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About
care_basic_guide care_basic_guide
Basic Care
care_advanced_guide care_advanced_guide
Advanced Care
care_scenes care_scenes
More About How-Tos
care_pet_and_diseases care_pet_and_diseases
Pests & Diseases
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More Info
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FAQ

How to Care for Apples 'sun Rival'

The range of trees that produce apples 'Sun Rival' are grown throughout the world for their fruit - there are 7,000 varieties worldwide! They have a long history as well; charred apple trunks have been found in prehistoric sites in Europe, and in colonial North America there are references to apples 'Sun Rival' being nicknamed "winter bananas" and "melt-in-the mouth." They can be found in varying shades of red, green, and yellow, and of different sizes.
Sunlight
Sunlight
Full sun
Apples 'Sun Rival'
Apples 'Sun Rival'
care_basic_guide

Basic Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterDetail

How to Water Apples 'Sun Rival'?

Watering is important and required within two days after transplanting. The soil should be completely saturated so that the roots can get sufficient water supply. If apples 'Sun Rival' is planted in a courtyard, water it until water accumulates on the soil surface without seepage for an extended time. If it is planted in a flower pot, fill the tray under the flower pot with water to let the water slowly penetrate into the soil. About ten days after transplanting, water apples 'Sun Rival' again to promote growth. Watering thereafter should be based on external climate and soil conditions; there is no need to water when the soil is still moist. Water should be provided when the soil is relatively dry, but don’t water so much that it accumulates around the tree.
Watering once every 3-5 days in winter is generally advised. With sufficient sunlight in summer, apples 'Sun Rival' should be watered once every 1-2 days. Be careful not to provide too much water each time. The best irrigation time is in the morning or on sunny days. This timing can promote water absorption and root respiration in the case of transpiration during the day. Avoid watering on rainy days, as this can easily cause root rot.
Cultivation:WaterDetail
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Cultivation:FertilizerDetail

How to Fertilize Apples 'Sun Rival'?

Apples 'Sun Rival' prefers fertilizer, and soil fertility will affect its growth and reproduction. It is best to apply sufficient base fertilizer composed mostly of organic fertilizer as well as some quick-acting fertilizer. Fertilizer application in fall produces the best results; it promotes rooting and accumulation of more nutrients for the following year's growth. Additionally, there are two other recommended fertilization times: before spring buds and when the fruit begins to grow. Dig out a small soil ditch 30 cm around the trunk, and then add the fertilizer evenly, water thoroughly, and loosen the soil properly after drying.
Cultivation:FertilizerDetail
Cultivation:SunlightDetail

What Are the Sunlight Requirements for Apples 'Sun Rival'?

Apples 'Sun Rival' prefers sunlight and grows well in full sun. Sufficient sunlight for about 8 hours a day is recommended. Sunlight will have a great impact on flower colors, while insufficient sunlight will lead to lighter colors. If there is strong light in summer, apples 'Sun Rival' needs proper shady conditions to avoid high-temperature injuries. Too much light may cause leaf curling or spots on stems and leaves.
Cultivation:SunlightDetail
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Cultivation:PruningDetail

How to Prune Apples 'Sun Rival'?

Pruning is very important for apples 'Sun Rival' and is usually performed between late fall after its leaves drop and early spring before it sprouts. Pruning not only keeps branches scattered and maintains the tree's shape, but also ensures ventilation and sunlight transmission, which is conducive to its growth. Promptly cut off dense, overlapping, thin, and infected branches, or prune out a suitable and aesthetic shape based on the viewing environment. When blooming, you can also cut off some branches and cut away withered flowers to promote budding and the blossoming of new branches.
When pruning and cutting longer branches, leave enough new buds for branches to grow better afterward.
Cultivation:PruningDetail
close
care_advanced_guide

Advanced Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail

What is the Ideal Temperature Range for Apples 'Sun Rival'?

Widely distributed in the northern temperate zone, apples 'Sun Rival' is generally very adaptable to the distinct seasons, including hot summers and cold winters. It can tolerate temperatures as low as -30 ℃. Apples 'Sun Rival' can’t tolerate extremely high temperatures in summer; temperatures above 32 ℃ will affect its growth. The tree is drought-tolerant and doesn’t require much water, hence, avoid over-watering it.
Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail
Cultivation:SoilDetail

What Soil is Best for Apples 'Sun Rival'?

Apples 'Sun Rival' can adapt to various soils. The most suitable soil for growth is slightly acidic or neutral, humus-rich, loose, well-drained, and sandy. The best pH range for the soil is 6-8. During cultivation, the soil can be mixed with garden soil, peat soil, and organic fertilizer in a proportion of 6:3:1.
Cultivation:SoilDetail
Cultivation:PropagationDetail

How to Propagate Apples 'Sun Rival'?

If there is a seedling growing at the root, you can cut the seedling from the plant before budding in spring or after leaves fall in autumn and winter. It is best to cut off the roots of the seedling and transplant them into new pots or dug pits.
Cultivation:PropagationDetail
Cultivation:PlantingDetail

How to Plant Apples 'Sun Rival'?

