000+ species
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
Cultivation:PlantingDetail

How to Plant Sand dollar cactus?

Cultivation:PlantingDetail
Sow, plant, or repot in spring or fall when the temperature is 15 to 20 ℃ . Keep air humidity high when seeding. Use plastic film to cover the soil and remove it after the seeds germinate.
Use permeable clay flowerpots for potted plants. Too large a flowerpot accumulates water easily, while too small a flowerpot limits the development of roots. Before planting, expose soil to blazing sunlight and disinfect to kill pathogens.
If planted in the garden, sand dollar cactus prefers an area with full sun and loose soil. Remove all weeds and replace the soil if needed to ensure good water permeability and avoid root rot. Wear gloves or use tongs when planting to prevent your fingers from getting pricked. You can also wrap the plant in a towel to help you move it.
Cultivation:HarvestDetail

How to Harvest Sand dollar cactus?

Cultivation:HarvestDetail
Most fruits of sand dollar cactus are edible. Pick the fruit when they turn red. Avoid food safety issues by confirming the species with experts. Wear gloves or use scissors and other tools to harvest.
PlantCare:TransplantSummary

How to Transplant Sand dollar cactus?

PlantCare:TransplantSummary
The prime season for transplanting sand dollar cactus is between late spring and early autumn (S2-S4), as this is when the plant experiences its strongest growth. Choose a sunny, well-draining location for best results. Always handle sand dollar cactus with care to avoid damaging its delicate body.
Cultivation:PottingSuggestions

How to Repot Sand dollar cactus?

Cultivation:PottingSuggestions
Flower Pots
care_scenes

More Info on Sand Dollar Cactus Growth and Care

Basic Care Guide
Explore More
care_seasonal_tips

Seasonal Care Tips

seasonal-tip

Seasonal Precautions

During peak growth in spring, summer, and fall, increase water and fertilizer. Avoid sunlight exposure in the heat of the summer. Spray water around the plant to cool it down when the temperature is too high, but avoid leaving water on the stem. Avoid water accumulation in the soil. In winter, water it as little as possible or not at all, and stop fertilizer.
more

Spring

more

Summer

more

Fall

more

Winter

The plant and similar succulent plants resume growing in the spring after winter dormancy.

more
1
Water the plant once or twice a month when the soil begins drying out.
more
2
An application of a balanced fertilizer every two weeks helps support healthy growth.
more
3
Pruning old growth encourages blooming and branching for a fuller plant.
more
4
Spring is also the time to repot the succulent if necessary.
more
5
Pay attention to the temperature in the early spring, this plant requires warmth and sunlight to resume growing.
more
6
Cutting off a leaf and setting it in a fresh growing medium is an easy way to propagate your plant.

Succulents like this plant are actively growing in the summer.

more
1
Keep an eye on soil moisture levels. Do not allow the soil to completely dry out.
more
2
Continue fertilizing every couple of weeks with all-purpose plant food.
more
3
The plant also requires plenty of sunlight during the day to encourage blooming.
more
4
Prune back the old flowers after blooming at the end of the summer.
more
5
While your plant is actively growing, you can also remove stems for propagation. Place the stem in fresh soil and lightly water it.

While your plant is starting to enter dormancy towards the end of fall, it's still growing for much of the season.

more
1
Continue watering and fertilizing on a regular schedule, but reduce both of these routines as the season winds down and begins reaching dormancy.
more
2
Use an all-purpose fertilizer and water the plant when the soil is dry; make sure to err on the side of dry soil rather than soggy soil.
more
3
Keep making sure your plant receives enough light during this time, particularly during the morning or evening hours, which will help the plant grow well.

During the cold winter months, the plant usually goes into a dormant state.

more
1
Reduce watering your plant in the winter to give it a rest and let it lie dormant. It’s best to keep the plant dry during this season, rather than risk it being soggy.
more
2
Make sure it receives an adequate amount of sunlight, typically in the morning or evening, although it’s not as urgent during dormancy.
more
3
Since these plants don't survive in freezing outdoor temperatures, keep them in sufficiently warm rooms indoors, away from drafts or cold windows.
more
4
For the most part, you can leave these hardy plants to themselves during these colder months.
care_pet_and_diseases

