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About
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Basic Care
care_advanced_guide care_advanced_guide
Advanced Care
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More About How-Tos
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Pests & Diseases
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More Info
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FAQ

How to Care for Common Basil 'african Blue'

Common basil 'African Blue' is a cross between camphor basil and dark oval basil. It is a sterile basil that cannot produce seeds of its own. The leaves start out purple and change to green over time. Long purple stems produce dark purple buds that open into lavender flowers. Common basil 'African Blue' is named for its purplish-blue color and African parentage.
Sunlight
Sunlight
Full sun
Common basil 'African Blue'
Common basil 'African Blue'
care_basic_guide

Basic Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterDetail

How to Water Common basil 'African Blue'?

Common basil 'African Blue' likes a moist environment. Frequent watering is required for seedlings to keep the soil moist. Established plants should be watered once every 4-6 days in spring and fall, and every 2-4 days in summer. In winter, move inside and reduce watering.
Also, it is preferable to use rainwater and distilled water, because tap water may contain a lot of calcium, magnesium, and other mineral salts, and long-term use tends to compact the soil. Inserting a finger into the flowerpot soil. If the soil is particularly hard and dry, it needs to be watered immediately. If the soil is soft and wet, no immediate watering is required.
Cultivation:WaterDetail
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Cultivation:FertilizerDetail

How to Fertilize Common basil 'African Blue'?

An appropriate amount of quick-acting fertilizer can make common basil 'African Blue' grow better based on the principle of less fertilizer applied more frequently. In the case of fertilizer deficiency, common basil 'African Blue' will be short. In the prosperous growing period, organic fertilizer can be applied once every two weeks. Observe its growth and keep it growing healthily.
During spring and fall, the roots, stem, and leaves grow and the flower buds differentiate. In summer, the temperature is high and the water evaporation is fast. Liquid fertilizer should be applied in small amounts but frequently. In winter, the temperature is low and the plant grows slowly or even stops growing, so no fertilizer is required generally.
Cultivation:FertilizerDetail
Cultivation:SunlightDetail

What Are the Sunlight Requirements for Common basil 'African Blue'?

Common basil 'African Blue' is a full sun plant and needs sufficient sunlight during the whole growth period. It is best placed where it is exposed to sunlight for more than 6 hours average daily. Without enough sunlight, photosynthesis will be inhibited and accumulated nutrients reduced.
If the average daily sunlight exposure is less than 4 hours, thin leaves and light aroma may result. However, common basil 'African Blue' should be properly shaded in hot summers, especially the seedlings.
Cultivation:SunlightDetail
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Cultivation:PruningDetail

How to Prune Common basil 'African Blue'?

Common basil 'African Blue' can be pruned when they reach 20 cm in height. Yellow leaves, once found, should be cut off promptly. If the plant grows too exuberantly and the ornamental effect deteriorates, redundant branches can be cut off. After pruning, add a small amount of slow-release fertilizer. Common basil 'African Blue' usually dies after the seeds are ripened, and its life can be extended by cutting off the flowers to prevent the seeds from ripening.
Cultivation:PruningDetail
close
care_advanced_guide

Advanced Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail

What is the Ideal Temperature Range for Common basil 'African Blue'?

Common basil 'African Blue' is native to Tropical Asia and likes a warm and humid environment. It is more resistant to heat than cold, and to drought than waterlogging. The optimum growth temperature is between 22 to 28 ℃ in the daytime and 13 to 18 ℃ at night. The leaves will turn yellow if the ambient temperature is lower than 13 ℃. Damage may be caused to the plant if the temperature is lower than 10 ℃, and the leaves will droop if the temperature is higher than 35 ℃.
Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail
Cultivation:SoilDetail

What Soil is Best for Common basil 'African Blue'?

Common basil 'African Blue' is a deep-rooted plant, with the roots growing up to 51 to 102 cm deep. Therefore, well-drained, fertile, loose sandy loam or humus soil is the best culture soil. Potted plants can be planted in a mixed culture of peat and vermiculite at 2:1, or garden soil and fully decomposed organic fertilizer at 2:1.
Common basil 'African Blue' does not have strict requirements on soil conditions. It can be planted in both acid and alkaline soil and can tolerate pH values of 5-8, but neutral soil is the best.
Cultivation:SoilDetail
Cultivation:PropagationDetail

How to Propagate Common basil 'African Blue'?

