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FAQ

How to Care for Chinese Ixora

Chinese ixora (Ixora chinensis) is a tropical evergreen shrub native to China and thus sometimes called simply Chinese Ixora. The red berries and clusters of bright flowers that bloom nearly year-round make this a popular ornamental plant.
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Water
Water
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Sunlight
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Chinese ixora
Chinese ixora
Chinese ixora
Chinese ixora
Chinese ixora
care_basic_guide

Basic Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterDetail

Water

During the summer, water your chinese ixora frequently and keep the soil moist. In the winter, it's okay to let the top of the soil dry out before watering. Always water with non-chlorinated water and avoid water that is high in calcium, which can create soil conditions that are too alkaline for the chinese ixora.
Your chinese ixora may also need extra attention if you live in a dry climate or it's kept indoors. The chinese ixora thrives in humid climates and should be misted daily. You can also keep it in a bathroom or a humid greenhouse, as long as it receives enough light.

Water

Ground Chinese ixora watering
In some cases, your Chinese ixora may not need any supplemental watering when it grows outside and will survive on rainwater alone. However, if you live in an area of little to no rain, you should water this plant about every two weeks. If you belong to the group of people who live out of this plant's natural hardiness zone, you should grow it indoors.
When a Chinese ixora is very young, such as when it is in a seedling stage, you will need to give it more water than you would if it were at a mature age. During the early stages of this plant’s life, it is important to keep the soil consistently moist to encourage root development. The same is true for any Chinese ixora that you have transplanted to a new growing location. As it continues to grow and establish, it can survive entirely on rainwater and only when the weather is hot and there is no rainfall at all for 2-3 weeks, then consider giving your Chinese ixora a full watering to prevent them from suffering stress.
Potted Chinese ixora watering
For potted plants, there are two main ways that you can determine how often to water your Chinese ixora . The first way is to set a predetermined watering schedule. If you choose this route, you should plan to water this plant about once every week or once every other week. However, this approach may not always work as it does not consider the unique conditions of your Chinese ixora ’s growing environment. Your watering frequency can also change depending on the season. For instance, a predetermined watering schedule will likely not suffice during summer when this plant's water needs are highest. An alternative route is to set your watering frequency based on soil moisture. Typically, it is best to wait until the first two to four inches of soil, usually ⅓ to ½ depth of the pots, have dried out entirely before you give more water. If more than half of the soil has become dry, you should consider giving more water than usual. In those cases, continue adding water until you see excess water draining from your pot’s drainage holes.
The seasonal changes will affect how often you water your Chinese ixora . Mainly, during the hottest summer months, you will likely need to increase how much you water this plant, especially if it grows in an area that receives ample sunlight. Strong summer sunlight can cause soil to dry out much faster than usual, meaning that you’ll need to water more frequently. By contrast, your Chinese ixora will need much less water during the winter, as it will not be in an active growing phase. During winter, you can get by with watering once every 2 to 3 weeks or sometimes not at all. For those growing this plant indoors, you should be somewhat wary of appliances such as air conditioners, which can cause your plant to dry out more quickly, which also calls for more frequent watering.
Underwater and overwater
When your Chinese ixora is planted in pots, overwatering is often more likely to.When you accidentally overwater your Chinese ixora , you should be prepared to remedy the situation immediately. First, you should stop watering your plant right away to minimize the effect of your overwatering. After, you should consider removing your Chinese ixora from its pot to inspect its roots. If you find that none of the roots have developed root rot, it may be permissible to return your plant to its container. If you do discover signs of root rot, then you should trim away any roots that have been affected. You may also want to apply a fungicide to prevent further damage. Lastly, you should repot your Chinese ixora in soil that is well-draining. In the case of an underwatered Chinese ixora , simply water this plant more frequently.
Underwatering is often an easy fix. If you underwater, the plant's leaves will tend to droop and dry out and fall off, and the leaves will quickly return to fullness after sufficient watering. Please correct your watering frequency as soon as underwatering occurs.
For outdoor plants, especially newly planted plants or plant seedlings, they can be prone to lack of watering. Remember that you need to keep watering enough for a few months when the tree is small or just planted. This is because once the roots are established, Chinese ixora can rely on rain most of the time.
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Cultivation:WaterDetail
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What is the best way to water my Chinese ixora?
Your Chinese ixora will not be too picky about how you choose to water it. As such, you can use just about any common watering tool to moisten this plant’s soil. Watering cans, hoses, and even cups will work just fine when it is time to water your Chinese ixora. Regardless of which watering tool you use, you should typically apply the water directly to the soil. In doing so, you should ensure that you moisten all soil areas equally to give all parts of the root system the water it needs. It can help to use filtered water, as tap water can contain particles that are harmful to plants. It is also beneficial to use water that is at or slightly above room temperature, as colder or hotter water can be somewhat shocking to the Chinese ixora. However, the Chinese ixora usually responds well to any kind of water you give it.
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What should I do if I water my Chinese ixora too much or too little?
For outdoor plants, especially newly planted plants or plant seedlings, they can be prone to lack of watering. Remember that you need to keep watering enough for a few months when the tree is small or just planted. This is because once the roots are established, Chinese ixora can rely on rain most of the time.
When your Chinese ixora is planted in pots, overwatering is often more likely to.When you accidentally overwater your Chinese ixora, you should be prepared to remedy the situation immediately. First, you should stop watering your plant right away to minimize the effect of your overwatering. After, you should consider removing your Chinese ixora from its pot to inspect its roots. If you find that none of the roots have developed root rot, it may be permissible to return your plant to its container. If you do discover signs of root rot, then you should trim away any roots that have been affected. You may also want to apply a fungicide to prevent further damage. Lastly, you should repot your Chinese ixora in soil that is well-draining. In the case of an underwatered Chinese ixora, simply water this plant more frequently.
Underwatering is often an easy fix. If you underwater, the plant's leaves will tend to droop and dry out and fall off, and the leaves will quickly return to fullness after sufficient watering. Please correct your watering frequency as soon as underwatering occurs.
Read More more
How often should I water my Chinese ixora?
Most plants that grow naturally outdoors can be allowed to grow normally with rainfall. If your area lacks rainfall, consider giving your plants adequate watering every 2 weeks during the spring and fall. More frequent watering is needed in summer. In winter, when growth becomes slower and plants need less water, water more sparingly. Throughout the winter, you may not give it additional watering at all. If your Chinese ixora is young or newly planted, then you should water more frequently to help it establish, and mature and grow up to have more adaptable and drought tolerant plants.
For potted plants, there are two main ways that you can determine how often to water your Chinese ixora. The first way is to set a predetermined watering schedule. If you choose this route, you should plan to water this plant about once every week or once every other week. However, this approach may not always work as it does not consider the unique conditions of the growing environment for your Chinese ixora .
Your watering frequency can also change depending on the season. For instance, a predetermined watering schedule will likely not suffice during summer when this plant's water needs are highest. An alternative route is to set your watering frequency based on soil moisture. Typically, it is best to wait until the first two to four inches of soil, usually ⅓ to ½ depth of the pots, have dried out entirely before you give more water.
Read More more
How much water does my Chinese ixora need?
When it comes time to water your Chinese ixora, you may be surprised to find that this plant does not always need a high volume of water. Instead, if only a few inches of soil have dried since your last watering, you can support healthy growth in the Chinese ixora by giving it about five to ten ounces of water every time you water. You can also decide your water volume based on soil moisture. As mentioned above, you should note how many inches of soil have dried out between waterings. A surefire way to make sure your Chinese ixora gets the moisture it needs is to supply enough water to moisten all the soil layers that became dry since the last time you watered. If more than half of the soil has become dry, you should consider giving more water than usual. In those cases, continue adding water until you see excess water draining from your pot’s drainage holes.
If your Chinese ixora is planted in an area that gets plenty of rain outdoors, it may not need additional watering. When the Chinese ixora is young or just getting established, make sure it gets 1-2 inches of rain per week. As it continues to grow and establish, it can survive entirely on rainwater and only when the weather is hot and there is no rainfall at all for 2-3 weeks, then consider giving your Chinese ixora a full watering to prevent them from suffering stress.
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How can I tell if i'm watering my Chinese ixora enough?
Overwatering is a far more common problem for the Chinese ixora, and there are several signs you should look for when this occurs. Generally, an overwatered Chinese ixora will have yellowing leaves and may even drop some leaves. Also, overwatering can cause the overall structure of your plant to shrivel and may also promote root rot. On the other hand, an underwatered Chinese ixora will also begin to wilt. It may also display leaves that are brown or brittle to the touch. Whether you see signs of overwatering or underwatering, you should be prepared to intervene and restore the health of your Chinese ixora.
Read More more
How can I water my Chinese ixora at different growth stages?
When the Chinese ixora is very young, such as when it is in a seedling stage, you will need to give it more water than you would if it were at a mature age. During the early stages of this plant’s life, it is important to keep the soil consistently moist to encourage root development. The same is true for any Chinese ixora that you have transplanted to a new growing location. Also, the Chinese ixora can develop showy flowers and fruits when you give them the correct care. If your Chinese ixora is in a flowering or fruiting phase, you will likely need to give a bit more water than you usually would to support these plant structures.
Read More more
How can I water my Chinese ixora through the seasons?
The seasonal changes will affect how often you water your Chinese ixora. Mainly, during the hottest summer months, you will likely need to increase how much you water this plant, especially if it grows in an area that receives ample sunlight. Strong summer sunlight can cause soil to dry out much faster than usual, meaning that you’ll need to water more frequently. By contrast, your Chinese ixora will need much less water during the winter, as it will not be in an active growing phase. During winter, you can get by with watering once every 2 to 3 weeks or sometimes not at all. For those growing this plant indoors, you should be somewhat wary of appliances such as air conditioners, which can cause your plant to dry out more quickly, which also calls for more frequent watering.
Read More more
What's the difference between watering my Chinese ixora indoors vs outdoors?
In some cases, your Chinese ixora may not need any supplemental watering when it grows outside and will survive on rainwater alone. However, if you live in an area of little to no rain, you should water this plant about every two weeks. If you belong to the group of people who live out of this plant's natural hardiness zone, you should grow it indoors. In an indoor setting, you should monitor your plant's soil as it can dry out more quickly when it is in a container or when it is exposed to HVAC units such as air conditioners. Those drying factors will lead you to water this plant a bit more often than if you grew it outdoors.
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Cultivation:FertilizerDetail

Fertilizer

To encourage blooming, the chinese ixora should be fertilized monthly during the growing season. Use a high nitrogen fertilizer, like an 8-4-4 (N-P-K) that includes magnesium. You may find a fertilizer that's specifically labeled for palms and Ixora chinensis. Compost can also be added 2-4 times a year around the base of the plant to add nutrients and help improve drainage.