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Sand dollar cactus based on 10 million real cases
Scars
Scars Scars Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Solutions: Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Learn More About the Scars more
Fruit withering
Fruit withering Fruit withering Fruit withering
Fungal infection or normal ripening can cause the fruit to dry out.
Solutions: There are a number of appropriate solutions to control fruit withering: Remove any fruit as soon as it shows any signs of infection. Do not compost. Use a fungicide prior to leaf bud and then as per manufacturers instructions throughout the season.
Learn More About the Fruit withering more
Underwatering
Underwatering Underwatering Underwatering
Leaves may wilt for a variety of reasons.
Solutions: The easiest (and most obvious) way to address underwatering is to fully hydrate the plant. However, this must be done carefully. A common mistake that many gardeners make is to douse their underwatered plants with water. This can overwhelm the roots of the plant and shock its system, something that can be even more damaging than the lack of water to begin with. Instead, water thoroughly and slowly, taking breaks to let the water slowly saturate through the soil to get to the roots. Use room temperature water, as cold water might be too much of a shock. In the future, shorten the time between waterings. A good rule of thumb is to check the soil around each plant daily. If it’s dry to at least two inches down, it’s time to water. If a container plant is repeatedly drying out very quickly, repotting into a slower-draining container might be a good idea, too.
Learn More About the Underwatering more
Scale insects
Scale insects Scale insects Scale insects
Scale insects are generally 2 to 3 mm across and can be found in a range of colors. They often cluster near leaf veins and can be scraped off with a fingernail.
Solutions: Outdoors, the weather and natural enemies of scale insects (such as lady beetles and parasitic wasps) typically keep these pests at bay. When their numbers become abundant (or when scale insects affect indoor plants), interventions are needed. Here are some options: Dip a cotton swab in 80% isopropyl alcohol and run it over the leaves and stems to remove scale Wash leaves with a mild detergent solution (this also removes honeydew) Inspect plants weekly for additional infestations Use spot treatments of insecticidal soap or horticultural oil Remove the plant if a heavy infestation cannot be eliminated – this will prevent it from spreading to other plants Take steps to control ants that may have been attracted to the insects' honeydew
Learn More About the Scale insects more
Caterpillars
Caterpillars Caterpillars Caterpillars
Caterpillars are fleshy moth or butterfly larvae that come in an array of colors, patterns, and even hairstyles. They chew on leaves and flower petals, creating large, irregular holes.
Solutions: Even though caterpillars are diverse, they all chew on plant parts and can cause significant damage if present in large numbers. For severe cases: Apply insecticide. For an organic solution, spray plants with a Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which specifically affects the larval stage of moths and butterflies. Be sure to coat plants, since caterpillars need to ingest Bt for it to be effective. This will not harm other insects. Spray a chili extract. Chili seeds can be cooked in water to make a spicy spray that caterpillars don't like. Spray this mixture on the plants, but be aware it will also be spicy to humans. Introduce beneficial insects. Release beneficial insects to the garden that eat caterpillars, such as parasitic wasps. For less severe cases: Hand pick. Using gloves, pick off caterpillars on plants and dispose of them in a bucket of soapy water. Dust plants with diatomaceous earth. This powder is harmless to humans but irritates caterpillars. Therefore, it will make it difficult for caterpillars to move and eat.
Learn More About the Caterpillars more
Fruit rot
Fruit rot Fruit rot Fruit rot
Soft rot in the fruit can have a variety of causes.
Solutions: Prune out and destroy infected spurs and branches. Correct spacing between plants to reduce wind-born infection. Chemical fungicides may become necessary. Bird deterrents and biological or chemical treatments for insects will reduce fruit damage, making it harder for fungal infections to take hold.
Learn More About the Fruit rot more
autodiagnose

Treat and prevent plant diseases.