Common basil 'African Blue' can be propagated by cuttage or sowing. Sowing is the main cultural method for families.
Cultivation:PropagationDetail
Cultivation:PlantingDetail

How to Plant Common basil 'African Blue'?

Common basil 'African Blue' is generally sown in spring and fall, and the best time for sowing is a sunny morning. The soil can be exposed to sunlight before sowing to kill harmful microorganisms in the soil. Select plump, pest-free seeds, spread them evenly in the soil, cover them with a layer of 5 mm thick soil, and spray water gently. If you worry about uneven sowing, you can mix the seeds with fine soil in advance and then spread them in the garden.
The best temperature for sowing common basil 'African Blue' is about 20 ℃, and the seedlings are expected to grow in 4-5 days. When they grow 1-2 leaves, poor or excessively dense seedlings may be removed, and the spacing of seedlings set to about 3 to 4 cm. When 8-10 leaves grow out on one plant, the plant can be transplanted. Keep plants spaced to about 25 cm apart.
Cultivation:PlantingDetail
Cultivation:HarvestDetail

How to Harvest Common basil 'African Blue'?

Common basil 'African Blue' can be used as an ornamental plant or picked as a fragrant herb to cook with at any time. Its leaves can be harvested before flowers bloom. Cut leaves with a small knife and try to avoid damaging the roots. Its leaves can be used in cold dishes or salads, or to remove the fishy taste of seafood, and dried leaves can be used as a spice. Its stem, leaves, and flowers can be harvested before blooming. They can be used to extract essential oils. It is best to harvest them at 9:00-17:00 after 2-3 consecutive sunny days. Its seeds are generally be harvested in late summer.
Cultivation:HarvestDetail
seasonal-tip

Seasonal Precautions

Common basil 'African Blue' is resistant to heat, so it is best to move plants indoors in winter. Common basil 'African Blue' should be properly shaded in summer; seedlings especially should not be directly exposed to strong sunlight. With hot temperatures and fast water evaporation, summer is also its most intense growing period. Use a lower concentration of liquid fertilizer in summer and fertilize more often to supplement enough nutrients and water for the plant. Smooth drainage should be ensured in summer because high humidity and poor drainage can easily cause the plant to be infected with fungus leaf spot.
seasonal-tip
care_scenes

