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About
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Basic Care
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How to Care for Paperwhite Narcissus

The paperwhite narcissus is suitable as a cut flower for use in table displays during winter. The blooms are incredibly fragrant and act as a perfume in the room, and the stems can bear up to ten beautiful white flowers. All parts of the plant are poisonous, including the bulbs. It’s often sold at Christmas time and given as gifts.
Water
Water
Every week
Sunlight
Sunlight
Full sun
Toxic to Pets
Paperwhite narcissus
Paperwhite narcissus
Paperwhite narcissus
Paperwhite narcissus
Paperwhite narcissus
care_basic_guide

Basic Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterDetail

How to Water Paperwhite narcissus?

Paperwhite narcissus has relatively low water requirements. When planting in your garden, it is usually enough to water them just once immediately after planting unless the weather is very dry during the growth period in spring. Paperwhite narcissus planted in a pot should be watered more often to avoid dry soil, especially during the leaf growth and flowering periods. After the leaves wither in summer, paperwhite narcissus enters its dormancy period. Avoid watering at this time to protect the bulbs from rotting. You can resume watering in autumn and winter when the soil is dry.
Cultivation:WaterDetail
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What should I do if I water Paperwhite narcissus too much/too little?
Over-watered Paperwhite narcissus will develop yellow leaves. It is normal for yellow leaves to develop when Paperwhite narcissus has reached the end of their blooming period. However, if the leaves turn yellow before the flowers have bloomed, it is a sign of over watering.
If you water your Paperwhite narcissus too much, then try to ensure there is adequate drainage and do not give it any more water for a couple of days. You can mix some sawdust into the soil to absorb the moisture. If the situation continues to deteriorate after controlled watering, consider whether the seedpods have rotted. Try digging them up and checking whether they have changed color and become soft. Once you find severe decay, then you should promptly clean out these seedpods.
Under-watered Paperwhite narcissus actually looks similar to over-watered Paperwhite narcissus with their yellow leaves. However, the stems will also droop and leaves will look smaller and will curl. You may also see some brown patches appear.
If you have given your Paperwhite narcissus too little water, then do not panic. It has a level of drought tolerance. Once you have realised, give it a good drink but do not saturate the surrounding soil. Just make sure it is moist.But do not give them too much and overwater them, you just need to let the soil to be mosit. Extended periods in water can lead to root rot and fungus growing on the bulb. The fungus can cause serious damage to the bulb which is noticed through spots that appear on the leaves and buds. The tips of the leaves may also discolor and die.
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How often should I water my Paperwhite narcissus?
It very much depends on the location and the current growth state of your Paperwhite narcissus.
Once you have planted your Paperwhite narcissus, water them well once and then leave them. That initial watering will kick start their growth, but after that you can leave them be until you see shoots appear.
If your Paperwhite narcissus is in a pot, you will need to water them when the top 1-2inch feels dry. Container plants can dry out faster than bedded plants, so ensure that the soil is damp.
If your Paperwhite narcissus is planted outside in flower beds and borders, they will not require additional water if it has rained during the week.
The Paperwhite narcissus has some drought resistance, slight dryness can be recovered quickly after watering, but excessive watering can directly cause the plant to die once the seed ball rots, you need to stay cautious about how often you water the plant.
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Should I adjust the watering frequency according to different seasons or climate for my Paperwhite narcissus?
When your Paperwhite narcissus is growing, you will need to water about once a week. As the temperature rises, the soil will dry out faster and you will need to increase the frequency of watering. A dry soil environment will be more friendly to your Paperwhite narcissus than an excessively wet soil environment.
Paperwhite narcissus will become dormant during summer and the above-ground parts will completely dry up and die after dormancy,. if you planted it outdoors, you shouldn't need to water it. Moreover, if there's plenty of rain in your region, you should consider digging them out to protect the buds from rot due to too much water.
If you planted it in pots, you should stop watering your Paperwhite narcissus completely after the dormant part dries out. After the above-ground part dries out completely, dig up the buds and store them in a cool location or stop watering them completely to keep the soil dry. Resume watering until the next sowing season. Or keep them in the soil in a cool location until the next growing season.
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What should I look for when planting my Paperwhite narcissus indoors or outdoors?
Monitor your containers for moisture, moving them to a sheltered position if they become sodden or waterlogged. Allow them to dry out and return them when the weather improves. Outdoor planting often takes rainwater into account, and when planting, you should consider planting the plants in well-drained soil to avoid waterlogging and decay.
Whether grown indoors or outdoors,before the buds grow out after planting the bulbs, they need very little water and you should try to let the soil dry out completely before watering in small amounts, which will effectively avoid bulb rot. You should wait to water them regularly until they grow new shoots.
Your Paperwhite narcissus is more susceptible to rot indoors in low light and poor ventilation. Therefore, you need to be careful when watering indoors and make sure that a lot of the soil is dry before watering. If you can keep it moist for a long time indoors, you also need to consider if your Paperwhite narcissus is in an unsuitable location. Whereas outdoors, good ventilation and plenty of light will be relatively safe.
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Cultivation:FertilizerDetail

How to Fertilize Paperwhite narcissus?

Paperwhite narcissus doesn't need much fertilizer. You can mix some bulb food or bone meal into the soil when planting in the fall. Water-soluble compound fertilizers can be applied when the plant begins to grow leaves and before flowering in spring. The ratio of the three main elements (N%-P2O5%-K2O%) can be 5-10-10 for leaf growth and 0-10-10 for the flowering period. You can top dress Potassium fertilizer once after flowering, as this is beneficial to bulb rejuvenation.

Fertilizer

Although their beauty can be somewhat short-lived, the Paperwhite narcissus is very capable of enriching the appearance of your garden during the short time when it is in bloom. These plants typically bloom in spring or late winter and can be a very welcome form of color during that time of year.
In order to enjoy the beauty of a Paperwhite narcissus, then you need to know how to care for it. That maintenance routine should include a certain method of fertilization that will help your Paperwhite narcissus thrive. The sections below will introduce you to everything you need to know.
You need to fertilize a Paperwhite narcissus for a few important reasons. The most obvious of these reasons is that fertilizer will help your Paperwhite narcissus produce lovely blooms. Fertilizing in early spring is one of the best ways to ensure that your Paperwhite narcissus has excellent flowers during that season. Fertilizer also gives your Paperwhite narcissus plenty of energy that it can store in the ground during its dormant growth phases. Giving your Paperwhite narcissus some extra nutrients during the fall planting process or during the late spring will help your Paperwhite narcissus hold more energy to use once active growth resumes.
There are a few times during which it is a good idea to fertilize a Paperwhite narcissus. The main time to fertilize is in early spring when the flowers are forming, at which time, the right fertilizer will encourage better blooms. You can also fertilize your Paperwhite narcissus later in the spring after the flowers have faded. Feeding at this time will give your Paperwhite narcissus plenty of energy that it can store and use next year. If you are planting your Paperwhite narcissus for the first time in the fall you can also provide some fertilizer at that time as well. Fertilizing during the planting process gives your Paperwhite narcissus the best chance of producing a healthy set of flowers during its first growing season.
Several different types of fertilizer can be beneficial to Paperwhite narcissus. To keep matters simple, you can always rely on a balanced fertilizer that has equal amounts of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. Fertilizer ratios that are equal, such as 10-10-10 or 5-5-5, will work well. It is also often best to use a granular fertilizer rather than a liquid one. If you are interested in being a bit more specific with your fertilizer choices, you should consider using a fertilizer that is rich overall with the three main nutrients but a bit higher in phosphorus content. Many gardeners stand by the claim that phosphorus will encourage better flowers that last longer. Organic materials, including bonemeal, can help add the phosphorus that may benefit your Paperwhite narcissus and its blooming abilities.
The first time that you should fertilize your Paperwhite narcissus is during the planting process, which takes place in the fall. After digging a small hole to plant your bulb, you can add some granular slow-release fertilizer to the hole. During the process, you should water continually to maintain consistent soil moisture. Following planting, you can fertilize once again during the early spring as the plant is emerging from the ground and developing its flowers. Again, you should use a granular fertilizer that has a balanced mix of nutrients and sprinkle it on the ground. As you apply the fertilizer, you should be sure to water the soil gently at the same time.
While fertilizer can be incredibly helpful to a Paperwhite narcissus, it can also be equally harmful if you give too much. Overfertilization will not only damage a Paperwhite narcissus, but it may lead to death in some cases. The best way to avoid this is to follow the instructions on the fertilizer package you buy rather than exceeding the recommended dose in hopes of making a more vigorous plant.
Likewise, it is typically less likely that you'll overfertilize your Paperwhite narcissus if you use a slow-release granular fertilizer. Since these fertilizers release their nutrients slowly, as the name implies, they are less capable of giving your Paperwhite narcissus too much fertilizer at once.
The correct times to fertilize a Paperwhite narcissus are during the fall planting process, during the early spring bloom period, and during the late spring following the bloom period. Fertilizing during any other part of the year is not necessary and may be harmful to your plant.
When caring for a Paperwhite narcissus, you should know that it has a considerable dormant phase in which it will not need fertilizer and will need far less water as well. As you would guess, your Paperwhite narcissus will be dormant during winter. However, this plant also enters a dormant phase during the summer. After the flowers fade, the leaves will persist briefly before dying back to the ground. Once the leaves die back, your plant has returned to a dormant phase, and it will not need fertilizer.
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Cultivation:FertilizerDetail
Why do I need to fertilize my Paperwhite narcissus?
You need to fertilize a Paperwhite narcissus for a few important reasons. The most obvious of these reasons is that fertilizer will help your Paperwhite narcissus produce lovely blooms. Fertilizing in early spring is one of the best ways to ensure that your Paperwhite narcissus has excellent flowers during that season.
Fertilizer also gives your Paperwhite narcissus plenty of energy that it can store in the ground during its dormant growth phases. Giving your Paperwhite narcissus some extra nutrients during the fall planting process or during the late spring will help your Paperwhite narcissus hold more energy to use once active growth resumes.
Read More more
When is the best time to fertilize my Paperwhite narcissus?
There are a few times during which it is a good idea to fertilize a Paperwhite narcissus. The main time to fertilize is in early spring when the flowers are forming, at which time, the right fertilizer will encourage better blooms. You can also fertilize your Paperwhite narcissus later in the spring after the flowers have faded. Feeding at this time will give your Paperwhite narcissus plenty of energy that it can store and use next year.
If you are planting your Paperwhite narcissus for the first time in the fall you can also provide some fertilizer at that time as well. Fertilizing during the planting process gives your Paperwhite narcissus the best chance of producing a healthy set of flowers during its first growing season.
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When should I avoid fertilizing my Paperwhite narcissus?
The correct times to fertilize a Paperwhite narcissus are during the fall planting process, during the early spring bloom period, and during the late spring following the bloom period. Fertilizing during any other part of the year is not necessary and may be harmful to your plant.
When caring for a Paperwhite narcissus, you should know that it has a considerable dormant phase in which it will not need fertilizer and will need far less water as well. As you would guess, your Paperwhite narcissus will be dormant during winter. However, this plant also enters a dormant phase during the summer. After the flowers fade, the leaves will persist briefly before dying back to the ground. Once the leaves die back, your plant has returned to a dormant phase, and it will not need fertilizer.
Read More more
What type of fertilizer does my Paperwhite narcissus need?
Several different types of fertilizer can be beneficial to Paperwhite narcissus. To keep matters simple, you can always rely on a balanced fertilizer that has equal amounts of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. Fertilizer ratios that are equal, such as 10-10-10 or 5-5-5, will work well. It is also often best to use a granular fertilizer rather than a liquid one.
If you are interested in being a bit more specific with your fertilizer choices, you should consider using a fertilizer that is rich overall with the three main nutrients but a bit higher in phosphorus content. Many gardeners stand by the claim that phosphorus will encourage better flowers that last longer. Organic materials, including bonemeal, can help add the phosphorus that may benefit your Paperwhite narcissus and its blooming abilities.
Read More more
How do I fertilize my Paperwhite narcissus?
The first time that you should fertilize your Paperwhite narcissus is during the planting process, which takes place in the fall. After digging a small hole to plant your bulb, you can add some granular slow-release fertilizer to the hole. During the process, you should water continually to maintain consistent soil moisture.
Following planting, you can fertilize once again during the early spring as the plant is emerging from the ground and developing its flowers. Again, you should use a granular fertilizer that has a balanced mix of nutrients and sprinkle it on the ground. As you apply the fertilizer, you should be sure to water the soil gently at the same time.
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What happens if I fertilize my Paperwhite narcissus too much?
While fertilizer can be incredibly helpful to a Paperwhite narcissus, it can also be equally harmful if you give too much. Overfertilization will not only damage a Paperwhite narcissus, but it may lead to death in some cases. The best way to avoid this is to follow the instructions on the fertilizer package you buy rather than exceeding the recommended dose in hopes of making a more vigorous plant.
Likewise, it is typically less likely that you'll overfertilize your Paperwhite narcissus if you use a slow-release granular fertilizer. Since these fertilizers release their nutrients slowly, as the name implies, they are less capable of giving your Paperwhite narcissus too much fertilizer at once.
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Cultivation:SunlightDetail

What Are the Sunlight Requirements for Paperwhite narcissus?

Paperwhite narcissus grows vigorously in sunny places. Insufficient light may cause excessive leaf growth. However, the plants can adapt to slightly shaded environments, such as under deciduous trees. Some varieties in the Cyclamineus and Triandrus groups are particularly suitable for moist and shaded environments.
Cultivation:SunlightDetail
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What type of sunlight does Paperwhite narcissus need?
Paperwhite narcissus needs full sun every day, and these plants rely on a minimum of six hours of sunlight to keep their leaves, roots, and blooms in a healthy state. Even though most perennials need six hours of sunlight a day, plants like the Orange Daylily or Giant Coreopsis could live off less sun for a minimum of three hours daily. Even though these perennial flowering plants can live with only three hours of direct sunlight, they won't be able to thrive like they would in sunnier conditions.
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Can sunlight damage Paperwhite narcissus? How to protect Paperwhite narcissus from the sun and heat damage?
The few Perennial Flowering Plants that don't like excessive heat in warm climates might react poorly to too much sun if they have heat damage. These plants may wilt or dry out from too much sun and may also develop growth issues if they're regularly in the sun during the most intense heat of the day. Some plants don't need protection from the light afternoon sun, but those that are harmed by intense afternoon exposure should be provided some shade in warmer climates. Gardeners could give these plants plenty of shade by planting them in spots that don't receive direct heat during the afternoon, like under trees or behind bushes.
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Should I protect Paperwhite narcissus from sun exposure?
While many perennial plants need plenty of sun to bloom to their fullest extent, some of them benefit from less sun in warmer climates. For example, people who live in hotter climates might want to provide shade for their flowering perennials in the hot afternoon sun, and this is even more true for months in the summer.
Even though some perennial flowering plants will benefit from partially shaded in the hottest climates, plants like the Giant Coreopsis aren't intimidated by too much sun. They might sit outside in the full sun in hot weather and still thrive.
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What will happen if Paperwhite narcissus gets inadequate sunlight?
If you're growing Paperwhite narcissus and you aren't getting enough sunlight, you'll notice signs of inadequate requirements in your plants. Most plants won't produce as many blooms as they would if they had full sun exposure. Some plants will develop dry spots on their leaves, but most of these plants will still bloom in the inadequate sun. Even though they bloom, the flowers will be smaller and less full.
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Does Paperwhite narcissus need special care about sunlight during its different growth stages?
Paperwhite narcissus is great flowers in gardens and will have optimum blooming if it gets six hours of sunlight a day minimum. Sometimes, flowers stay fresh longer if they're partially shaded during the really hot parts of the day. When Paperwhite narcissus is young, gardeners want to ensure their younger plants are getting plenty of sunlight but don't have to endure intense heat during the afternoon sunlight. If you have a fully mature plant, provide it with plenty of sun so it may keep up its growth properly.
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How much light does Paperwhite narcissus need for photosynthesis?
Paperwhite narcissus will need a minimum of six hours of light to best support their photosynthesis cycles. These flowering plants need the sun to help their foliage and blooms grow. However, certain perennial flowering plants like the Giant Coreopsis might need anywhere from eight to twelve hours of full sun a day to maintain their large flowers and healthy foliage.
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How much light should Paperwhite narcissus get per day to grow healthily?
If you want your Paperwhite narcissus to grow healthy and bloom as much as possible during its blooming season, you should try to give your plant six hours of direct sunlight. Some perennial plants might even do more sunlight and could sit in the sun for up to twelve hours, depending on the heat in the area and the general environment. Plants like the Red Hot Poker and Giant Coreopsis thrive in much hotter climates and might sit in all types of strong sunlight.
Some home gardeners have to use grow lights because their spaces don't allow for tons of outdoor sunlight. Most perennials could grow happily in grow lights, but they will need anywhere from eight to fourteen hours of artificial light to stay strong since these lights don't have as much power as the sun.
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Cultivation:PruningDetail

How to Prune Paperwhite narcissus?