AI-powered plant doctor helps you diagnose plant problems in seconds.
close
Scars
plant poor
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Scars form when the plant repairs wounds. They can be the result of people or pets passing by and scraping the plant. Once the underlying issue is resolved, the plant will heal but a scar may remain.
Pests and pathogens can also cause scarring. Insects may attack the plant for a meal, resulting in extensive scarring when a few invaders turn into an infestation. Diseases such as fungus and bacteria can weaken the plant, causing brown spots, mushy areas, or blisters that lead to scars.
Scars occur on stems when a leaf or bud has been lost and the plant has healed. The harder tissue is like a scab that protects a wound.
On other occasions, scars can signal problems from environmental conditions, such as overexposure to sunlight or heat. It might surprise you to know that plants can suffer from sunburn, even desert dwellers like cactus!
Solutions
Solutions
Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover.
  1. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes.
  2. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray.
  3. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs.
  4. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Prevention
Prevention
Preventing some sources of scarring is easier than others, but all start with careful attention to your plants once you decide to bring them home.
  1. Review specific guidelines for your plant, including soil drainage, watering, and fertilizer requirements.
  2. Inspect plants before planting and use sterile pots and fresh potting soil or media to limit transfer of fungi or bacteria.
  3. Once established, check your plants regularly for signs of scarring or the presence of pests, as it is better to catch problems as early as possible.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
close
Fruit withering
plant poor
Fruit withering
Fungal infection or normal ripening can cause the fruit to dry out.
Overview
Overview
Fruit withering is common on many tree fruits, including apples, pears, peaches, cherries, and plums, as well as fruiting shrubs. It is caused by a fungal pathogen and will result in wrinkled and desiccated fruit.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Here are the most common symptoms in the order that they are likely to occur.
  1. Both leaves and blossom on the tips of branches will go brown and wither.
  2. Gray powdery patches will appear on infected leaves and flowers, and this will be most apparent after rain.
  3. Any fruit that does appear will turn wrinkled and fail to develop.
  4. Branch tips begin to die, progressing back to larger branches, causing general deterioration of the tree or plant.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The withering is caused by one of two fungal pathogens, one called Monilina laxa and the other called M. fructigen. The spores overwinter on infected plant material and are then spread the following spring by wind, rain, or animal vectors. The problem will start to become noticeable in mid-spring, but will increase in severity as summer progresses and the fungus grows. If not addressed, the disease will intensify and spread to other plants in the vicinity.
Solutions
Solutions
There are a number of appropriate solutions to control fruit withering:
  1. Remove any fruit as soon as it shows any signs of infection. Do not compost.
  2. Use a fungicide prior to leaf bud and then as per manufacturers instructions throughout the season.
Prevention
Prevention
Preventative measures include:
  1. Ensuring adequate spacing between plants or trees.
  2. Staking plants that are prone to tumbling to prevent moisture or humidity build up.
  3. Prune correctly so that there is adequate air movement and remove any dead or diseased branches that may carry spores.
  4. Practice good plant hygiene by removing fallen material and destroying it as soon as possible.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
close
Underwatering
plant poor
Underwatering
Leaves may wilt for a variety of reasons.
Overview
Overview
Underwatering plants is one of the quickest ways to kill them. This is something that most gardeners are well aware of. Unfortunately, knowing exactly how much water a plant needs can be tricky, especially considering that underwatering and overwatering present similar symptoms in plants.
Therefore, it’s important to be vigilant and attentive to each plants’ individual needs.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
As mentioned earlier, overwatering and underwatering present similar symptoms in plants. These symptoms include poor growth, wilted leaves, defoliation, and brown leaf tips or margins. Ultimately, both underwatering and overwatering can lead to the death of a plant.
The easiest way to determine whether a plant has too much water or too little is to look at the leaves. If underwatering is the culprit, the leaves will look brown and crunchy, while if it’s overwatering, they will appear yellow or a pale green in color.
When this issue first begins, there may be no noticeable symptoms at all, particularly in hardy or drought-tolerant plants. However, they will begin to wilt once they start suffering from a lack of water. The edges of the plant’s leaves will become brown or curled. Soil pulling away from the edges of the planter is a telltale sign, or a crispy, brittle stem.
Prolonged underwatering can cause a plant’s growth to become stunted. The leaves might drop and the plant can be more susceptible to pest infestations, too.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Underwatering is caused by, quite simply, not watering plants often or deeply enough. There is a heightened risk of underwatering if any of these situations apply:
  • Extreme heat and dry weather (when growing outdoors)
  • Grow lights or indoor lighting that is too bright or intense for the type of plant
  • Using fast-draining growing media such as sand
Solutions
Solutions
The easiest (and most obvious) way to address underwatering is to fully hydrate the plant. However, this must be done carefully. A common mistake that many gardeners make is to douse their underwatered plants with water. This can overwhelm the roots of the plant and shock its system, something that can be even more damaging than the lack of water to begin with.
Instead, water thoroughly and slowly, taking breaks to let the water slowly saturate through the soil to get to the roots. Use room temperature water, as cold water might be too much of a shock.
In the future, shorten the time between waterings. A good rule of thumb is to check the soil around each plant daily. If it’s dry to at least two inches down, it’s time to water. If a container plant is repeatedly drying out very quickly, repotting into a slower-draining container might be a good idea, too.
Prevention
Prevention
Always check the soil before watering. If the top inch of soil feels moist, though not wet, the watering is perfect. If it’s dry, water it immediately. If it feels soggy, you avoid watering until it dries out a bit more.
Also, make sure the lighting is sufficient for the species. Plants grow faster and need more water when there is intense light or lots of heat. Being aware of these conditions and modifying them, if possible, is a good way to prevent underwatering. Many container plants are potted in soil mixtures mean to be well-draining. Adding materials that retain moisture, like compost or peat moss, can also prevent these symptoms.
Other tips to prevent underwatering include:
  • Choose pots with adequately-sized drainage holes
  • Avoid warm temperatures
  • Use large pots with additional soil (these take longer to dry out)
  • Avoid terracotta pots, which lose water quickly
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
close
Scale insects
plant poor
Scale insects
Scale insects are generally 2 to 3 mm across and can be found in a range of colors. They often cluster near leaf veins and can be scraped off with a fingernail.
Overview
Overview
Tiny, bumpy growths all over the stem of a plant is a classic sign of scale insects. These sucking insects bury their mouthparts into the leaves, fruit, or bark of trees, shrubs, and other plants. Over time, scale insects can severely damage their hosts.
Scale insects are not just one species of insects but instead are a large, diverse group of more than 8,000 individual species, including soft scales (brown soft scale, cottony maple scale, European elm scale) and armored scales (oystershell scale, euonymus scale, San Jose scale). These tiny pests may be between 3 to 10 mm in length and are closely related to whiteflies and aphids.
Despite the differences in size and appearance, the one thing that all scale insects have in common is that they grow beneath a wax covering. This covering looks somewhat like the scales of a fish or a reptile - hence the name. It protects the insect from harm.
Scale insects feed on a wide variety of plants but are most common on herbaceous ornamental plants (both indoor and outdoor) as well as numerous species of shrubs and trees. Scale insects are easy to overlook, in part because they are so small and also because they do not look like actual insects. However, it is important to take action as soon as they are noticed to ensure the health of the plants.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The most obvious symptom is the presence of groups of the insects themselves, which look much like bumpy growths on plants, generally quite small (less than the size of a coin). Scale insects tend to cluster together and appear all at once.