Fertilizer

Bright colors and rich textures are what Chinese ixora can add to your home décor. With a few well-placed and well-cared-for Chinese ixora plants, you can impress your home guests and enhance the beauty of your house. The issue is, if you don't understand how to fertilize your Chinese ixora, there is little chance that you can expect this plant to perform its best. Read on to learn answers to some of the most common fertilization questions about Chinese ixora.
Fertilization is important to a Chinese ixora overall health and well-being. With the proper supply of energy and nutrients, your Chinese ixora will develop a healthy array of foliage while also producing a set of sturdy stems and branches. However, it is the flowers of a Chinese ixora that are often most valuable to the gardeners who grow them. Fortunately, fertilization also helps this plant produce flowers that are large, vibrant, and long-lasting. The reason for this is that the right kind of fertilizer will make it much easier for your Chinese ixora to transfer fuel from its roots through its stems to its flowers. Proper fertilization also keeps this plant's health in good general condition, making it better able to fight off diseases.
The main time of year when you should fertilize a Chinese ixora is during the early spring when your plant is exiting its dormant phase and preparing to open its buds. Feeding at this time will give your Chinese ixora plenty of available energy to use to support its overall growth and flower development, but this is not the only time that it is a good idea to feed this plant. An additional feeding at the end of the season during the fall months can also benefit this plant, although this second feeding does not need to be as large as the first one. Also, some gardeners choose to fertilize their Chinese ixora while they are planting it, but this is not always necessary.
While it is often alright to use a general-purpose fertilizer that has even ratios of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, Chinese ixora plants often do best when they receive a specific type of fertilizer. In most instances, the most important nutrients for a Chinese ixora are nitrogen and phosphorus, which is why they should appear in higher volumes in the fertilizer you use compared to the potassium content. A fertilizer that has an N-P-K ratio of 10-10-8 or something similar should work well. However, it can also be beneficial to apply an organic material such as compost for at least one of your annual feedings. If you choose to use fertilizer, it is most common to use granular fertilizer for a Chinese ixora.
Applying fertilizer for your Chinese ixora is a quite straightforward task that any gardener can perform, even those with minimal experience. To feed your Chinese ixora with granular fertilizer, all you need to do is sprinkle the fertilizer on the soil. However, before you do so, make sure that you moisten the soil with water. Additionally, you can also amend your Chinese ixora plant's soil by adding an organic material like compost or manure. If you want to incorporate one of those amendments into your soil, you should place some of the material on top of the soil. Then use a hand rake to gently work the material into the first few inches of soil without disturbing the roots.
There are several negative outcomes that will occur if your regularly overfertilize your Chinese ixora. First, when you give one of these plants too much fertilizer, you can expect to see leaf discoloration and perhaps some wilting. Excessive fertilization can also lead to fertilizer burn, which will dry out the roots, making them ineffective.
However, the threats of overfertilization do not end there for the Chinese ixora. If you feed one of these plants too much, it may show a lack of flowers or bloom with flowers that are a bit lackluster. Also, an overfertilized Chinese ixora will be weaker overall, show stunted growth, and is more vulnerable to diseases and pest infestations.
As is the case for many plants, you do not need to fertilize your Chinese ixora during the winter. In winter, a Chinese ixora will be in a dormant phase, which means it does not need to gain much energy from the soil to develop new growth. Fertilizing during winter makes it much more likely that the negative outcomes of overfertilization will occur. The two main feeding times for a Chinese ixora are during the early spring and the fall. That means that during most of the spring and summer, this plant will not need fertilizer. It is also wise to hold off on feedings if your plant is experiencing excessively hot or dry conditions for whatever reason.
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Cultivation:FertilizerDetail
Why do I need to fertilize my Chinese ixora?
Fertilization is important to a Chinese ixora overall health and well-being. With the proper supply of energy and nutrients, your Chinese ixora will develop a healthy array of foliage while also producing a set of sturdy stems and branches.
However, it is the flowers of a Chinese ixora that are often most valuable to the gardeners who grow them. Fortunately, fertilization also helps this plant produce flowers that are large, vibrant, and long-lasting. The reason for this is that the right kind of fertilizer will make it much easier for your Chinese ixora to transfer fuel from its roots through its stems to its flowers. Proper fertilization also keeps this plant's health in good general condition, making it better able to fight off diseases.
Read More more
When is the best time to fertilize my Chinese ixora?
The main time of year when you should fertilize a Chinese ixora is during the early spring when your plant is exiting its dormant phase and preparing to open its buds. Feeding at this time will give your Chinese ixora plenty of available energy to use to support its overall growth and flower development, but this is not the only time that it is a good idea to feed this plant.
An additional feeding at the end of the season during the fall months can also benefit this plant, although this second feeding does not need to be as large as the first one. Also, some gardeners choose to fertilize their Chinese ixora while they are planting it, but this is not always necessary.
Read More more
When should I avoid fertilizing my Chinese ixora?
As is the case for many plants, you do not need to fertilize your Chinese ixora during the winter. In winter, a Chinese ixora will be in a dormant phase, which means it does not need to gain much energy from the soil to develop new growth. Fertilizing during winter makes it much more likely that the negative outcomes of overfertilization will occur.
The two main feeding times for a Chinese ixora are during the early spring and the fall. That means that during most of the spring and summer, this plant will not need fertilizer. It is also wise to hold off on feedings if your plant is experiencing excessively hot or dry conditions for whatever reason.
Read More more
What type of fertilizer does my Chinese ixora need?
While it is often alright to use a general-purpose fertilizer that has even ratios of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, Chinese ixora plants often do best when they receive a specific type of fertilizer. In most instances, the most important nutrients for a Chinese ixora are nitrogen and phosphorus, which is why they should appear in higher volumes in the fertilizer you use compared to the potassium content.
A fertilizer that has an N-P-K ratio of 10-10-8 or something similar should work well. However, it can also be beneficial to apply an organic material such as compost for at least one of your annual feedings. If you choose to use fertilizer, it is most common to use granular fertilizer for a Chinese ixora.
Read More more
How do I fertilize my Chinese ixora?
Applying fertilizer for your Chinese ixora is a quite straightforward task that any gardener can perform, even those with minimal experience. To feed your Chinese ixora with granular fertilizer, all you need to do is sprinkle the fertilizer on the soil. However, before you do so, make sure that you moisten the soil with water.
Additionally, you can also amend your Chinese ixora plant's soil by adding an organic material like compost or manure. If you want to incorporate one of those amendments into your soil, you should place some of the material on top of the soil. Then use a hand rake to gently work the material into the first few inches of soil without disturbing the roots.
Read More more
What happens if I fertilize my Chinese ixora too much?
There are several negative outcomes that will occur if your regularly overfertilize your Chinese ixora. First, when you give one of these plants too much fertilizer, you can expect to see leaf discoloration and perhaps some wilting. Excessive fertilization can also lead to fertilizer burn, which will dry out the roots, making them ineffective.
However, the threats of overfertilization do not end there for the Chinese ixora. If you feed one of these plants too much, it may show a lack of flowers or bloom with flowers that are a bit lackluster. Also, an overfertilized Chinese ixora will be weaker overall, show stunted growth, and is more vulnerable to diseases and pest infestations.
Read More more
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Cultivation:SunlightDetail

Sunlight

Your chinese ixora should be grown in full sun for the best flower production. While it will tolerate partial shade, it needs a minimum of 6 hours of sunlight per day. If you're growing it in a container indoors, you should place the pot in a bright room and move it outdoors during warm weather, so that it receives as much light as possible.
Cultivation:SunlightDetail
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How many hours of sunlight does Chinese ixora need to grow?
Tropical ornamental plants that prefer full sun need a minimum of 6 hours of direct sunlight per day. These plants are adapted to growing in areas with intense, direct sunlight and require this type of light to thrive. In their natural habitats, they are often found growing in open fields or along the edges of forests, where they receive ample sunlight throughout the day.
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What will happen if Chinese ixora doesn’t get enough sunlight?
If tropical ornamental plants that prefer full sun do not receive enough sunlight, they may become leggy and weak. They may also develop yellow or pale leaves, and may stop producing flowers. Over time, these plants may die if they are not given the amount of direct sunlight they need.
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What will happen if Chinese ixora gets too much sunlight?
While tropical ornamental plants that prefer full sun need a lot of direct sunlight, they can be damaged by too much sun. If these plants are exposed to intense sunlight for prolonged periods, they may develop sunburned leaves or brown spots. They may also become dehydrated if the soil dries out too quickly in full sun.
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How can you protect Chinese ixora from excessive sunlight?
To protect tropical ornamental plants that prefer full sun from excessive sunlight, it is important to choose a location that gets plenty of direct sunlight but also has some protection from the hottest part of the day. If you are growing these plants in containers, you can move them to a more shaded location during the hottest part of the day to protect them from the sun's rays. You can also provide some shade by using a shade cloth or umbrella during the hottest part of the day.
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Cautions and tips
It is important to gradually acclimate tropical ornamental plants that prefer full sun gradually to direct sunlight, especially if they have been grown indoors or in a shaded area. Start by placing the plant in direct sunlight for an hour or two each day, gradually increasing the amount of time it spends in direct sunlight over a period of several days or weeks. Be sure to keep an eye on the plant's soil moisture levels when it is exposed to full sun. These plants may require more frequent watering in full sun than they would in a more shaded location. Use a moisture meter or check the soil with your finger to determine when the plant needs to be watered.
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Cultivation:PruningDetail

Pruning

In general, the chinese ixora should be pruned once per year. Pruning can be used to help trim the chinese ixora to a desired shape and size, and it also encourages blooming. It's best to prune in late winter or early spring, before the plant puts on new growth. Avoid cutting off all the flower buds that grow at the tips of stems.
For more experienced gardeners or those looking for a challenge, the chinese ixora is suitable for bonsai cultivation techniques.
Cultivation:PruningDetail
Is pruning necessary for my Chinese ixora?
Before your Chinese ixora hedge begins taking over the sidewalk, or your hanging basket Chinese ixoras start to look scraggly, it is a good idea to think about pruning. Without proper maintenance, Chinese ixora may grow rapidly and uncontrollably, crowding out other plants. If you decide to include Chinese ixora in your garden or landscaping plan, you should monitor its growth carefully and have a plan for pruning. Pruning is as important for the Chinese ixora as it is for any other ornamental plant species that you may choose to grow in your garden. If you prune this plant properly, you can enhance its overall health while preserving its most showy ornamental features. With that said, you cannot expect to reap those benefits if you don’t know when and how to prune this species. In fact, improper pruning can cause you to remove the season’s blooms, detracting significantly from the Chinese ixora’s beauty. Even if you live in a cooler area or only plan to grow Chinese ixora in pots or hanging baskets, regular pruning can encourage blooming and keep your plants healthy and vigorous.
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When is the best time to prune my Chinese ixora?
As Chinese ixora blooms earlier than normal plants, pruning should also be earlier. What you should do instead is wait until the late spring or early summer to prune if you want to prune your Chinese ixora on a large scale. The ideal time for pruning takes place at the end or just after this plant’s bloom period. Also, you should avoid pruning late in summer and into fall, pruning at this time may affect the flowering of plants the following year. Additionally, you may want to trim the plants throughout the growing season to encourage blooming. You can also prune at any time if there is any yellowing or diseased foliage.
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How can I prune my Chinese ixora?
For your major pruning, use sharp pruning sheers that will make clean cuts to avoid damaging your plants. Make each cut at a 45° angle to encourage healthy new growth. Remove any dead or decayed stems first, cutting them off just above the damaged section or cutting them completely to the ground. Next, consider the desired height and shape of your Chinese ixora, and then prune accordingly. To control the size of your Chinese ixora, you can cut back as much as one third of its height and girth, and it is best done by pruning immediately after flowering Finally, you may prefer to just trim off dead or damaged portions of the plant, including deadheading spent flowers, to keep it looking its best. This can be done at any time of year. Diseased or damaged stems should be cut right at the soil line and removed completely. Blooms should be cut off just below the flower head.
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What should I do after pruning my Chinese ixora?
Chinese ixora is generally tolerant of limited water and may become mildewy with too much water. Right after pruning is a good time to water and fertilizer though, to encourage new growth and blooming. However, care needs to be taken to avoid wounded areas when watering to avoid fungal infestation of the plant through fresh wounds. When you are ready to dispose of sections of the plant that you removed during pruning, there are two important things to keep in mind. Chinese ixora leaves or branches found to be diseased need to be trimmed off and destroyed away from the plant. Do not used as compost material. Wherever you dispose of the trimmings, remember that Chinese ixora roots and spreads easily. Be careful that your trimmings do not inadvertently produce new, unwanted Chinese ixora.
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What are some tips for pruning my Chinese ixora?
From hedges to containers, in any landscape or garden, annual pruning and regular trims can encourage Chinese ixora produce beautiful blooms and remain healthy for many years. For your major pruning, use sharp pruning sheers that will make clean cuts to avoid damaging your plants. Make each cut at a 45° angle to encourage healthy new growth. As you are pruning your Chinese ixora, step back occasionally to check the appearance of the plant to make sure it has the shape you want and that you are pruning it symmetrically. Try not to prune heavily at flowering time, just the dried flowers need to be pruned back as this will affect flowering. A useful approach is to remove only the longer branches and sucker shoots, leaving the blooms closer to the primary stems intact. Finally, as you prune, be on the lookout for mold or mildew. Chinese ixora is susceptible to fungal or bacterial and you will want to address this problem, removing molded or fungal(bacterial) sections to avoid further damage to your Chinese ixora.
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Advanced Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail

Temperature

As the chinese ixora is native to tropical regions in Southeast Asia, it requires a warm, humid climate. It thrives outdoors in areas where winter temperatures remain above 2 ℃. In areas that experience colder winters, the chinese ixora should be grown in a container and moved indoors for the winter.
If growing indoors or in a dry climate, you'll probably need to mist your chinese ixora regularly to provide enough moisture. Your chinese ixora should also be watered regularly - it will do best in moist but well-drained soil.
Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail
What is the optimal temperature for Chinese ixora?
For this tropical plant to thrive, you’ll want to keep them between 75℉ and 90℉ (25-32℃). Each species can handle temperatures outside of this range, but keeping it within several degrees of these limits will ensure they grow to their maximum potential.
As for its extreme temperature limits, any environment below 50℉ (10℃) or above 95℉ (35℃) will begin to hinder its growth and cause various aberrations to its leaves and stems. This is especially true with low temperatures; even a light frost can cause your tropical plants to perish. Cellular death can begin to happen at a rapid pace, with some species dying in as little as 12 to 24 hours.
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Does Chinese ixora require different temperatures for different growing phases?
While Chinese ixora doesn’t require any changes in temperature to enter different growing phases, it is important to stay consistent. Wild temperature fluctuations can slow down its growth regardless of its current phase, so it's always better to keep them in a controlled environment. That optimal temperature range of 75℉ and 90℉ (25-32℃) is vital to maintain, especially staying above the lower limit. Going above 90℉(32℃) isn’t ideal, but as tropical plant it won’t suffer too much. On the other hand, going below 50℉ (10℃) (and especially 40℉/5℃) will begin to directly damage this heat-loving plant species.
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Does Chinese ixora need different temperatures for different seasons?
Chinese ixora does not need different temperatures for different growing seasons. The most important step in seasonal care is to keep the environment within the optimal temperature range. That's why it's always best to keep this plant indoors. That way, you can control the temperature no matter what the climate is like outside.
Light is also important for tropical species, with all of these plants preferring a partial side level of sun exposure. This means any light they receive needs to be dappled or filtered, with bright but indirect light being the best option when growing your plants indoors. Too much direct sunlight can negatively affect your plant’s leaves, reducing its growth potential.
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What are the temperature guidelines to keep your Chinese ixora healthy?
Tip #1: Don’t Leave Your Plant Near Windows in Colder Months
If you want to make sure your plant isn’t exposed to colder temperatures, you may want to keep them away from windows. In colder months like late fall and winter, even the smallest draft can leak cold air into your home through cracks in your windows. While this air usually dissipates and warms up as it travels throughout your home, any plants placed in close proximity to the window will be affected. Move your tropical plants into an area where they will still get bright but indirect light, while making sure they won’t be affected by potential drafts.
Tip #2: If You Find Dry Patches, Your Plant May Be Getting Too Much Sunlight or Heat
You may notice the leaves become white or even scorched on a sunny day. These discolorations and unusual markings usually indicate that a plant is getting too much heat or sunlight, and it may be dehydrated. Excess light and heat will dry out the soil, stopping plants from getting the moisture they need to support their cellular structure. It also slows down or stops the process of photosynthesis, further hindering growth. If ignored for too long, these dry spots can spread and eventually result in the death of your plants.
Tip #3: Avoid Frost at All Costs
Colder temperatures and frost can damage your plants by causing ice crystals or disrupt normal physiological activity. This makes it nearly impossible for water to move freely throughout plant tissue, creating a deficit of moisture in their stems and leaves. You can tell a plant has been damaged by frost if it begins to suffer from hydrosis (it will appear as though it's soaked with water.) If the problem persists, your plants may begin shriveling and turning a dark brown or black hue. After that, the plant will almost certainly die.
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What is the best way to maintain the right temperature for my Chinese ixora?
The best way to maintain the right temperature range for Chinese ixora is by keeping an eye on both the climate and humidity. You’ll want to try to keep each species in a room where you have access to climate control, keeping the heat in the temperature range best mimics its natural habitat. The humidity levels will also have a direct effect on temperature, so it's important to monitor these as well. You can artificially raise the humidity of your growing space by using a humidifier or lightly misting the leaves with water.
If you intend to grow this species outside, you may find it difficult to maintain the right balance of temperature and humidity. If temperatures begin to drop or the air becomes too dry, your best option is to find room within your home and move your plant inside. An indoor growing space will allow you to control the climate more closely, helping your plant reach its full potential.
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Cultivation:SoilDetail

Soil

The chinese ixora thrives in well-drained, acidic soils; a soil pH of 5 is ideal. If needed, you can make your soil more acidic by adding sphagnum peat moss or elemental sulfur. If you're growing it in a container, opt for an acidic, peat moss-based potting mix.
Cultivation:SoilDetail
Cultivation:PlantingDetail

Planting

If you're growing your chinese ixora in the garden, select a planting site that receives full sun or light shade and has well-drained, acidic soil. Before planting, add compost to your soil and test its pH. If needed, add sphagnum peat moss or elemental sulfur to ensure that the pH is acidic enough. plant your chinese ixora so that the soil is at the same level on the plant as it was in the pot.
The chinese ixora looks excellent as a solitary shrub or as a hedge. When planting a dense hedge, space plants 91 cm apart. In warm climates, they're often grown beneath palm trees and in combination with hibiscus.
If you're growing your chinese ixora in a container, select a pot that is 2.5 to 5 cm wider than the pot it's currently in, and make sure that it has drainage holes. Your chinese ixora will benefit from being moved to a slightly larger pot every couple of years. Use an acidic, peat moss-based potting soil.
Cultivation:PlantingDetail
Cultivation:PottingSuggestions

Potting Suggestions

Potted plants should be repotted every 1-2 years.
Cultivation:PottingSuggestions
care_seasonal_tips

Seasonal Care Tips

seasonal-tip

Seasonal Precautions

The chinese ixora is extremely sensitive to cold and frost. If you live somewhere where temperatures dip below 2 ℃, plant your chinese ixora in a container and move it indoors for the winter.
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Spring

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Summer

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Fall

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Winter

Tropical plants like your plant require some care in the spring.

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1
Early spring is the ideal time to remove any overgrowth and dead vines or branches.
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2
A monthly application of diluted all-purpose liquid fertilizer will encourage healthy growth and blooming. Make sure to apply the fertilizer before buds start appearing.
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3
Water whenever the top layer of soil is beginning to dry out.
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4
Move any container plants to a sunny location to strengthen growth.
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5
Carefully prune older, new growth for propagation. Coating the cutting in rooting hormone will help establish the new plant.

To encourage flowering or fruiting, the plant requires some care.

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1
Ensure the plant is receiving plenty of sunlight.
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2
Keep an eye out for diseases and pests in the summer.
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3
Watering frequency may also need increasing, depending on the amount of weekly rainfall.
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4
Continue fertilizing once or twice a month to support flowering or fruiting.
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5
Container plants receiving more than six or so hours of sunlight a day may require relocating to a partially shady location.
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New plants can be propagated from root or stem shoots. Carefully remove the cutting, coat in a rotting hormone powder, and plant in a container.

While your plant is growing in the fall, continue the monthly fertilization and make sure the plant receives the water and misting it needs to thrive.

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1
Keep the soil moist, watering whenever the soil becomes dry, and fertilize the plant monthly with a diluted, liquid, all-purpose fertilizer.
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Make sure your plant continues to take in bright sunlight through this season, which will help promote growth throughout the season.
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3
To propagate the plant, you can take cuttings at this time and repot them.
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4
Continue to watch out for pests and diseases, such as scales and mealybugs.

Continue to care for your plant during winter, even though it won’t need as much attention as during the months of active growth.