Remove withered flowers from paperwhite narcissus promptly to prevent it from consuming nutrients during fruit growth. Retaining bulb nutrients this way prolongs the blooming time of other flowers. After flowering, do not cut off the leaves until they turn yellow and wither so that the leaves can photosynthesize for as long as possible and store nutrients for the bulbs. This is conducive to the following year's rebloom.
Cultivation:PruningDetail
How can I prune my Paperwhite narcissus?
Pruning your Paperwhite narcissus is a fairly simple process. First, you will need a reliable set of hand pruners or hedge trimmers. You may use a clean pair of sharp scissors if you don’t have pruners or garden shears on hand. It’s important to always clean your gardening tools before and after using them to prevent the possibility of spreading disease or infection to other plants. To prune your Paperwhite narcissus simply allow your plant to go dormant over the Winter. Some time between late winter and early spring – or when new growth starts to appear – take your clean pruners or trimmers and cut away any dying, damaged, yellow or declining foliage. Repeat this process until you reach the base of the plant or until there are no dead pieces left to cut. When pruning, be careful not to damage the new growth that may be emerging near the base of your plant. These parts cannot be restored and pruning can increase the ventilation of the plants and facilitate their growth. Any pruning that is done to this plant should be cut straight across the blades or stems. No angled cuts are required. Diseased leaf blade foliage can be removed as it appears. This could be done anytime when your Paperwhite narcissus is growing.
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What should I do after pruning my Paperwhite narcissus?
Once you’ve pruned your plant, you should dispose of the stems and leaves either by composting the healthy ones or throwing out the diseased parts. You can also fertilize just before or after pruning, which gives Paperwhite narcissus a little vitamin boost that can provide it the nutrients needed to better protect itself from any nearby pathogens or diseases. Do not water the Paperwhite narcissus immediately after pruning as this can lead to fungal infestation of the plants through the wounds. You don’t need much after care when you’re done pruning. It might benefit from light watering and some liquid plant food to encourage new growth.
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How can I prune my Paperwhite narcissus during different seasons?
Early spring and late winter are the best times to prune your Paperwhite narcissus on a large scale. If you want to control the size of your Paperwhite narcissus, you can prune them as you wish, but be careful not to prune more than a third of the size of the plant. Yellow and diseased leaves may appear during the summer months when the Paperwhite narcissus is growing vigorously and these types of leaves need to be pruned back immediately. These parts of the Paperwhite narcissus cannot be restored and pruning increases the ventilation of the plant and facilitates its growth.
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When should I prune my Paperwhite narcissus through different stages of growth?
Strategic pruning is usually done at different times of the year or during certain stages of growth depending on the plant. However, knowing when to prune your Paperwhite narcissus depends on where you live and how established your plant is. For example, if your Paperwhite narcissus is a new resident, it’s a good idea to wait until the plant starts to grow back before you start pruning. On the other hand, if your plant is already established, you will want to prune the dry or dead parts in plant before new leafy growth appears in early spring or late winter. This is the time of year when plants are dormant and pruning causes the least damage to them. This is also the best time of year to do more extensive pruning. It’s important to note that if Paperwhite narcissus is pruned too late in the season, it can leave new growth at risk for damage or disease. However, if your Paperwhite narcissus is indoors this is not a problem and you can prune at any time. Since this can affect the long-term health and appearance of your plant, it’s important to keep this in mind when deciding when and how to prune. As your Paperwhite narcissus grows larger over time, you can trim it as needed after annual pruning. Dead, damaged, or diseased leaf blade foliage can be removed as it appears. This could be done anytime when your Paperwhite narcissus is growing.
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care_advanced_guide

Advanced Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail

What is the Ideal Temperature Range for Paperwhite narcissus?

Most varieties of paperwhite narcissus are hardy and can overwinter in hardiness zones 8-10. Paperwhite narcissus needs 6-8 weeks of temperatures below 5 ℃ in winter to successfully complete flower initiation and flower. The best temperature for growth is 12 to 18 ℃, and for flowering about 20 ℃. Paperwhite narcissus doesn’t have a high demand for water and can adapt well to both dry and humid climates.
Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail
What is the optimal temperature for Paperwhite narcissus?
Colder temperatures can affect plants since they have the same temperature as the air around them. When they are exposed to the sun, they can start to get warm again, but this is not the case during winter. The temperature range for the Paperwhite narcissus is often 70~85℉(21~30℃). They might tolerate 20~30℉(-6~0℃) even 15℉(-10℃), but not for long since this can result in frost damage. Maximum temperatures should be around 70~85℉(21~30℃), but make sure that you spray them with water from time to time and give them some shade to prevent wilting.
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Should I adjust the temperature for Paperwhite narcissus during different growing phases?
Do some research and make sure that the temperature is right when growing Paperwhite narcissus. Some growers might consider decreasing the plants' thermostats during the growing season to reduce HVAC costs. However, it's vital to understand that the temperature can affect the flowering, pest management, and quality of the plants.
There will be a temperature point where the Paperwhite narcissus will stop growing, and this can happen during the winter when some species might go into a dormant state. The base temperature becomes warmer when the season changes and the Paperwhite narcissus can grow faster. The species that are naturally growing in warm habitats have higher optimum temperatures when you compare them to the ones that thrive in a cooler climate.
When the seeds of Paperwhite narcissus are exposed to cool temperatures, this can cause a decrease in uniformity and delays. You might also want to lower the temperature during flowering but not at other phases. Cooler temperatures at night will also require less water, so adjust the irrigation as needed.
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How can I keep Paperwhite narcissus warm in cold seasons?
Stop fertilizing the plant to avoid new growth and allow the old ones to become hardy. This way, they can endure colder temperature when it begins to drop. To keep them warm, you can build structures around the Paperwhite narcissus like cages or trellises. There are also options to use heat mats that can gently warm the soil since they can consistently maintain an ideal temperature range for the Paperwhite narcissus.
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How can I save Paperwhite narcissus from temperature damage?
During winter, you can protect the Paperwhite narcissus from frost by covering it with cloths, tarps, burlaps, sheets, or plastic buckets. Make sure to keep them down so they continue to act as insulators and the wind will not blow them away. However, ensure that the plastic sheets or burlap covers should not touch any part of the fruit or foliage, or the cold temperatures can transfer to the material and cause burns. When the temperatures begin to rise during the daytime, remove the covers.
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Should I adjust the temperature for Paperwhite narcissus in different seasons?
When growing the Paperwhite narcissus in spring, you might want to increase humidity since the air temperature tends to be cooler at this time. A dry temperature can be a stressful growing environment for various species, which can help. If summer arrives, the large cover of the greenhouse and the warm temperature will mean that there will be a higher humidity level in the air. Some signs to look for are the condensation that is often found on the walls of the greenhouse, and this can cause issues with pollination and the development of infections when the water begins to fall on the leaves. Make adjustments according to the temperature and do some spraying during the hotter days of the year.
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What damage will Paperwhite narcissus suffer if the temperature is too high/low?
Generally, the first cold snap can destroy the Paperwhite narcissus and others might go into a dormant state when the temperature is low. Some plants can get chilled when the temperatures range from 20~30℉(-6~0℃). They can freeze when the temperature begins to drop below 32℉(0℃). Those species that hide most of their parts under the soil might lose their structures above ground, but they can recover in spring. Some of the associated issues with too low temperatures are the lack of availability of resources like water, and nutrients, and those subtropical plants can suffer when the temperature reaches below 20℉(-6℃). The plants can also get damaged because of extreme heat stress when it's too high. This can reduce the transpiration rate that can affect the growth and productivity of Paperwhite narcissus.
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What tips and cautions should I keep in mind when it comes to temperature for Paperwhite narcissus?
You need to cover the plants at night since these can add about 5 degrees more to protect the species from frost and freezing temperatures. The cloth rows can work well as blankets and ensure that there are no openings where the heat could escape.
When using the covers, avoid the plastic from touching the foliage because this can cause the Paperwhite narcissus to freeze. Remember to keep the covers during the day and stop using heat pads during the summer. It will always be worth the effort to protect the cold-intolerant plants from freezing temperatures to help them survive.
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How can I keep Paperwhite narcissus warm without a heat pad?
If you prefer not to use a heat pad, bring the Paperwhite narcissus inside, especially if it's freezing outdoors. During spring, consider the ones you need to bring indoors and plant them in moveable pots and containers.
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How can I provide Paperwhite narcissus with an adequate temperature condition?
Most often, the ones caring for the Paperwhite narcissus will grow them in greenhouses. This is because they can provide adequate temperature in these areas that won't affect the photosynthesis process of a specific process.
Some install the proper HVAC systems to control the temperatures of Paperwhite narcissus. This can handle many species' cooling and heating needs, especially during the summer and winter. They generally place the cooling or heating pad under the plants rather than above to achieve their desired temperatures.
If outdoors, you can protect the Paperwhite narcissus from frost by covering it with cloths, tarps, burlaps, sheets, or plastic buckets.
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Under what conditions should I stop adjusting the temperature for Paperwhite narcissus?
Heat mats are often left on Paperwhite narcissus to set the temperatures at a more consistent level. When the weather becomes warmer during the day, you can remove them, especially if the species are exposed to the sun. Put the pads away once the plants are established and when they start growing flowers and fruits.
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Cultivation:SoilDetail

What Soil is Best for Paperwhite narcissus?

Paperwhite narcissus prefers fertile, loose, well-drained, and slightly acidic or neutral soil. The suitable soil pH range is 6-7. It cannot be planted in clay soil with poor drainage, as accumulated water will cause the bulb to rot and fail to bloom. Add coarse sand and humus to improve the soil structure and ensure good drainage can avoid it.
Cultivation:SoilDetail
Cultivation:PropagationDetail

How to Propagate Paperwhite narcissus?

You can buy bulbs directly from a garden center for planting. Paperwhite narcissus is a perennial bulb. Baby bulbs will form around any parent bulbs that have been growing for many years. You can use these small bulbs to propagate. In the autumn, dig out the bulbs, cut off the small bulbs, and replant them in your garden or flower pots using the original planting method. After growing for 2-3 years, the plant can bloom again.

Propagation

This plant propagates in a special way, and if you want to propagate this plant quickly, using tubers is a good way. For the best results, propagate your Paperwhite narcissus when it's dormant. You can also propagate plants in the early spring or during the autumn months. Since it won't need much water during these periods, it will be easier for the plant to adjust. If you propagate during the growing season, trim away about two-thirds of the leaves to reduce water needs. To safely divide and propagate your tubers, you only need a couple of tools. Make sure you have these on hand and then get started!
  1. A sharp, sanitized knife or garden trowel.
  2. Space in your soil or growing medium.
  3. (possibly) sharp, sanitized scissors or shears.
Steps: Step 1: Uncover the underground root stem or tuber. Step 2: Use your tool to divide the root or tuber into sections, making sure each section has at least one eye or bud. If the tubers are relatively small, they cannot be cut to prevent the tubers from being too small for nutrition. Step 3:Plant the divided tubers into the soil. Mix organic fertilizer into the soil if its possible. Place one or two tubers in each hole, preferably at a depth of 7-15 cm. Step 4:After planting, keep the soil moist but not waterlogged. This will help the tubers to germinate in time. Step 5: If necessary, cut back most of the foliage of non-dormant plants to allow stronger root growth.
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Cultivation:PropagationDetail
Cultivation:PlantingDetail

How to Plant Paperwhite narcissus?

You can buy bulbs for planting in the fall. plant paperwhite narcissus at night, ideally when the temperature is below 10 ℃. Too high a temperature may cause new leaves to sprout prematurely. If the temperature drops, the new leaves will suffer frost damage.
When planting in your garden, choose a well-ventilated place to dig a pit. You can add some compost to the bottom of the pit, and then insert the bulb, taking care to face the tip upward. Gently cover with soil, press firmly, and water it well. The planting depth is generally 3-4 times the bulb height, and the spacing is twice the bulb diameter.
When planting in a flower pot, choose a pot that is 5 times wider than the diameter of the bulb. The bottom of the pot must also have drainage holes. If it is a large container, it is best to put a 3 cm layer of thick, coarse sand or broken brick at the bottom to help with drainage. The planting depth can be slightly shallower than planting on the ground, and at least 2.5 cm of soil under each bulb is required. plant spacing can be slightly denser than planting directly in your garden. After planting, you can mulch the soil surface with a layer of gravel, which helps to retain moisture and adds beauty.
Cultivation:PlantingDetail
Cultivation:HarvestDetail

How to Harvest Paperwhite narcissus?

Paperwhite narcissus is very beautiful. When the flower buds are enlarged and the outer petals have just softened but not yet fully opened, you can cut them to enjoy in a vase. Use sharp garden shears to cut from the base of the flower stem and promptly put it in a vase filled with 2/3 clean water to avoid water loss. The vase life of these flowers is 7-15 days. If you want to extend their display period as much as possible, you can add some cut flower food and change the water every 3 days.
Cultivation:HarvestDetail
PlantCare:TransplantSummary

How to Transplant Paperwhite narcissus?

Autumn is the time to transplant paperwhite narcissus, prime because the plant can set roots before winter. Aim for a sunny to part-shade location with well-drained soil. Note, overwatering can lead tо rot. So, transplant judiciously when the plant overgrows its space.
PlantCare:TransplantSummary
care_scenes

More Info on Paperwhite Narcissus Growth and Care

Basic Care Guide
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Lighting
Full sun
The paperwhite narcissus thrives best under substantial exposure to the sun's rays and can continue to grow under moderate sun. Originating from an environment of ample sun, this attribute contributes substantially to its robust growth. Insufficient solar exposure could retard growth, while overexposure may cause plant stress.
Best Sunlight Practices
Temperature
-5 43 ℃
Paperwhite narcissus is native to temperate environments, thriving in a temperature range of 59 to 100.4 °F (15 to 38 ℃). During colder seasons, it is suggested to keep the plant around these temperatures for optimal growth.
Temp for Healthy Growth
Transplant
1-2 feet
Autumn is the time to transplant paperwhite narcissus, prime because the plant can set roots before winter. Aim for a sunny to part-shade location with well-drained soil. Note, overwatering can lead tо rot. So, transplant judiciously when the plant overgrows its space.
Transplant Techniques
Feng shui direction
Southwest
In Feng Shui paradigm, paperwhite narcissus is typically seen as auspicious given its winter blooms signify renewal. Its potent fragrance is thought to promote energy flow. Keeping paperwhite narcissus in a Southwest facing direction could enhance love and relationship space due to the Earth element associated with this direction, and paperwhite narcissus being an emblem of love and admiration.
Fengshui Details
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Seasonal Care Tips

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Spring

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Summer

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Fall

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Winter

Spring blooming bulbs like this plant are easy to care for, even during the growing season. The bulb provides the necessary nutrients that may be lacking in the soil.

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However, an application of bone meal can help support healthy growth.
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Water the plants regularly, whenever the soil is beginning to dry out.
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Increase the amount of light the container plant is receiving to encourage healthy growth.

This plant and other spring-blooming bulbs are dormant in the summer.

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Decrease watering only when the first half of the soil has dried out.
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Do not apply any fertilizer.
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After the foliage has turned brown and dries out, go ahead and remove it from the plant. Do not remove the leaves when green, the foliage provides nutrients to the bulb.

Established the plant will bloom during the fall after they wake up, so care is needed to make sure it grows well and is ready for cultivation.

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Once the growth begins, start your regular watering and fertilizing routine to keep the soil slightly moist and fertile.
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Fertilize at least once during this season.
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Provide plenty of light to encourage growth and strong flowering.
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Fall, once the temperature drops, is the best time to plant your plant or to propagate new plants and establish cuttings or replant corms in pots or directly in garden soil.

Your plant should be actively growing through this season.