The insects hatch from eggs inside these scales and develop through two growth stages before becoming adults. Once mature, adult females produce eggs that they hide beneath their bodies. These ultimately hatch into tiny crawlers, which are yellow to orange, and begin feeding within just a day or two. They suck sap through their needle-like mouthparts and will excrete a substance called honeydew behind them as they eat.
Since the scale insectss are subtle in appearance, symptoms in the host plants may be the first sign that is noticed. As the insects eat all the plant's nutrients, leaves will drop prematurely, and the growth of plants becomes stunted. Dead or browned leaves might remain for a long period of time on the scale-killed branches.
Sooty mold can also appear on infested plants, growing in the honeydew that the insects leave behind. It is a black fungus that is fluffy and unattractive. The sooty mold growth causes plants to yellow, since it interferes with the process of photosynthesis.
Solutions
Solutions
Outdoors, the weather and natural enemies of scale insects (such as lady beetles and parasitic wasps) typically keep these pests at bay.
When their numbers become abundant (or when scale insects affect indoor plants), interventions are needed. Here are some options:
  • Dip a cotton swab in 80% isopropyl alcohol and run it over the leaves and stems to remove scale
  • Wash leaves with a mild detergent solution (this also removes honeydew)
  • Inspect plants weekly for additional infestations
  • Use spot treatments of insecticidal soap or horticultural oil
  • Remove the plant if a heavy infestation cannot be eliminated – this will prevent it from spreading to other plants
  • Take steps to control ants that may have been attracted to the insects' honeydew
Prevention
Prevention
To prevent scale insects from affecting plants, take the following steps:
  • Carefully inspect plants before purchasing, checking every stem and leaf for signs of scale
  • Make traps for new insects by leaving double-sided tape near stems and branches
  • Ensure that plants have a good growing environment, monitoring both moisture and sunlight levels
  • Introduce small parasitic wasps and other predators to the garden
  • Rinse small plants when foliage becomes dusty
  • Prune weak areas of a plant to eliminate potential infestation hot spots
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
close
Caterpillars
plant poor
Caterpillars
Caterpillars are fleshy moth or butterfly larvae that come in an array of colors, patterns, and even hairstyles. They chew on leaves and flower petals, creating large, irregular holes.
Overview
Overview
Caterpillars can cause problems for home gardeners. If not managed, these insects can defoliate a plant in just a matter of days. However, home gardeners face a challenge because these caterpillars eventually turn into beautiful butterflies and moths, which are important for pollination and the general ecosystem.
There are thousands of different species of caterpillars and many will only target certain plants. If caterpillars are posing a problem, they can be removed by hand, or gardeners can use insect-proof netting to protect their valuable plants.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Caterpillars are the larvae of butterflies and moths. During the warmer months, butterflies and moths that visit gardens will lay their eggs on the underside of leaves.
When the tiny eggs hatch, the young larvae emerge and start feeding on the leaves of the plant. Depending on how many larvae have hatched, they can easily defoliate the plant in a very short period of time. Caterpillars will shed their skin as they grow, around 4 or 5 times during this feeding cycle.
Symptoms of caterpillars eating plants appear as holes in the leaves. The edges of the leaves may be eaten away as well, and flowers can be affected as well.
Some are easy to see, but others need to be searched for. This is because their bodies are often camouflaged to look like part of the plant. Gardeners need to look carefully along the stems of the plant as well as under the leaves. Also, look for tiny white, yellow, or brown eggs that can be found in groups on the underside of leaves.
Once the caterpillar is fully grown, it transforms into a pupa or chrysalis. Then, after a period of time that varies according to the species, a butterfly or moth will emerge from the pupa and the cycle begins again.
Solutions
Solutions
Even though caterpillars are diverse, they all chew on plant parts and can cause significant damage if present in large numbers.
For severe cases:
  1. Apply insecticide. For an organic solution, spray plants with a Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which specifically affects the larval stage of moths and butterflies. Be sure to coat plants, since caterpillars need to ingest Bt for it to be effective. This will not harm other insects.
  2. Spray a chili extract. Chili seeds can be cooked in water to make a spicy spray that caterpillars don't like. Spray this mixture on the plants, but be aware it will also be spicy to humans.
  3. Introduce beneficial insects. Release beneficial insects to the garden that eat caterpillars, such as parasitic wasps.
For less severe cases:
  1. Hand pick. Using gloves, pick off caterpillars on plants and dispose of them in a bucket of soapy water.
  2. Dust plants with diatomaceous earth. This powder is harmless to humans but irritates caterpillars. Therefore, it will make it difficult for caterpillars to move and eat.
Prevention
Prevention
Prevention may require less effort than attempts to eradicate infestations that have already begun. Here are our top steps for prevention:
  1. Monitor plants. Check plants regularly for caterpillar eggs on leaves. If they do not belong to an endangered species, they should be squished.
  2. Use insect netting. Cover plants with insect netting to prevent butterflies and moths from laying eggs on plants.
  3. Apply diatomaceous earth. Apply DE to plants early in the season and reapply after rain.
  4. Encourage plant diversity. This will attract predatory insects including parasitic wasps.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
close
Fruit rot
plant poor
Fruit rot
Soft rot in the fruit can have a variety of causes.
Overview
Overview
Fruit rot is quite common, and there are a large number of factors that can lie at the heart of this problem. Symptoms also vary from fruit to fruit and from cause to cause, but in general, one can recognize fruit that is rotten or starting to rot. Many of the most common causes of rotting are related to fungal diseases, which enter the fruit through wounds such as those caused by birds. The disease then spreads outwards from the wound. From there it can spread to neighboring fruit or be carried by the wind to plants further away.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Below are some of the broader symptoms to look out for in cases of fruit rot. If this occurs on just one or two fruit it may just be as the result of a small-scale infection, but if it is widespread then a fungal infection problem is likely.
  1. Small brown spots appear on the fruit.
  2. Brown spots expand, normally in concentric circles and the center starts to go soft and mushy.
  3. Mushiness spreads and grey or brown powdery pustules start to coat the fruit.
  4. Some fruit will drop but others may remain and gradually turn mummified.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Fruit rot is often caused by fungal infection. These fungi overwinter on fallen fruit, and then the spores are spread by the wind the following spring. Birds and sap-sucking insects can also act as vectors. Entry to new fruit is made considerably easier if there are wounds of any kind through which the spores can penetrate the skin. The healthier the tree or plant, the better able it is to defend itself from infection.
Solutions
Solutions
  1. Prune out and destroy infected spurs and branches.
  2. Correct spacing between plants to reduce wind-born infection.
  3. Chemical fungicides may become necessary.
  4. Bird deterrents and biological or chemical treatments for insects will reduce fruit damage, making it harder for fungal infections to take hold.
Prevention
Prevention
To prevent pests and disease infection:
  1. Pick fruits on time. Remove fruit once ripe to prevent opportunities for pests and fungal infections to take hold.
  2. Rake and clean debris. Remove and bury surrounding plant material that may host diseases.
  3. Prune branches and thin fruit. Remove ripening fruits so they do not touch one another and prune branches to improve air circulation (reducing the wet conditions in which fungi thrive).
  4. Consider preventative use of fungicide prior to fruit forming.
To prevent nutrient deficiency that weakens the plant:
  1. Add mulch. Adding a layer of mulch on top of the soil early in the season will keep moisture even.
  2. Use organic fertilizer. Plants given ammonia-based fertilizer cannot uptake calcium efficiently. Use compost, fish emulsion, liquid kelp or other organic fertilizer.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
care_more_info