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Keep this plant indoors in freezing winter climates to best protect it and allow it to regrow during the spring.
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2
During the winter, your plant isn't greedy for water, but does require bright light. You can reduce watering to a minimum during this time.
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3
Keep the plant in bright sunlight even during the winter. Avoid feeding the plant during this restful season. Other than giving it some cold protection and sunlight, you can almost leave the plant to itself.
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Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Chinese ixora based on 10 million real cases
Brown spot
Brown spot Brown spot
Brown spot
This infection can cause brown spots or patches to appear on the plant.
Solutions: In minor cases of brown spot, there isn’t any need to treat the disease. However, if much of the foliage is affected and defoliation occurs, the plant will benefit from getting rid of the infection. It is recommended to start by applying organic treatment options, working up to the more potent synthetic, chemical fungicides if necessary. Organic options won’t kill the fungus, but will prevent it from spreading. Dissolve ½ teaspoon of baking soda and one teaspoon of liquid soap in a gallon of water. Using a spray bottle, spray on tops and bottoms of leaves until the mixture drips off. Repeat every two weeks until existing spots stop enlarging and new spots no longer appear. Spray a copper-based fungicidal soap on the leaves, coating the top and bottom leaf surfaces. Reapply as directed on the product label. Copper penetrates the leaf surface and prevents germination of spores so the fungus cannot spread. Apply an all-purpose fungicide to the entire plant, following the label instructions carefully.
Nutrient deficiencies
Nutrient deficiencies Nutrient deficiencies
Nutrient deficiencies
A lack of nutrients will cause a widespread yellowing of the leaves. The yellowing may begin at the base or top of the plant.
Solutions: There are several easy ways to remedy the nutrient deficiencies in soils. Use a water-soluble fertilizer. Fertilizers will include most or all of the macro and micro-nutrients the plants need to thrive. Adding some fertilizer to the soil will make those nutrients available and can combat deficiencies. Regularly apply organic fertilizer pellets. Organic fertilizers such as animal manures and bonemeal can supply plants with all the nutrients that they need to grow strong and healthy. Apply compost. Though not as finely tuned as artificial fertilizer, compost can nevertheless be rich in important nutrients and should be applied to the soil regularly. Apply nutrients via foliar application. In addition to supplementing the soil with nutrients, foliar fertilizer can be applied directly to the plant's leaves. Nutrients offered via foliar application are often taken up even quicker than those put in the soil, so the foliar application can be great for swiftly addressing specific deficiencies.
Leaf scorch
Leaf scorch Leaf scorch
Leaf scorch
Leaf blight causes leaves to dry out and turn brown starting at their tips.
Solutions: The solution to leaf scorch will depend on the cause, however, in general all cultural care methods that improve plant health and root functionality will reduce symptoms. Mulching the root zone (preferably with wood chip mulch) helps retain moisture, reduce evaporation, and promotes a healthy, functional root environment that is critical for water movement to the leaves. Check the root collar for girdling or circling roots that strangle the trunk and limit water and nutrient movement. Protect trees from severe root damage of nearby construction and excavation. If fertilizer burn is to blame, irrigate the soil deeply to flush out excess fertilizer salts. However, keep in mind that fertilizer runoff is an environmental pollutant. Avoiding excess fertilization in the first place is the best approach. If soil testing has revealed a potassium deficiency, apply a potassium fertilizer and water well. Even if you have enough potassium in the soil, plants will not be able to take it up if the soil is consistently too dry. Severely affected twigs may be removed using a pair of sharp and sanitized pruning shears, as weakened branches are susceptible to secondary infections. If your plant has bacterial leaf scorch, there is no cure. Antibiotic injections applied by a professional can reduce symptoms for a season, however, the above cultural management methods are the best options to reduce symptoms and prolong life. An infected plant will likely die within ten years.
Leaf Weevils
Leaf Weevils Leaf Weevils
Leaf Weevils
Leaf Weevils are insects that feed on the leaves of plants.
Solutions: Leaf Weevils are relatively easy to control once their presence is discovered. Here’s what to do: Spray the foliage with an insecticide Place sticky traps around the lower trunks of fruit trees and other woody plants. Weevils can’t fly, and have to crawl up the plants when they emerge from the soil. Dig into the soil around plants with a garden fork and remove and dispose of any larvae. Let chickens roam around the garden, as they love to feed on weevil larvae.
Sooty mold
Sooty mold Sooty mold
Sooty mold
Sooty mildew causes black mold on the leaves that can be wiped away.
Solutions: The first step in treating the plant is to eradicate the insects that secrete the honeydew substance. Visually inspect the plant for insects, making sure to look on the underside of leaves and in the crotch of branches. Insects that may be present are as follows: Aphids are minuscule pear-shaped bugs. Most are green in color. Whiteflies are pale in color, almost translucent, and are covered with a powdery whitish wax. They may look like tiny white moths. Scale appears as small brown bumps attached to the leaves and branches, with either a soft or armored coating. Mealybugs are small white insects that look like cotton wool. To treat insect infestation, follow these steps: Handpick insects off if the infestation is minor. Wipe plant leaves gently with a clean, damp cloth or spray with a jet of water from the hose to dislodge them. Treat with insecticidal soap or neem oil for serious infestations. The fatty acids in insecticidal soaps suffocate small-bodied insects. Neem oil is a common botanical pesticide that blocks the hormones that transition insects from larva to pupa to adult, halting the insect’s life cycle. Once the insect infestation has been treated, remove as much mold from the leaves as possible. The remaining mold will dry out due to the lack of honeydew and will fall off the plant. Wash with insecticidal or very dilute dishwashing soap. Apply a couple of hours before rain is predicted, if possible. The soap will help soften the soot, making it easier to rinse it away. Spray plants with a steady stream of water.
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Brown spot
plant poor
Brown spot
This infection can cause brown spots or patches to appear on the plant.
Overview
Overview
Discolored spots on the foliage of plants are one of the most common disease problems people observe. These spots are caused by fungal and bacterial diseases, with most infections related to a fungal pathogen.
Brown spot can occurs on all houseplants, flowering ornamentals, vegetable plants, and leaves of trees, bushes, and shrubs. No plants are resistant to it, and the problem is worse in warm, wet environments. It can occur at any point in the life stage as long as leaves are present.
Small brownish spots appear on the foliage and enlarge as the disease progresses. In severe cases, the plant or tree is weakened when the lesions interrupt photosynthesis or cause defoliation.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
In most cases, brown spot only affects a small percentage of the whole plant, appearing on a small amount of the leaves. A small infection only puts minor stress on the plant. However, if left untreated and the disease progresses over numerous seasons, it will severely impact the health and productivity of the infected specimen.
  • Sporulation begins (reproduction of the fungal spores), and tiny spots appear on leaves.
  • Placement is often random and scattered as diseases are spread through raindrops.
  • May appear on lower leaves and the interior of the plant where humidity is higher.
  • Brown spots enlarge and grow large enough to touch neighboring spots to form a more prominent blotch.
  • Leaf margins may turn yellow.
  • Tiny black dots (fruiting bodies of the fungi) appear in the dead spots.
  • Blotches grow in size until the entire leaf is brown.
  • The leaf falls off the plant.
Severe Symptoms
  • Partial or complete premature defoliation
  • Reduced growth
  • Increased susceptibility to pests and other diseases
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Brown spot, or leaf spot, is a common descriptive term given to several diseases affecting the leaves of plants and trees. Around 85% of diseases exhibiting leaf spots are due to fungus or fungus-like organisms. Sometimes brown spot is caused by a bacterial infection, or insect activity with similar symptoms.
When conditions are warm and the leaf surfaces are wet, fungal spores being transported by wind or rain land on the surface and cling to it. They do not rupture the cell walls but grow in the space between the plant plasma membrane and the plant cell wall. As the spores reproduce, they release toxins and enzymes that cause necrotic spots (i.e., dead tissue) on the leaves, allowing the fungi to consume the products released when the cells degrade.
Solutions
Solutions
In minor cases of brown spot, there isn’t any need to treat the disease. However, if much of the foliage is affected and defoliation occurs, the plant will benefit from getting rid of the infection. It is recommended to start by applying organic treatment options, working up to the more potent synthetic, chemical fungicides if necessary.
Organic options won’t kill the fungus, but will prevent it from spreading.
  1. Dissolve ½ teaspoon of baking soda and one teaspoon of liquid soap in a gallon of water. Using a spray bottle, spray on tops and bottoms of leaves until the mixture drips off. Repeat every two weeks until existing spots stop enlarging and new spots no longer appear.
  2. Spray a copper-based fungicidal soap on the leaves, coating the top and bottom leaf surfaces. Reapply as directed on the product label. Copper penetrates the leaf surface and prevents germination of spores so the fungus cannot spread.
  3. Apply an all-purpose fungicide to the entire plant, following the label instructions carefully.
Prevention
Prevention
Like many other diseases, it is easier to prevent brown spot than cure it, and this is done through cultural practices.
  • Clear fall leaves from the ground before winter to minimize places where fungi and bacteria can overwinter.
  • Maintain good air movement between plants through proper plant spacing.
  • Increase air circulation through the center of plants through pruning.
  • Thoroughly clean all pruning tools after working with diseased plants.
  • Never dispose of disease plant material in a compost pile.
  • Avoid overhead watering to keep moisture off of the foliage.
  • Keep plants healthy by providing adequate sunlight, water, and fertilizer.
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Nutrient deficiencies
plant poor
Nutrient deficiencies
A lack of nutrients will cause a widespread yellowing of the leaves. The yellowing may begin at the base or top of the plant.
Overview
Overview
Nutrient deficiencies can be seen in many different ways on plants. Basically, the lack of nutrients will inhibit plant growth, produce weak stems and leaves, and leave plants open to infection from pests and diseases. Plants use the nutrients from the soil to help them with photosynthesis. This, in turn, produces healthy plant growth. Plants that lack adequate amounts of nutrients will look lackluster and unhealthy. Eventually, if this is not addressed, it will cause the plants to die. The most important nutrients that plants need are nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and sulfur. Additionally, plants require small amounts of micronutrients such as iron, boron, manganese, zinc, copper, and molybdenum.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
A common sign that plants are experiencing nutrient deficiencies is the yellowing of leaves. This may be an overall yellowing or leaves that are yellow but still have green veins. These leaves will eventually brown off and die.
Another sign is the loss of plant vigor. The plants may not be growing as well as they should or their growth may be stunted.
Below are some common symptoms that appear when plants are lacking in nutrients.
Nitrogen (N): Inner, older leaves yellow first. If the deficiency is severe, yellowing progresses outward to newer growth.
Potassium (K): Leaf edges may turn brown and crinkly, with a yellowing layer forming just inside of the edge. Older leaves tend to be impacted first.
Phosphorus (P): Lack of vigorous growth. Plants will appear stunted.
Zinc (Zn): Yellowing tends to occur first at the base of the leaf.
Copper (Cu): Newer leaves begin to yellow first, with older leaves yellowing only if the deficiency becomes severe.
Boron (B): Newer leaves are impacted first. Foliage may also become particularly brittle in cases of boron deficiency.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
There are several factors that can lead to nutrient deficiencies, a situation where plants are not receiving the nutrients that they need. This could be because they are planted in nutrient-deficient soils, or that the soil's pH is too high or low. Incorrect soil pH can lock up certain nutrients, thus making them unavailable to plants. Lack of soil moisture can also be a problem, because plants need water to be able to absorb the nutrients from the soil.
Solutions
Solutions
There are several easy ways to remedy the nutrient deficiencies in soils.
  1. Use a water-soluble fertilizer. Fertilizers will include most or all of the macro and micro-nutrients the plants need to thrive. Adding some fertilizer to the soil will make those nutrients available and can combat deficiencies.
  2. Regularly apply organic fertilizer pellets. Organic fertilizers such as animal manures and bonemeal can supply plants with all the nutrients that they need to grow strong and healthy.
  3. Apply compost. Though not as finely tuned as artificial fertilizer, compost can nevertheless be rich in important nutrients and should be applied to the soil regularly.
  4. Apply nutrients via foliar application. In addition to supplementing the soil with nutrients, foliar fertilizer can be applied directly to the plant's leaves. Nutrients offered via foliar application are often taken up even quicker than those put in the soil, so the foliar application can be great for swiftly addressing specific deficiencies.
Prevention
Prevention
There are several easy ways to prevent nutrient deficiencies in plants.
  1. Regular fertilizing. Regular addition of fertilizer to the soil is one of the simplest and most effective ways to prevent deficiencies.
  2. Proper watering. Both over and under watering can adversely impact a plant's roots, which in turn makes it harder for them to properly take up nutrients.
  3. Testing the soil's pH. A soil's acidity or alkalinity will impact the degree to which certain nutrients are available to be taken up by plants. Knowing the soil's pH means it can be amended to suit the needs of the individual plants.
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Leaf scorch
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Leaf scorch
Leaf blight causes leaves to dry out and turn brown starting at their tips.
Overview
Overview
Leaf scorch refers to two general conditions: physiological leaf scorch and bacterial leaf scorch. It causes leaves to discolor starting along the margins, and eventually die.
Leaf scorch development is most common in the hot, dry season, becoming most noticeable in late summer. However, it can occur at other times of the year. It most often affects young trees and shrubs, but it can also affect flowers, vegetables, and other plants.
Leaf scorch can get progressively worse over multiple seasons. If the root causes are not addressed, leaf scorch can lead to plant death.
While you cannot reverse the damage caused by physiological leaf scorch, you can prevent further damage. With proper management, plants will fully recover. However, there is no cure for bacterial leaf scorch, which is a systemic infection.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
  • Yellow, brown, or blackened leaves starting with the leaf margins
  • Dying twig tips on trees and shrubs as leaves die and fall
  • Often there is a bright yellow border line between the dead and living leaf tissue
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
There are numerous contributing causes of leaf scorch.
Bacterial leaf scorch is caused by the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa. The bacteria block the xylem vessels, preventing water movement. Symptoms may vary across species.
Physiological leaf scorch most commonly occurs when a plant cannot take up enough water. Numerous conditions can lead to this issue, particularly an unhealthy root system. Some causes of an unhealthy root system include overly-compacted soil, recent tillage, root compaction and severing due to pavement or other construction, drought, and overly-saturated soils.
Potassium deficiency can contribute to leaf scorch. Since plants need potassium to move water, they cannot properly move water when there is a lack of potassium.
Too much fertilizer can also cause leaf scorch symptoms. The accumulation of salts (including nutrient salts from fertilizers, as well as salt water) accumulate at the leaf margins and may build up to concentrations that burn the tissues.
Solutions
Solutions
The solution to leaf scorch will depend on the cause, however, in general all cultural care methods that improve plant health and root functionality will reduce symptoms.
  • Mulching the root zone (preferably with wood chip mulch) helps retain moisture, reduce evaporation, and promotes a healthy, functional root environment that is critical for water movement to the leaves.
  • Check the root collar for girdling or circling roots that strangle the trunk and limit water and nutrient movement.
  • Protect trees from severe root damage of nearby construction and excavation.
  • If fertilizer burn is to blame, irrigate the soil deeply to flush out excess fertilizer salts. However, keep in mind that fertilizer runoff is an environmental pollutant. Avoiding excess fertilization in the first place is the best approach.
  • If soil testing has revealed a potassium deficiency, apply a potassium fertilizer and water well. Even if you have enough potassium in the soil, plants will not be able to take it up if the soil is consistently too dry.
  • Severely affected twigs may be removed using a pair of sharp and sanitized pruning shears, as weakened branches are susceptible to secondary infections.
  • If your plant has bacterial leaf scorch, there is no cure. Antibiotic injections applied by a professional can reduce symptoms for a season, however, the above cultural management methods are the best options to reduce symptoms and prolong life. An infected plant will likely die within ten years.
Prevention
Prevention
  • Physiological leaf scorch is best avoided by making sure your plants have a healthy, functional root system and access to enough water. Water regularly, especially on the mornings of excessively hot, sunny days. Deep, infrequent irrigation is better than shallow, frequent irrigation.
  • Have your soil tested and apply the proper nutrients. Be sure to not over-apply fertilizers.
  • Make sure your plants’ roots have room to expand. Avoid compacted soil as well and avoid paving areas above the root zone. Do not till or disturb the soil where plant roots are growing.
  • Plant new trees and shrubs in the fall, so that they have the maximum amount of time to become established before the environmental stresses of the next summer.
  • Remove any dead or dying plant tissue that may harbor secondary infections.
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Leaf Weevils
plant poor
Leaf Weevils
Leaf Weevils are insects that feed on the leaves of plants.
Overview
Overview
Leaf Weevils are insects that feed on the leaves of plants. They can cause major damage to both edible and non-edible plants. Watch out for these garden pests and use control measures to get rid of them as soon as the problem is noticed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Leaf Weevils are small flightless insects that are typically around 6 mm long. They have a hard body that is oval shaped and covered in short hairs, a long snout on their head that is downward facing, and 3 pairs of legs with hooked claws.
Once mated, the female weevil with lay around 20 eggs at one time, either in leaf litter on the ground or sometimes on the soil. Weevils generally only produce one batch of eggs a year but may produce 2 if conditions are ideal.
The eggs take around 6 to 15 days to hatch. When the larva emerges, it burrows into the soil. These larvae have chewing mouth parts and no legs. They feed on the roots of the plants. When this happens, you may see signs of wilting of the leaves, stems, and flowers as the plant can’t deliver enough water from the roots to the above-ground growing parts.
Eventually, the larva evolves into a soft white pupa. The pupating period normally takes around 1 to 3 weeks. After this, the adult leaf weevil will emerge and crawl up the plant to feed on the leaves.
Adult leaf Weevils feed on young leaves, stems, flowers, and buds of almost any plant. This includes many varieties of fruits and vegetables as well as ornamental plants. This creates irregular round holes in the leaves. These holes normally start at the edges of the leaf. Holes may also be made in flowers, lesions may be caused on the skin of fruit, and sometimes whole stems are chewed off.
These insects prefer a humid environment with warm temperatures. They are mostly active during the night and will hide in leaf litter, mulch, and other debris during the day.
Solutions
Solutions
Leaf Weevils are relatively easy to control once their presence is discovered. Here’s what to do:
  • Spray the foliage with an insecticide
  • Place sticky traps around the lower trunks of fruit trees and other woody plants. Weevils can’t fly, and have to crawl up the plants when they emerge from the soil.
  • Dig into the soil around plants with a garden fork and remove and dispose of any larvae.
  • Let chickens roam around the garden, as they love to feed on weevil larvae.
Prevention
Prevention
There are various ways to keep leaf Weevils away from plants.
  • Remove weeds such as dandelion, capeweed, portulaca, mallow, sorrel, and dock. Leaf Weevils are attracted to these weeds and will set up a colony.
  • Make sure fruit trees are well spaced from each other. This ensures that the weevils and their larvae don’t spread from one tree to the next.
  • Cultivate the soil before planting a new crop. This allows any larvae or pupae in the soil to be unearthed and disposed of.
  • Regularly fertilize the soil to encourage both earthworm and microbial activity.
  • Check plants regularly to see any signs of leaf weevil activity. Also check under loose bark, mulch, leaf litter, and in the junction of stems on the plant.
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Sooty mold
plant poor
Sooty mold
Sooty mildew causes black mold on the leaves that can be wiped away.
Overview
Overview
Sooty mold is a common disease of many plant varieties, especially those that are likely to be attacked by aphids and scale insects. While this disease can be unsightly and will reduce the plant's ability to photosynthesize, it generally won't kill an affected plant. It is treatable by fixing the underlying cause.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Plants are covered with a black soot-like substance. Sooty mold can cover leaves, stems, flower buds, and other parts of the plant.
Sometimes, there are also signs of small white casts on the mold, which are the result of the insects shedding.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Sooty mold is a secondary disease that is a result of a pest problem. Sap-sucking insects such as aphids, mealybugs, whiteflies, and scale insects excrete a honeydew-like substance that sticks to the surface of the plant. When various parts of the plant are covered in this honeydew, the sooty mold fungal spores land on the plant and start to reproduce. This causes the black mold that can be seen on the plant. It's somewhat similar to the black mold that infects damp areas in the house.
Sooty mold does not feed on the plants themselves but rather on the honeydew secreted by insect pests.
Solutions
Solutions
The first step in treating the plant is to eradicate the insects that secrete the honeydew substance. Visually inspect the plant for insects, making sure to look on the underside of leaves and in the crotch of branches. Insects that may be present are as follows:
  • Aphids are minuscule pear-shaped bugs. Most are green in color.
  • Whiteflies are pale in color, almost translucent, and are covered with a powdery whitish wax. They may look like tiny white moths.
  • Scale appears as small brown bumps attached to the leaves and branches, with either a soft or armored coating.
  • Mealybugs are small white insects that look like cotton wool.
To treat insect infestation, follow these steps:
  1. Handpick insects off if the infestation is minor. Wipe plant leaves gently with a clean, damp cloth or spray with a jet of water from the hose to dislodge them.
  2. Treat with insecticidal soap or neem oil for serious infestations. The fatty acids in insecticidal soaps suffocate small-bodied insects. Neem oil is a common botanical pesticide that blocks the hormones that transition insects from larva to pupa to adult, halting the insect’s life cycle.
Once the insect infestation has been treated, remove as much mold from the leaves as possible. The remaining mold will dry out due to the lack of honeydew and will fall off the plant.
  1. Wash with insecticidal or very dilute dishwashing soap. Apply a couple of hours before rain is predicted, if possible. The soap will help soften the soot, making it easier to rinse it away.
  2. Spray plants with a steady stream of water.
Prevention
Prevention
  1. Keep plants properly watered. Drought stress will increase susceptibility to insect problems.
  2. Fertilize plants per the recommended schedule on the product label to strengthen natural plant defenses.
  3. Control insects that produce honeydew. Grow plants that attract beneficial insects or grow plants that naturally deter sap-suckers.
  4. Control ants on tree stems with sticky tape. Ants like honeydew and will protect honeydew-producing insects from predators like ladybugs.
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More About Chinese Ixora