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While your plant tends to be hardy enough to grow through cold winters, you can also choose to move your plants indoors to give them extra protection from the cold.
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Even so, make sure they have a good source of light to keep the growth strong.
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You can even dig up the bulbs and transplant them to indoor pots or garden beds.
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Water cautiously, as this plant doesn't require an abundance of moisture. Keep it moist but err on the side of dry rather than soggy.
care_pet_and_diseases

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Paperwhite narcissus based on 10 million real cases
Wilting after blooming
Wilting after blooming Wilting after blooming
Wilting after blooming
Flowers may wither for a variety of reasons.
Solutions: Check the soil or potting medium. Coarse textures can allow water to drain too rapidly, preventing the plant from taking up enough. If the soil and roots seem very dry, add sphagnum moss or other mediums that hold water. Water according to recommendations for each plant's species. Low humidity can be corrected by misting the plant regularly or placing it near a humidifier. Keeping it near other plants helps, too. Keep the environment consistent in terms of temperature, humidity, and lighting. Keep it away from vents, heaters, and air conditioners, and avoid moving it to locations where it will experience a temperature shock. Hot, dry heat, and cold drafts are problematic for many plants. Especially if the plant is outside, it could be experiencing heat or light stress. Try moving it to a shadier location.
Flower withering
Flower withering Flower withering
Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Solutions: If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible. For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface. In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well. If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Solutions: If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Scars
Scars Scars
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Solutions: Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
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Wilting after blooming
plant poor
Wilting after blooming
Flowers may wither for a variety of reasons.
Overview
Overview
Wilting after blooming is sometimes a natural aging process of the flower, while other times it may indicate a problem. Orchids, for example, can bloom for anywhere from two weeks to three months, so wilting after a few days signals a problem for most varieties. This can happen to virtually any ornamental flowering plant, but those with shallow roots and limited tolerance for drought, full sun, and low humidity are more susceptible.
This is a common problem, and often has an easy fix. Sometimes, however, it is the result of more serious causes such as pests or disease of the root system.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
  • At first, flowers may look a little limp.
  • Petals may start to appear dried out and turn brown.
  • Eventually they may drop off the plant all together.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Wilting blooms can be a sign of an unhealthy root system. Any condition that prevents the plant from absorbing enough water and nutrition can result in wilting blooms and sometimes other symptoms. If the plant doesn’t have enough water, it cannot maintain appropriate pressure within stems, leaves, and blooms, causing them to wilt.
This can result from physical damage – for example from root breakage during re-potting or attack by insects like cutworms. If you recently re-potted your plant, physical damage to the roots is a likely cause. If you see insects, they may be eating leaves, roots, or flowers. Fungal infections can also cause root rot and damage, preventing water and nutrient uptake.
Finally, wilting blooms can result simply from age. If no other symptoms are visible, it may simply signal the natural end of the flower’s lifespan. If it seems premature, this may be caused by environmental factors: water, humidity, light, or stress. Under-watering is a common cause. Similarly, plants adapted to high humidity dry out easily when humidity is low, like during winter or in dry climates. Too much light can also stress plants that need shade, causing blooms to wilt.
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Flower withering
plant poor
Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Overview
Overview
Flower withering occurs when flowers become weak, droopy, wilted, or faded until they can’t be revived. During withering, they begin to wrinkle and shrink until the flower becomes completely dry or dead.
Any flowers, regardless of the plant type or the climate they are grown in, are susceptible to withering. It is a worldwide problem across houseplants, herbs, flowering ornamentals, trees, shrubs, garden vegetables, and food crops.
Unlike wilting—which withering is often confused with—withering can be caused by different things and is often due to more than a lack of water. Withering can be fatal in severe cases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Flower withering progresses from very mild cases to severe occurrences that kill the flower. The severity of the symptoms is related to the cause and how long the condition is allowed to progress before action is taken.
  • Wilted, droopy flowers
  • Petals and leaves begin to wrinkle
  • Brown papery streaks or spots appear on the petals and leaf tips
  • Flowerhead shrink in size
  • Petal color fades
  • Yellowing leaves
  • Complete death of the flower
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The main causes of flower withering include natural age progress, lack of water, nutritional deficiencies, and bacterial or fungal diseases. It’s critical to determine the underlying cause when flower withering is noticed. This will guide the best course of action, if treatment is possible.
Check the soil for moisture and then closely examine the entire plant for signs of nutrient deficiencies. If neither of those appears to be the cause then cut open the stem below a flower. If a cross-section reveals brown or rust-colored stains it is safe to assume that this is a bacterial or fungal infection.
If the flower is nearing the end of its normal lifespan, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence, or cell aging and death. Cell division stops and the plant begins breaking down resources within the flower to use in other parts of the plant.
In all other cases, flower withering happens when the plant seals off the stem as a defense mechanism, stopping transport within the vascular system. This prevents further water loss through the flowers but also stops bacteria and fungi from moving to healthy parts of the plant. Once water and nutrient transport stops, the flower begins to wither and ultimately die.
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Aged yellow and dry
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Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Overview
Overview
Regardless of the type of plant or where it is grown, at some point, it will begin to aged yellow and dry. This is a natural, unavoidable process that happens when the plant has completed all of the steps in its life.
Annual plants go through this process at the end of a single growing season. Perennial plants live for multiple years, if not tens or hundreds of years, but will still ultimately exhibit these symptoms.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
When plants have progressed through their natural developmental stages and are nearing the end of their lifecycle, they begin showing signs of decline. Leaves will start to yellow and droop, and over time they turn papery brown and dry.
Once completely dry, the leaves begin to fall from the plant until the entire plant has dried out.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
At the end of its life, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence or natural aging and death. Cell division stops, and the plant begins catabolizing resources to use in other parts of the plant.
As this happens, the tissues begin yellow and drying until the entire plant is desiccated and perishes.
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Scars
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Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Scars form when the plant repairs wounds. They can be the result of people or pets passing by and scraping the plant. Once the underlying issue is resolved, the plant will heal but a scar may remain.
Pests and pathogens can also cause scarring. Insects may attack the plant for a meal, resulting in extensive scarring when a few invaders turn into an infestation. Diseases such as fungus and bacteria can weaken the plant, causing brown spots, mushy areas, or blisters that lead to scars.
Scars occur on stems when a leaf or bud has been lost and the plant has healed. The harder tissue is like a scab that protects a wound.
On other occasions, scars can signal problems from environmental conditions, such as overexposure to sunlight or heat. It might surprise you to know that plants can suffer from sunburn, even desert dwellers like cactus!
Solutions
Solutions
Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover.
  1. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes.
  2. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray.
  3. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs.
  4. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Prevention
Prevention
Preventing some sources of scarring is easier than others, but all start with careful attention to your plants once you decide to bring them home.
  1. Review specific guidelines for your plant, including soil drainage, watering, and fertilizer requirements.
  2. Inspect plants before planting and use sterile pots and fresh potting soil or media to limit transfer of fungi or bacteria.
  3. Once established, check your plants regularly for signs of scarring or the presence of pests, as it is better to catch problems as early as possible.
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care_toxicity

Paperwhite Narcissus and Their Toxicity

Toxic to Cats
Toxic to Cats
Poisoning from paperwhite narcissus can be severely harmful to cats; suspected ingestion creates a veterinary emergency. All parts of the plant, especially the bulbs, contain lycorine and other noxious substances, causing symptoms after ingestion that include vomiting, diarrhea, drooling, weakness, tremors, cardiac arrhythmias and low blood pressure, convulsions, loss of appetite, lethargy, and tremors.
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Who Is Most at Risk of Plant Poisoning?
Your pets like cats and dogs can be poisoned by them as well!
1
Do not let your lovely pets eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
2
It’s better to kill those growing around your house. Wear long-sleeved shirts, pants and gloves with sharp tools to dig it out completely;
3
Clean the tools with rubbing alcohol or soap and water but do not do that with bare hands;
4
Clean your hands and skin once exposed to plants with soap and water;
5
Consider using barrier creams that contain bentoquatam to prevent poison oak, ivy and sumac rashes;
6
Dump it in special trash cans in sealed garbage packages, and do not let your pets reach it;Do not let your lovely pets eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
7
If you take your pets to hike with you in the wild, please don’t let them eat any plants that you don’t know;
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Once your pets eat, touch or inhale anything from toxic plants and act abnormally, please call the doctors for help ASAP!
pets
Pets
Some pets are less likely than children to eat and touch just about everything. This is good, as a pet owner. However, you know your pet best, and it is up to you to keep them safe. There are plenty of poisonous weeds that can grow within the confines of your lawn, which might make your dogs or cats ill or worse if they eat them. Try to have an idea of what toxic plants grow in your area and keep them under control and your pets away from them.
pets
Common Toxic Houseplants
Common Toxic Houseplants
When it comes to decorating a house, there is nothing more refreshing than adding some beautiful houseplants. Some common house plants can also be toxic.

Aloe

aloe
Aloe is famous for its sunburn-soothing properties and its gorgeous desert design. However, many people do not realize that the latex the aloe vera plant produces can be mildly toxic to pets and children.

The latex contains a chemical compound known as saponin. Which when ingested, can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and low blood sugar. This, if left unchecked, can lead to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. The proper response is to contact poison control or a veterinarian to know what to do in your particular circumstance if either your child or pet consumes aloe.

The latex of the plant is similar to the sap of the tree. It is inside the leaf, but sticks mainly toward the edges. If aloe gel is prepared properly it should be safe for use, but be sure to apply it only topically when treating burns.

Philodendron

Philodendron
Philodendron, also known as sweetheart vine, has become a resident at many houses and even businesses. They are glossy green and the leaves elegantly split, displaying interesting designs. Behind this beauty there is a needle-like toxin called calcium oxalate crystals.

These crystals are held within the plant and only affect you, your pets, or your loved ones if the plant tissue is broken. If ingested, the crystals can cause severe swelling, difficulty breathing, stomach pain, burning and pain. If they are accidentally caught on the skin, they can cause skin irritation.

If anyone accidentally ingests philodendron and they find it difficult to breathe or their tongue starts to swell up, it is important to seek medical attention immediately to avoid suffocation. If you have very young children or pets who have a tendency to tear at plants, keep them away from any philodendrons.

Peace Lily

Peace Lily
Peace lilies produce stunningly white flowers that bring to mind peace and serenity. This is one reason they are invited into our homes and given a place to stay. However, similar to philodendrons, the peace lily contains oxalate crystals known as raphides.

The raphides, once ingested, will cause swelling and burning sensations and can also cause skin irritation. Both pets and humans can get these symptoms so it is important to keep these plants from anyone who is likely to tear or chew it. Symptoms can become dire if the raphides cause the tongue and throat to swell to a point where the person or pet is having difficulty breathing. Seek proper medical attention if this is the case.

Snake Plant

Snake Plant
The snake plant is an interesting and popular house plant. Its stark architecture and wavy coloring has made it a fan favorite. This plant too, however, is toxic when ingested or if the sap touches your skin.

Snake plant sap will cause rashes if it comes into contact with your skin. In addition, it will cause diarrhea and vomiting when ingested. Again these symptoms are very serious and would be best avoided by keeping snake plants out of reach or by choosing a different houseplant.
Common Toxic Garden Plants
Common Toxic Garden Plants

Daffodil

Daffodil
Daffodils are a strikingly colorful flower. This can sometimes bring them much attention not from just onlooking adults but children as well. Since kids are more drawn to colorful objects, they may have a higher chance of just grabbing the flower and eating it. Adults have also been known to accidentally grab daffodil bulbs instead of onions.

Why are these mistakes so dangerous? Daffodils contain lycorine, which can induce nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It also contains oxalates which can cause swelling and pain. The symptoms can be worse in animals, because if your pets eat daffodils they may experience drowsiness, low blood pressure or even liver damage.

Make sure to call poison control when these symptoms set in. The vomiting and diarrhea have been known to go away after 3 hours, but it is better to be safe than sorry. Ingesting liquids to keep hydration up can be important. If the patient is having difficulty breathing, seek medical attention immediately.

Hydrangea

Hydrangea
Hydrangeas are unique, with their soft blue and pink flowers. They are a great addition to any garden, but should not be snacked on—not that you would want to. Hydrangeas can be especially nasty because they contain compounds known as glycosides. These will release hydrogen cyanide into the bloodstream when consumed. This will block your body’s ability to uptake oxygen to the cells in your body.

The way to combat this kind of poisoning is through getting IVs from the vet or doctor. It is important to contact your medical professional immediately since the symptoms can be fatal within minutes or hours.

Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons
Rhododendron, the state flower of Washington, is also toxic. The multitudinous, pink flowers can be quite dangerous. All parts of this plant are toxic, the leaves and seeds more so than the flowers. However, even the nectar of the flower is toxic and in the Mediterranean, where rhododendrons grow in more dense quantities, the honey from bees who gather rhododendron nectar can be poisonous.

Normally kids and pets do not eat enough to experience the full poisoning effect. However, just eating two leaves is enough to be considered dangerous. The grayanotoxin glycosides within the rhododendron can cause vomiting, diarrhea and irregular heartbeats. Things can get very serious when too much rhododendron is consumed and can lead to necessary medical intervention.

Start by calling poison control first if you suspect anyone has been munching on rhododendrons. The experts there will be able to help guide you through the necessary processes to cure your loved one.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb
Yummy rhubarb has a nasty side to it. While the stems are used in many recipes, including for rhubarb strawberry pie, the leaves are toxic. They contain oxalic acid which is known to blister the mouth, cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and kidney stones. The leaves are known to be more toxic to pets than humans, but in either case, it is important to contact poison control immediately to figure out necessary steps to cure the patient.
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard

Bittersweet Nightshade

Bittersweet Nightshade
Nightshade is an invasive, noxious weed that is extremely poisonous. It has been found along the East and West Coast of the U.S. It makes its home in areas with disturbed soil. This could be near your garden or areas that have recently had bushes/trees put in.

These plants are dark green with purple flowers that develop into bright red berries. The whole plant is toxic and should be avoided by pets and children alike. If ingested it can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The colorful berries are especially enticing to young children. If you see any plants that look similar to tomato or pepper plants that you did not plant in your yard, it is best to just pull them immediately.

Call poison control immediately if you think someone has fallen victim to nightshade.

Buttercups

Buttercups
Buttercups are found throughout the United States, especially in wet areas. The shiny, yellow flowers will pop up in the springtime, accompanying their dandelion friends. However, unlike dandelions, buttercups are not edible.

Buttercups will release a compound called protoanemonin. This toxin is known to cause vomiting, diarrhea, bloody stool, hypersalivation, depression, blisters, and more. These symptoms will affect both humans and animals. The sap may also cause irritation when it comes into contact with skin. These yellow flowers are dangerous and children should be observed cautiously when around them.

Foxgloves

Foxgloves
Foxgloves are beautiful plants that build towers out of vivid purple bell-shaped blossoms. They are very pretty to look at, but they contain a compound known as digoxin. This chemical is used in certain medicines to help people with certain heart conditions. However, the medicine is made by specialists, whereas someone eating foxgloves will receive unregulated amounts of the chemical.

This toxin can make you vomit and lower your heartbeat. This often causes dizziness and faintness. It is extremely important to call poison control immediately to know what to do in the case of foxglove poisoning. Some people have confused the young leaves of foxglove with borage, making adult foragers at risk as well as kids and pets.
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
Now that you know where to start with toxic plant identification, let us discuss how to either tend to the poisonous plants you decide to keep or get rid of them that plague your yard.

How to Tend to Poisonous Plants

Many plants that are toxic when ingested are also skin irritants. The philodendron is a good example of this. When the sap comes into contact with skin, it can cause a rash to form. To help protect yourself when tending to toxic plants, it is important to wear some sort of gloves.
Tend
Latex gloves may be the best solution due to their disposability. Regular gloves could potentially keep the poisonous sap on their surface. If the gloves aren’t cleaned then you could accidentally touch the irritant or pass it to someone else.

In addition you will want to plan where to keep your deadly beauties. If you have a toxic indoor plant try to keep it up high or out of reach of children and pets. This will keep accidents few and far between. Another idea is keeping your plants in areas that are usually inaccessible to children or pets. Areas such as an office, study room, or guest bedroom could be good locations. If applicable, you could also set up a terrarium for your little plant baby, making it more difficult for curious hands or paws to access.
tend2
If you plan to have outdoor plants, location will be key. You will want to put plants in an area that will be inaccessible to children, pets and even wild animals. You will probably want to avoid planting the plants in the front of your house if kids walk by on a regular basis, just to be cautious. Having the plants behind a fence will be best, but use your discretion when choosing a spot.