It is generally easiest to plant apples 'Sun Rival' by buying seedlings rather than sowing seeds. The recommended planting time is before budding in early spring or after leaves fall in early winter. Before planting, thoroughly check whether the roots of the tree are healthy. If rotten roots are found, they need to be quickly cut and disinfected with carbendazim.
When planted in a garden, the pit depth should be about 40 cm and the diameter about 60 cm. If the root is large, the size of the pit needs to be twice as big as the root ball. Before transplanting, apply some rotten organic fertilizer as the base fertilizer. In severe cold zones, pay attention to keeping apples 'Sun Rival' warm while transplanting. Add a cover such as wood chips or mulch at the base of the plant to ensure it overwinters safely.
Cultivation:PlantingDetail
seasonal-tip

Seasonal Precautions

If in summer the plant is exposed to high temperatures or strong, direct light, you can set up a shading net for small tree seedlings. Be sure to provide adequate drainage for heavy rainy days. During high temperatures, increase watering frequency to protect apples 'Sun Rival' from dehydration, but do not water it at noon. Apples 'Sun Rival' is dormant in winter and has lower water requirements, hence, be careful to avoid overwatering.
seasonal-tip
care_scenes

More Info on Apples 'sun Rival' Growth and Care

Basic Care Guide
Lighting
Full sun
Temperature
-25 35 ℃
care_pet_and_diseases

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Apples 'Sun Rival' based on 10 million real cases
Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles are a class of colored insects 1 to 2 cm in size. They gnaw on leaves and petals resulting in small, round holes scattered over the surface.
Solutions: For less serious cases: Remove beetles, nymphs, and eggs. Remove all life stages of the beetles and kill them by placing them in a bucket of warm, soapy water. This can be done more easily by placing the bucket under affected leaves and shaking the plant. This method is most effective in the afternoon when leaf beetles are more active. Always dispose of insects in a sealed bag or container to avoid escape and spread. To treat more serious infestations: Apply organic insecticides. Use naturally-derived insecticides before moving on to synthetic insecticides. Neem oil and pyrethrum are naturally-derived insecticides that should be applied following label instructions. Apply synthetic insecticides. Examples of insecticides effective for leaf beetles include carbaryl, permethrin, and bifenthrin. Apply insecticides according to label instructions.
Fruit withering
Fruit withering Fruit withering
Fruit withering
Fungal infection or normal ripening can cause the fruit to dry out.
Solutions: There are a number of appropriate solutions to control fruit withering: Remove any fruit as soon as it shows any signs of infection. Do not compost. Use a fungicide prior to leaf bud and then as per manufacturers instructions throughout the season.
Nutrient deficiencies
Nutrient deficiencies Nutrient deficiencies
Nutrient deficiencies
A lack of nutrients will cause a widespread yellowing of the leaves. The yellowing may begin at the base or top of the plant.
Solutions: There are several easy ways to remedy the nutrient deficiencies in soils. Use a water-soluble fertilizer. Fertilizers will include most or all of the macro and micro-nutrients the plants need to thrive. Adding some fertilizer to the soil will make those nutrients available and can combat deficiencies. Regularly apply organic fertilizer pellets. Organic fertilizers such as animal manures and bonemeal can supply plants with all the nutrients that they need to grow strong and healthy. Apply compost. Though not as finely tuned as artificial fertilizer, compost can nevertheless be rich in important nutrients and should be applied to the soil regularly. Apply nutrients via foliar application. In addition to supplementing the soil with nutrients, foliar fertilizer can be applied directly to the plant's leaves. Nutrients offered via foliar application are often taken up even quicker than those put in the soil, so the foliar application can be great for swiftly addressing specific deficiencies.
Sap-sucking insects
Sap-sucking insects Sap-sucking insects
Sap-sucking insects
Sap-sucking insects can create dense clusters of small yellow or white spots on the leaves.
Solutions: Sap-sucking insects can be hard to spot, as they are often small and attach to the undersides of plant leaves. If you see signs of an infestation, follow these steps to eradicate it. Hand-pick bugs and remove eggs: Inspect your plants for insects and drop any you find in a container of soapy water. Look carefully at the undersides of plant leaves and squish any egg clusters you find. Use Insecticide: Targeted spraying can take out sap-sucking insects. Small infestations can be controlled with insecticidal soap, though larger outbreaks might require a stronger spray. Introduce natural predators: Many insects, including ladybugs and praying mantises, love to feast on sap-suckers. You can purchase them at garden stores and release them near infected plants, or encourage wild ones by creating habitat space.
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Leaf beetles
plant poor
Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles are a class of colored insects 1 to 2 cm in size. They gnaw on leaves and petals resulting in small, round holes scattered over the surface.
Overview
Overview
Leaf beetles range in size from 1.5 mm to 2 cm. Both adult beetles and their larvae eat the leaves of many different types of plants. There are over 35,000 different species of leaf beetles, in a variety of colors including gold, green, yellow-striped, and red striped. Some of these have been mistaken for ladybirds because of their shape and coloring. They can be oval, round, or elongated in shape. These insect pests are most active in spring and summer.
If not controlled, leaf beetles can do a lot of damage to vegetable crops and ornamental plants. They feed on the leaves, flowers, stems, roots, and fruits of different plants. They can fly, which means it's easy for them to move from one plant to another. Some species of leaf beetles only target one specific crop, while others will target many different types of plants. Although a lot of the damage that they cause is cosmetic, an infestation can weaken a plant and leave it prone to other more problematic diseases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The first signs of a leaf beetles infestation are small visible holes in leaves. Leaves then become discolored and dark beetle droppings can be seen. As the leaves turn yellow and brown, they will drop off the plant onto the ground. Some leaves will appear skeletonized with only the veins still remaining.
Infestation begins in spring, when the adult beetles emerge from the soil and lay their eggs on the leaves of plants. When these eggs hatch, the young nymphs start munching on the leaves as they grow up. Once leaf beetles are large and mature, they'll fall to the ground and pupate in the soil over winter before starting the cycle all over again.
Leaf beetles also eat holes in fruits and vegetables. These can be seen as small round holes that sometimes have a larger brown area surrounding them.