Plant Type
Plant Type
Shrub
Lifespan
Lifespan
Perennial, Annual
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Spring, Summer, Early fall, Mid fall
Flower Color
Flower Color
Orange
Red
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green
Flower Size
Flower Size
2.5 to 3 cm
Plant Height
Plant Height
3 to 4.5 m

Usages

Garden Use
The chinese ixora does well as a hedge plant, good for planting in gardens and courtyards, because of its dense growth and bright blooms. It is commonly seen in many gardens due to its beauty and low maintenance requirements. It is prized for its ability to mark boundaries and be pruned into a tidy growth pattern. It does well in cottage gardens and is typically planted with other flowering bushes like the butterfly bush and boxwood wintergreen.
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Common Problems

Why does my chinese ixora fail to flower?

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The most common reasons the chinese ixora fails to flower are a lack of sunlight, poor soil conditions, or the flower buds have been pruned. If your chinese ixora is in a container, consider moving it to a sunnier space or getting a grow light. You should also test your soil and ensure that its pH is near 5. Amend your soil with elemental sulfur to make it more acidic.

Why does my chinese ixora have purplish-red spots on some of its leaves?

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Purplish-red spots typically indicate a potassium and phosphorus deficiency. Rock phosphate, bone meal, and more can all be used to add phosphorus to the soil. To add potassium, you should add granite meal or greensand.

Why does my chinese ixora have yellow, spotty leaves and few blooms?

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These are symptoms of a magnesium deficiency. When you fertilize your chinese ixora, select a fertilizer that contains magnesium. Also, check your soil's pH; a pH that is too high or too alkaline can prevent the plant from taking up magnesium. The chinese ixora prefers a pH of 5 - elemental sulfur can be used to lower your soil's pH if necessary.
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Chinese ixora
Chinese ixora
Chinese ixora
Chinese ixora
Chinese ixora

How to Care for Chinese Ixora

Chinese ixora (Ixora chinensis) is a tropical evergreen shrub native to China and thus sometimes called simply Chinese Ixora. The red berries and clusters of bright flowers that bloom nearly year-round make this a popular ornamental plant.
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Water
Water
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Sunlight
Sunlight
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care_basic_guide

Basic Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterDetail

Water

Cultivation:WaterDetail
During the summer, water your chinese ixora frequently and keep the soil moist. In the winter, it's okay to let the top of the soil dry out before watering. Always water with non-chlorinated water and avoid water that is high in calcium, which can create soil conditions that are too alkaline for the chinese ixora.
Your chinese ixora may also need extra attention if you live in a dry climate or it's kept indoors. The chinese ixora thrives in humid climates and should be misted daily. You can also keep it in a bathroom or a humid greenhouse, as long as it receives enough light.
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Water