More About Sand Dollar Cactus

Plant Type
Plant Type
Shrub
Lifespan
Lifespan
Perennial
Spread
Spread
5 to 15 cm
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Spring, Summer
Flower Color
Flower Color
Yellow
Flower Size
Flower Size
2.5 to 5 cm
Plant Height
Plant Height
2.5 to 6 cm

Usages

Garden Use
Though it is a sensitive little plant that requires a lot of care, the sand dollar cactus is still sought by gardeners in desert and Mediterranean climates for its unusual looks and pretty yearly blooms. They are overwhelmingly used in containers, but could do well in a dry succulent garden or desert-themed rock garden.
plantfinder

Find your perfect green friends.

Plan your green oasis based on your criteria: plant type, pet safety, skill level, sites, and more.
care_faq

Common Problems

Why is its fleshy stem thinner and thinner as it grows?

more more
Thin stems may be caused by insufficient sunlight, insufficient water, or fertilizer deficiency. Move the pot to a brighter place, but avoid sunburn. Increase water and fertilizer.

How do I deal with root or stem rot?

more more
Excess water often leads to root and stem rot. Avoid accumulated water in soil. Prune rotten roots and stems and transplant to a new flowerpot in a well-ventilated place. The soil should be loose and air-permeable as far as possible.

Why doesn't my sand dollar cactus ever bloom?

more more
Firstly, it may not be time for the plant to bloom. Time from seedling to blooming can range between 2-20 years or longer. Secondly, the plant may need more sunlight, temperature or fertilizer. Increase the exposure to sunlight and fertilizer appropriately, supplement the fertilizer with phosphorus and potassium, or purchase special fertilizer for promoting blooming of sand dollar cactus.

Why does sand dollar cactus turn yellow?

more more
Sand dollar cactus turns yellow due to overwatering, insufficient sunlight, or pests. Sand dollar cactus does not require much water, and excess water leads to root anoxia and root rot. Generally, it does not need to be watered often. Water it only when the soil is completely dry. Remember to drain the water in the flowerpot tray. Sunlight can be increased, but avoid direct exposure to blazing sunlight to prevent sunburn. Remove a small amount of pests with alcohol. For large infestations, spray pesticide.
care_new_plant

Caring for a New Plant

new-plant
The following pictures and instructions for flower plant are aimed to help your plants adapt and thrive in a new environment.
more
1
Picking a Healthy Flower Plant
check-health

Check Its Health

part
Whole Plant
Symmetrical crown, evenly distributed branches, full and compact shape, no excessive growth, close internodes, and uniform leaf size.
more
Flowers
Many unopened flower buds are closely attached, without falling off easily when shaken, and show no diseased spots or wilting on the petals.
part
Branches
The branches are not withered, and the trunk is free of boreholes or damage.
part
Stems
No mold, browning or soft rot at the base of the plant.
part
Leaves
Check the inside of the plant, shaded and overlapping areas, back of leaves. Even colour, no yellowing, no brown spots, no crawling insects, no cobwebs, no deformities, no wilting.
health-trouble

Health Troubleshooting

Whole Plant
Branches
Stems
Flowers
Leaves
more
more 1 Asymmetrical crown or missing, uneven branching: prune the weak and slender branches of the larger portion of the asymmetrical crown, then trim the overgrown larger branches.
more
more 2 Internodes are longer in the upper part, leaves are sparse and smaller on top: increase light intensity or duration.
more
more 1 Dry branches: check if the branch is still alive by peeling back a small section of bark and trim away any dry branches. Watch out for signs of insect infestation inside the branch.
more
more 2 Bark with holes: inject insecticide into the holes and apply systemic insecticide to the roots.
more
more 3 Damaged bark: brush on a wound-healing agent, and avoid getting it wet.
more
Mildew, browning, or soft rot at the base: place the plant in a ventilated, dry environment and water with fungicide.
more
more 1 Many flowers have already bloomed: lower the temperature in the environment to extend the flowering period. Prune any dying flowers in a timely manner to prevent nutrient depletion.
more
more 2 Flower bud dropping: keep temperature at 15-25℃, place in bright but shaded area, water frequently, and avoid fertilizing.
more
more 3 Flower petals have spots or disease: avoid spraying water directly onto the petals.
more
more 4 Flower wilting: avoid soil that is too wet or too dry. When touching the soil with your finger, it should feel moist but not leave any water traces on your finger.
more
more 1 Uneven leaf color and yellowing: prune yellow leaves and check if there are signs of rot at the base of the plant. Spray with fungicide for severe cases.
more
more 2 Brown spots or small yellow spots: place the plant in a ventilated area and avoid watering the leaves. Spray with fungicide for severe cases.
more
more 3 Tiny crawling insects on the back of leaves or spider webs between leaves: increase light exposure and spray with insecticide for severe cases.
more
more 4 Deformations or missing parts on leaves: determine if it's physical damage or pest infestation. Linear or tearing damage is physical, while the rest are pests. Spray with insecticide.
more
more 5 Wilting leaves: provide partial shade and avoid excessive sun exposure. Remove 1/3 to 1/2 of the leaves for severe cases.
autodiagnose

Treat and prevent plant diseases.

AI-powered plant doctor helps you diagnose plant problems in seconds.
check-condition

Check Its Growing Conditions

more
Soil Check
Soil should smell fresh like after a rain and no musty odor.
more
Light Check
Check the light requirement of the plant and if it match with planting location.
more
Ventilation Check
Ensure good ventilation.
more
Temperature Check
Ensure outdoor temperature is suitable for plants.
condition-trouble

Condition Troubleshooting

Soil
Ideal Temperature
Ventilation
Suitable Light
check
Succulent & cactus soil
Soil
Soil smells musty or foul: check the root system for decay, place the plant in a ventilated, dry environment, and water with fungicide.
check
15℃ to 35℃
Ideal Temperature
Temperature is too low: Temporarily move the plants indoors and then to outdoors when temperature is suitable.
check
Well Ventilated
Ventilation
Non-ventilated environment: can lead to root rot, diseases, and flower drop. Place the plants in an airy location avoiding dead spots.
check
Full sun, Partial sun
Suitable Light
Insufficient light: reduce light appropriately during flowering period but not a fully shaded environment. After flowering, move to normal cultivation environment. For plants with long flowering and fruiting periods, provide normal light to avoid shortening.
Transplant recovery: After transplanting, pot plants should be temporarily shaded, then moved to normal light after a week if no abnormal drop or wilting. In-ground plants, shade for a week and then transfer to normal light or just pay attention to watering.
more
2
Adapting Your New Flower Plant
Step 1
condition-image
Repotting
Potted plants - Wait until flowering stage is over before changing pots. In-ground plants - Plant directly taking care not to harm root system or remove soil.
Step 2
condition-image
Pruning
Prune residual flowers, yellow/dead leaves. No other pruning at this time.
Step 3
condition-image
Watering
Water appropriately. Water more frequently for newly transplanted or purchased plants to keep the soil consistently moist for at least 2 weeks. Avoid overwatering, do not water when there is water on your finger after touching the soil. Both underwatering and overwatering can cause plants to drop their flowers or fruit.
Step 4
condition-image
Fertilizing
Don't fertilize just after purchase. Fertilize after 2 weeks using half concentration.
lightmeter

Know the light your plants really get.