Solutions
Solutions
For less serious cases:
  1. Remove beetles, nymphs, and eggs. Remove all life stages of the beetles and kill them by placing them in a bucket of warm, soapy water. This can be done more easily by placing the bucket under affected leaves and shaking the plant. This method is most effective in the afternoon when leaf beetles are more active. Always dispose of insects in a sealed bag or container to avoid escape and spread.
To treat more serious infestations:
  1. Apply organic insecticides. Use naturally-derived insecticides before moving on to synthetic insecticides. Neem oil and pyrethrum are naturally-derived insecticides that should be applied following label instructions.
  2. Apply synthetic insecticides. Examples of insecticides effective for leaf beetles include carbaryl, permethrin, and bifenthrin. Apply insecticides according to label instructions.
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Fruit withering
plant poor
Fruit withering
Fungal infection or normal ripening can cause the fruit to dry out.
Overview
Overview
Fruit withering is common on many tree fruits, including apples, pears, peaches, cherries, and plums, as well as fruiting shrubs. It is caused by a fungal pathogen and will result in wrinkled and desiccated fruit.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Here are the most common symptoms in the order that they are likely to occur.
  1. Both leaves and blossom on the tips of branches will go brown and wither.
  2. Gray powdery patches will appear on infected leaves and flowers, and this will be most apparent after rain.
  3. Any fruit that does appear will turn wrinkled and fail to develop.
  4. Branch tips begin to die, progressing back to larger branches, causing general deterioration of the tree or plant.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The withering is caused by one of two fungal pathogens, one called Monilina laxa and the other called M. fructigen. The spores overwinter on infected plant material and are then spread the following spring by wind, rain, or animal vectors. The problem will start to become noticeable in mid-spring, but will increase in severity as summer progresses and the fungus grows. If not addressed, the disease will intensify and spread to other plants in the vicinity.
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Nutrient deficiencies
plant poor
Nutrient deficiencies
A lack of nutrients will cause a widespread yellowing of the leaves. The yellowing may begin at the base or top of the plant.
Overview
Overview
Nutrient deficiencies can be seen in many different ways on plants. Basically, the lack of nutrients will inhibit plant growth, produce weak stems and leaves, and leave plants open to infection from pests and diseases. Plants use the nutrients from the soil to help them with photosynthesis. This, in turn, produces healthy plant growth. Plants that lack adequate amounts of nutrients will look lackluster and unhealthy. Eventually, if this is not addressed, it will cause the plants to die. The most important nutrients that plants need are nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and sulfur. Additionally, plants require small amounts of micronutrients such as iron, boron, manganese, zinc, copper, and molybdenum.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
A common sign that plants are experiencing nutrient deficiencies is the yellowing of leaves. This may be an overall yellowing or leaves that are yellow but still have green veins. These leaves will eventually brown off and die.
Another sign is the loss of plant vigor. The plants may not be growing as well as they should or their growth may be stunted.
Below are some common symptoms that appear when plants are lacking in nutrients.
Nitrogen (N): Inner, older leaves yellow first. If the deficiency is severe, yellowing progresses outward to newer growth.
Potassium (K): Leaf edges may turn brown and crinkly, with a yellowing layer forming just inside of the edge. Older leaves tend to be impacted first.
Phosphorus (P): Lack of vigorous growth. Plants will appear stunted.
Zinc (Zn): Yellowing tends to occur first at the base of the leaf.
Copper (Cu): Newer leaves begin to yellow first, with older leaves yellowing only if the deficiency becomes severe.
Boron (B): Newer leaves are impacted first. Foliage may also become particularly brittle in cases of boron deficiency.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
There are several factors that can lead to nutrient deficiencies, a situation where plants are not receiving the nutrients that they need. This could be because they are planted in nutrient-deficient soils, or that the soil's pH is too high or low. Incorrect soil pH can lock up certain nutrients, thus making them unavailable to plants. Lack of soil moisture can also be a problem, because plants need water to be able to absorb the nutrients from the soil.
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Sap-sucking insects
plant poor
Sap-sucking insects
Sap-sucking insects can create dense clusters of small yellow or white spots on the leaves.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Your plant has developed tiny yellowish spots scattered across the leaves that look like mold or mildew. If these marks won't wipe off, they are likely caused by sap-sucking insects like aphids, squash bugs, scale bugs, leafhoppers, whiteflies, mites, mealybugs, and more.
Each of these pests uses mouthparts to pierce leaf tissues and suck the sap. uses mouthparts to pierce leaf tissues and suck the sap. Signs of damage are difficult to spot at first, but a large infestation can quickly compromise the whole plant. You're most likely to see sap-sucking insects during the hottest months because plants make easier targets when already weakened from heat or drought.
Though sap-sucking insects are unlikely to kill your plant on their own, they can severely weaken it and make it more susceptible to disease. They may also spread viruses from one plant to another as they feed.
Solutions
Solutions
Sap-sucking insects can be hard to spot, as they are often small and attach to the undersides of plant leaves. If you see signs of an infestation, follow these steps to eradicate it.
  1. Hand-pick bugs and remove eggs: Inspect your plants for insects and drop any you find in a container of soapy water. Look carefully at the undersides of plant leaves and squish any egg clusters you find.
  2. Use Insecticide: Targeted spraying can take out sap-sucking insects. Small infestations can be controlled with insecticidal soap, though larger outbreaks might require a stronger spray.
  3. Introduce natural predators: Many insects, including ladybugs and praying mantises, love to feast on sap-suckers. You can purchase them at garden stores and release them near infected plants, or encourage wild ones by creating habitat space.
Prevention
Prevention
Healthy plants are less likely to suffer from sap-sucker attacks. Keep them fortified with fertilizer and the right amounts of water and sunlight. Plants that receive excess nitrogen are also more susceptible to attack, so don’t overfertilize. You should also remove weeds and tall grasses surrounding your outdoor plants so as not to create habitat space for the pests.
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care_more_info