More Info on Common Basil 'african Blue' Growth and Care

Basic Care Guide
Lighting
Full sun
Temperature
5 43 ℃
care_pet_and_diseases

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Common basil 'African Blue' based on 10 million real cases
Brown spot
Brown spot Brown spot
Brown spot
This infection can cause brown spots or patches to appear on the plant.
Solutions: In minor cases of brown spot, there isn’t any need to treat the disease. However, if much of the foliage is affected and defoliation occurs, the plant will benefit from getting rid of the infection. It is recommended to start by applying organic treatment options, working up to the more potent synthetic, chemical fungicides if necessary. Organic options won’t kill the fungus, but will prevent it from spreading. Dissolve ½ teaspoon of baking soda and one teaspoon of liquid soap in a gallon of water. Using a spray bottle, spray on tops and bottoms of leaves until the mixture drips off. Repeat every two weeks until existing spots stop enlarging and new spots no longer appear. Spray a copper-based fungicidal soap on the leaves, coating the top and bottom leaf surfaces. Reapply as directed on the product label. Copper penetrates the leaf surface and prevents germination of spores so the fungus cannot spread. Apply an all-purpose fungicide to the entire plant, following the label instructions carefully.
Leaf deformity
Leaf deformity Leaf deformity
Leaf deformity
Leaf deformities can have a variety of causes.
Solutions: Follow these steps to revive plants with abnormal leaves. Remove damaged leaves: Plants can recover from damage when given the time to do so. Remove any deformed leaves so they don't continue drawing energy from the plant. This also creates room for healthier ones to grow. Stop using herbicide: Though herbicide damage is challenging to diagnose, gardeners can potentially prevent deformed leaves by not using any and by strictly following manufacturers instructions. Spray insecticide: Prevent pests from inhabiting plant leaves by spraying with insecticide regularly and practicing good natural pest prevention techniques. Apply a balanced fertilizer: Solve nutrient deficiencies and excesses by using a well-balanced fertilizer (organic or conventional both work) before planting, and consider topdressing when signs of stress are apparent. Fix watering schedule: If plant leaves are curled downward due to too much or too little water, adjust the watering schedule so the soil is moist, but not damp. Remove infected plants: If the plant has succumbed to a viral infection, not much can be done to revive it. Remove and destroy all compromised plant material to prevent spread to other plants.
Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Solutions: If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
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Brown spot
plant poor
Brown spot
This infection can cause brown spots or patches to appear on the plant.
Overview
Overview
Discolored spots on the foliage of plants are one of the most common disease problems people observe. These spots are caused by fungal and bacterial diseases, with most infections related to a fungal pathogen.
Brown spot can occurs on all houseplants, flowering ornamentals, vegetable plants, and leaves of trees, bushes, and shrubs. No plants are resistant to it, and the problem is worse in warm, wet environments. It can occur at any point in the life stage as long as leaves are present.
Small brownish spots appear on the foliage and enlarge as the disease progresses. In severe cases, the plant or tree is weakened when the lesions interrupt photosynthesis or cause defoliation.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
In most cases, brown spot only affects a small percentage of the whole plant, appearing on a small amount of the leaves. A small infection only puts minor stress on the plant. However, if left untreated and the disease progresses over numerous seasons, it will severely impact the health and productivity of the infected specimen.
  • Sporulation begins (reproduction of the fungal spores), and tiny spots appear on leaves.
  • Placement is often random and scattered as diseases are spread through raindrops.
  • May appear on lower leaves and the interior of the plant where humidity is higher.
  • Brown spots enlarge and grow large enough to touch neighboring spots to form a more prominent blotch.
  • Leaf margins may turn yellow.
  • Tiny black dots (fruiting bodies of the fungi) appear in the dead spots.
  • Blotches grow in size until the entire leaf is brown.
  • The leaf falls off the plant.
Severe Symptoms
  • Partial or complete premature defoliation
  • Reduced growth
  • Increased susceptibility to pests and other diseases
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Brown spot, or leaf spot, is a common descriptive term given to several diseases affecting the leaves of plants and trees. Around 85% of diseases exhibiting leaf spots are due to fungus or fungus-like organisms. Sometimes brown spot is caused by a bacterial infection, or insect activity with similar symptoms.
When conditions are warm and the leaf surfaces are wet, fungal spores being transported by wind or rain land on the surface and cling to it. They do not rupture the cell walls but grow in the space between the plant plasma membrane and the plant cell wall. As the spores reproduce, they release toxins and enzymes that cause necrotic spots (i.e., dead tissue) on the leaves, allowing the fungi to consume the products released when the cells degrade.
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Leaf deformity
plant poor
Leaf deformity
Leaf deformities can have a variety of causes.
Overview
Overview
Leaf deformity manifests in the form of curled, cupped, or distorted leaves, often first seen in the spring. There are a number of different possibilities as to the cause and it will not always be easy to isolate the problem without laboratory analysis. In the majority of cases, however, the gardener should be able to isolate the cause through close examination of the plant and the local conditions.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The plant has developed abnormal leaves. They may look similar to leaf curl, but show other problems such as:
  • stunting
  • abnormal shapes
  • a bumpy texture
  • gaps between leaf sections
  • raised growths on the top surface
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The causes are widespread and varied and the gardener will need to examine plants carefully as well as consider environmental factors.
Disease due to insect damage: Mites, aphids, and other insects that feast on plant leaves can leave them vulnerable to viral and bacterial disease. Some, like leaf galls and rust, produce distorted leaves. If the gardener sees insects on the plants, it is likely the insect is the culprit. Some mites are too small to see, and laboratory analysis may be required.
Herbicide exposure: Herbicides can stress plant leaves. This may lead to stunted growth and a curling, cupped appearance. Even if the plant owner didn't apply herbicides, herbicide drift and planting in contaminated soils can expose plants to these chemicals. If all plants in an area have deformed leaves, the cause is likely herbicides. Herbicide exposure is also characterized by narrow new leaves.
Less than ideal growing conditions: If plants are exposed to cold temperatures right as their leaves are coming out of the bud, they might become stunted and malformed. If deformed leaves occur right after a cold spell or frost, this is likely the cause. Too much and too little water can also cause deformed leaves. Leaves curling down but not distorting is more likely to be a watering issue than a leaf deformity.
Nutrient deficiencies: A lack of critical nutrients during the growing phase, including boron, calcium, and molybdenum, may lead plant leaves to grow stunted or disfigured. If a nutrient deficiency is to blame, the leaves will also show discoloring.
Fungal infections: a variety of fungal pathogens can distort leaves, as is the case with Peach leaf curl.
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Aged yellow and dry
plant poor
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Overview
Overview
Regardless of the type of plant or where it is grown, at some point, it will begin to aged yellow and dry. This is a natural, unavoidable process that happens when the plant has completed all of the steps in its life.
Annual plants go through this process at the end of a single growing season. Perennial plants live for multiple years, if not tens or hundreds of years, but will still ultimately exhibit these symptoms.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
When plants have progressed through their natural developmental stages and are nearing the end of their lifecycle, they begin showing signs of decline. Leaves will start to yellow and droop, and over time they turn papery brown and dry.
Once completely dry, the leaves begin to fall from the plant until the entire plant has dried out.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
At the end of its life, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence or natural aging and death. Cell division stops, and the plant begins catabolizing resources to use in other parts of the plant.
As this happens, the tissues begin yellow and drying until the entire plant is desiccated and perishes.
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care_more_info