Ground Chinese ixora watering
In some cases, your Chinese ixora may not need any supplemental watering when it grows outside and will survive on rainwater alone. However, if you live in an area of little to no rain, you should water this plant about every two weeks. If you belong to the group of people who live out of this plant's natural hardiness zone, you should grow it indoors.
When a Chinese ixora is very young, such as when it is in a seedling stage, you will need to give it more water than you would if it were at a mature age. During the early stages of this plant’s life, it is important to keep the soil consistently moist to encourage root development. The same is true for any Chinese ixora that you have transplanted to a new growing location. As it continues to grow and establish, it can survive entirely on rainwater and only when the weather is hot and there is no rainfall at all for 2-3 weeks, then consider giving your Chinese ixora a full watering to prevent them from suffering stress.
Potted Chinese ixora watering
For potted plants, there are two main ways that you can determine how often to water your Chinese ixora . The first way is to set a predetermined watering schedule. If you choose this route, you should plan to water this plant about once every week or once every other week. However, this approach may not always work as it does not consider the unique conditions of your Chinese ixora ’s growing environment. Your watering frequency can also change depending on the season. For instance, a predetermined watering schedule will likely not suffice during summer when this plant's water needs are highest. An alternative route is to set your watering frequency based on soil moisture. Typically, it is best to wait until the first two to four inches of soil, usually ⅓ to ½ depth of the pots, have dried out entirely before you give more water. If more than half of the soil has become dry, you should consider giving more water than usual. In those cases, continue adding water until you see excess water draining from your pot’s drainage holes.
The seasonal changes will affect how often you water your Chinese ixora . Mainly, during the hottest summer months, you will likely need to increase how much you water this plant, especially if it grows in an area that receives ample sunlight. Strong summer sunlight can cause soil to dry out much faster than usual, meaning that you’ll need to water more frequently. By contrast, your Chinese ixora will need much less water during the winter, as it will not be in an active growing phase. During winter, you can get by with watering once every 2 to 3 weeks or sometimes not at all. For those growing this plant indoors, you should be somewhat wary of appliances such as air conditioners, which can cause your plant to dry out more quickly, which also calls for more frequent watering.
Underwater and overwater
When your Chinese ixora is planted in pots, overwatering is often more likely to.When you accidentally overwater your Chinese ixora , you should be prepared to remedy the situation immediately. First, you should stop watering your plant right away to minimize the effect of your overwatering. After, you should consider removing your Chinese ixora from its pot to inspect its roots. If you find that none of the roots have developed root rot, it may be permissible to return your plant to its container. If you do discover signs of root rot, then you should trim away any roots that have been affected. You may also want to apply a fungicide to prevent further damage. Lastly, you should repot your Chinese ixora in soil that is well-draining. In the case of an underwatered Chinese ixora , simply water this plant more frequently.
Underwatering is often an easy fix. If you underwater, the plant's leaves will tend to droop and dry out and fall off, and the leaves will quickly return to fullness after sufficient watering. Please correct your watering frequency as soon as underwatering occurs.
For outdoor plants, especially newly planted plants or plant seedlings, they can be prone to lack of watering. Remember that you need to keep watering enough for a few months when the tree is small or just planted. This is because once the roots are established, Chinese ixora can rely on rain most of the time.
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Cultivation:FertilizerDetail

Fertilizer

Cultivation:FertilizerDetail
To encourage blooming, the chinese ixora should be fertilized monthly during the growing season. Use a high nitrogen fertilizer, like an 8-4-4 (N-P-K) that includes magnesium. You may find a fertilizer that's specifically labeled for palms and Ixora chinensis. Compost can also be added 2-4 times a year around the base of the plant to add nutrients and help improve drainage.
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Fertilizer

Bright colors and rich textures are what Chinese ixora can add to your home décor. With a few well-placed and well-cared-for Chinese ixora plants, you can impress your home guests and enhance the beauty of your house. The issue is, if you don't understand how to fertilize your Chinese ixora, there is little chance that you can expect this plant to perform its best. Read on to learn answers to some of the most common fertilization questions about Chinese ixora.
Fertilization is important to a Chinese ixora overall health and well-being. With the proper supply of energy and nutrients, your Chinese ixora will develop a healthy array of foliage while also producing a set of sturdy stems and branches. However, it is the flowers of a Chinese ixora that are often most valuable to the gardeners who grow them. Fortunately, fertilization also helps this plant produce flowers that are large, vibrant, and long-lasting. The reason for this is that the right kind of fertilizer will make it much easier for your Chinese ixora to transfer fuel from its roots through its stems to its flowers. Proper fertilization also keeps this plant's health in good general condition, making it better able to fight off diseases.
The main time of year when you should fertilize a Chinese ixora is during the early spring when your plant is exiting its dormant phase and preparing to open its buds. Feeding at this time will give your Chinese ixora plenty of available energy to use to support its overall growth and flower development, but this is not the only time that it is a good idea to feed this plant. An additional feeding at the end of the season during the fall months can also benefit this plant, although this second feeding does not need to be as large as the first one. Also, some gardeners choose to fertilize their Chinese ixora while they are planting it, but this is not always necessary.
While it is often alright to use a general-purpose fertilizer that has even ratios of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, Chinese ixora plants often do best when they receive a specific type of fertilizer. In most instances, the most important nutrients for a Chinese ixora are nitrogen and phosphorus, which is why they should appear in higher volumes in the fertilizer you use compared to the potassium content. A fertilizer that has an N-P-K ratio of 10-10-8 or something similar should work well. However, it can also be beneficial to apply an organic material such as compost for at least one of your annual feedings. If you choose to use fertilizer, it is most common to use granular fertilizer for a Chinese ixora.
Applying fertilizer for your Chinese ixora is a quite straightforward task that any gardener can perform, even those with minimal experience. To feed your Chinese ixora with granular fertilizer, all you need to do is sprinkle the fertilizer on the soil. However, before you do so, make sure that you moisten the soil with water. Additionally, you can also amend your Chinese ixora plant's soil by adding an organic material like compost or manure. If you want to incorporate one of those amendments into your soil, you should place some of the material on top of the soil. Then use a hand rake to gently work the material into the first few inches of soil without disturbing the roots.
There are several negative outcomes that will occur if your regularly overfertilize your Chinese ixora. First, when you give one of these plants too much fertilizer, you can expect to see leaf discoloration and perhaps some wilting. Excessive fertilization can also lead to fertilizer burn, which will dry out the roots, making them ineffective.
However, the threats of overfertilization do not end there for the Chinese ixora. If you feed one of these plants too much, it may show a lack of flowers or bloom with flowers that are a bit lackluster. Also, an overfertilized Chinese ixora will be weaker overall, show stunted growth, and is more vulnerable to diseases and pest infestations.
As is the case for many plants, you do not need to fertilize your Chinese ixora during the winter. In winter, a Chinese ixora will be in a dormant phase, which means it does not need to gain much energy from the soil to develop new growth. Fertilizing during winter makes it much more likely that the negative outcomes of overfertilization will occur. The two main feeding times for a Chinese ixora are during the early spring and the fall. That means that during most of the spring and summer, this plant will not need fertilizer. It is also wise to hold off on feedings if your plant is experiencing excessively hot or dry conditions for whatever reason.
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Cultivation:SunlightDetail

Sunlight

Cultivation:SunlightDetail
Your chinese ixora should be grown in full sun for the best flower production. While it will tolerate partial shade, it needs a minimum of 6 hours of sunlight per day. If you're growing it in a container indoors, you should place the pot in a bright room and move it outdoors during warm weather, so that it receives as much light as possible.
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Cultivation:PruningDetail

Pruning

Cultivation:PruningDetail
In general, the chinese ixora should be pruned once per year. Pruning can be used to help trim the chinese ixora to a desired shape and size, and it also encourages blooming. It's best to prune in late winter or early spring, before the plant puts on new growth. Avoid cutting off all the flower buds that grow at the tips of stems.
For more experienced gardeners or those looking for a challenge, the chinese ixora is suitable for bonsai cultivation techniques.
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Advanced Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail

Temperature

Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail
As the chinese ixora is native to tropical regions in Southeast Asia, it requires a warm, humid climate. It thrives outdoors in areas where winter temperatures remain above 2 ℃. In areas that experience colder winters, the chinese ixora should be grown in a container and moved indoors for the winter.
If growing indoors or in a dry climate, you'll probably need to mist your chinese ixora regularly to provide enough moisture. Your chinese ixora should also be watered regularly - it will do best in moist but well-drained soil.
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Cultivation:SoilDetail

Soil

Cultivation:SoilDetail
The chinese ixora thrives in well-drained, acidic soils; a soil pH of 5 is ideal. If needed, you can make your soil more acidic by adding sphagnum peat moss or elemental sulfur. If you're growing it in a container, opt for an acidic, peat moss-based potting mix.
Cultivation:PlantingDetail

Planting

Cultivation:PlantingDetail
If you're growing your chinese ixora in the garden, select a planting site that receives full sun or light shade and has well-drained, acidic soil. Before planting, add compost to your soil and test its pH. If needed, add sphagnum peat moss or elemental sulfur to ensure that the pH is acidic enough. plant your chinese ixora so that the soil is at the same level on the plant as it was in the pot.
The chinese ixora looks excellent as a solitary shrub or as a hedge. When planting a dense hedge, space plants 91 cm apart. In warm climates, they're often grown beneath palm trees and in combination with hibiscus.
If you're growing your chinese ixora in a container, select a pot that is 2.5 to 5 cm wider than the pot it's currently in, and make sure that it has drainage holes. Your chinese ixora will benefit from being moved to a slightly larger pot every couple of years. Use an acidic, peat moss-based potting soil.
Cultivation:PottingSuggestions

Potting Suggestions

Cultivation:PottingSuggestions
Potted plants should be repotted every 1-2 years.
care_seasonal_tips

Seasonal Care Tips

seasonal-tip

Seasonal Precautions

The chinese ixora is extremely sensitive to cold and frost. If you live somewhere where temperatures dip below 2 ℃, plant your chinese ixora in a container and move it indoors for the winter.
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Spring

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Summer

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Fall

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Winter

Tropical plants like your plant require some care in the spring.

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1
Early spring is the ideal time to remove any overgrowth and dead vines or branches.
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2
A monthly application of diluted all-purpose liquid fertilizer will encourage healthy growth and blooming. Make sure to apply the fertilizer before buds start appearing.
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3
Water whenever the top layer of soil is beginning to dry out.
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4
Move any container plants to a sunny location to strengthen growth.
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5
Carefully prune older, new growth for propagation. Coating the cutting in rooting hormone will help establish the new plant.

To encourage flowering or fruiting, the plant requires some care.

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1
Ensure the plant is receiving plenty of sunlight.
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2
Keep an eye out for diseases and pests in the summer.
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3
Watering frequency may also need increasing, depending on the amount of weekly rainfall.
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4
Continue fertilizing once or twice a month to support flowering or fruiting.
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5
Container plants receiving more than six or so hours of sunlight a day may require relocating to a partially shady location.
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6
New plants can be propagated from root or stem shoots. Carefully remove the cutting, coat in a rotting hormone powder, and plant in a container.

While your plant is growing in the fall, continue the monthly fertilization and make sure the plant receives the water and misting it needs to thrive.

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1
Keep the soil moist, watering whenever the soil becomes dry, and fertilize the plant monthly with a diluted, liquid, all-purpose fertilizer.
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2
Make sure your plant continues to take in bright sunlight through this season, which will help promote growth throughout the season.
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3
To propagate the plant, you can take cuttings at this time and repot them.
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4
Continue to watch out for pests and diseases, such as scales and mealybugs.

Continue to care for your plant during winter, even though it won’t need as much attention as during the months of active growth.