More About Apples 'sun Rival'

Plant Type
Plant Type
Tree
Lifespan
Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Height
Plant Height
3 m
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care_faq

Common Problems

Why are the leaves of apples 'Sun Rival' turning yellow?

more more
There are many possible causes of yellowing leaves. First, check whether the plant is affected by environmental factors. Insufficient light, high temperatures, sun exposure, unsuitable soil, and lack of fertilizer or water can all cause plant leaves to yellow or wither. If the environment appears suitable, check whether the symptoms are caused by pests. Insect pests are the easiest to spot, indicated by traces such as insect bites and eggs, or the presence of insects themselves. If pests are not found, yellowing may be caused by a disease like root rot. The infected part of the plant needs to be removed and the cut should be quickly disinfected.

Why does apples 'Sun Rival' only grow leaves without flowers, or have only a few blooms?

more more
Non-flowering or scarce blooms are generally caused by a lack of plant nutrients. Fertilizer should be applied once during the spring leaf-spreading period to provide sufficient nutrition for flower buds. Be careful, however: applying too much nitrogen fertilizer will cause branches and leaves to grow too fast to bloom. During flower bud growth, apply some phosphorus potassium fertilizers to promote blossoming. Re-fertilization after flowering also helps flower buds develop and accumulate nutrients for blossoming in the coming year. Adequate sunlight, good ventilation, and proper watering are all necessary conditions for flowering. Additionally, the extra branches and leaves should be pruned regularly to ensure that more nutrients are distributed to reproduction and growth.

Why are leaves still withering despite sufficient watering?

more more
Withered leaves may not be caused by a lack of water. If the soil is moist but leaves are still dry, the problem may be pests. The affected and dry leaves need to be quickly removed and ventilation should be provided to the plant immediately. Eliminate pests by spraying the plant with broad-spectrum pesticides.
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FAQ
Apples 'Sun Rival'
Apples 'Sun Rival'

How to Care for Apples 'sun Rival'

The range of trees that produce apples 'Sun Rival' are grown throughout the world for their fruit - there are 7,000 varieties worldwide! They have a long history as well; charred apple trunks have been found in prehistoric sites in Europe, and in colonial North America there are references to apples 'Sun Rival' being nicknamed "winter bananas" and "melt-in-the mouth." They can be found in varying shades of red, green, and yellow, and of different sizes.
Sunlight
Full sun
Sunlight Sunlight detail
care_basic_guide

Basic Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterDetail

How to Water Apples 'Sun Rival'?

Cultivation:WaterDetail
Watering is important and required within two days after transplanting. The soil should be completely saturated so that the roots can get sufficient water supply. If apples 'Sun Rival' is planted in a courtyard, water it until water accumulates on the soil surface without seepage for an extended time. If it is planted in a flower pot, fill the tray under the flower pot with water to let the water slowly penetrate into the soil. About ten days after transplanting, water apples 'Sun Rival' again to promote growth. Watering thereafter should be based on external climate and soil conditions; there is no need to water when the soil is still moist. Water should be provided when the soil is relatively dry, but don’t water so much that it accumulates around the tree.
Watering once every 3-5 days in winter is generally advised. With sufficient sunlight in summer, apples 'Sun Rival' should be watered once every 1-2 days. Be careful not to provide too much water each time. The best irrigation time is in the morning or on sunny days. This timing can promote water absorption and root respiration in the case of transpiration during the day. Avoid watering on rainy days, as this can easily cause root rot.
waterreminders

Never miss a care task again!