More About Common Basil 'african Blue'

Plant Type
Plant Type
Herb
Lifespan
Lifespan
Annual
Spread
Spread
50 cm
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Summer
Flower Color
Flower Color
Pink
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green
Silver
Purple
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care_faq

Common Problems

Why do the leaves turn yellow or wither?

more more
There are many reasons for yellowing leaves. Leaves turn yellow if the temperature is lower than 13 ℃. Therefore, it is best to move plants inside in winter if the ambient temperature is too low. If the soil is dry for a long time or the soil is poorly drained, diseases may result. Keep soil moist and well-drained. If they don't get enough sunlight, plants can't produce enough energy through photosynthesis, and leaves turn yellow or wither. Your plant should be exposed to 6 or more hours of sunlight. It is also possible that insufficient soil fertility causes the leaves to turn yellow or wither, and a suitable amount of organic fertilizer can be applied to improve the plant's condition.

Why do the leaf tips wither?

more more
Leaf tips can wither from insufficient water or sunlight. The flowerpot may be changed and the water amount should be well controlled. Lighting should be adjusted in summer and winter to avoid blazing sunlight in summer and ensure sufficient sunlight in winter.

Why do the leaves curl and shrink?

more more
If the plant cannot obtain sufficient water, leaves shrink due to water shortage, so you must control how much water it gets. It is also possible that the root got damaged during a flowerpot change. The plant absorbs water from the soil through the root, so the root damage can cause water shortage. It will take some time for the plant to recover in such a case. It may also be affected by insects, such as aphids, which feed on the sap in the plant, causing the young leaves to curl and shrink. Insects can be washed away with water and/or special pesticides applied.

Why doesn't the plant have an aroma, or only a light aroma?

more more
The aromas of common basil 'African Blue' vary from variety to variety, just like that of the lilac flower. Some aromas are slightly peppermint, slightly sweet, or slightly spicy. Light aromas may be caused by insufficient sunlight or fertilizer. The average time of daily sunlight exposure should be above 4 hours and slow-release fertilizer should be added.

Why doesn't it ever bloom?

more more
Insufficiency of sunlight or fertilizer can keep a plant from blooming. Put the plant in a bright, ventilated place, and apply a proper amount of nutrient solution each time you water. It may also be due to the long-term use of tap water with high mineral salts, so it is recommended to water with rainwater or distilled water instead of tap water.