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1
Keep this plant indoors in freezing winter climates to best protect it and allow it to regrow during the spring.
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2
During the winter, your plant isn't greedy for water, but does require bright light. You can reduce watering to a minimum during this time.
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3
Keep the plant in bright sunlight even during the winter. Avoid feeding the plant during this restful season. Other than giving it some cold protection and sunlight, you can almost leave the plant to itself.
care_pet_and_diseases

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Chinese ixora based on 10 million real cases
Brown spot
Brown spot  Brown spot  Brown spot
This infection can cause brown spots or patches to appear on the plant.
Solutions: In minor cases of brown spot, there isn’t any need to treat the disease. However, if much of the foliage is affected and defoliation occurs, the plant will benefit from getting rid of the infection. It is recommended to start by applying organic treatment options, working up to the more potent synthetic, chemical fungicides if necessary. Organic options won’t kill the fungus, but will prevent it from spreading. Dissolve ½ teaspoon of baking soda and one teaspoon of liquid soap in a gallon of water. Using a spray bottle, spray on tops and bottoms of leaves until the mixture drips off. Repeat every two weeks until existing spots stop enlarging and new spots no longer appear. Spray a copper-based fungicidal soap on the leaves, coating the top and bottom leaf surfaces. Reapply as directed on the product label. Copper penetrates the leaf surface and prevents germination of spores so the fungus cannot spread. Apply an all-purpose fungicide to the entire plant, following the label instructions carefully.
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Nutrient deficiencies
Nutrient deficiencies  Nutrient deficiencies  Nutrient deficiencies
A lack of nutrients will cause a widespread yellowing of the leaves. The yellowing may begin at the base or top of the plant.
Solutions: There are several easy ways to remedy the nutrient deficiencies in soils. Use a water-soluble fertilizer. Fertilizers will include most or all of the macro and micro-nutrients the plants need to thrive. Adding some fertilizer to the soil will make those nutrients available and can combat deficiencies. Regularly apply organic fertilizer pellets. Organic fertilizers such as animal manures and bonemeal can supply plants with all the nutrients that they need to grow strong and healthy. Apply compost. Though not as finely tuned as artificial fertilizer, compost can nevertheless be rich in important nutrients and should be applied to the soil regularly. Apply nutrients via foliar application. In addition to supplementing the soil with nutrients, foliar fertilizer can be applied directly to the plant's leaves. Nutrients offered via foliar application are often taken up even quicker than those put in the soil, so the foliar application can be great for swiftly addressing specific deficiencies.
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Leaf scorch
Leaf scorch  Leaf scorch  Leaf scorch
Leaf blight causes leaves to dry out and turn brown starting at their tips.
Solutions: The solution to leaf scorch will depend on the cause, however, in general all cultural care methods that improve plant health and root functionality will reduce symptoms. Mulching the root zone (preferably with wood chip mulch) helps retain moisture, reduce evaporation, and promotes a healthy, functional root environment that is critical for water movement to the leaves. Check the root collar for girdling or circling roots that strangle the trunk and limit water and nutrient movement. Protect trees from severe root damage of nearby construction and excavation. If fertilizer burn is to blame, irrigate the soil deeply to flush out excess fertilizer salts. However, keep in mind that fertilizer runoff is an environmental pollutant. Avoiding excess fertilization in the first place is the best approach. If soil testing has revealed a potassium deficiency, apply a potassium fertilizer and water well. Even if you have enough potassium in the soil, plants will not be able to take it up if the soil is consistently too dry. Severely affected twigs may be removed using a pair of sharp and sanitized pruning shears, as weakened branches are susceptible to secondary infections. If your plant has bacterial leaf scorch, there is no cure. Antibiotic injections applied by a professional can reduce symptoms for a season, however, the above cultural management methods are the best options to reduce symptoms and prolong life. An infected plant will likely die within ten years.
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Leaf Weevils
Leaf Weevils  Leaf Weevils  Leaf Weevils
Leaf Weevils are insects that feed on the leaves of plants.
Solutions: Leaf Weevils are relatively easy to control once their presence is discovered. Here’s what to do: Spray the foliage with an insecticide Place sticky traps around the lower trunks of fruit trees and other woody plants. Weevils can’t fly, and have to crawl up the plants when they emerge from the soil. Dig into the soil around plants with a garden fork and remove and dispose of any larvae. Let chickens roam around the garden, as they love to feed on weevil larvae.
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Sooty mold
Sooty mold  Sooty mold  Sooty mold
Sooty mildew causes black mold on the leaves that can be wiped away.
Solutions: The first step in treating the plant is to eradicate the insects that secrete the honeydew substance. Visually inspect the plant for insects, making sure to look on the underside of leaves and in the crotch of branches. Insects that may be present are as follows: Aphids are minuscule pear-shaped bugs. Most are green in color. Whiteflies are pale in color, almost translucent, and are covered with a powdery whitish wax. They may look like tiny white moths. Scale appears as small brown bumps attached to the leaves and branches, with either a soft or armored coating. Mealybugs are small white insects that look like cotton wool. To treat insect infestation, follow these steps: Handpick insects off if the infestation is minor. Wipe plant leaves gently with a clean, damp cloth or spray with a jet of water from the hose to dislodge them. Treat with insecticidal soap or neem oil for serious infestations. The fatty acids in insecticidal soaps suffocate small-bodied insects. Neem oil is a common botanical pesticide that blocks the hormones that transition insects from larva to pupa to adult, halting the insect’s life cycle. Once the insect infestation has been treated, remove as much mold from the leaves as possible. The remaining mold will dry out due to the lack of honeydew and will fall off the plant. Wash with insecticidal or very dilute dishwashing soap. Apply a couple of hours before rain is predicted, if possible. The soap will help soften the soot, making it easier to rinse it away. Spray plants with a steady stream of water.
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Brown spot
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Brown spot
This infection can cause brown spots or patches to appear on the plant.
Overview
Overview
Discolored spots on the foliage of plants are one of the most common disease problems people observe. These spots are caused by fungal and bacterial diseases, with most infections related to a fungal pathogen.
Brown spot can occurs on all houseplants, flowering ornamentals, vegetable plants, and leaves of trees, bushes, and shrubs. No plants are resistant to it, and the problem is worse in warm, wet environments. It can occur at any point in the life stage as long as leaves are present.
Small brownish spots appear on the foliage and enlarge as the disease progresses. In severe cases, the plant or tree is weakened when the lesions interrupt photosynthesis or cause defoliation.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
In most cases, brown spot only affects a small percentage of the whole plant, appearing on a small amount of the leaves. A small infection only puts minor stress on the plant. However, if left untreated and the disease progresses over numerous seasons, it will severely impact the health and productivity of the infected specimen.
  • Sporulation begins (reproduction of the fungal spores), and tiny spots appear on leaves.
  • Placement is often random and scattered as diseases are spread through raindrops.
  • May appear on lower leaves and the interior of the plant where humidity is higher.
  • Brown spots enlarge and grow large enough to touch neighboring spots to form a more prominent blotch.
  • Leaf margins may turn yellow.
  • Tiny black dots (fruiting bodies of the fungi) appear in the dead spots.
  • Blotches grow in size until the entire leaf is brown.
  • The leaf falls off the plant.
Severe Symptoms
  • Partial or complete premature defoliation
  • Reduced growth
  • Increased susceptibility to pests and other diseases
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Brown spot, or leaf spot, is a common descriptive term given to several diseases affecting the leaves of plants and trees. Around 85% of diseases exhibiting leaf spots are due to fungus or fungus-like organisms. Sometimes brown spot is caused by a bacterial infection, or insect activity with similar symptoms.
When conditions are warm and the leaf surfaces are wet, fungal spores being transported by wind or rain land on the surface and cling to it. They do not rupture the cell walls but grow in the space between the plant plasma membrane and the plant cell wall. As the spores reproduce, they release toxins and enzymes that cause necrotic spots (i.e., dead tissue) on the leaves, allowing the fungi to consume the products released when the cells degrade.
Solutions
Solutions
In minor cases of brown spot, there isn’t any need to treat the disease. However, if much of the foliage is affected and defoliation occurs, the plant will benefit from getting rid of the infection. It is recommended to start by applying organic treatment options, working up to the more potent synthetic, chemical fungicides if necessary.
Organic options won’t kill the fungus, but will prevent it from spreading.
  1. Dissolve ½ teaspoon of baking soda and one teaspoon of liquid soap in a gallon of water. Using a spray bottle, spray on tops and bottoms of leaves until the mixture drips off. Repeat every two weeks until existing spots stop enlarging and new spots no longer appear.
  2. Spray a copper-based fungicidal soap on the leaves, coating the top and bottom leaf surfaces. Reapply as directed on the product label. Copper penetrates the leaf surface and prevents germination of spores so the fungus cannot spread.
  3. Apply an all-purpose fungicide to the entire plant, following the label instructions carefully.
Prevention
Prevention
Like many other diseases, it is easier to prevent brown spot than cure it, and this is done through cultural practices.
  • Clear fall leaves from the ground before winter to minimize places where fungi and bacteria can overwinter.
  • Maintain good air movement between plants through proper plant spacing.
  • Increase air circulation through the center of plants through pruning.
  • Thoroughly clean all pruning tools after working with diseased plants.
  • Never dispose of disease plant material in a compost pile.
  • Avoid overhead watering to keep moisture off of the foliage.
  • Keep plants healthy by providing adequate sunlight, water, and fertilizer.
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Nutrient deficiencies
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Nutrient deficiencies
A lack of nutrients will cause a widespread yellowing of the leaves. The yellowing may begin at the base or top of the plant.
Overview
Overview
Nutrient deficiencies can be seen in many different ways on plants. Basically, the lack of nutrients will inhibit plant growth, produce weak stems and leaves, and leave plants open to infection from pests and diseases. Plants use the nutrients from the soil to help them with photosynthesis. This, in turn, produces healthy plant growth. Plants that lack adequate amounts of nutrients will look lackluster and unhealthy. Eventually, if this is not addressed, it will cause the plants to die. The most important nutrients that plants need are nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and sulfur. Additionally, plants require small amounts of micronutrients such as iron, boron, manganese, zinc, copper, and molybdenum.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
A common sign that plants are experiencing nutrient deficiencies is the yellowing of leaves. This may be an overall yellowing or leaves that are yellow but still have green veins. These leaves will eventually brown off and die.
Another sign is the loss of plant vigor. The plants may not be growing as well as they should or their growth may be stunted.
Below are some common symptoms that appear when plants are lacking in nutrients.
Nitrogen (N): Inner, older leaves yellow first. If the deficiency is severe, yellowing progresses outward to newer growth.
Potassium (K): Leaf edges may turn brown and crinkly, with a yellowing layer forming just inside of the edge. Older leaves tend to be impacted first.
Phosphorus (P): Lack of vigorous growth. Plants will appear stunted.
Zinc (Zn): Yellowing tends to occur first at the base of the leaf.
Copper (Cu): Newer leaves begin to yellow first, with older leaves yellowing only if the deficiency becomes severe.
Boron (B): Newer leaves are impacted first. Foliage may also become particularly brittle in cases of boron deficiency.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
There are several factors that can lead to nutrient deficiencies, a situation where plants are not receiving the nutrients that they need. This could be because they are planted in nutrient-deficient soils, or that the soil's pH is too high or low. Incorrect soil pH can lock up certain nutrients, thus making them unavailable to plants. Lack of soil moisture can also be a problem, because plants need water to be able to absorb the nutrients from the soil.
Solutions
Solutions
There are several easy ways to remedy the nutrient deficiencies in soils.
  1. Use a water-soluble fertilizer. Fertilizers will include most or all of the macro and micro-nutrients the plants need to thrive. Adding some fertilizer to the soil will make those nutrients available and can combat deficiencies.
  2. Regularly apply organic fertilizer pellets. Organic fertilizers such as animal manures and bonemeal can supply plants with all the nutrients that they need to grow strong and healthy.
  3. Apply compost. Though not as finely tuned as artificial fertilizer, compost can nevertheless be rich in important nutrients and should be applied to the soil regularly.
  4. Apply nutrients via foliar application. In addition to supplementing the soil with nutrients, foliar fertilizer can be applied directly to the plant's leaves. Nutrients offered via foliar application are often taken up even quicker than those put in the soil, so the foliar application can be great for swiftly addressing specific deficiencies.
Prevention
Prevention
There are several easy ways to prevent nutrient deficiencies in plants.
  1. Regular fertilizing. Regular addition of fertilizer to the soil is one of the simplest and most effective ways to prevent deficiencies.
  2. Proper watering. Both over and under watering can adversely impact a plant's roots, which in turn makes it harder for them to properly take up nutrients.
  3. Testing the soil's pH. A soil's acidity or alkalinity will impact the degree to which certain nutrients are available to be taken up by plants. Knowing the soil's pH means it can be amended to suit the needs of the individual plants.
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Leaf scorch
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Leaf scorch
Leaf blight causes leaves to dry out and turn brown starting at their tips.
Overview
Overview
Leaf scorch refers to two general conditions: physiological leaf scorch and bacterial leaf scorch. It causes leaves to discolor starting along the margins, and eventually die.
Leaf scorch development is most common in the hot, dry season, becoming most noticeable in late summer. However, it can occur at other times of the year. It most often affects young trees and shrubs, but it can also affect flowers, vegetables, and other plants.
Leaf scorch can get progressively worse over multiple seasons. If the root causes are not addressed, leaf scorch can lead to plant death.
While you cannot reverse the damage caused by physiological leaf scorch, you can prevent further damage. With proper management, plants will fully recover. However, there is no cure for bacterial leaf scorch, which is a systemic infection.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
  • Yellow, brown, or blackened leaves starting with the leaf margins
  • Dying twig tips on trees and shrubs as leaves die and fall
  • Often there is a bright yellow border line between the dead and living leaf tissue
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
There are numerous contributing causes of leaf scorch.
Bacterial leaf scorch is caused by the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa. The bacteria block the xylem vessels, preventing water movement. Symptoms may vary across species.
Physiological leaf scorch most commonly occurs when a plant cannot take up enough water. Numerous conditions can lead to this issue, particularly an unhealthy root system. Some causes of an unhealthy root system include overly-compacted soil, recent tillage, root compaction and severing due to pavement or other construction, drought, and overly-saturated soils.
Potassium deficiency can contribute to leaf scorch. Since plants need potassium to move water, they cannot properly move water when there is a lack of potassium.
Too much fertilizer can also cause leaf scorch symptoms. The accumulation of salts (including nutrient salts from fertilizers, as well as salt water) accumulate at the leaf margins and may build up to concentrations that burn the tissues.
Solutions
Solutions
The solution to leaf scorch will depend on the cause, however, in general all cultural care methods that improve plant health and root functionality will reduce symptoms.
  • Mulching the root zone (preferably with wood chip mulch) helps retain moisture, reduce evaporation, and promotes a healthy, functional root environment that is critical for water movement to the leaves.
  • Check the root collar for girdling or circling roots that strangle the trunk and limit water and nutrient movement.
  • Protect trees from severe root damage of nearby construction and excavation.
  • If fertilizer burn is to blame, irrigate the soil deeply to flush out excess fertilizer salts. However, keep in mind that fertilizer runoff is an environmental pollutant. Avoiding excess fertilization in the first place is the best approach.
  • If soil testing has revealed a potassium deficiency, apply a potassium fertilizer and water well. Even if you have enough potassium in the soil, plants will not be able to take it up if the soil is consistently too dry.
  • Severely affected twigs may be removed using a pair of sharp and sanitized pruning shears, as weakened branches are susceptible to secondary infections.
  • If your plant has bacterial leaf scorch, there is no cure. Antibiotic injections applied by a professional can reduce symptoms for a season, however, the above cultural management methods are the best options to reduce symptoms and prolong life. An infected plant will likely die within ten years.
Prevention
Prevention
  • Physiological leaf scorch is best avoided by making sure your plants have a healthy, functional root system and access to enough water. Water regularly, especially on the mornings of excessively hot, sunny days. Deep, infrequent irrigation is better than shallow, frequent irrigation.
  • Have your soil tested and apply the proper nutrients. Be sure to not over-apply fertilizers.
  • Make sure your plants’ roots have room to expand. Avoid compacted soil as well and avoid paving areas above the root zone. Do not till or disturb the soil where plant roots are growing.
  • Plant new trees and shrubs in the fall, so that they have the maximum amount of time to become established before the environmental stresses of the next summer.
  • Remove any dead or dying plant tissue that may harbor secondary infections.
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Leaf Weevils
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Leaf Weevils
Leaf Weevils are insects that feed on the leaves of plants.
Overview
Overview
Leaf Weevils are insects that feed on the leaves of plants. They can cause major damage to both edible and non-edible plants. Watch out for these garden pests and use control measures to get rid of them as soon as the problem is noticed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Leaf Weevils are small flightless insects that are typically around 6 mm long. They have a hard body that is oval shaped and covered in short hairs, a long snout on their head that is downward facing, and 3 pairs of legs with hooked claws.
Once mated, the female weevil with lay around 20 eggs at one time, either in leaf litter on the ground or sometimes on the soil. Weevils generally only produce one batch of eggs a year but may produce 2 if conditions are ideal.
The eggs take around 6 to 15 days to hatch. When the larva emerges, it burrows into the soil. These larvae have chewing mouth parts and no legs. They feed on the roots of the plants. When this happens, you may see signs of wilting of the leaves, stems, and flowers as the plant can’t deliver enough water from the roots to the above-ground growing parts.
Eventually, the larva evolves into a soft white pupa. The pupating period normally takes around 1 to 3 weeks. After this, the adult leaf weevil will emerge and crawl up the plant to feed on the leaves.
Adult leaf Weevils feed on young leaves, stems, flowers, and buds of almost any plant. This includes many varieties of fruits and vegetables as well as ornamental plants. This creates irregular round holes in the leaves. These holes normally start at the edges of the leaf. Holes may also be made in flowers, lesions may be caused on the skin of fruit, and sometimes whole stems are chewed off.
These insects prefer a humid environment with warm temperatures. They are mostly active during the night and will hide in leaf litter, mulch, and other debris during the day.
Solutions
Solutions
Leaf Weevils are relatively easy to control once their presence is discovered. Here’s what to do:
  • Spray the foliage with an insecticide
  • Place sticky traps around the lower trunks of fruit trees and other woody plants. Weevils can’t fly, and have to crawl up the plants when they emerge from the soil.
  • Dig into the soil around plants with a garden fork and remove and dispose of any larvae.
  • Let chickens roam around the garden, as they love to feed on weevil larvae.
Prevention
Prevention
There are various ways to keep leaf Weevils away from plants.
  • Remove weeds such as dandelion, capeweed, portulaca, mallow, sorrel, and dock. Leaf Weevils are attracted to these weeds and will set up a colony.
  • Make sure fruit trees are well spaced from each other. This ensures that the weevils and their larvae don’t spread from one tree to the next.
  • Cultivate the soil before planting a new crop. This allows any larvae or pupae in the soil to be unearthed and disposed of.
  • Regularly fertilize the soil to encourage both earthworm and microbial activity.
  • Check plants regularly to see any signs of leaf weevil activity. Also check under loose bark, mulch, leaf litter, and in the junction of stems on the plant.
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Sooty mold
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Sooty mold
Sooty mildew causes black mold on the leaves that can be wiped away.
Overview
Overview
Sooty mold is a common disease of many plant varieties, especially those that are likely to be attacked by aphids and scale insects. While this disease can be unsightly and will reduce the plant's ability to photosynthesize, it generally won't kill an affected plant. It is treatable by fixing the underlying cause.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Plants are covered with a black soot-like substance. Sooty mold can cover leaves, stems, flower buds, and other parts of the plant.
Sometimes, there are also signs of small white casts on the mold, which are the result of the insects shedding.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Sooty mold is a secondary disease that is a result of a pest problem. Sap-sucking insects such as aphids, mealybugs, whiteflies, and scale insects excrete a honeydew-like substance that sticks to the surface of the plant. When various parts of the plant are covered in this honeydew, the sooty mold fungal spores land on the plant and start to reproduce. This causes the black mold that can be seen on the plant. It's somewhat similar to the black mold that infects damp areas in the house.
Sooty mold does not feed on the plants themselves but rather on the honeydew secreted by insect pests.
Solutions
Solutions
The first step in treating the plant is to eradicate the insects that secrete the honeydew substance. Visually inspect the plant for insects, making sure to look on the underside of leaves and in the crotch of branches. Insects that may be present are as follows:
  • Aphids are minuscule pear-shaped bugs. Most are green in color.
  • Whiteflies are pale in color, almost translucent, and are covered with a powdery whitish wax. They may look like tiny white moths.
  • Scale appears as small brown bumps attached to the leaves and branches, with either a soft or armored coating.
  • Mealybugs are small white insects that look like cotton wool.
To treat insect infestation, follow these steps:
  1. Handpick insects off if the infestation is minor. Wipe plant leaves gently with a clean, damp cloth or spray with a jet of water from the hose to dislodge them.
  2. Treat with insecticidal soap or neem oil for serious infestations. The fatty acids in insecticidal soaps suffocate small-bodied insects. Neem oil is a common botanical pesticide that blocks the hormones that transition insects from larva to pupa to adult, halting the insect’s life cycle.
Once the insect infestation has been treated, remove as much mold from the leaves as possible. The remaining mold will dry out due to the lack of honeydew and will fall off the plant.
  1. Wash with insecticidal or very dilute dishwashing soap. Apply a couple of hours before rain is predicted, if possible. The soap will help soften the soot, making it easier to rinse it away.
  2. Spray plants with a steady stream of water.
Prevention
Prevention
  1. Keep plants properly watered. Drought stress will increase susceptibility to insect problems.
  2. Fertilize plants per the recommended schedule on the product label to strengthen natural plant defenses.
  3. Control insects that produce honeydew. Grow plants that attract beneficial insects or grow plants that naturally deter sap-suckers.
  4. Control ants on tree stems with sticky tape. Ants like honeydew and will protect honeydew-producing insects from predators like ladybugs.
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More About Chinese Ixora