Plant care made easier than ever with our tailor-made smart care reminder.
Cultivation:FertilizerDetail

How to Fertilize Apples 'Sun Rival'?

Cultivation:FertilizerDetail
Apples 'Sun Rival' prefers fertilizer, and soil fertility will affect its growth and reproduction. It is best to apply sufficient base fertilizer composed mostly of organic fertilizer as well as some quick-acting fertilizer. Fertilizer application in fall produces the best results; it promotes rooting and accumulation of more nutrients for the following year's growth. Additionally, there are two other recommended fertilization times: before spring buds and when the fruit begins to grow. Dig out a small soil ditch 30 cm around the trunk, and then add the fertilizer evenly, water thoroughly, and loosen the soil properly after drying.
Cultivation:SunlightDetail

What Are the Sunlight Requirements for Apples 'Sun Rival'?

Cultivation:SunlightDetail
Apples 'Sun Rival' prefers sunlight and grows well in full sun. Sufficient sunlight for about 8 hours a day is recommended. Sunlight will have a great impact on flower colors, while insufficient sunlight will lead to lighter colors. If there is strong light in summer, apples 'Sun Rival' needs proper shady conditions to avoid high-temperature injuries. Too much light may cause leaf curling or spots on stems and leaves.
lightmeter

Know the light your plants really get.

Find the best spots for them to optimize their health, simply using your phone.
Cultivation:PruningDetail

How to Prune Apples 'Sun Rival'?

Cultivation:PruningDetail
Pruning is very important for apples 'Sun Rival' and is usually performed between late fall after its leaves drop and early spring before it sprouts. Pruning not only keeps branches scattered and maintains the tree's shape, but also ensures ventilation and sunlight transmission, which is conducive to its growth. Promptly cut off dense, overlapping, thin, and infected branches, or prune out a suitable and aesthetic shape based on the viewing environment. When blooming, you can also cut off some branches and cut away withered flowers to promote budding and the blossoming of new branches.
When pruning and cutting longer branches, leave enough new buds for branches to grow better afterward.
close
care_advanced_guide

Advanced Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail

What is the Ideal Temperature Range for Apples 'Sun Rival'?

Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail
Widely distributed in the northern temperate zone, apples 'Sun Rival' is generally very adaptable to the distinct seasons, including hot summers and cold winters. It can tolerate temperatures as low as -30 ℃. Apples 'Sun Rival' can’t tolerate extremely high temperatures in summer; temperatures above 32 ℃ will affect its growth. The tree is drought-tolerant and doesn’t require much water, hence, avoid over-watering it.
Cultivation:SoilDetail

What Soil is Best for Apples 'Sun Rival'?

Cultivation:SoilDetail
Apples 'Sun Rival' can adapt to various soils. The most suitable soil for growth is slightly acidic or neutral, humus-rich, loose, well-drained, and sandy. The best pH range for the soil is 6-8. During cultivation, the soil can be mixed with garden soil, peat soil, and organic fertilizer in a proportion of 6:3:1.
Cultivation:PropagationDetail

How to Propagate Apples 'Sun Rival'?

Cultivation:PropagationDetail
If there is a seedling growing at the root, you can cut the seedling from the plant before budding in spring or after leaves fall in autumn and winter. It is best to cut off the roots of the seedling and transplant them into new pots or dug pits.
Cultivation:PlantingDetail

How to Plant Apples 'Sun Rival'?

Cultivation:PlantingDetail
It is generally easiest to plant apples 'Sun Rival' by buying seedlings rather than sowing seeds. The recommended planting time is before budding in early spring or after leaves fall in early winter. Before planting, thoroughly check whether the roots of the tree are healthy. If rotten roots are found, they need to be quickly cut and disinfected with carbendazim.
When planted in a garden, the pit depth should be about 40 cm and the diameter about 60 cm. If the root is large, the size of the pit needs to be twice as big as the root ball. Before transplanting, apply some rotten organic fertilizer as the base fertilizer. In severe cold zones, pay attention to keeping apples 'Sun Rival' warm while transplanting. Add a cover such as wood chips or mulch at the base of the plant to ensure it overwinters safely.
seasonal-tip

Seasonal Precautions

If in summer the plant is exposed to high temperatures or strong, direct light, you can set up a shading net for small tree seedlings. Be sure to provide adequate drainage for heavy rainy days. During high temperatures, increase watering frequency to protect apples 'Sun Rival' from dehydration, but do not water it at noon. Apples 'Sun Rival' is dormant in winter and has lower water requirements, hence, be careful to avoid overwatering.
care_scenes