Why do the roots of common basil 'African Blue' rot?

more more
Common basil 'African Blue' is a deep-rooted plant; roots grow up to 51 to 102 cm long. Therefore, the size and depth of the flowerpot must be considerable. In addition, the growth of the root is closely related to the quality of soil, so poor drainage, permeability, and improper watering can cause the roots to rot. Sandy loam, or soil with good drainage and permeability, is preferred. Water more in summer and less in winter.
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FAQ
Common basil 'African Blue'
Common basil 'African Blue'

How to Care for Common Basil 'african Blue'

Common basil 'African Blue' is a cross between camphor basil and dark oval basil. It is a sterile basil that cannot produce seeds of its own. The leaves start out purple and change to green over time. Long purple stems produce dark purple buds that open into lavender flowers. Common basil 'African Blue' is named for its purplish-blue color and African parentage.
Sunlight
Full sun
Sunlight Sunlight detail
care_basic_guide

Basic Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterDetail

How to Water Common basil 'African Blue'?

Cultivation:WaterDetail
Common basil 'African Blue' likes a moist environment. Frequent watering is required for seedlings to keep the soil moist. Established plants should be watered once every 4-6 days in spring and fall, and every 2-4 days in summer. In winter, move inside and reduce watering.
Also, it is preferable to use rainwater and distilled water, because tap water may contain a lot of calcium, magnesium, and other mineral salts, and long-term use tends to compact the soil. Inserting a finger into the flowerpot soil. If the soil is particularly hard and dry, it needs to be watered immediately. If the soil is soft and wet, no immediate watering is required.
waterreminders

Never miss a care task again!

Plant care made easier than ever with our tailor-made smart care reminder.
Cultivation:FertilizerDetail

How to Fertilize Common basil 'African Blue'?

Cultivation:FertilizerDetail
An appropriate amount of quick-acting fertilizer can make common basil 'African Blue' grow better based on the principle of less fertilizer applied more frequently. In the case of fertilizer deficiency, common basil 'African Blue' will be short. In the prosperous growing period, organic fertilizer can be applied once every two weeks. Observe its growth and keep it growing healthily.
During spring and fall, the roots, stem, and leaves grow and the flower buds differentiate. In summer, the temperature is high and the water evaporation is fast. Liquid fertilizer should be applied in small amounts but frequently. In winter, the temperature is low and the plant grows slowly or even stops growing, so no fertilizer is required generally.
Cultivation:SunlightDetail

What Are the Sunlight Requirements for Common basil 'African Blue'?

Cultivation:SunlightDetail
Common basil 'African Blue' is a full sun plant and needs sufficient sunlight during the whole growth period. It is best placed where it is exposed to sunlight for more than 6 hours average daily. Without enough sunlight, photosynthesis will be inhibited and accumulated nutrients reduced.
If the average daily sunlight exposure is less than 4 hours, thin leaves and light aroma may result. However, common basil 'African Blue' should be properly shaded in hot summers, especially the seedlings.
lightmeter

Know the light your plants really get.

Find the best spots for them to optimize their health, simply using your phone.
Cultivation:PruningDetail

How to Prune Common basil 'African Blue'?

Cultivation:PruningDetail
Common basil 'African Blue' can be pruned when they reach 20 cm in height. Yellow leaves, once found, should be cut off promptly. If the plant grows too exuberantly and the ornamental effect deteriorates, redundant branches can be cut off. After pruning, add a small amount of slow-release fertilizer. Common basil 'African Blue' usually dies after the seeds are ripened, and its life can be extended by cutting off the flowers to prevent the seeds from ripening.
close
care_advanced_guide

Advanced Care Guide

Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail

What is the Ideal Temperature Range for Common basil 'African Blue'?

Cultivation:WaterAndHardinessDetail
Common basil 'African Blue' is native to Tropical Asia and likes a warm and humid environment. It is more resistant to heat than cold, and to drought than waterlogging. The optimum growth temperature is between 22 to 28 ℃ in the daytime and 13 to 18 ℃ at night. The leaves will turn yellow if the ambient temperature is lower than 13 ℃. Damage may be caused to the plant if the temperature is lower than 10 ℃, and the leaves will droop if the temperature is higher than 35 ℃.
Cultivation:SoilDetail

What Soil is Best for Common basil 'African Blue'?