How to Get Rid of Poisonous Plants

plants
The easiest but possibly most controversial way to get rid of poisonous plants is by using herbicides. This can be especially easy if you own a grass lawn and use an herbicide that targets broadleaf (non-grass) species. You can find many herbicides meant for yard use by simply searching the term online. Once you have purchased the herbicide you will want to make sure to follow the label posted on the container. If you follow the instructions precisely, then everything should run smoothly for you.

If you don’t plan on using herbicides, there are a few organic methods you can use to try to get rid of toxic plants. You can manually pull the plants out of the ground. This is probably one of the most difficult methods because there is no assurance that you will get the whole plant out this way.

You can also try pouring boiling hot water or spraying white vinegar on the target plants. This may take more time than using a synthetic herbicide, but you can feel a little better about using these products.

You can also try to use wood chips to cover a certain area where you do not want anything to grow. This will not stop all the weeds, but the few that make it through can be easily picked by hand.
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Who Is Most at Risk of Plant Poisoning?
Everyone should keep the following in mind to prevent being poisoned:
1
Do not eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
2
If you need to kill it, wear long-sleeved shirts, pants and gloves with sharp tools to dig it out completely;
3
Clean the tools with rubbing alcohol or soap and water but do not do that with bare hands;
4
Clean your hands and skin once exposed to plants with soap and water;
5
Consider using barrier creams that contain bentoquatam to prevent poison oak, ivy and sumac rashes;
6
Dump it in special trash cans in sealed garbage packages;
7
Wear properly when you hiking or working in the wilderness. Long pants, long sleeves, gloves, hiking shoes, etc., that protect you from being hurt by any plants;
8
Once you or your family aren’t feeling well after eating, touching or inhaling anything from toxic plants, please call your doctor for help ASAP!
Outdoor Workers
Outdoor Workers and Recreationalists
Those who enjoy the outdoors either as a hobby or as part of their work will rarely see a plant and decide to munch on it (although the scenario is not unheard of). However, they do tend to deal with moving through and brushing aside plants. These people are more at risk of being poisoned by touching toxic plants than by ingesting them.
Outdoor Workers
Foragers
Foragers
Foraging for food and medicinal plants is a desirable skill among people who want to feel at one with the land. This hobby can be very useful and enjoyable, but if done wrong , it can lead to disastrous effects. People who forage are picking and grabbing plants with the full intention of using those plants, most of the time to ingest them.
Foragers
Children
Children
While outdoor workers are more likely to touch poison and foragers are more likely to ingest poison, children can easily do both. These bundles of joy just love to run around and explore the world. They enjoy touching things and occasionally shoving random stuff in their mouth; this is a terrible combination with toxic plants in the mix.
If you let your children run about, it is important to know what are the local toxic plants that they could accidentally get into. Try to educate the children and steer them away from where the toxic plants are located.
Children
Common Toxic Houseplants
Common Toxic Houseplants
When it comes to decorating a house, there is nothing more refreshing than adding some beautiful houseplants. Some common house plants can also be toxic.

Aloe

aloe
Aloe is famous for its sunburn-soothing properties and its gorgeous desert design. However, many people do not realize that the latex the aloe vera plant produces can be mildly toxic to pets and children.

The latex contains a chemical compound known as saponin. Which when ingested, can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and low blood sugar. This, if left unchecked, can lead to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. The proper response is to contact poison control or a veterinarian to know what to do in your particular circumstance if either your child or pet consumes aloe.

The latex of the plant is similar to the sap of the tree. It is inside the leaf, but sticks mainly toward the edges. If aloe gel is prepared properly it should be safe for use, but be sure to apply it only topically when treating burns.

Philodendron

Philodendron
Philodendron, also known as sweetheart vine, has become a resident at many houses and even businesses. They are glossy green and the leaves elegantly split, displaying interesting designs. Behind this beauty there is a needle-like toxin called calcium oxalate crystals.

These crystals are held within the plant and only affect you, your pets, or your loved ones if the plant tissue is broken. If ingested, the crystals can cause severe swelling, difficulty breathing, stomach pain, burning and pain. If they are accidentally caught on the skin, they can cause skin irritation.

If anyone accidentally ingests philodendron and they find it difficult to breathe or their tongue starts to swell up, it is important to seek medical attention immediately to avoid suffocation. If you have very young children or pets who have a tendency to tear at plants, keep them away from any philodendrons.

Peace Lily

Peace Lily
Peace lilies produce stunningly white flowers that bring to mind peace and serenity. This is one reason they are invited into our homes and given a place to stay. However, similar to philodendrons, the peace lily contains oxalate crystals known as raphides.

The raphides, once ingested, will cause swelling and burning sensations and can also cause skin irritation. Both pets and humans can get these symptoms so it is important to keep these plants from anyone who is likely to tear or chew it. Symptoms can become dire if the raphides cause the tongue and throat to swell to a point where the person or pet is having difficulty breathing. Seek proper medical attention if this is the case.

Snake Plant

Snake Plant
The snake plant is an interesting and popular house plant. Its stark architecture and wavy coloring has made it a fan favorite. This plant too, however, is toxic when ingested or if the sap touches your skin.

Snake plant sap will cause rashes if it comes into contact with your skin. In addition, it will cause diarrhea and vomiting when ingested. Again these symptoms are very serious and would be best avoided by keeping snake plants out of reach or by choosing a different houseplant.
Common Toxic Garden Plants
Common Toxic Garden Plants

Daffodil

Daffodil
Daffodils are a strikingly colorful flower. This can sometimes bring them much attention not from just onlooking adults but children as well. Since kids are more drawn to colorful objects, they may have a higher chance of just grabbing the flower and eating it. Adults have also been known to accidentally grab daffodil bulbs instead of onions.

Why are these mistakes so dangerous? Daffodils contain lycorine, which can induce nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It also contains oxalates which can cause swelling and pain. The symptoms can be worse in animals, because if your pets eat daffodils they may experience drowsiness, low blood pressure or even liver damage.

Make sure to call poison control when these symptoms set in. The vomiting and diarrhea have been known to go away after 3 hours, but it is better to be safe than sorry. Ingesting liquids to keep hydration up can be important. If the patient is having difficulty breathing, seek medical attention immediately.

Hydrangea

Hydrangea
Hydrangeas are unique, with their soft blue and pink flowers. They are a great addition to any garden, but should not be snacked on—not that you would want to. Hydrangeas can be especially nasty because they contain compounds known as glycosides. These will release hydrogen cyanide into the bloodstream when consumed. This will block your body’s ability to uptake oxygen to the cells in your body.

The way to combat this kind of poisoning is through getting IVs from the vet or doctor. It is important to contact your medical professional immediately since the symptoms can be fatal within minutes or hours.

Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons
Rhododendron, the state flower of Washington, is also toxic. The multitudinous, pink flowers can be quite dangerous. All parts of this plant are toxic, the leaves and seeds more so than the flowers. However, even the nectar of the flower is toxic and in the Mediterranean, where rhododendrons grow in more dense quantities, the honey from bees who gather rhododendron nectar can be poisonous.

Normally kids and pets do not eat enough to experience the full poisoning effect. However, just eating two leaves is enough to be considered dangerous. The grayanotoxin glycosides within the rhododendron can cause vomiting, diarrhea and irregular heartbeats. Things can get very serious when too much rhododendron is consumed and can lead to necessary medical intervention.

Start by calling poison control first if you suspect anyone has been munching on rhododendrons. The experts there will be able to help guide you through the necessary processes to cure your loved one.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb
Yummy rhubarb has a nasty side to it. While the stems are used in many recipes, including for rhubarb strawberry pie, the leaves are toxic. They contain oxalic acid which is known to blister the mouth, cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and kidney stones. The leaves are known to be more toxic to pets than humans, but in either case, it is important to contact poison control immediately to figure out necessary steps to cure the patient.
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard

Bittersweet Nightshade

Bittersweet Nightshade
Nightshade is an invasive, noxious weed that is extremely poisonous. It has been found along the East and West Coast of the U.S. It makes its home in areas with disturbed soil. This could be near your garden or areas that have recently had bushes/trees put in.

These plants are dark green with purple flowers that develop into bright red berries. The whole plant is toxic and should be avoided by pets and children alike. If ingested it can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The colorful berries are especially enticing to young children. If you see any plants that look similar to tomato or pepper plants that you did not plant in your yard, it is best to just pull them immediately.

Call poison control immediately if you think someone has fallen victim to nightshade.

Buttercups

Buttercups
Buttercups are found throughout the United States, especially in wet areas. The shiny, yellow flowers will pop up in the springtime, accompanying their dandelion friends. However, unlike dandelions, buttercups are not edible.

Buttercups will release a compound called protoanemonin. This toxin is known to cause vomiting, diarrhea, bloody stool, hypersalivation, depression, blisters, and more. These symptoms will affect both humans and animals. The sap may also cause irritation when it comes into contact with skin. These yellow flowers are dangerous and children should be observed cautiously when around them.

Foxgloves

Foxgloves
Foxgloves are beautiful plants that build towers out of vivid purple bell-shaped blossoms. They are very pretty to look at, but they contain a compound known as digoxin. This chemical is used in certain medicines to help people with certain heart conditions. However, the medicine is made by specialists, whereas someone eating foxgloves will receive unregulated amounts of the chemical.

This toxin can make you vomit and lower your heartbeat. This often causes dizziness and faintness. It is extremely important to call poison control immediately to know what to do in the case of foxglove poisoning. Some people have confused the young leaves of foxglove with borage, making adult foragers at risk as well as kids and pets.
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
Now that you know where to start with toxic plant identification, let us discuss how to either tend to the poisonous plants you decide to keep or get rid of them that plague your yard.

How to Tend to Poisonous Plants

Many plants that are toxic when ingested are also skin irritants. The philodendron is a good example of this. When the sap comes into contact with skin, it can cause a rash to form. To help protect yourself when tending to toxic plants, it is important to wear some sort of gloves.
Tend
Latex gloves may be the best solution due to their disposability. Regular gloves could potentially keep the poisonous sap on their surface. If the gloves aren’t cleaned then you could accidentally touch the irritant or pass it to someone else.

In addition you will want to plan where to keep your deadly beauties. If you have a toxic indoor plant try to keep it up high or out of reach of children and pets. This will keep accidents few and far between. Another idea is keeping your plants in areas that are usually inaccessible to children or pets. Areas such as an office, study room, or guest bedroom could be good locations. If applicable, you could also set up a terrarium for your little plant baby, making it more difficult for curious hands or paws to access.
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If you plan to have outdoor plants, location will be key. You will want to put plants in an area that will be inaccessible to children, pets and even wild animals. You will probably want to avoid planting the plants in the front of your house if kids walk by on a regular basis, just to be cautious. Having the plants behind a fence will be best, but use your discretion when choosing a spot.

How to Get Rid of Poisonous Plants

plants
The easiest but possibly most controversial way to get rid of poisonous plants is by using herbicides. This can be especially easy if you own a grass lawn and use an herbicide that targets broadleaf (non-grass) species. You can find many herbicides meant for yard use by simply searching the term online. Once you have purchased the herbicide you will want to make sure to follow the label posted on the container. If you follow the instructions precisely, then everything should run smoothly for you.

If you don’t plan on using herbicides, there are a few organic methods you can use to try to get rid of toxic plants. You can manually pull the plants out of the ground. This is probably one of the most difficult methods because there is no assurance that you will get the whole plant out this way.

You can also try pouring boiling hot water or spraying white vinegar on the target plants. This may take more time than using a synthetic herbicide, but you can feel a little better about using these products.

You can also try to use wood chips to cover a certain area where you do not want anything to grow. This will not stop all the weeds, but the few that make it through can be easily picked by hand.
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More About Paperwhite Narcissus

Spread
Spread
5 to 7 cm
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Spring, Late fall, Winter
Flower Color
Flower Color
White
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green
Flower Size
Flower Size
3 cm
Plant Height
Plant Height
30 to 45 cm

Name story

Paperwhite daffodil
The plant belongs to the daffodil family, but unlike the wild daffodil or the most common yellow hybrids, the flowers are pure white in color - with the exception of tiny yellow stamens. The epithet part of the Latin name means the same - 'paper-like.'
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Common Problems

Why does my paperwhite narcissus grow leaves but never bloom?

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Difficulty with blooming is a common problem among paperwhite narcissus. There are several possible reasons for it:
  • The indoor temperature may be too high for the plants to flowering, resulting in failure to bloom. You can make the bulbs stay in 5 ℃ for 35-45 days before planting, or move the pots to a place with temperatures below 5 ℃ after planting. If the bulbs purchased have been treated at low temperature, the problem may not come from it.
  • paperwhite narcissus needs ample sunlight to thrive during the growth period. If you always keep them in the shade, they will not get enough light. This may cause excessive leaf growth and reduced blooming.
  • If you apply a lot of nitrogenous fertilizer and little phosphate and potassium fertilizer in growing, paperwhite narcissus will lack nutrients for blooming. Use fertilizer rich in phosphate and potassium.
  • After paperwhite narcissus blooming, you must deadhead them in time. Otherwise, the plant will consume excess nutrients. Additionally, you can proactively cut off leaves instead of waiting for them to naturally wither and turn yellow. Waiting makes plants avoid insufficient photosynthesis of the leaves and accumulate nutrients for bulbs. Otherwise, the flowering in the following year will be affected.
  • Paperwhite narcissus in pots can grow for many years and produce many baby bulbs. The bulbs make it so crowded that paperwhite narcissus lacks nutrients for blooming in the pot. You can dig out the baby bulbs, remove and plant them separately after 3-5 years of growing. Then, replant the parent bulb into a new substrate mixed with fertilizer.
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Caring for a New Plant

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The following pictures and instructions for flower plant are aimed to help your plants adapt and thrive in a new environment.
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1
Picking a Healthy Flower Plant
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Check Its Health

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Whole Plant
Symmetrical crown, evenly distributed branches, full and compact shape, no excessive growth, close internodes, and uniform leaf size.
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Flowers
Many unopened flower buds are closely attached, without falling off easily when shaken, and show no diseased spots or wilting on the petals.
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Branches
The branches are not withered, and the trunk is free of boreholes or damage.
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Stems
No mold, browning or soft rot at the base of the plant.
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Leaves
Check the inside of the plant, shaded and overlapping areas, back of leaves. Even colour, no yellowing, no brown spots, no crawling insects, no cobwebs, no deformities, no wilting.
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Health Troubleshooting

Whole Plant
trouble-image
more 1 Asymmetrical crown or missing, uneven branching: prune the weak and slender branches of the larger portion of the asymmetrical crown, then trim the overgrown larger branches.
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more 2 Internodes are longer in the upper part, leaves are sparse and smaller on top: increase light intensity or duration.
Branches
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more 1 Dry branches: check if the branch is still alive by peeling back a small section of bark and trim away any dry branches. Watch out for signs of insect infestation inside the branch.
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more 2 Bark with holes: inject insecticide into the holes and apply systemic insecticide to the roots.
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more 3 Damaged bark: brush on a wound-healing agent, and avoid getting it wet.
Stems
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Mildew, browning, or soft rot at the base: place the plant in a ventilated, dry environment and water with fungicide.
Flowers
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more 1 Many flowers have already bloomed: lower the temperature in the environment to extend the flowering period. Prune any dying flowers in a timely manner to prevent nutrient depletion.
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more 2 Flower bud dropping: keep temperature at 15-25℃, place in bright but shaded area, water frequently, and avoid fertilizing.
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more 3 Flower petals have spots or disease: avoid spraying water directly onto the petals.
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more 4 Flower wilting: avoid soil that is too wet or too dry. When touching the soil with your finger, it should feel moist but not leave any water traces on your finger.
Leaves
trouble-image
more 1 Uneven leaf color and yellowing: prune yellow leaves and check if there are signs of rot at the base of the plant. Spray with fungicide for severe cases.
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more 2 Brown spots or small yellow spots: place the plant in a ventilated area and avoid watering the leaves. Spray with fungicide for severe cases.
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more 3 Tiny crawling insects on the back of leaves or spider webs between leaves: increase light exposure and spray with insecticide for severe cases.
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more 4 Deformations or missing parts on leaves: determine if it's physical damage or pest infestation. Linear or tearing damage is physical, while the rest are pests. Spray with insecticide.
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more 5 Wilting leaves: provide partial shade and avoid excessive sun exposure. Remove 1/3 to 1/2 of the leaves for severe cases.
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Check Its Growing Conditions