More Info on Apples 'sun Rival' Growth and Care

Basic Care Guide
care_pet_and_diseases

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Apples 'Sun Rival' based on 10 million real cases
Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles Leaf beetles Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles are a class of colored insects 1 to 2 cm in size. They gnaw on leaves and petals resulting in small, round holes scattered over the surface.
Solutions: For less serious cases: Remove beetles, nymphs, and eggs. Remove all life stages of the beetles and kill them by placing them in a bucket of warm, soapy water. This can be done more easily by placing the bucket under affected leaves and shaking the plant. This method is most effective in the afternoon when leaf beetles are more active. Always dispose of insects in a sealed bag or container to avoid escape and spread. To treat more serious infestations: Apply organic insecticides. Use naturally-derived insecticides before moving on to synthetic insecticides. Neem oil and pyrethrum are naturally-derived insecticides that should be applied following label instructions. Apply synthetic insecticides. Examples of insecticides effective for leaf beetles include carbaryl, permethrin, and bifenthrin. Apply insecticides according to label instructions.
Learn More About the Leaf beetles more
Fruit withering
Fruit withering Fruit withering Fruit withering
Fungal infection or normal ripening can cause the fruit to dry out.
Solutions: There are a number of appropriate solutions to control fruit withering: Remove any fruit as soon as it shows any signs of infection. Do not compost. Use a fungicide prior to leaf bud and then as per manufacturers instructions throughout the season.
Learn More About the Fruit withering more
Nutrient deficiencies
Nutrient deficiencies Nutrient deficiencies Nutrient deficiencies
A lack of nutrients will cause a widespread yellowing of the leaves. The yellowing may begin at the base or top of the plant.
Solutions: There are several easy ways to remedy the nutrient deficiencies in soils. Use a water-soluble fertilizer. Fertilizers will include most or all of the macro and micro-nutrients the plants need to thrive. Adding some fertilizer to the soil will make those nutrients available and can combat deficiencies. Regularly apply organic fertilizer pellets. Organic fertilizers such as animal manures and bonemeal can supply plants with all the nutrients that they need to grow strong and healthy. Apply compost. Though not as finely tuned as artificial fertilizer, compost can nevertheless be rich in important nutrients and should be applied to the soil regularly. Apply nutrients via foliar application. In addition to supplementing the soil with nutrients, foliar fertilizer can be applied directly to the plant's leaves. Nutrients offered via foliar application are often taken up even quicker than those put in the soil, so the foliar application can be great for swiftly addressing specific deficiencies.
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Sap-sucking insects
Sap-sucking insects Sap-sucking insects Sap-sucking insects
Sap-sucking insects can create dense clusters of small yellow or white spots on the leaves.
Solutions: Sap-sucking insects can be hard to spot, as they are often small and attach to the undersides of plant leaves. If you see signs of an infestation, follow these steps to eradicate it. Hand-pick bugs and remove eggs: Inspect your plants for insects and drop any you find in a container of soapy water. Look carefully at the undersides of plant leaves and squish any egg clusters you find. Use Insecticide: Targeted spraying can take out sap-sucking insects. Small infestations can be controlled with insecticidal soap, though larger outbreaks might require a stronger spray. Introduce natural predators: Many insects, including ladybugs and praying mantises, love to feast on sap-suckers. You can purchase them at garden stores and release them near infected plants, or encourage wild ones by creating habitat space.
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Leaf beetles
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Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles are a class of colored insects 1 to 2 cm in size. They gnaw on leaves and petals resulting in small, round holes scattered over the surface.
Overview
Overview
Leaf beetles range in size from 1.5 mm to 2 cm. Both adult beetles and their larvae eat the leaves of many different types of plants. There are over 35,000 different species of leaf beetles, in a variety of colors including gold, green, yellow-striped, and red striped. Some of these have been mistaken for ladybirds because of their shape and coloring. They can be oval, round, or elongated in shape. These insect pests are most active in spring and summer.
If not controlled, leaf beetles can do a lot of damage to vegetable crops and ornamental plants. They feed on the leaves, flowers, stems, roots, and fruits of different plants. They can fly, which means it's easy for them to move from one plant to another. Some species of leaf beetles only target one specific crop, while others will target many different types of plants. Although a lot of the damage that they cause is cosmetic, an infestation can weaken a plant and leave it prone to other more problematic diseases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The first signs of a leaf beetles infestation are small visible holes in leaves. Leaves then become discolored and dark beetle droppings can be seen. As the leaves turn yellow and brown, they will drop off the plant onto the ground. Some leaves will appear skeletonized with only the veins still remaining.
Infestation begins in spring, when the adult beetles emerge from the soil and lay their eggs on the leaves of plants. When these eggs hatch, the young nymphs start munching on the leaves as they grow up. Once leaf beetles are large and mature, they'll fall to the ground and pupate in the soil over winter before starting the cycle all over again.
Leaf beetles also eat holes in fruits and vegetables. These can be seen as small round holes that sometimes have a larger brown area surrounding them.
Solutions
Solutions
For less serious cases:
  1. Remove beetles, nymphs, and eggs. Remove all life stages of the beetles and kill them by placing them in a bucket of warm, soapy water. This can be done more easily by placing the bucket under affected leaves and shaking the plant. This method is most effective in the afternoon when leaf beetles are more active. Always dispose of insects in a sealed bag or container to avoid escape and spread.
To treat more serious infestations:
  1. Apply organic insecticides. Use naturally-derived insecticides before moving on to synthetic insecticides. Neem oil and pyrethrum are naturally-derived insecticides that should be applied following label instructions.
  2. Apply synthetic insecticides. Examples of insecticides effective for leaf beetles include carbaryl, permethrin, and bifenthrin. Apply insecticides according to label instructions.
Prevention
Prevention
To prevent infestations of leaf beetles, follow these practices.
  1. Regularly check for beetles. To prevent large pest infestations, be proactive about frequently checking plants for pests and removing them quickly.
  2. Clear debris. Clear weeds and debris to remove areas where these beetles may overwinter and hide.
  3. Attract natural predators. Birds and other insects, such as wasps and ladybugs, are effective natural predators of leaf beetles. Encourage them to visit by including a diverse array of plants to provide habitat and food. Also, avoid applying broad-spectrum herbicides that can harm and kill beneficial insects.
  4. Plant aromatic herbs like mint, garlic, or rosemary, as these can repel leaf beetles.
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Fruit withering
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Fruit withering
Fungal infection or normal ripening can cause the fruit to dry out.
Overview
Overview
Fruit withering is common on many tree fruits, including apples, pears, peaches, cherries, and plums, as well as fruiting shrubs. It is caused by a fungal pathogen and will result in wrinkled and desiccated fruit.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Here are the most common symptoms in the order that they are likely to occur.