Plant Type
Plant Type
Shrub
Lifespan
Lifespan
Perennial, Annual
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Spring, Summer, Early fall, Mid fall
Flower Color
Flower Color
Orange
Red
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green
Flower Size
Flower Size
2.5 to 3 cm
Plant Height
Plant Height
3 to 4.5 m

Usages

Garden Use
The chinese ixora does well as a hedge plant, good for planting in gardens and courtyards, because of its dense growth and bright blooms. It is commonly seen in many gardens due to its beauty and low maintenance requirements. It is prized for its ability to mark boundaries and be pruned into a tidy growth pattern. It does well in cottage gardens and is typically planted with other flowering bushes like the butterfly bush and boxwood wintergreen.
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Common Problems

Why does my chinese ixora fail to flower?

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The most common reasons the chinese ixora fails to flower are a lack of sunlight, poor soil conditions, or the flower buds have been pruned. If your chinese ixora is in a container, consider moving it to a sunnier space or getting a grow light. You should also test your soil and ensure that its pH is near 5. Amend your soil with elemental sulfur to make it more acidic.

Why does my chinese ixora have purplish-red spots on some of its leaves?

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Purplish-red spots typically indicate a potassium and phosphorus deficiency. Rock phosphate, bone meal, and more can all be used to add phosphorus to the soil. To add potassium, you should add granite meal or greensand.

Why does my chinese ixora have yellow, spotty leaves and few blooms?

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These are symptoms of a magnesium deficiency. When you fertilize your chinese ixora, select a fertilizer that contains magnesium. Also, check your soil's pH; a pH that is too high or too alkaline can prevent the plant from taking up magnesium. The chinese ixora prefers a pH of 5 - elemental sulfur can be used to lower your soil's pH if necessary.
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