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Soil Check
Soil should smell fresh like after a rain and no musty odor.
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Light Check
Check the light requirement of the plant and if it match with planting location.
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Ventilation Check
Ensure good ventilation.
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Temperature Check
Ensure outdoor temperature is suitable for plants.
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Condition Troubleshooting

check
Soil
Potting mix soil, Peat moss mix soil
Soil smells musty or foul: check the root system for decay, place the plant in a ventilated, dry environment, and water with fungicide.
check
Ideal Temperature
0℃ to 35℃
Temperature is too low: Temporarily move the plants indoors and then to outdoors when temperature is suitable.
check
Ventilation
Well Ventilated
Non-ventilated environment: can lead to root rot, diseases, and flower drop. Place the plants in an airy location avoiding dead spots.
check
Suitable Light
Full sun, Partial sun
Insufficient light: reduce light appropriately during flowering period but not a fully shaded environment. After flowering, move to normal cultivation environment. For plants with long flowering and fruiting periods, provide normal light to avoid shortening.
Transplant recovery: After transplanting, pot plants should be temporarily shaded, then moved to normal light after a week if no abnormal drop or wilting. In-ground plants, shade for a week and then transfer to normal light or just pay attention to watering.
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2
Adapting Your New Flower Plant
Step 1
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Repotting
Potted plants - Wait until flowering stage is over before changing pots. In-ground plants - Plant directly taking care not to harm root system or remove soil.
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Step 2
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Pruning
Prune residual flowers, yellow/dead leaves. No other pruning at this time.
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Step 3
condition-image
Watering
Water appropriately. Water more frequently for newly transplanted or purchased plants to keep the soil consistently moist for at least 2 weeks. Avoid overwatering, do not water when there is water on your finger after touching the soil. Both underwatering and overwatering can cause plants to drop their flowers or fruit.
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Step 4
condition-image
Fertilizing
Don't fertilize just after purchase. Fertilize after 2 weeks using half concentration.
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main-image
Paperwhite Narcissus
label-image
Repotting
Repotting potted plants: Wait until flowering ends. Repotting in-ground plants: Be careful not to harm roots/soil.
label-image
Pruning
Prune residual flowers, and yellow/dead leaves. No other pruning at this time.
label-image
Watering
Water new plants more often for 2 weeks. Avoid over/under watering by checking the soil.
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Fertilizing
Don't fertilize just after purchase. Fertilize after 2 weeks using half concentration.
label-image
Sunlight
Long flowering plants need normal light. Shade transplants for a week, then move to normal light.
label
main-image
Paperwhite Narcissus
label-image
Repotting
Repotting potted plants: Wait until flowering ends. Repotting in-ground plants: Be careful not to harm roots/soil.
label-image
Pruning
Prune residual flowers, and yellow/dead leaves. No other pruning at this time.
label-image
Watering
Water new plants more often for 2 weeks. Avoid over/under watering by checking the soil.
label-image
Fertilizing
Don't fertilize just after purchase. Fertilize after 2 weeks using half concentration.
label-image
Sunlight
Long flowering plants need normal light. Shade transplants for a week, then move to normal light.
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Paperwhite narcissus
Paperwhite narcissus
Paperwhite narcissus
Paperwhite narcissus
Paperwhite narcissus

How to Care for Paperwhite Narcissus

The paperwhite narcissus is suitable as a cut flower for use in table displays during winter. The blooms are incredibly fragrant and act as a perfume in the room, and the stems can bear up to ten beautiful white flowers. All parts of the plant are poisonous, including the bulbs. It’s often sold at Christmas time and given as gifts.
Water
Every week
Water
Sunlight
Full sun
Sunlight Sunlight detail
Toxic to Pets
care_basic_guide

Basic Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterDetail

How to Water Paperwhite narcissus?

Cultivation:WaterDetail
Paperwhite narcissus has relatively low water requirements. When planting in your garden, it is usually enough to water them just once immediately after planting unless the weather is very dry during the growth period in spring. Paperwhite narcissus planted in a pot should be watered more often to avoid dry soil, especially during the leaf growth and flowering periods. After the leaves wither in summer, paperwhite narcissus enters its dormancy period. Avoid watering at this time to protect the bulbs from rotting. You can resume watering in autumn and winter when the soil is dry.
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Cultivation:FertilizerDetail

How to Fertilize Paperwhite narcissus?

Cultivation:FertilizerDetail
Paperwhite narcissus doesn't need much fertilizer. You can mix some bulb food or bone meal into the soil when planting in the fall. Water-soluble compound fertilizers can be applied when the plant begins to grow leaves and before flowering in spring. The ratio of the three main elements (N%-P2O5%-K2O%) can be 5-10-10 for leaf growth and 0-10-10 for the flowering period. You can top dress Potassium fertilizer once after flowering, as this is beneficial to bulb rejuvenation.
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Fertilizer

Although their beauty can be somewhat short-lived, the Paperwhite narcissus is very capable of enriching the appearance of your garden during the short time when it is in bloom. These plants typically bloom in spring or late winter and can be a very welcome form of color during that time of year.
In order to enjoy the beauty of a Paperwhite narcissus, then you need to know how to care for it. That maintenance routine should include a certain method of fertilization that will help your Paperwhite narcissus thrive. The sections below will introduce you to everything you need to know.
You need to fertilize a Paperwhite narcissus for a few important reasons. The most obvious of these reasons is that fertilizer will help your Paperwhite narcissus produce lovely blooms. Fertilizing in early spring is one of the best ways to ensure that your Paperwhite narcissus has excellent flowers during that season. Fertilizer also gives your Paperwhite narcissus plenty of energy that it can store in the ground during its dormant growth phases. Giving your Paperwhite narcissus some extra nutrients during the fall planting process or during the late spring will help your Paperwhite narcissus hold more energy to use once active growth resumes.
There are a few times during which it is a good idea to fertilize a Paperwhite narcissus. The main time to fertilize is in early spring when the flowers are forming, at which time, the right fertilizer will encourage better blooms. You can also fertilize your Paperwhite narcissus later in the spring after the flowers have faded. Feeding at this time will give your Paperwhite narcissus plenty of energy that it can store and use next year. If you are planting your Paperwhite narcissus for the first time in the fall you can also provide some fertilizer at that time as well. Fertilizing during the planting process gives your Paperwhite narcissus the best chance of producing a healthy set of flowers during its first growing season.
Several different types of fertilizer can be beneficial to Paperwhite narcissus. To keep matters simple, you can always rely on a balanced fertilizer that has equal amounts of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. Fertilizer ratios that are equal, such as 10-10-10 or 5-5-5, will work well. It is also often best to use a granular fertilizer rather than a liquid one. If you are interested in being a bit more specific with your fertilizer choices, you should consider using a fertilizer that is rich overall with the three main nutrients but a bit higher in phosphorus content. Many gardeners stand by the claim that phosphorus will encourage better flowers that last longer. Organic materials, including bonemeal, can help add the phosphorus that may benefit your Paperwhite narcissus and its blooming abilities.
The first time that you should fertilize your Paperwhite narcissus is during the planting process, which takes place in the fall. After digging a small hole to plant your bulb, you can add some granular slow-release fertilizer to the hole. During the process, you should water continually to maintain consistent soil moisture. Following planting, you can fertilize once again during the early spring as the plant is emerging from the ground and developing its flowers. Again, you should use a granular fertilizer that has a balanced mix of nutrients and sprinkle it on the ground. As you apply the fertilizer, you should be sure to water the soil gently at the same time.
While fertilizer can be incredibly helpful to a Paperwhite narcissus, it can also be equally harmful if you give too much. Overfertilization will not only damage a Paperwhite narcissus, but it may lead to death in some cases. The best way to avoid this is to follow the instructions on the fertilizer package you buy rather than exceeding the recommended dose in hopes of making a more vigorous plant.
Likewise, it is typically less likely that you'll overfertilize your Paperwhite narcissus if you use a slow-release granular fertilizer. Since these fertilizers release their nutrients slowly, as the name implies, they are less capable of giving your Paperwhite narcissus too much fertilizer at once.
The correct times to fertilize a Paperwhite narcissus are during the fall planting process, during the early spring bloom period, and during the late spring following the bloom period. Fertilizing during any other part of the year is not necessary and may be harmful to your plant.
When caring for a Paperwhite narcissus, you should know that it has a considerable dormant phase in which it will not need fertilizer and will need far less water as well. As you would guess, your Paperwhite narcissus will be dormant during winter. However, this plant also enters a dormant phase during the summer. After the flowers fade, the leaves will persist briefly before dying back to the ground. Once the leaves die back, your plant has returned to a dormant phase, and it will not need fertilizer.
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Cultivation:SunlightDetail

What Are the Sunlight Requirements for Paperwhite narcissus?

Cultivation:SunlightDetail
Paperwhite narcissus grows vigorously in sunny places. Insufficient light may cause excessive leaf growth. However, the plants can adapt to slightly shaded environments, such as under deciduous trees. Some varieties in the Cyclamineus and Triandrus groups are particularly suitable for moist and shaded environments.
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Cultivation:PruningDetail

How to Prune Paperwhite narcissus?

Cultivation:PruningDetail
Remove withered flowers from paperwhite narcissus promptly to prevent it from consuming nutrients during fruit growth. Retaining bulb nutrients this way prolongs the blooming time of other flowers. After flowering, do not cut off the leaves until they turn yellow and wither so that the leaves can photosynthesize for as long as possible and store nutrients for the bulbs. This is conducive to the following year's rebloom.
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Advanced Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail

What is the Ideal Temperature Range for Paperwhite narcissus?

Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail
Most varieties of paperwhite narcissus are hardy and can overwinter in hardiness zones 8-10. Paperwhite narcissus needs 6-8 weeks of temperatures below 5 ℃ in winter to successfully complete flower initiation and flower. The best temperature for growth is 12 to 18 ℃, and for flowering about 20 ℃. Paperwhite narcissus doesn’t have a high demand for water and can adapt well to both dry and humid climates.
What is the optimal temperature for Paperwhite narcissus?
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Cultivation:SoilDetail

What Soil is Best for Paperwhite narcissus?

Cultivation:SoilDetail
Paperwhite narcissus prefers fertile, loose, well-drained, and slightly acidic or neutral soil. The suitable soil pH range is 6-7. It cannot be planted in clay soil with poor drainage, as accumulated water will cause the bulb to rot and fail to bloom. Add coarse sand and humus to improve the soil structure and ensure good drainage can avoid it.
Cultivation:PropagationDetail

How to Propagate Paperwhite narcissus?

Cultivation:PropagationDetail
You can buy bulbs directly from a garden center for planting. Paperwhite narcissus is a perennial bulb. Baby bulbs will form around any parent bulbs that have been growing for many years. You can use these small bulbs to propagate. In the autumn, dig out the bulbs, cut off the small bulbs, and replant them in your garden or flower pots using the original planting method. After growing for 2-3 years, the plant can bloom again.
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Propagation

This plant propagates in a special way, and if you want to propagate this plant quickly, using tubers is a good way. For the best results, propagate your Paperwhite narcissus when it's dormant. You can also propagate plants in the early spring or during the autumn months. Since it won't need much water during these periods, it will be easier for the plant to adjust. If you propagate during the growing season, trim away about two-thirds of the leaves to reduce water needs. To safely divide and propagate your tubers, you only need a couple of tools. Make sure you have these on hand and then get started!
  1. A sharp, sanitized knife or garden trowel.
  2. Space in your soil or growing medium.
  3. (possibly) sharp, sanitized scissors or shears.
Steps: Step 1: Uncover the underground root stem or tuber. Step 2: Use your tool to divide the root or tuber into sections, making sure each section has at least one eye or bud. If the tubers are relatively small, they cannot be cut to prevent the tubers from being too small for nutrition. Step 3:Plant the divided tubers into the soil. Mix organic fertilizer into the soil if its possible. Place one or two tubers in each hole, preferably at a depth of 7-15 cm. Step 4:After planting, keep the soil moist but not waterlogged. This will help the tubers to germinate in time. Step 5: If necessary, cut back most of the foliage of non-dormant plants to allow stronger root growth.
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Cultivation:PlantingDetail

How to Plant Paperwhite narcissus?

Cultivation:PlantingDetail
You can buy bulbs for planting in the fall. plant paperwhite narcissus at night, ideally when the temperature is below 10 ℃. Too high a temperature may cause new leaves to sprout prematurely. If the temperature drops, the new leaves will suffer frost damage.
When planting in your garden, choose a well-ventilated place to dig a pit. You can add some compost to the bottom of the pit, and then insert the bulb, taking care to face the tip upward. Gently cover with soil, press firmly, and water it well. The planting depth is generally 3-4 times the bulb height, and the spacing is twice the bulb diameter.
When planting in a flower pot, choose a pot that is 5 times wider than the diameter of the bulb. The bottom of the pot must also have drainage holes. If it is a large container, it is best to put a 3 cm layer of thick, coarse sand or broken brick at the bottom to help with drainage. The planting depth can be slightly shallower than planting on the ground, and at least 2.5 cm of soil under each bulb is required. plant spacing can be slightly denser than planting directly in your garden. After planting, you can mulch the soil surface with a layer of gravel, which helps to retain moisture and adds beauty.
Cultivation:HarvestDetail

How to Harvest Paperwhite narcissus?

Cultivation:HarvestDetail
Paperwhite narcissus is very beautiful. When the flower buds are enlarged and the outer petals have just softened but not yet fully opened, you can cut them to enjoy in a vase. Use sharp garden shears to cut from the base of the flower stem and promptly put it in a vase filled with 2/3 clean water to avoid water loss. The vase life of these flowers is 7-15 days. If you want to extend their display period as much as possible, you can add some cut flower food and change the water every 3 days.
PlantCare:TransplantSummary

How to Transplant Paperwhite narcissus?

PlantCare:TransplantSummary
Autumn is the time to transplant paperwhite narcissus, prime because the plant can set roots before winter. Aim for a sunny to part-shade location with well-drained soil. Note, overwatering can lead tо rot. So, transplant judiciously when the plant overgrows its space.
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More Info on Paperwhite Narcissus Growth and Care

Basic Care Guide
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Seasonal Care Tips

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Spring

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Summer

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Fall

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Winter

Spring blooming bulbs like this plant are easy to care for, even during the growing season. The bulb provides the necessary nutrients that may be lacking in the soil.

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However, an application of bone meal can help support healthy growth.
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Water the plants regularly, whenever the soil is beginning to dry out.
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Increase the amount of light the container plant is receiving to encourage healthy growth.

This plant and other spring-blooming bulbs are dormant in the summer.

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Decrease watering only when the first half of the soil has dried out.
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Do not apply any fertilizer.
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After the foliage has turned brown and dries out, go ahead and remove it from the plant. Do not remove the leaves when green, the foliage provides nutrients to the bulb.

Established the plant will bloom during the fall after they wake up, so care is needed to make sure it grows well and is ready for cultivation.

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Once the growth begins, start your regular watering and fertilizing routine to keep the soil slightly moist and fertile.
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Fertilize at least once during this season.
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Provide plenty of light to encourage growth and strong flowering.
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Fall, once the temperature drops, is the best time to plant your plant or to propagate new plants and establish cuttings or replant corms in pots or directly in garden soil.

Your plant should be actively growing through this season.