  1. Both leaves and blossom on the tips of branches will go brown and wither.
  2. Gray powdery patches will appear on infected leaves and flowers, and this will be most apparent after rain.
  3. Any fruit that does appear will turn wrinkled and fail to develop.
  4. Branch tips begin to die, progressing back to larger branches, causing general deterioration of the tree or plant.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The withering is caused by one of two fungal pathogens, one called Monilina laxa and the other called M. fructigen. The spores overwinter on infected plant material and are then spread the following spring by wind, rain, or animal vectors. The problem will start to become noticeable in mid-spring, but will increase in severity as summer progresses and the fungus grows. If not addressed, the disease will intensify and spread to other plants in the vicinity.
Solutions
Solutions
There are a number of appropriate solutions to control fruit withering:
  1. Remove any fruit as soon as it shows any signs of infection. Do not compost.
  2. Use a fungicide prior to leaf bud and then as per manufacturers instructions throughout the season.
Prevention
Prevention
Preventative measures include:
  1. Ensuring adequate spacing between plants or trees.
  2. Staking plants that are prone to tumbling to prevent moisture or humidity build up.
  3. Prune correctly so that there is adequate air movement and remove any dead or diseased branches that may carry spores.
  4. Practice good plant hygiene by removing fallen material and destroying it as soon as possible.
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Nutrient deficiencies
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Nutrient deficiencies
A lack of nutrients will cause a widespread yellowing of the leaves. The yellowing may begin at the base or top of the plant.
Overview
Overview
Nutrient deficiencies can be seen in many different ways on plants. Basically, the lack of nutrients will inhibit plant growth, produce weak stems and leaves, and leave plants open to infection from pests and diseases. Plants use the nutrients from the soil to help them with photosynthesis. This, in turn, produces healthy plant growth. Plants that lack adequate amounts of nutrients will look lackluster and unhealthy. Eventually, if this is not addressed, it will cause the plants to die. The most important nutrients that plants need are nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and sulfur. Additionally, plants require small amounts of micronutrients such as iron, boron, manganese, zinc, copper, and molybdenum.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
A common sign that plants are experiencing nutrient deficiencies is the yellowing of leaves. This may be an overall yellowing or leaves that are yellow but still have green veins. These leaves will eventually brown off and die.
Another sign is the loss of plant vigor. The plants may not be growing as well as they should or their growth may be stunted.
Below are some common symptoms that appear when plants are lacking in nutrients.
Nitrogen (N): Inner, older leaves yellow first. If the deficiency is severe, yellowing progresses outward to newer growth.
Potassium (K): Leaf edges may turn brown and crinkly, with a yellowing layer forming just inside of the edge. Older leaves tend to be impacted first.
Phosphorus (P): Lack of vigorous growth. Plants will appear stunted.
Zinc (Zn): Yellowing tends to occur first at the base of the leaf.
Copper (Cu): Newer leaves begin to yellow first, with older leaves yellowing only if the deficiency becomes severe.
Boron (B): Newer leaves are impacted first. Foliage may also become particularly brittle in cases of boron deficiency.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
There are several factors that can lead to nutrient deficiencies, a situation where plants are not receiving the nutrients that they need. This could be because they are planted in nutrient-deficient soils, or that the soil's pH is too high or low. Incorrect soil pH can lock up certain nutrients, thus making them unavailable to plants. Lack of soil moisture can also be a problem, because plants need water to be able to absorb the nutrients from the soil.
Solutions
Solutions
There are several easy ways to remedy the nutrient deficiencies in soils.
  1. Use a water-soluble fertilizer. Fertilizers will include most or all of the macro and micro-nutrients the plants need to thrive. Adding some fertilizer to the soil will make those nutrients available and can combat deficiencies.
  2. Regularly apply organic fertilizer pellets. Organic fertilizers such as animal manures and bonemeal can supply plants with all the nutrients that they need to grow strong and healthy.
  3. Apply compost. Though not as finely tuned as artificial fertilizer, compost can nevertheless be rich in important nutrients and should be applied to the soil regularly.
  4. Apply nutrients via foliar application. In addition to supplementing the soil with nutrients, foliar fertilizer can be applied directly to the plant's leaves. Nutrients offered via foliar application are often taken up even quicker than those put in the soil, so the foliar application can be great for swiftly addressing specific deficiencies.
Prevention
Prevention
There are several easy ways to prevent nutrient deficiencies in plants.
  1. Regular fertilizing. Regular addition of fertilizer to the soil is one of the simplest and most effective ways to prevent deficiencies.
  2. Proper watering. Both over and under watering can adversely impact a plant's roots, which in turn makes it harder for them to properly take up nutrients.
  3. Testing the soil's pH. A soil's acidity or alkalinity will impact the degree to which certain nutrients are available to be taken up by plants. Knowing the soil's pH means it can be amended to suit the needs of the individual plants.
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Sap-sucking insects
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Sap-sucking insects
Sap-sucking insects can create dense clusters of small yellow or white spots on the leaves.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Your plant has developed tiny yellowish spots scattered across the leaves that look like mold or mildew. If these marks won't wipe off, they are likely caused by sap-sucking insects like aphids, squash bugs, scale bugs, leafhoppers, whiteflies, mites, mealybugs, and more.
Each of these pests uses mouthparts to pierce leaf tissues and suck the sap. uses mouthparts to pierce leaf tissues and suck the sap. Signs of damage are difficult to spot at first, but a large infestation can quickly compromise the whole plant. You're most likely to see sap-sucking insects during the hottest months because plants make easier targets when already weakened from heat or drought.
Though sap-sucking insects are unlikely to kill your plant on their own, they can severely weaken it and make it more susceptible to disease. They may also spread viruses from one plant to another as they feed.
Solutions
Solutions
Sap-sucking insects can be hard to spot, as they are often small and attach to the undersides of plant leaves. If you see signs of an infestation, follow these steps to eradicate it.
  1. Hand-pick bugs and remove eggs: Inspect your plants for insects and drop any you find in a container of soapy water. Look carefully at the undersides of plant leaves and squish any egg clusters you find.
  2. Use Insecticide: Targeted spraying can take out sap-sucking insects. Small infestations can be controlled with insecticidal soap, though larger outbreaks might require a stronger spray.
  3. Introduce natural predators: Many insects, including ladybugs and praying mantises, love to feast on sap-suckers. You can purchase them at garden stores and release them near infected plants, or encourage wild ones by creating habitat space.
Prevention
Prevention
Healthy plants are less likely to suffer from sap-sucker attacks. Keep them fortified with fertilizer and the right amounts of water and sunlight. Plants that receive excess nitrogen are also more susceptible to attack, so don’t overfertilize. You should also remove weeds and tall grasses surrounding your outdoor plants so as not to create habitat space for the pests.
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More About Apples 'sun Rival'