Find the best spots for them to optimize their health, simply using your phone.
product icon close
Your Ultimate Guide to Plants
Identify grow and nurture the better way!
product icon
17,000 local species +400,000 global species studied
product icon
Nearly 5 years of research
product icon
80+ scholars in botany and gardening
ad
product icon close
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
Lighting
close
Indoor
Indoor
Outdoor
Choose a site here for personalized care tips.
Requirements
Full sun
Ideal
Above 6 hours sunlight
Partial sun
Tolerance
About 3-6 hours sunlight
Watch how sunlight gracefully moves through your garden, and choose spots that provide the perfect balance of light and shade for your plants, ensuring their happiness.
Essentials
Sand dollar cactus has a strong preference for abundant daylight exposure which is beneficial for its flourishing growth, resembling its native habitats. The plant can also endure a moderate level of light, although an excessive lack or oversupply of rays can stunt growth or cause sunburning respectively.
Preferred
Tolerable
Unsuitable
icon
Know the light your plants really get.
Find the best spots for them to optimize their health, simply using your phone.
Download the App
Artificial lighting
Indoor plants require adequate lighting for optimal growth. When natural sunlight is insufficient, particularly in winter or in less sunny spaces, artificial lights offer a vital solution, promoting faster, healthier growth.
View more
Indoor plants require adequate lighting for optimal growth. When natural sunlight is insufficient, particularly in winter or in less sunny spaces, artificial lights offer a vital solution, promoting faster, healthier growth.
1. Choose the right type of artificial light: LED lights are a popular choice for indoor plant lighting because they can be customized to provide the specific wavelengths of light that your plants need.
Full sun plants need 30-50W/sq ft of artificial light, partial sun plants need 20-30W/sq ft, and full shade plants need 10-20W/sq ft.
2. Determine the appropriate distance: Place the light source 12-36 inches above the plant to mimic natural sunlight.
3. Determine the duration: Mimic the length of natural daylight hours for your plant species. most plants need 8-12 hours of light per day.
Important Symptoms
Insufficient light
Sand dollar cactus is a beloved choice for indoor gardening, and they require strong light to thrive. However, when placed in rooms with suboptimal lighting, they may develop symptoms of light deficiency.
View more
(Symptom details and solutions)
Small leaves
New leaves may grow smaller in size compared to the previous ones once they have matured.
Leggy or sparse growth
The spaces between leaves or stems of your Sand dollar cactus may become longer, resulting in a thin and stretched-out appearance. This can make the plant look sparse and weak, and it may easily break or lean due to its own weight.
Faster leaf drop
When plants are exposed to low light conditions, they tend to shed older leaves early to conserve resources. Within a limited time, these resources can be utilized to grow new leaves until the plant's energy reserves are depleted.
Slower or no new growth
Sand dollar cactus enters a survival mode when light conditions are poor, which leads to a halt in leaf production. As a result, the plant's growth becomes delayed or stops altogether.
Lighter-colored new leaves
Insufficient sunlight can cause leaves to develop irregular color patterns or appear pale. This indicates a lack of chlorophyll and essential nutrients.
Solutions
1. To ensure optimal growth, gradually move plants to a sunnier location each week, until they receive at least 6 hours of direct sunlight daily. Use a south-facing window and keep curtains open during the day for maximum sunlight exposure and nutrient accumulation.2. To provide additional light for your plant, consider using artificial light if it's large or not easily movable. Keep a desk or ceiling lamp on for at least 8 hours daily, or invest in professional plant grow lights for ample light.
Excessive light
Sand dollar cactus require strong light to thrive, and some are remarkably resilient to sun exposure, rarely suffering from sunburn.
View more
(Symptom details and solutions)
Chlorosis
Chlorosis is a condition where the plant's leaves lose their green color and turn yellow. This is due to the breakdown of chlorophyll from excessive sunlight, which negatively affects the plant's ability to photosynthesize.
Sunscald
Sunscald occurs when the plant's leaves or stems are damaged by intense sunlight exposure. It appears as pale, bleached, or necrotic areas on the plant tissue and can reduce the plant's overall health.
Leaf Curling
Leaf curling is a symptom where leaves curl or twist under extreme sunlight conditions. This is a defense mechanism used by the plant to reduce its surface area exposed to sunlight, minimizing water loss and damage.
Wilting
Wilting occurs when a plant loses turgor pressure and its leaves and stems begin to droop. Overexposure to sunlight can cause wilting by increasing the plant's water loss through transpiration, making it difficult for the plant to maintain adequate hydration.
Leaf Scorching
Leaf scorching is a symptom characterized by the appearance of brown, dry, and crispy edges or patches on leaves due to excessive sunlight. This can lead to a reduction in photosynthetic capacity and overall plant health.
Solutions
1. Move your plant to the optimal position where it can receive abundant sunlight but also have some shade. An east-facing window is an ideal choice as the morning sunlight is gentler. This way, your plant can enjoy ample sunlight while reducing the risk of sunburn.2. It is recommended to trim off any completely dehydrated or withered parts of the plant.
Discover care info about seasonal tips, plant diseases, and more?
Temperature
close
Indoor
Indoor
Outdoor
Choose a site here for personalized care tips.
Requirements
Ideal
Tolerable
Unsuitable
Just like people, each plant has its own preferences. Learn about your plants' temperature needs and create a comforting environment for them to flourish. As you care for your plants, your bond with them will deepen. Trust your intuition as you learn about their temperature needs, celebrating the journey you share. Lovingly monitor the temperature around your plants and adjust their environment as needed. A thermometer can be your ally in this heartfelt endeavor. Be patient and gentle with yourself as you explore your plants' temperature needs. Cherish your successes, learn from challenges, and nurture your garden with love, creating a haven that reflects the warmth of your care.
Essentials