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While your plant tends to be hardy enough to grow through cold winters, you can also choose to move your plants indoors to give them extra protection from the cold.
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Even so, make sure they have a good source of light to keep the growth strong.
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You can even dig up the bulbs and transplant them to indoor pots or garden beds.
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Water cautiously, as this plant doesn't require an abundance of moisture. Keep it moist but err on the side of dry rather than soggy.
care_pet_and_diseases

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Paperwhite narcissus based on 10 million real cases
Wilting after blooming
Wilting after blooming Wilting after blooming Wilting after blooming
Flowers may wither for a variety of reasons.
Solutions: Check the soil or potting medium. Coarse textures can allow water to drain too rapidly, preventing the plant from taking up enough. If the soil and roots seem very dry, add sphagnum moss or other mediums that hold water. Water according to recommendations for each plant's species. Low humidity can be corrected by misting the plant regularly or placing it near a humidifier. Keeping it near other plants helps, too. Keep the environment consistent in terms of temperature, humidity, and lighting. Keep it away from vents, heaters, and air conditioners, and avoid moving it to locations where it will experience a temperature shock. Hot, dry heat, and cold drafts are problematic for many plants. Especially if the plant is outside, it could be experiencing heat or light stress. Try moving it to a shadier location.
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Flower withering
Flower withering Flower withering Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Solutions: If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible. For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface. In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well. If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
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Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry Aged yellow and dry Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Solutions: If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Learn More About the Aged yellow and dry more
Scars
Scars Scars Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Solutions: Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
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Wilting after blooming
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Wilting after blooming
Flowers may wither for a variety of reasons.
Overview
Overview
Wilting after blooming is sometimes a natural aging process of the flower, while other times it may indicate a problem. Orchids, for example, can bloom for anywhere from two weeks to three months, so wilting after a few days signals a problem for most varieties. This can happen to virtually any ornamental flowering plant, but those with shallow roots and limited tolerance for drought, full sun, and low humidity are more susceptible.
This is a common problem, and often has an easy fix. Sometimes, however, it is the result of more serious causes such as pests or disease of the root system.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
  • At first, flowers may look a little limp.
  • Petals may start to appear dried out and turn brown.
  • Eventually they may drop off the plant all together.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Wilting blooms can be a sign of an unhealthy root system. Any condition that prevents the plant from absorbing enough water and nutrition can result in wilting blooms and sometimes other symptoms. If the plant doesn’t have enough water, it cannot maintain appropriate pressure within stems, leaves, and blooms, causing them to wilt.
This can result from physical damage – for example from root breakage during re-potting or attack by insects like cutworms. If you recently re-potted your plant, physical damage to the roots is a likely cause. If you see insects, they may be eating leaves, roots, or flowers. Fungal infections can also cause root rot and damage, preventing water and nutrient uptake.
Finally, wilting blooms can result simply from age. If no other symptoms are visible, it may simply signal the natural end of the flower’s lifespan. If it seems premature, this may be caused by environmental factors: water, humidity, light, or stress. Under-watering is a common cause. Similarly, plants adapted to high humidity dry out easily when humidity is low, like during winter or in dry climates. Too much light can also stress plants that need shade, causing blooms to wilt.
Solutions
Solutions
  • Check the soil or potting medium. Coarse textures can allow water to drain too rapidly, preventing the plant from taking up enough. If the soil and roots seem very dry, add sphagnum moss or other mediums that hold water.
  • Water according to recommendations for each plant's species.
  • Low humidity can be corrected by misting the plant regularly or placing it near a humidifier. Keeping it near other plants helps, too.
  • Keep the environment consistent in terms of temperature, humidity, and lighting. Keep it away from vents, heaters, and air conditioners, and avoid moving it to locations where it will experience a temperature shock. Hot, dry heat, and cold drafts are problematic for many plants.
  • Especially if the plant is outside, it could be experiencing heat or light stress. Try moving it to a shadier location.
Prevention
Prevention
  • Read up on moisture, light, and soil type preferences for each plant to avoid underwatering, incorrect light levels, or other conditions that can cause wilting blooms.
  • Avoid re-potting during the flowering period. This causes additional stress on the plants because they need to repair root damage and adapt to the new micro-environment, all of which can result in wilting.
  • One other potential cause is ethylene gas, a plant hormone related to ripening. Some fruits and vegetables emit ethylene, especially bananas. Apples, grapes, melons, avocados, and potatoes can also give it off, so keep flowering plants away from fresh produce.
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Flower withering
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Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Overview
Overview
Flower withering occurs when flowers become weak, droopy, wilted, or faded until they can’t be revived. During withering, they begin to wrinkle and shrink until the flower becomes completely dry or dead.
Any flowers, regardless of the plant type or the climate they are grown in, are susceptible to withering. It is a worldwide problem across houseplants, herbs, flowering ornamentals, trees, shrubs, garden vegetables, and food crops.
Unlike wilting—which withering is often confused with—withering can be caused by different things and is often due to more than a lack of water. Withering can be fatal in severe cases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Flower withering progresses from very mild cases to severe occurrences that kill the flower. The severity of the symptoms is related to the cause and how long the condition is allowed to progress before action is taken.
  • Wilted, droopy flowers
  • Petals and leaves begin to wrinkle
  • Brown papery streaks or spots appear on the petals and leaf tips
  • Flowerhead shrink in size
  • Petal color fades
  • Yellowing leaves
  • Complete death of the flower
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The main causes of flower withering include natural age progress, lack of water, nutritional deficiencies, and bacterial or fungal diseases. It’s critical to determine the underlying cause when flower withering is noticed. This will guide the best course of action, if treatment is possible.
Check the soil for moisture and then closely examine the entire plant for signs of nutrient deficiencies. If neither of those appears to be the cause then cut open the stem below a flower. If a cross-section reveals brown or rust-colored stains it is safe to assume that this is a bacterial or fungal infection.
If the flower is nearing the end of its normal lifespan, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence, or cell aging and death. Cell division stops and the plant begins breaking down resources within the flower to use in other parts of the plant.
In all other cases, flower withering happens when the plant seals off the stem as a defense mechanism, stopping transport within the vascular system. This prevents further water loss through the flowers but also stops bacteria and fungi from moving to healthy parts of the plant. Once water and nutrient transport stops, the flower begins to wither and ultimately die.
Solutions
Solutions
If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface.
In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well.
If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Prevention
Prevention
This is definitely one of those instances where prevention is more effective than cure. Here are some preventative measures for avoiding premature flower withering.
  • Water plants according to their needs -- either keep the soil slightly moist or allow the top inch or two to dry out before watering again.
  • Fertilize lightly on a consistent basis, depending upon the plant’s growth. Quick-growing plants and those that flower or develop fruit will need more frequent fertilizing than slow-growing plants.
  • Purchase plants that are certified disease- or pathogen-free.
  • Look for disease-resistant cultivars.
  • Isolate plants showing disease symptoms to prevent the spread to neighboring plants.
  • Practice good plant hygiene by removing any fallen plant material as soon as possible.
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Aged yellow and dry
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Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Overview
Overview
Regardless of the type of plant or where it is grown, at some point, it will begin to aged yellow and dry. This is a natural, unavoidable process that happens when the plant has completed all of the steps in its life.
Annual plants go through this process at the end of a single growing season. Perennial plants live for multiple years, if not tens or hundreds of years, but will still ultimately exhibit these symptoms.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
When plants have progressed through their natural developmental stages and are nearing the end of their lifecycle, they begin showing signs of decline. Leaves will start to yellow and droop, and over time they turn papery brown and dry.
Once completely dry, the leaves begin to fall from the plant until the entire plant has dried out.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
At the end of its life, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence or natural aging and death. Cell division stops, and the plant begins catabolizing resources to use in other parts of the plant.
As this happens, the tissues begin yellow and drying until the entire plant is desiccated and perishes.
Solutions
Solutions
If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Prevention
Prevention
Unfortunately, there is no way to prevent plants from dying of “old age.” To help prolong their life, and put off symptoms of aged yellow and dry for as long as possible, take care of them by giving them enough water, fertilizing them appropriately, and making sure they get enough sunlight.
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Scars
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Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Scars form when the plant repairs wounds. They can be the result of people or pets passing by and scraping the plant. Once the underlying issue is resolved, the plant will heal but a scar may remain.
Pests and pathogens can also cause scarring. Insects may attack the plant for a meal, resulting in extensive scarring when a few invaders turn into an infestation. Diseases such as fungus and bacteria can weaken the plant, causing brown spots, mushy areas, or blisters that lead to scars.
Scars occur on stems when a leaf or bud has been lost and the plant has healed. The harder tissue is like a scab that protects a wound.
On other occasions, scars can signal problems from environmental conditions, such as overexposure to sunlight or heat. It might surprise you to know that plants can suffer from sunburn, even desert dwellers like cactus!
Solutions
Solutions
Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover.
  1. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes.
  2. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray.
  3. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs.
  4. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Prevention
Prevention
Preventing some sources of scarring is easier than others, but all start with careful attention to your plants once you decide to bring them home.
  1. Review specific guidelines for your plant, including soil drainage, watering, and fertilizer requirements.
  2. Inspect plants before planting and use sterile pots and fresh potting soil or media to limit transfer of fungi or bacteria.
  3. Once established, check your plants regularly for signs of scarring or the presence of pests, as it is better to catch problems as early as possible.
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care_toxicity

Paperwhite Narcissus and Their Toxicity

* The judgment on toxicity and danger is for reference only. We DO NOT GUARANTEE any accuracy of such judgment. Therefore, you SHALL NOT rely on such judgment. It is IMPORTANT TO SEEK PROFESSIONAL ADVICE in advance when necessary.
Toxic to Cats
Poisoning from paperwhite narcissus can be severely harmful to cats; suspected ingestion creates a veterinary emergency. All parts of the plant, especially the bulbs, contain lycorine and other noxious substances, causing symptoms after ingestion that include vomiting, diarrhea, drooling, weakness, tremors, cardiac arrhythmias and low blood pressure, convulsions, loss of appetite, lethargy, and tremors.
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Who Is Most at Risk of Plant Poisoning?
Your pets like cats and dogs can be poisoned by them as well!
1
Do not let your lovely pets eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
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It’s better to kill those growing around your house. Wear long-sleeved shirts, pants and gloves with sharp tools to dig it out completely;
3
Clean the tools with rubbing alcohol or soap and water but do not do that with bare hands;
4
Clean your hands and skin once exposed to plants with soap and water;
5
Consider using barrier creams that contain bentoquatam to prevent poison oak, ivy and sumac rashes;
6
Dump it in special trash cans in sealed garbage packages, and do not let your pets reach it;Do not let your lovely pets eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
7
If you take your pets to hike with you in the wild, please don’t let them eat any plants that you don’t know;
8
Once your pets eat, touch or inhale anything from toxic plants and act abnormally, please call the doctors for help ASAP!
pets
Pets
Some pets are less likely than children to eat and touch just about everything. This is good, as a pet owner. However, you know your pet best, and it is up to you to keep them safe. There are plenty of poisonous weeds that can grow within the confines of your lawn, which might make your dogs or cats ill or worse if they eat them. Try to have an idea of what toxic plants grow in your area and keep them under control and your pets away from them.
pets
Common Toxic Houseplants
Common Toxic Houseplants
When it comes to decorating a house, there is nothing more refreshing than adding some beautiful houseplants. Some common house plants can also be toxic.

Aloe

aloe
Aloe is famous for its sunburn-soothing properties and its gorgeous desert design. However, many people do not realize that the latex the aloe vera plant produces can be mildly toxic to pets and children.

The latex contains a chemical compound known as saponin. Which when ingested, can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and low blood sugar. This, if left unchecked, can lead to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. The proper response is to contact poison control or a veterinarian to know what to do in your particular circumstance if either your child or pet consumes aloe.

The latex of the plant is similar to the sap of the tree. It is inside the leaf, but sticks mainly toward the edges. If aloe gel is prepared properly it should be safe for use, but be sure to apply it only topically when treating burns.

Philodendron

Philodendron
Philodendron, also known as sweetheart vine, has become a resident at many houses and even businesses. They are glossy green and the leaves elegantly split, displaying interesting designs. Behind this beauty there is a needle-like toxin called calcium oxalate crystals.

These crystals are held within the plant and only affect you, your pets, or your loved ones if the plant tissue is broken. If ingested, the crystals can cause severe swelling, difficulty breathing, stomach pain, burning and pain. If they are accidentally caught on the skin, they can cause skin irritation.

If anyone accidentally ingests philodendron and they find it difficult to breathe or their tongue starts to swell up, it is important to seek medical attention immediately to avoid suffocation. If you have very young children or pets who have a tendency to tear at plants, keep them away from any philodendrons.

Peace Lily

Peace Lily
Peace lilies produce stunningly white flowers that bring to mind peace and serenity. This is one reason they are invited into our homes and given a place to stay. However, similar to philodendrons, the peace lily contains oxalate crystals known as raphides.

The raphides, once ingested, will cause swelling and burning sensations and can also cause skin irritation. Both pets and humans can get these symptoms so it is important to keep these plants from anyone who is likely to tear or chew it. Symptoms can become dire if the raphides cause the tongue and throat to swell to a point where the person or pet is having difficulty breathing. Seek proper medical attention if this is the case.

Snake Plant

Snake Plant
The snake plant is an interesting and popular house plant. Its stark architecture and wavy coloring has made it a fan favorite. This plant too, however, is toxic when ingested or if the sap touches your skin.

Snake plant sap will cause rashes if it comes into contact with your skin. In addition, it will cause diarrhea and vomiting when ingested. Again these symptoms are very serious and would be best avoided by keeping snake plants out of reach or by choosing a different houseplant.
Common Toxic Garden Plants
Common Toxic Garden Plants

Daffodil

Daffodil
Daffodils are a strikingly colorful flower. This can sometimes bring them much attention not from just onlooking adults but children as well. Since kids are more drawn to colorful objects, they may have a higher chance of just grabbing the flower and eating it. Adults have also been known to accidentally grab daffodil bulbs instead of onions.

Why are these mistakes so dangerous? Daffodils contain lycorine, which can induce nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It also contains oxalates which can cause swelling and pain. The symptoms can be worse in animals, because if your pets eat daffodils they may experience drowsiness, low blood pressure or even liver damage.

Make sure to call poison control when these symptoms set in. The vomiting and diarrhea have been known to go away after 3 hours, but it is better to be safe than sorry. Ingesting liquids to keep hydration up can be important. If the patient is having difficulty breathing, seek medical attention immediately.

Hydrangea

Hydrangea
Hydrangeas are unique, with their soft blue and pink flowers. They are a great addition to any garden, but should not be snacked on—not that you would want to. Hydrangeas can be especially nasty because they contain compounds known as glycosides. These will release hydrogen cyanide into the bloodstream when consumed. This will block your body’s ability to uptake oxygen to the cells in your body.

The way to combat this kind of poisoning is through getting IVs from the vet or doctor. It is important to contact your medical professional immediately since the symptoms can be fatal within minutes or hours.

Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons
Rhododendron, the state flower of Washington, is also toxic. The multitudinous, pink flowers can be quite dangerous. All parts of this plant are toxic, the leaves and seeds more so than the flowers. However, even the nectar of the flower is toxic and in the Mediterranean, where rhododendrons grow in more dense quantities, the honey from bees who gather rhododendron nectar can be poisonous.

Normally kids and pets do not eat enough to experience the full poisoning effect. However, just eating two leaves is enough to be considered dangerous. The grayanotoxin glycosides within the rhododendron can cause vomiting, diarrhea and irregular heartbeats. Things can get very serious when too much rhododendron is consumed and can lead to necessary medical intervention.

Start by calling poison control first if you suspect anyone has been munching on rhododendrons. The experts there will be able to help guide you through the necessary processes to cure your loved one.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb
Yummy rhubarb has a nasty side to it. While the stems are used in many recipes, including for rhubarb strawberry pie, the leaves are toxic. They contain oxalic acid which is known to blister the mouth, cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and kidney stones. The leaves are known to be more toxic to pets than humans, but in either case, it is important to contact poison control immediately to figure out necessary steps to cure the patient.
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard

Bittersweet Nightshade

Bittersweet Nightshade
Nightshade is an invasive, noxious weed that is extremely poisonous. It has been found along the East and West Coast of the U.S. It makes its home in areas with disturbed soil. This could be near your garden or areas that have recently had bushes/trees put in.

These plants are dark green with purple flowers that develop into bright red berries. The whole plant is toxic and should be avoided by pets and children alike. If ingested it can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The colorful berries are especially enticing to young children. If you see any plants that look similar to tomato or pepper plants that you did not plant in your yard, it is best to just pull them immediately.

Call poison control immediately if you think someone has fallen victim to nightshade.

Buttercups

Buttercups
Buttercups are found throughout the United States, especially in wet areas. The shiny, yellow flowers will pop up in the springtime, accompanying their dandelion friends. However, unlike dandelions, buttercups are not edible.

Buttercups will release a compound called protoanemonin. This toxin is known to cause vomiting, diarrhea, bloody stool, hypersalivation, depression, blisters, and more. These symptoms will affect both humans and animals. The sap may also cause irritation when it comes into contact with skin. These yellow flowers are dangerous and children should be observed cautiously when around them.

Foxgloves

Foxgloves
Foxgloves are beautiful plants that build towers out of vivid purple bell-shaped blossoms. They are very pretty to look at, but they contain a compound known as digoxin. This chemical is used in certain medicines to help people with certain heart conditions. However, the medicine is made by specialists, whereas someone eating foxgloves will receive unregulated amounts of the chemical.