Plant Type
Plant Type
Tree
Lifespan
Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Height
Plant Height
3 m
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Common Problems

Why are the leaves of apples 'Sun Rival' turning yellow?

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There are many possible causes of yellowing leaves. First, check whether the plant is affected by environmental factors. Insufficient light, high temperatures, sun exposure, unsuitable soil, and lack of fertilizer or water can all cause plant leaves to yellow or wither. If the environment appears suitable, check whether the symptoms are caused by pests. Insect pests are the easiest to spot, indicated by traces such as insect bites and eggs, or the presence of insects themselves. If pests are not found, yellowing may be caused by a disease like root rot. The infected part of the plant needs to be removed and the cut should be quickly disinfected.

Why does apples 'Sun Rival' only grow leaves without flowers, or have only a few blooms?

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Non-flowering or scarce blooms are generally caused by a lack of plant nutrients. Fertilizer should be applied once during the spring leaf-spreading period to provide sufficient nutrition for flower buds. Be careful, however: applying too much nitrogen fertilizer will cause branches and leaves to grow too fast to bloom. During flower bud growth, apply some phosphorus potassium fertilizers to promote blossoming. Re-fertilization after flowering also helps flower buds develop and accumulate nutrients for blossoming in the coming year. Adequate sunlight, good ventilation, and proper watering are all necessary conditions for flowering. Additionally, the extra branches and leaves should be pruned regularly to ensure that more nutrients are distributed to reproduction and growth.

Why are leaves still withering despite sufficient watering?

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Withered leaves may not be caused by a lack of water. If the soil is moist but leaves are still dry, the problem may be pests. The affected and dry leaves need to be quickly removed and ventilation should be provided to the plant immediately. Eliminate pests by spraying the plant with broad-spectrum pesticides.
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Requirements
Full sun
Ideal
Above 6 hours sunlight
Partial sun
Tolerance
About 3-6 hours sunlight
Watch how sunlight gracefully moves through your garden, and choose spots that provide the perfect balance of light and shade for your plants, ensuring their happiness.
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Just like people, each plant has its own preferences. Learn about your plants' temperature needs and create a comforting environment for them to flourish. As you care for your plants, your bond with them will deepen. Trust your intuition as you learn about their temperature needs, celebrating the journey you share. Lovingly monitor the temperature around your plants and adjust their environment as needed. A thermometer can be your ally in this heartfelt endeavor. Be patient and gentle with yourself as you explore your plants' temperature needs. Cherish your successes, learn from challenges, and nurture your garden with love, creating a haven that reflects the warmth of your care.
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