Sand dollar cactus is originally native in environments with a temperature range of approximately 68 to 100 °F (20 to 38 ℃). It tends to favour this temperature range, even when cultivated in different environments. Extreme seasonal variations may necessitate adjustments to maintain this preferred temperature.
Regional wintering strategies
Sand dollar cactus is a heat-loving plant that gradually stops growing and enters a dormant state during the winter. When the outdoor temperature drops below {Tolerable_growing_temperature_min}, it should be moved indoors for cultivation. Choose a location near a south-facing window to provide as much sunlight as possible. If there is insufficient natural light, supplemental lighting can be used. When the temperature falls below {Suitable_growth_temperature_min}, the plant's growth slows down, and watering should be reduced or stopped to prevent root rot. For Sand dollar cactus grown outdoors, watering should be completely halted during low temperatures. If feasible, you can set up a temporary greenhouse for insulation or use materials such as plastic film or fabric to wrap the plant during cold temperatures.
Important Symptoms
Low Temperature
Sand dollar cactus thrives in high temperatures and is not tolerant of low temperatures. It grows best when the temperature is above {Suitable_growth_temperature_min}. During winter, it should be kept above {Tolerable_growing_temperature_min}. When the temperature falls below {Limit_growth_temperature}, the plant may become weak, wilt, and be prone to root rot. In cases of mild frost damage, there may not be any initial symptoms, but after a week, the plant will gradually wither.
Solutions
Trim off the frostbitten areas, paying attention to whether the roots have rotted. If the roots have rotted, they need to be cut off, and the plant can be propagated through cuttings. Immediately move indoors to a warm environment and place the plant near a south-facing window to ensure ample sunlight. If there is insufficient light, you can use supplemental lighting.
High Temperature
During summer, Sand dollar cactus should be kept below {Suitable_growth_temperature_max}. When the temperature exceeds {Tolerable_growing_temperature_max}, the plant's growth will cease, it will experience water loss, wilting, and becomes more susceptible to sunburn.
Solutions
Remove the sunburned and rotten parts. Shield the plant from afternoon sunlight until it recovers and starts growing again. For plants with root rot, stop watering until new roots begin to emerge.
Discover care info about seasonal tips, plant diseases, and more?
Transplant
close
How to Successfully Transplant Sand Dollar Cactus?
The prime season for transplanting sand dollar cactus is between late spring and early autumn (S2-S4), as this is when the plant experiences its strongest growth. Choose a sunny, well-draining location for best results. Always handle sand dollar cactus with care to avoid damaging its delicate body.
What Preparations are Needed Before Transplanting Sand Dollar Cactus?
What is the Ideal Time for Transplanting Sand Dollar Cactus?
The ultimate season to transfer sand dollar cactus is between spring and summer (S2-S4). This period ensures optimal growth as it provides ample warmth and sunlight. By transplanting sand dollar cactus in this season, it allows the plant to establish a robust root system and flourish beautifully. Remember, timing is key to ensure sand dollar cactus thrives in its new home, so it's crucial to get it just right!
How Much Space Should You Leave Between Sand Dollar Cactus Plants?
When transplanting your sand dollar cactus, it's recommended to space each one about 1-2 feet (30-60 cm) apart. This will provide enough room for them to grow without overcrowding each other.
What is the Best Soil Mix for Sand Dollar Cactus Transplanting?
Try using a well-drained cactus mix or sandy soil for your sand dollar cactus, enriched with a base fertilizer high in phosphorus. This will promote healthy and vigorous growth.
Where Should You Relocate Your Sand Dollar Cactus?
Choose a location for your sand dollar cactus that gets plenty of sunlight. However, keep it partially shaded during the harshest midday sun to prevent sunburn. Remember, cacti love the sun, but not all day!
What Equipments Should You Prepare Before Transplantation Sand Dollar Cactus?
Gardening Gloves
To protect your hands while working with the soil and sand dollar cactus.
Trowel
For digging up the sand dollar cactus and its root ball without damaging it from its original location.
Garden Spade
For digging the new hole for transplantation of sand dollar cactus.
Pot (Optional)
If you are moving your sand dollar cactus from one pot to another, you'll need a new pot that's slightly larger than the old one.
Watering Can
To water the sand dollar cactus immediately after transplantation.
Organic Compost
To enrich the soil and provide nutrients to sand dollar cactus upon transplantation.
How Do You Remove Sand Dollar Cactus from the Soil?
From the Ground: First, water the sand dollar cactus plant to dampen the soil. Then, using a trowel or garden spade, dig carefully around the plant, while ensuring that the plant's root ball remains intact. Gradually work the trowel or spade under the root ball to lift the plant from its original location.
From a Pot: Start by watering the sand dollar cactus in its existing pot. Then, lay the pot on its side and gently roll it to loosen the root ball. Grasp the base of the sand dollar cactus and tug gently to remove it from the pot. If it’s resistant, you might need to use a knife to cut away the pot.
From a Seedling Tray: If your sand dollar cactus is still a seedling in a tray, water it first. Then, using a small utensil or your fingers, gently remove the seedling along with its roots. Handle the seedling by its leaves and avoid touching the stem or roots as much as possible.
Step-by-Step Guide for Transplanting Sand Dollar Cactus
Step1 Preparation
Once you've got your sand dollar cactus ready to transplant, start by digging a hole in your designated spot. This hole should be deep enough to accommodate the root ball of sand dollar cactus and its current soil without crowding.
Step2 Transplanting
Place the sand dollar cactus in the center of the hole, while making sure it’s not deeper than it was originally growing. Add some organic compost around the root ball.
Step3 Settling In
Fill in the hole with the dug-up soil. Pat the soil firmly around the base of the sand dollar cactus, but not too tight as to choke the plant.
Step4 Watering
Water the sand dollar cactus generously right after transplanting. The soil around the root ball should be wet, but not soaking. You are aiming for a moist environment for sand dollar cactus to begin developing new roots.
How Do You Care For Sand Dollar Cactus After Transplanting?