This toxin can make you vomit and lower your heartbeat. This often causes dizziness and faintness. It is extremely important to call poison control immediately to know what to do in the case of foxglove poisoning. Some people have confused the young leaves of foxglove with borage, making adult foragers at risk as well as kids and pets.
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
Now that you know where to start with toxic plant identification, let us discuss how to either tend to the poisonous plants you decide to keep or get rid of them that plague your yard.

How to Tend to Poisonous Plants

Many plants that are toxic when ingested are also skin irritants. The philodendron is a good example of this. When the sap comes into contact with skin, it can cause a rash to form. To help protect yourself when tending to toxic plants, it is important to wear some sort of gloves.
Tend
Latex gloves may be the best solution due to their disposability. Regular gloves could potentially keep the poisonous sap on their surface. If the gloves aren’t cleaned then you could accidentally touch the irritant or pass it to someone else.

In addition you will want to plan where to keep your deadly beauties. If you have a toxic indoor plant try to keep it up high or out of reach of children and pets. This will keep accidents few and far between. Another idea is keeping your plants in areas that are usually inaccessible to children or pets. Areas such as an office, study room, or guest bedroom could be good locations. If applicable, you could also set up a terrarium for your little plant baby, making it more difficult for curious hands or paws to access.
tend2
If you plan to have outdoor plants, location will be key. You will want to put plants in an area that will be inaccessible to children, pets and even wild animals. You will probably want to avoid planting the plants in the front of your house if kids walk by on a regular basis, just to be cautious. Having the plants behind a fence will be best, but use your discretion when choosing a spot.

How to Get Rid of Poisonous Plants

plants
The easiest but possibly most controversial way to get rid of poisonous plants is by using herbicides. This can be especially easy if you own a grass lawn and use an herbicide that targets broadleaf (non-grass) species. You can find many herbicides meant for yard use by simply searching the term online. Once you have purchased the herbicide you will want to make sure to follow the label posted on the container. If you follow the instructions precisely, then everything should run smoothly for you.

If you don’t plan on using herbicides, there are a few organic methods you can use to try to get rid of toxic plants. You can manually pull the plants out of the ground. This is probably one of the most difficult methods because there is no assurance that you will get the whole plant out this way.

You can also try pouring boiling hot water or spraying white vinegar on the target plants. This may take more time than using a synthetic herbicide, but you can feel a little better about using these products.

You can also try to use wood chips to cover a certain area where you do not want anything to grow. This will not stop all the weeds, but the few that make it through can be easily picked by hand.
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Who Is Most at Risk of Plant Poisoning?
Everyone should keep the following in mind to prevent being poisoned:
1
Do not eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
2
If you need to kill it, wear long-sleeved shirts, pants and gloves with sharp tools to dig it out completely;
3
Clean the tools with rubbing alcohol or soap and water but do not do that with bare hands;
4
Clean your hands and skin once exposed to plants with soap and water;
5
Consider using barrier creams that contain bentoquatam to prevent poison oak, ivy and sumac rashes;
6
Dump it in special trash cans in sealed garbage packages;
7
Wear properly when you hiking or working in the wilderness. Long pants, long sleeves, gloves, hiking shoes, etc., that protect you from being hurt by any plants;
8
Once you or your family aren’t feeling well after eating, touching or inhaling anything from toxic plants, please call your doctor for help ASAP!
Outdoor Workers
Outdoor Workers and Recreationalists
Those who enjoy the outdoors either as a hobby or as part of their work will rarely see a plant and decide to munch on it (although the scenario is not unheard of). However, they do tend to deal with moving through and brushing aside plants. These people are more at risk of being poisoned by touching toxic plants than by ingesting them.
Outdoor Workers
Foragers
Foragers
Foraging for food and medicinal plants is a desirable skill among people who want to feel at one with the land. This hobby can be very useful and enjoyable, but if done wrong , it can lead to disastrous effects. People who forage are picking and grabbing plants with the full intention of using those plants, most of the time to ingest them.
Foragers
Children
Children
While outdoor workers are more likely to touch poison and foragers are more likely to ingest poison, children can easily do both. These bundles of joy just love to run around and explore the world. They enjoy touching things and occasionally shoving random stuff in their mouth; this is a terrible combination with toxic plants in the mix.
If you let your children run about, it is important to know what are the local toxic plants that they could accidentally get into. Try to educate the children and steer them away from where the toxic plants are located.
Children
Common Toxic Houseplants
Common Toxic Houseplants
When it comes to decorating a house, there is nothing more refreshing than adding some beautiful houseplants. Some common house plants can also be toxic.

Aloe

aloe
Aloe is famous for its sunburn-soothing properties and its gorgeous desert design. However, many people do not realize that the latex the aloe vera plant produces can be mildly toxic to pets and children.

The latex contains a chemical compound known as saponin. Which when ingested, can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and low blood sugar. This, if left unchecked, can lead to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. The proper response is to contact poison control or a veterinarian to know what to do in your particular circumstance if either your child or pet consumes aloe.

The latex of the plant is similar to the sap of the tree. It is inside the leaf, but sticks mainly toward the edges. If aloe gel is prepared properly it should be safe for use, but be sure to apply it only topically when treating burns.

Philodendron

Philodendron
Philodendron, also known as sweetheart vine, has become a resident at many houses and even businesses. They are glossy green and the leaves elegantly split, displaying interesting designs. Behind this beauty there is a needle-like toxin called calcium oxalate crystals.

These crystals are held within the plant and only affect you, your pets, or your loved ones if the plant tissue is broken. If ingested, the crystals can cause severe swelling, difficulty breathing, stomach pain, burning and pain. If they are accidentally caught on the skin, they can cause skin irritation.

If anyone accidentally ingests philodendron and they find it difficult to breathe or their tongue starts to swell up, it is important to seek medical attention immediately to avoid suffocation. If you have very young children or pets who have a tendency to tear at plants, keep them away from any philodendrons.

Peace Lily

Peace Lily
Peace lilies produce stunningly white flowers that bring to mind peace and serenity. This is one reason they are invited into our homes and given a place to stay. However, similar to philodendrons, the peace lily contains oxalate crystals known as raphides.

The raphides, once ingested, will cause swelling and burning sensations and can also cause skin irritation. Both pets and humans can get these symptoms so it is important to keep these plants from anyone who is likely to tear or chew it. Symptoms can become dire if the raphides cause the tongue and throat to swell to a point where the person or pet is having difficulty breathing. Seek proper medical attention if this is the case.

Snake Plant

Snake Plant
The snake plant is an interesting and popular house plant. Its stark architecture and wavy coloring has made it a fan favorite. This plant too, however, is toxic when ingested or if the sap touches your skin.

Snake plant sap will cause rashes if it comes into contact with your skin. In addition, it will cause diarrhea and vomiting when ingested. Again these symptoms are very serious and would be best avoided by keeping snake plants out of reach or by choosing a different houseplant.
Common Toxic Garden Plants
Common Toxic Garden Plants

Daffodil

Daffodil
Daffodils are a strikingly colorful flower. This can sometimes bring them much attention not from just onlooking adults but children as well. Since kids are more drawn to colorful objects, they may have a higher chance of just grabbing the flower and eating it. Adults have also been known to accidentally grab daffodil bulbs instead of onions.

Why are these mistakes so dangerous? Daffodils contain lycorine, which can induce nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It also contains oxalates which can cause swelling and pain. The symptoms can be worse in animals, because if your pets eat daffodils they may experience drowsiness, low blood pressure or even liver damage.

Make sure to call poison control when these symptoms set in. The vomiting and diarrhea have been known to go away after 3 hours, but it is better to be safe than sorry. Ingesting liquids to keep hydration up can be important. If the patient is having difficulty breathing, seek medical attention immediately.

Hydrangea

Hydrangea
Hydrangeas are unique, with their soft blue and pink flowers. They are a great addition to any garden, but should not be snacked on—not that you would want to. Hydrangeas can be especially nasty because they contain compounds known as glycosides. These will release hydrogen cyanide into the bloodstream when consumed. This will block your body’s ability to uptake oxygen to the cells in your body.

The way to combat this kind of poisoning is through getting IVs from the vet or doctor. It is important to contact your medical professional immediately since the symptoms can be fatal within minutes or hours.

Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons
Rhododendron, the state flower of Washington, is also toxic. The multitudinous, pink flowers can be quite dangerous. All parts of this plant are toxic, the leaves and seeds more so than the flowers. However, even the nectar of the flower is toxic and in the Mediterranean, where rhododendrons grow in more dense quantities, the honey from bees who gather rhododendron nectar can be poisonous.

Normally kids and pets do not eat enough to experience the full poisoning effect. However, just eating two leaves is enough to be considered dangerous. The grayanotoxin glycosides within the rhododendron can cause vomiting, diarrhea and irregular heartbeats. Things can get very serious when too much rhododendron is consumed and can lead to necessary medical intervention.

Start by calling poison control first if you suspect anyone has been munching on rhododendrons. The experts there will be able to help guide you through the necessary processes to cure your loved one.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb
Yummy rhubarb has a nasty side to it. While the stems are used in many recipes, including for rhubarb strawberry pie, the leaves are toxic. They contain oxalic acid which is known to blister the mouth, cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and kidney stones. The leaves are known to be more toxic to pets than humans, but in either case, it is important to contact poison control immediately to figure out necessary steps to cure the patient.
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard

Bittersweet Nightshade

Bittersweet Nightshade
Nightshade is an invasive, noxious weed that is extremely poisonous. It has been found along the East and West Coast of the U.S. It makes its home in areas with disturbed soil. This could be near your garden or areas that have recently had bushes/trees put in.

These plants are dark green with purple flowers that develop into bright red berries. The whole plant is toxic and should be avoided by pets and children alike. If ingested it can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The colorful berries are especially enticing to young children. If you see any plants that look similar to tomato or pepper plants that you did not plant in your yard, it is best to just pull them immediately.

Call poison control immediately if you think someone has fallen victim to nightshade.

Buttercups

Buttercups
Buttercups are found throughout the United States, especially in wet areas. The shiny, yellow flowers will pop up in the springtime, accompanying their dandelion friends. However, unlike dandelions, buttercups are not edible.

Buttercups will release a compound called protoanemonin. This toxin is known to cause vomiting, diarrhea, bloody stool, hypersalivation, depression, blisters, and more. These symptoms will affect both humans and animals. The sap may also cause irritation when it comes into contact with skin. These yellow flowers are dangerous and children should be observed cautiously when around them.

Foxgloves

Foxgloves
Foxgloves are beautiful plants that build towers out of vivid purple bell-shaped blossoms. They are very pretty to look at, but they contain a compound known as digoxin. This chemical is used in certain medicines to help people with certain heart conditions. However, the medicine is made by specialists, whereas someone eating foxgloves will receive unregulated amounts of the chemical.

This toxin can make you vomit and lower your heartbeat. This often causes dizziness and faintness. It is extremely important to call poison control immediately to know what to do in the case of foxglove poisoning. Some people have confused the young leaves of foxglove with borage, making adult foragers at risk as well as kids and pets.
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
Now that you know where to start with toxic plant identification, let us discuss how to either tend to the poisonous plants you decide to keep or get rid of them that plague your yard.

How to Tend to Poisonous Plants

Many plants that are toxic when ingested are also skin irritants. The philodendron is a good example of this. When the sap comes into contact with skin, it can cause a rash to form. To help protect yourself when tending to toxic plants, it is important to wear some sort of gloves.
Tend
Latex gloves may be the best solution due to their disposability. Regular gloves could potentially keep the poisonous sap on their surface. If the gloves aren’t cleaned then you could accidentally touch the irritant or pass it to someone else.

In addition you will want to plan where to keep your deadly beauties. If you have a toxic indoor plant try to keep it up high or out of reach of children and pets. This will keep accidents few and far between. Another idea is keeping your plants in areas that are usually inaccessible to children or pets. Areas such as an office, study room, or guest bedroom could be good locations. If applicable, you could also set up a terrarium for your little plant baby, making it more difficult for curious hands or paws to access.
tend2
If you plan to have outdoor plants, location will be key. You will want to put plants in an area that will be inaccessible to children, pets and even wild animals. You will probably want to avoid planting the plants in the front of your house if kids walk by on a regular basis, just to be cautious. Having the plants behind a fence will be best, but use your discretion when choosing a spot.

How to Get Rid of Poisonous Plants

plants
The easiest but possibly most controversial way to get rid of poisonous plants is by using herbicides. This can be especially easy if you own a grass lawn and use an herbicide that targets broadleaf (non-grass) species. You can find many herbicides meant for yard use by simply searching the term online. Once you have purchased the herbicide you will want to make sure to follow the label posted on the container. If you follow the instructions precisely, then everything should run smoothly for you.

If you don’t plan on using herbicides, there are a few organic methods you can use to try to get rid of toxic plants. You can manually pull the plants out of the ground. This is probably one of the most difficult methods because there is no assurance that you will get the whole plant out this way.

You can also try pouring boiling hot water or spraying white vinegar on the target plants. This may take more time than using a synthetic herbicide, but you can feel a little better about using these products.

You can also try to use wood chips to cover a certain area where you do not want anything to grow. This will not stop all the weeds, but the few that make it through can be easily picked by hand.
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More About Paperwhite Narcissus

Spread
Spread
5 to 7 cm
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Spring, Late fall, Winter
Flower Color
Flower Color
White
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green
Flower Size
Flower Size
3 cm
Plant Height
Plant Height
30 to 45 cm

Name story

Paperwhite daffodil
The plant belongs to the daffodil family, but unlike the wild daffodil or the most common yellow hybrids, the flowers are pure white in color - with the exception of tiny yellow stamens. The epithet part of the Latin name means the same - 'paper-like.'
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Common Problems

Why does my paperwhite narcissus grow leaves but never bloom?

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Difficulty with blooming is a common problem among paperwhite narcissus. There are several possible reasons for it:
  • The indoor temperature may be too high for the plants to flowering, resulting in failure to bloom. You can make the bulbs stay in 5 ℃ for 35-45 days before planting, or move the pots to a place with temperatures below 5 ℃ after planting. If the bulbs purchased have been treated at low temperature, the problem may not come from it.
  • paperwhite narcissus needs ample sunlight to thrive during the growth period. If you always keep them in the shade, they will not get enough light. This may cause excessive leaf growth and reduced blooming.
  • If you apply a lot of nitrogenous fertilizer and little phosphate and potassium fertilizer in growing, paperwhite narcissus will lack nutrients for blooming. Use fertilizer rich in phosphate and potassium.
  • After paperwhite narcissus blooming, you must deadhead them in time. Otherwise, the plant will consume excess nutrients. Additionally, you can proactively cut off leaves instead of waiting for them to naturally wither and turn yellow. Waiting makes plants avoid insufficient photosynthesis of the leaves and accumulate nutrients for bulbs. Otherwise, the flowering in the following year will be affected.
  • Paperwhite narcissus in pots can grow for many years and produce many baby bulbs. The bulbs make it so crowded that paperwhite narcissus lacks nutrients for blooming in the pot. You can dig out the baby bulbs, remove and plant them separately after 3-5 years of growing. Then, replant the parent bulb into a new substrate mixed with fertilizer.
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Caring for a New Plant

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The following pictures and instructions for flower plant are aimed to help your plants adapt and thrive in a new environment.
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1
Picking a Healthy Flower Plant
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Check Its Health

part
Whole Plant
Symmetrical crown, evenly distributed branches, full and compact shape, no excessive growth, close internodes, and uniform leaf size.
part
Flowers
Many unopened flower buds are closely attached, without falling off easily when shaken, and show no diseased spots or wilting on the petals.
part
Branches
The branches are not withered, and the trunk is free of boreholes or damage.
part
Stems
No mold, browning or soft rot at the base of the plant.
part
Leaves
Check the inside of the plant, shaded and overlapping areas, back of leaves. Even colour, no yellowing, no brown spots, no crawling insects, no cobwebs, no deformities, no wilting.
health-trouble