Cultivation:SoilDetail
Common basil 'African Blue' is a deep-rooted plant, with the roots growing up to 51 to 102 cm deep. Therefore, well-drained, fertile, loose sandy loam or humus soil is the best culture soil. Potted plants can be planted in a mixed culture of peat and vermiculite at 2:1, or garden soil and fully decomposed organic fertilizer at 2:1.
Common basil 'African Blue' does not have strict requirements on soil conditions. It can be planted in both acid and alkaline soil and can tolerate pH values of 5-8, but neutral soil is the best.
Cultivation:PropagationDetail

How to Propagate Common basil 'African Blue'?

Cultivation:PropagationDetail
Common basil 'African Blue' can be propagated by cuttage or sowing. Sowing is the main cultural method for families.
Cultivation:PlantingDetail

How to Plant Common basil 'African Blue'?

Cultivation:PlantingDetail
Common basil 'African Blue' is generally sown in spring and fall, and the best time for sowing is a sunny morning. The soil can be exposed to sunlight before sowing to kill harmful microorganisms in the soil. Select plump, pest-free seeds, spread them evenly in the soil, cover them with a layer of 5 mm thick soil, and spray water gently. If you worry about uneven sowing, you can mix the seeds with fine soil in advance and then spread them in the garden.
The best temperature for sowing common basil 'African Blue' is about 20 ℃, and the seedlings are expected to grow in 4-5 days. When they grow 1-2 leaves, poor or excessively dense seedlings may be removed, and the spacing of seedlings set to about 3 to 4 cm. When 8-10 leaves grow out on one plant, the plant can be transplanted. Keep plants spaced to about 25 cm apart.
Cultivation:HarvestDetail

How to Harvest Common basil 'African Blue'?

Cultivation:HarvestDetail
Common basil 'African Blue' can be used as an ornamental plant or picked as a fragrant herb to cook with at any time. Its leaves can be harvested before flowers bloom. Cut leaves with a small knife and try to avoid damaging the roots. Its leaves can be used in cold dishes or salads, or to remove the fishy taste of seafood, and dried leaves can be used as a spice. Its stem, leaves, and flowers can be harvested before blooming. They can be used to extract essential oils. It is best to harvest them at 9:00-17:00 after 2-3 consecutive sunny days. Its seeds are generally be harvested in late summer.
seasonal-tip

Seasonal Precautions

Common basil 'African Blue' is resistant to heat, so it is best to move plants indoors in winter. Common basil 'African Blue' should be properly shaded in summer; seedlings especially should not be directly exposed to strong sunlight. With hot temperatures and fast water evaporation, summer is also its most intense growing period. Use a lower concentration of liquid fertilizer in summer and fertilize more often to supplement enough nutrients and water for the plant. Smooth drainage should be ensured in summer because high humidity and poor drainage can easily cause the plant to be infected with fungus leaf spot.
care_scenes

More Info on Common Basil 'african Blue' Growth and Care

Basic Care Guide
care_pet_and_diseases

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Common basil 'African Blue' based on 10 million real cases
Brown spot
Brown spot Brown spot Brown spot
This infection can cause brown spots or patches to appear on the plant.
Solutions: In minor cases of brown spot, there isn’t any need to treat the disease. However, if much of the foliage is affected and defoliation occurs, the plant will benefit from getting rid of the infection. It is recommended to start by applying organic treatment options, working up to the more potent synthetic, chemical fungicides if necessary. Organic options won’t kill the fungus, but will prevent it from spreading. Dissolve ½ teaspoon of baking soda and one teaspoon of liquid soap in a gallon of water. Using a spray bottle, spray on tops and bottoms of leaves until the mixture drips off. Repeat every two weeks until existing spots stop enlarging and new spots no longer appear. Spray a copper-based fungicidal soap on the leaves, coating the top and bottom leaf surfaces. Reapply as directed on the product label. Copper penetrates the leaf surface and prevents germination of spores so the fungus cannot spread. Apply an all-purpose fungicide to the entire plant, following the label instructions carefully.
Learn More About the Brown spot more
Leaf deformity
Leaf deformity Leaf deformity Leaf deformity
Leaf deformities can have a variety of causes.
Solutions: Follow these steps to revive plants with abnormal leaves. Remove damaged leaves: Plants can recover from damage when given the time to do so. Remove any deformed leaves so they don't continue drawing energy from the plant. This also creates room for healthier ones to grow. Stop using herbicide: Though herbicide damage is challenging to diagnose, gardeners can potentially prevent deformed leaves by not using any and by strictly following manufacturers instructions. Spray insecticide: Prevent pests from inhabiting plant leaves by spraying with insecticide regularly and practicing good natural pest prevention techniques. Apply a balanced fertilizer: Solve nutrient deficiencies and excesses by using a well-balanced fertilizer (organic or conventional both work) before planting, and consider topdressing when signs of stress are apparent. Fix watering schedule: If plant leaves are curled downward due to too much or too little water, adjust the watering schedule so the soil is moist, but not damp. Remove infected plants: If the plant has succumbed to a viral infection, not much can be done to revive it. Remove and destroy all compromised plant material to prevent spread to other plants.
Learn More About the Leaf deformity more
Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry Aged yellow and dry Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Solutions: If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Learn More About the Aged yellow and dry more
autodiagnose