Watering
In the first few weeks after transplantation, keep the soil around the sand dollar cactus consistently moist but never soggy. Overwatering can cause the plant to rot.
Monitoring
Watch out for signs of transplant stress such as wilting, yellowing of leaves, or slowed growth. If you notice any of these, reduce the frequency of watering and if condition doesn't improve, consider seeking advice from a local nursery or extension service.
Pest Control
Keep an eye out for any snails, slugs, or other pests that might harm sand dollar cactus. Try using natural pest control methods if you spot any.
Pruning
If any part of the sand dollar cactus plant looks dead or diseased post-transplantation, prune it off to prevent the spread to the rest of the plant. Remember to use a clean, sharp tool for pruning.
Troubleshooting Common Issues with Sand Dollar Cactus Transplantation.
When's the best time to transplant my sand dollar cactus?
The optimal time to move your sand dollar cactus would be during late Spring to Autumn, ensuring the most successful transplant.
How much space should I leave between each sand dollar cactus?
Give each sand dollar cactus ample room to grow by placing them about 1-2 feet (30-60 cm) apart. This prevents overcrowding and promotes healthier growth.
What should I do if the sand dollar cactus's root system is too large or tangled?
A rootbound sand dollar cactus can be harmful. Carefully loosen the root ball with your fingers or a handheld garden tool before transplanting. Be gentle to avoid root damage.
What do I do if the leaves on my transplanted sand dollar cactus start yellowing?
Yellowing often indicates overwatering. Ensure the plant is draining well and reduce watering frequency. Remember, sand dollar cactus prefers being on the dry side, so it's okay to let the soil dry out between waterings.
I transplanted my sand dollar cactus but it seems to be wilting. What could be the problem?
Wilting can be a sign of transplant shock. Try to minimize this by maintaining consistent conditions with the plant's previous environment and avoid overwatering. It should rebound within a few weeks.
What's the best type of soil for transplanting sand dollar cactus?
Sand dollar cactus thrives in sandy or pebbly soil with excellent drainage. Mix one part of potting soil with one part of perlite or pumice to make the ideal soil mix.
Do I need to pre-water the sand dollar cactus before transplanting it?
Yes, watering a couple of days before translocation can help hydrate the plant, making it more resilient during the transplanting process. However, ensure that it's dry on moving day.
What's the best way to remove sand dollar cactus from its original pot?
Tilt the pot sideways, support the sand dollar cactus from its base, and gently coax it loose. If it's stuck, you can carefully tap the pot's edges to loosen the roots.
How deep should I plant the sand dollar cactus in the new pot?
The sand dollar cactus should sit at the same depth it was previously growing. Plant it too deep, and the stem could rot; too shallow, and the roots could dry out.
What should I do if there's fungus growth after transplanting sand dollar cactus?
Fungus can be a sign of overwatering and poor ventilation. Reduce your watering, improve airflow around the plant, and consider applying a fungicide made for cacti if growth persists.
Discover care info about seasonal tips, plant diseases, and more?
Cookie Management Tool
In addition to managing cookies through your browser or device, you can change your cookie settings below.
Necessary Cookies
Necessary cookies enable core functionality. The website cannot function properly without these cookies, and can only be disabled by changing your browser preferences.
Analytical Cookies
Analytical cookies help us to improve our application/website by collecting and reporting information on its usage.
Cookie Name Source Purpose Lifespan
_ga Google Analytics These cookies are set because of our use of Google Analytics. They are used to collect information about your use of our application/website. The cookies collect specific information, such as your IP address, data related to your device and other information about your use of the application/website. Please note that the data processing is essentially carried out by Google LLC and Google may use your data collected by the cookies for own purposes, e.g. profiling and will combine it with other data such as your Google Account. For more information about how Google processes your data and Google’s approach to privacy as well as implemented safeguards for your data, please see here. 1 Year
_pta PictureThis Analytics We use these cookies to collect information about how you use our site, monitor site performance, and improve our site performance, our services, and your experience. 1 Year
Cookie Name
_ga
Source
Google Analytics
Purpose
These cookies are set because of our use of Google Analytics. They are used to collect information about your use of our application/website. The cookies collect specific information, such as your IP address, data related to your device and other information about your use of the application/website. Please note that the data processing is essentially carried out by Google LLC and Google may use your data collected by the cookies for own purposes, e.g. profiling and will combine it with other data such as your Google Account. For more information about how Google processes your data and Google’s approach to privacy as well as implemented safeguards for your data, please see here.
Lifespan
1 Year

Cookie Name
_pta
Source
PictureThis Analytics
Purpose
We use these cookies to collect information about how you use our site, monitor site performance, and improve our site performance, our services, and your experience.
Lifespan
1 Year
Marketing Cookies
Marketing cookies are used by advertising companies to serve ads that are relevant to your interests.
Cookie Name Source Purpose Lifespan
_fbp Facebook Pixel A conversion pixel tracking that we use for retargeting campaigns. Learn more here. 1 Year
_adj Adjust This cookie provides mobile analytics and attribution services that enable us to measure and analyze the effectiveness of marketing campaigns, certain events and actions within the Application. Learn more here. 1 Year
Cookie Name
_fbp
Source
Facebook Pixel
Purpose
A conversion pixel tracking that we use for retargeting campaigns. Learn more here.
Lifespan
1 Year

Cookie Name
_adj
Source
Adjust
Purpose
This cookie provides mobile analytics and attribution services that enable us to measure and analyze the effectiveness of marketing campaigns, certain events and actions within the Application. Learn more here.
Lifespan
1 Year
This page looks better in the app
Open