Health Troubleshooting

Whole Plant
Branches
Stems
Flowers
Leaves
more
more 1 Asymmetrical crown or missing, uneven branching: prune the weak and slender branches of the larger portion of the asymmetrical crown, then trim the overgrown larger branches.
more
more 2 Internodes are longer in the upper part, leaves are sparse and smaller on top: increase light intensity or duration.
more
more 1 Dry branches: check if the branch is still alive by peeling back a small section of bark and trim away any dry branches. Watch out for signs of insect infestation inside the branch.
more
more 2 Bark with holes: inject insecticide into the holes and apply systemic insecticide to the roots.
more
more 3 Damaged bark: brush on a wound-healing agent, and avoid getting it wet.
more
Mildew, browning, or soft rot at the base: place the plant in a ventilated, dry environment and water with fungicide.
more
more 1 Many flowers have already bloomed: lower the temperature in the environment to extend the flowering period. Prune any dying flowers in a timely manner to prevent nutrient depletion.
more
more 2 Flower bud dropping: keep temperature at 15-25℃, place in bright but shaded area, water frequently, and avoid fertilizing.
more
more 3 Flower petals have spots or disease: avoid spraying water directly onto the petals.
more
more 4 Flower wilting: avoid soil that is too wet or too dry. When touching the soil with your finger, it should feel moist but not leave any water traces on your finger.
more
more 1 Uneven leaf color and yellowing: prune yellow leaves and check if there are signs of rot at the base of the plant. Spray with fungicide for severe cases.
more
more 2 Brown spots or small yellow spots: place the plant in a ventilated area and avoid watering the leaves. Spray with fungicide for severe cases.
more
more 3 Tiny crawling insects on the back of leaves or spider webs between leaves: increase light exposure and spray with insecticide for severe cases.
more
more 4 Deformations or missing parts on leaves: determine if it's physical damage or pest infestation. Linear or tearing damage is physical, while the rest are pests. Spray with insecticide.
more
more 5 Wilting leaves: provide partial shade and avoid excessive sun exposure. Remove 1/3 to 1/2 of the leaves for severe cases.
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Check Its Growing Conditions

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Soil Check
Soil should smell fresh like after a rain and no musty odor.
more
Light Check
Check the light requirement of the plant and if it match with planting location.
more
Ventilation Check
Ensure good ventilation.
more
Temperature Check
Ensure outdoor temperature is suitable for plants.
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Condition Troubleshooting

Soil
Ideal Temperature
Ventilation
Suitable Light
check
Potting mix soil, Peat moss mix soil
Soil
Soil smells musty or foul: check the root system for decay, place the plant in a ventilated, dry environment, and water with fungicide.
check
0℃ to 35℃
Ideal Temperature
Temperature is too low: Temporarily move the plants indoors and then to outdoors when temperature is suitable.
check
Well Ventilated
Ventilation
Non-ventilated environment: can lead to root rot, diseases, and flower drop. Place the plants in an airy location avoiding dead spots.
check
Full sun, Partial sun
Suitable Light
Insufficient light: reduce light appropriately during flowering period but not a fully shaded environment. After flowering, move to normal cultivation environment. For plants with long flowering and fruiting periods, provide normal light to avoid shortening.
Transplant recovery: After transplanting, pot plants should be temporarily shaded, then moved to normal light after a week if no abnormal drop or wilting. In-ground plants, shade for a week and then transfer to normal light or just pay attention to watering.
more
2
Adapting Your New Flower Plant
Step 1
condition-image
Repotting
Potted plants - Wait until flowering stage is over before changing pots. In-ground plants - Plant directly taking care not to harm root system or remove soil.
Step 2
condition-image
Pruning
Prune residual flowers, yellow/dead leaves. No other pruning at this time.
Step 3
condition-image
Watering
Water appropriately. Water more frequently for newly transplanted or purchased plants to keep the soil consistently moist for at least 2 weeks. Avoid overwatering, do not water when there is water on your finger after touching the soil. Both underwatering and overwatering can cause plants to drop their flowers or fruit.
Step 4
condition-image
Fertilizing
Don't fertilize just after purchase. Fertilize after 2 weeks using half concentration.
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Lighting
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Indoor
Indoor
Outdoor
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Requirements
Full sun
Ideal
Above 6 hours sunlight
Partial sun
Tolerance
About 3-6 hours sunlight
Watch how sunlight gracefully moves through your garden, and choose spots that provide the perfect balance of light and shade for your plants, ensuring their happiness.
Essentials
The paperwhite narcissus thrives best under substantial exposure to the sun's rays and can continue to grow under moderate sun. Originating from an environment of ample sun, this attribute contributes substantially to its robust growth. Insufficient solar exposure could retard growth, while overexposure may cause plant stress.
Preferred
Tolerable
Unsuitable
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Artificial lighting
Indoor plants require adequate lighting for optimal growth. When natural sunlight is insufficient, particularly in winter or in less sunny spaces, artificial lights offer a vital solution, promoting faster, healthier growth.
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Indoor plants require adequate lighting for optimal growth. When natural sunlight is insufficient, particularly in winter or in less sunny spaces, artificial lights offer a vital solution, promoting faster, healthier growth.
1. Choose the right type of artificial light: LED lights are a popular choice for indoor plant lighting because they can be customized to provide the specific wavelengths of light that your plants need.
Full sun plants need 30-50W/sq ft of artificial light, partial sun plants need 20-30W/sq ft, and full shade plants need 10-20W/sq ft.
2. Determine the appropriate distance: Place the light source 12-36 inches above the plant to mimic natural sunlight.
3. Determine the duration: Mimic the length of natural daylight hours for your plant species. most plants need 8-12 hours of light per day.
Important Symptoms
Insufficient light
Paperwhite narcissus thrives in full sunlight and is commonly grown outdoors where it receives ample sunlight. When placed in rooms with inadequate lighting, symptoms of light deficiency may not be readily apparent.
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(Symptom details and solutions)
Small leaves
New leaves may grow smaller in size compared to the previous ones once they have matured.
Leggy or sparse growth
The spaces between leaves or stems of your Paperwhite narcissus may become longer, resulting in a thin and stretched-out appearance. This can make the plant look sparse and weak, and it may easily break or lean due to its own weight.
Faster leaf drop
When plants are exposed to low light conditions, they tend to shed older leaves early to conserve resources. Within a limited time, these resources can be utilized to grow new leaves until the plant's energy reserves are depleted.
Slower or no new growth
Paperwhite narcissus enters a survival mode when light conditions are poor, which leads to a halt in leaf production. As a result, the plant's growth becomes delayed or stops altogether.
Lighter-colored new leaves
Insufficient sunlight can cause leaves to develop irregular color patterns or appear pale. This indicates a lack of chlorophyll and essential nutrients.
Solutions
1. To ensure optimal growth, gradually move plants to a sunnier location each week, until they receive at least 6 hours of direct sunlight daily. Use a south-facing window and keep curtains open during the day for maximum sunlight exposure and nutrient accumulation.2. To provide additional light for your plant, consider using artificial light if it's large or not easily movable. Keep a desk or ceiling lamp on for at least 8 hours daily, or invest in professional plant grow lights for ample light.
Excessive light
Paperwhite narcissus thrives in full sun exposure and can tolerate intense sunlight. With their remarkable resilience, symptoms of sunburn may not be easily visible, as they rarely suffer from it.
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(Symptom details and solutions)
Chlorosis
Chlorosis is a condition where the plant's leaves lose their green color and turn yellow. This is due to the breakdown of chlorophyll from excessive sunlight, which negatively affects the plant's ability to photosynthesize.
Sunscald
Sunscald occurs when the plant's leaves or stems are damaged by intense sunlight exposure. It appears as pale, bleached, or necrotic areas on the plant tissue and can reduce the plant's overall health.
Leaf Curling
Leaf curling is a symptom where leaves curl or twist under extreme sunlight conditions. This is a defense mechanism used by the plant to reduce its surface area exposed to sunlight, minimizing water loss and damage.
Wilting
Wilting occurs when a plant loses turgor pressure and its leaves and stems begin to droop. Overexposure to sunlight can cause wilting by increasing the plant's water loss through transpiration, making it difficult for the plant to maintain adequate hydration.
Leaf Scorching
Leaf scorching is a symptom characterized by the appearance of brown, dry, and crispy edges or patches on leaves due to excessive sunlight. This can lead to a reduction in photosynthetic capacity and overall plant health.
Solutions
1. Move your plant to the optimal position where it can receive abundant sunlight but also have some shade. An east-facing window is an ideal choice as the morning sunlight is gentler. This way, your plant can enjoy ample sunlight while reducing the risk of sunburn.2. It is recommended to trim off any completely dehydrated or withered parts of the plant.
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Temperature
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Indoor
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Requirements
Ideal
Tolerable
Unsuitable
Just like people, each plant has its own preferences. Learn about your plants' temperature needs and create a comforting environment for them to flourish. As you care for your plants, your bond with them will deepen. Trust your intuition as you learn about their temperature needs, celebrating the journey you share. Lovingly monitor the temperature around your plants and adjust their environment as needed. A thermometer can be your ally in this heartfelt endeavor. Be patient and gentle with yourself as you explore your plants' temperature needs. Cherish your successes, learn from challenges, and nurture your garden with love, creating a haven that reflects the warmth of your care.
Essentials
Paperwhite narcissus is native to temperate environments, thriving in a temperature range of 59 to 100.4 °F (15 to 38 ℃). During colder seasons, it is suggested to keep the plant around these temperatures for optimal growth.
Regional wintering strategies
Paperwhite narcissus has some cold tolerance and generally does not require any additional measures when the temperature is above {Tolerable_growing_temperature_min}. However, if the temperature is expected to drop below {Tolerable_growing_temperature_min}, it is necessary to take some temporary measures for cold protection, such as wrapping the plant with plastic film, fabric, or other materials. Once the temperature rises again, the protective measures should be removed promptly.
Important Symptoms
Low Temperature
Paperwhite narcissus has moderate tolerance to low temperatures and thrives best when the temperature is above {Suitable_growth_temperature_min}. During winter, it should be kept above {Tolerable_growing_temperature_min}. When the temperature falls below {Limit_growth_temperature}, the leaves may start to droop. In mild cases, they can recover, but in severe cases, the leaves will wilt and eventually fall off.
Solutions
Trim off the frost-damaged parts. Prior to encountering low temperatures again, wrap the plant with materials such as non-woven fabric or cloth, and construct a wind barrier to protect it from the cold wind.
High Temperature
During summer, Paperwhite narcissus should be kept below {Suitable_growth_temperature_max}. When the temperature exceeds {Tolerable_growing_temperature_max}, the color of the leaves becomes lighter, the leaf tips may become dry and withered, the leaves may curl, and the plant becomes more susceptible to sunburn.
Solutions
Trim away the sunburned and dried-up parts. Move the plant to a location that provides shade from the midday and afternoon sun, or use a shade cloth to create shade. Water the plant in the morning and evening to keep the soil moist.
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Transplant
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How to Successfully Transplant Paperwhite Narcissus?
Autumn is the time to transplant paperwhite narcissus, prime because the plant can set roots before winter. Aim for a sunny to part-shade location with well-drained soil. Note, overwatering can lead tо rot. So, transplant judiciously when the plant overgrows its space.
What Preparations are Needed Before Transplanting Paperwhite Narcissus?
What is the Ideal Time for Transplanting Paperwhite Narcissus?
The optimal time to transplant paperwhite narcissus is fall; this allows the bulbs to take advantage of cooler temperatures for root establishment. Transplanting in this period grants paperwhite narcissus more robust growth and vibrant blooms. Embrace the joy of experiencing paperwhite narcissus's stunning flowers by following this transplanting advice!
How Much Space Should You Leave Between Paperwhite Narcissus Plants?
When transplanting your paperwhite narcissus, ensure there's adequate room for each plant to grow. Ideally, space each paperwhite narcissus about 1-2 feet (30-60cm) apart. This will allow ample room for root expansion, thus promoting healthy growth.
What is the Best Soil Mix for Paperwhite Narcissus Transplanting?
Before transplanting paperwhite narcissus, prepare the ground with rich, well-drained soil. Adding a base fertilizer, like compost or well-rotted manure, can give your paperwhite narcissus a great start. It'll provide the nutrients needed for a healthy plant.
Where Should You Relocate Your Paperwhite Narcissus?
Remember, paperwhite narcissus love full or partial sun. So, install your paperwhite narcissus in a location where they’ll receive plenty of sunshine, at least for a part of the day. This helps them to bloom nicely and grow strong!
What Equipments Should You Prepare Before Transplantation Paperwhite Narcissus?
Trowel
A small hand tool used for digging, applying, smoothing, or moving small amounts of soil or dirt. Ideal for precision when digging out paperwhite narcissus in its original location, or creating the hole in the new location.
Gardening Gloves
To protect your hands whilst dealing with soil and carefully handling the paperwhite narcissus.
Watering Can
For providing water before, during, and after the transplant process. The gentle droplet flow from a watering can is often preferable for delicate plants like paperwhite narcissus.
Measuring Tape
To ensure appropriate distance between the transplants and provide enough space for paperwhite narcissus to grow.
How Do You Remove Paperwhite Narcissus from the Soil?
From Ground: Start watering the paperwhite narcissus plant a day before the actual process to ease the transplantation shock. When you're ready to begin, wear your gardening gloves and gently dig around the paperwhite narcissus using a trowel, taking care not to damage the bulb. Once loosened, carefully lift the plant, ensuring not to damage the roots.
From Pot: Water the paperwhite narcissus plant and let the excess drain off. Carefully run the trowel around the pot's edge to loosen the soil. Keeping the paperwhite narcissus at a tilted position, hold the base and gently pull it out from the pot.
From Seedling Tray: Make sure the paperwhite narcissus has grown enough to handle the transplant process. Water well, then carefully lift the seedling using a trowel. Hold onto the leafy part, not the stem, while transplanting, as the stem can easily get damaged.
Step-by-Step Guide for Transplanting Paperwhite Narcissus
Step1 Preparation
Before you start transplanting, prepare the planting site by digging a hole twice the width of the root ball of paperwhite narcissus and the same depth as it was planted before.
Step2 Placement
Now, place the paperwhite narcissus in the prepared hole, ensuring the top of the root ball is level with the surrounding soil.
Step3 Backfilling
Slowly begin backfilling the hole, firming the soil gently around the base of paperwhite narcissus. Make sure the plant isn't buried too deep, as this can cause rot.
Step4 Watering
After planting, generously water paperwhite narcissus to settle the soil around the roots and to eliminate any air pockets. Fill any depressions that form.
How Do You Care For Paperwhite Narcissus After Transplanting?
Temperature
Ensure that paperwhite narcissus is being grown in its preferred temperature range. For paperwhites, this is cool indoor temperatures. High temperatures can cause plants to become spindly and flop over.
Watering
Keep the soil evenly moist but avoid overwatering as paperwhite narcissus is susceptible to bulb rot.
Deadheading
Once the blooms of paperwhite narcissus have faded, cut them off so that the plant doesn't waste energy making seeds. However, leave the foliage in place until it dies back naturally. The leaves provide crucial nourishment to the bulb for next year's blooms.
Troubleshooting Common Issues with Paperwhite Narcissus Transplantation.
When is the best time to transplant paperwhite narcissus?
The prime period to move paperwhite narcissus is during the S2 season, this allows the plant adequate time to establish before the next blooming period.
What spacing should be considered for transplanting paperwhite narcissus?
For healthy growth, it's advisable to place paperwhite narcissus about 1-2 feet (30-60 cm) apart. They need enough space for proper root growth.
What type of soil is optimal for paperwhite narcissus transplantation?
Paperwhite narcissus prefers well-draining soil. If your garden soil is heavy clay, lighten it with some perlite or coarse sand.
What's the appropriate depth for transplanting paperwhite narcissus bulbs?
You should plant paperwhite narcissus bulbs three times their own depth. This will provide the best environment for root establishment.
Does paperwhite narcissus transplantation require any specific light requirements?
Paperwhite narcissus does well in full sun to partial shade during the growing period. Ensure it receives enough light after transplanting.
What aftercare practices should I follow after transplanting paperwhite narcissus?
Keep soil consistently moist but avoid over-watering. A water-soluble fertilizer can boost growth after transplantation.
Should I trim the leaves of paperwhite narcissus during transplantation?
Remove any dead or yellow leaves, but keep majority intact. The leaves are essential for photosynthesis right after transplantation.
What should I do if the transplanted paperwhite narcissus shows signs of stress?
Ensure it's not waterlogged or dry. If the issue continues, consider checking for pests or diseases and take relevant actions.
How can I prevent disease when transplanting paperwhite narcissus?
Inspect bulbs for disease before transplanting. If any are soft or discolored, discard them. Proper spacing can also prevent disease spread.
Is it necessary to transplant paperwhite narcissus every year?
As a perennial plant, paperwhite narcissus does not need to be transplanted yearly. If growth is vigorous, consider dividing it every few years.
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