Treat and prevent plant diseases.

AI-powered plant doctor helps you diagnose plant problems in seconds.
close
Brown spot
plant poor
Brown spot
This infection can cause brown spots or patches to appear on the plant.
Overview
Overview
Discolored spots on the foliage of plants are one of the most common disease problems people observe. These spots are caused by fungal and bacterial diseases, with most infections related to a fungal pathogen.
Brown spot can occurs on all houseplants, flowering ornamentals, vegetable plants, and leaves of trees, bushes, and shrubs. No plants are resistant to it, and the problem is worse in warm, wet environments. It can occur at any point in the life stage as long as leaves are present.
Small brownish spots appear on the foliage and enlarge as the disease progresses. In severe cases, the plant or tree is weakened when the lesions interrupt photosynthesis or cause defoliation.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
In most cases, brown spot only affects a small percentage of the whole plant, appearing on a small amount of the leaves. A small infection only puts minor stress on the plant. However, if left untreated and the disease progresses over numerous seasons, it will severely impact the health and productivity of the infected specimen.
  • Sporulation begins (reproduction of the fungal spores), and tiny spots appear on leaves.
  • Placement is often random and scattered as diseases are spread through raindrops.
  • May appear on lower leaves and the interior of the plant where humidity is higher.
  • Brown spots enlarge and grow large enough to touch neighboring spots to form a more prominent blotch.
  • Leaf margins may turn yellow.
  • Tiny black dots (fruiting bodies of the fungi) appear in the dead spots.
  • Blotches grow in size until the entire leaf is brown.
  • The leaf falls off the plant.
Severe Symptoms
  • Partial or complete premature defoliation
  • Reduced growth
  • Increased susceptibility to pests and other diseases
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Brown spot, or leaf spot, is a common descriptive term given to several diseases affecting the leaves of plants and trees. Around 85% of diseases exhibiting leaf spots are due to fungus or fungus-like organisms. Sometimes brown spot is caused by a bacterial infection, or insect activity with similar symptoms.
When conditions are warm and the leaf surfaces are wet, fungal spores being transported by wind or rain land on the surface and cling to it. They do not rupture the cell walls but grow in the space between the plant plasma membrane and the plant cell wall. As the spores reproduce, they release toxins and enzymes that cause necrotic spots (i.e., dead tissue) on the leaves, allowing the fungi to consume the products released when the cells degrade.
Solutions
Solutions
In minor cases of brown spot, there isn’t any need to treat the disease. However, if much of the foliage is affected and defoliation occurs, the plant will benefit from getting rid of the infection. It is recommended to start by applying organic treatment options, working up to the more potent synthetic, chemical fungicides if necessary.
Organic options won’t kill the fungus, but will prevent it from spreading.
  1. Dissolve ½ teaspoon of baking soda and one teaspoon of liquid soap in a gallon of water. Using a spray bottle, spray on tops and bottoms of leaves until the mixture drips off. Repeat every two weeks until existing spots stop enlarging and new spots no longer appear.
  2. Spray a copper-based fungicidal soap on the leaves, coating the top and bottom leaf surfaces. Reapply as directed on the product label. Copper penetrates the leaf surface and prevents germination of spores so the fungus cannot spread.
  3. Apply an all-purpose fungicide to the entire plant, following the label instructions carefully.
Prevention
Prevention
Like many other diseases, it is easier to prevent brown spot than cure it, and this is done through cultural practices.
  • Clear fall leaves from the ground before winter to minimize places where fungi and bacteria can overwinter.
  • Maintain good air movement between plants through proper plant spacing.
  • Increase air circulation through the center of plants through pruning.
  • Thoroughly clean all pruning tools after working with diseased plants.
  • Never dispose of disease plant material in a compost pile.
  • Avoid overhead watering to keep moisture off of the foliage.
  • Keep plants healthy by providing adequate sunlight, water, and fertilizer.
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Leaf deformity
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Leaf deformity
Leaf deformities can have a variety of causes.
Overview
Overview
Leaf deformity manifests in the form of curled, cupped, or distorted leaves, often first seen in the spring. There are a number of different possibilities as to the cause and it will not always be easy to isolate the problem without laboratory analysis. In the majority of cases, however, the gardener should be able to isolate the cause through close examination of the plant and the local conditions.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The plant has developed abnormal leaves. They may look similar to leaf curl, but show other problems such as:
  • stunting
  • abnormal shapes
  • a bumpy texture
  • gaps between leaf sections
  • raised growths on the top surface
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The causes are widespread and varied and the gardener will need to examine plants carefully as well as consider environmental factors.
Disease due to insect damage: Mites, aphids, and other insects that feast on plant leaves can leave them vulnerable to viral and bacterial disease. Some, like leaf galls and rust, produce distorted leaves. If the gardener sees insects on the plants, it is likely the insect is the culprit. Some mites are too small to see, and laboratory analysis may be required.
Herbicide exposure: Herbicides can stress plant leaves. This may lead to stunted growth and a curling, cupped appearance. Even if the plant owner didn't apply herbicides, herbicide drift and planting in contaminated soils can expose plants to these chemicals. If all plants in an area have deformed leaves, the cause is likely herbicides. Herbicide exposure is also characterized by narrow new leaves.
Less than ideal growing conditions: If plants are exposed to cold temperatures right as their leaves are coming out of the bud, they might become stunted and malformed. If deformed leaves occur right after a cold spell or frost, this is likely the cause. Too much and too little water can also cause deformed leaves. Leaves curling down but not distorting is more likely to be a watering issue than a leaf deformity.
Nutrient deficiencies: A lack of critical nutrients during the growing phase, including boron, calcium, and molybdenum, may lead plant leaves to grow stunted or disfigured. If a nutrient deficiency is to blame, the leaves will also show discoloring.
Fungal infections: a variety of fungal pathogens can distort leaves, as is the case with Peach leaf curl.
Solutions
Solutions
Follow these steps to revive plants with abnormal leaves.
  1. Remove damaged leaves: Plants can recover from damage when given the time to do so. Remove any deformed leaves so they don't continue drawing energy from the plant. This also creates room for healthier ones to grow.
  2. Stop using herbicide: Though herbicide damage is challenging to diagnose, gardeners can potentially prevent deformed leaves by not using any and by strictly following manufacturers instructions.
  3. Spray insecticide: Prevent pests from inhabiting plant leaves by spraying with insecticide regularly and practicing good natural pest prevention techniques.
  4. Apply a balanced fertilizer: Solve nutrient deficiencies and excesses by using a well-balanced fertilizer (organic or conventional both work) before planting, and consider topdressing when signs of stress are apparent.
  5. Fix watering schedule: If plant leaves are curled downward due to too much or too little water, adjust the watering schedule so the soil is moist, but not damp.
  6. Remove infected plants: If the plant has succumbed to a viral infection, not much can be done to revive it. Remove and destroy all compromised plant material to prevent spread to other plants.
Prevention
Prevention
  1. Fertilize properly. Keep your plants full of essential nutrients with a balanced fertilizer.
  2. Regularly monitor for pests. Remove all pests by hand or treat them with an insecticide. Early discovery and treatment will prevent the spread of pests and diseases.
  3. Provide the proper amount of water. Water until the soil is moist, but not damp. Only once the soil dries out, should the plant be watered again.
  4. Protect plants from cold. Bring plants indoors or protect them with frost cloth when bad weather is forecast.
  5. Avoid herbicide exposure. If the gardener or surrounding neighbors are applying herbicides, consider moving vulnerable plants to where they are less exposed to any chemicals that may be carried on the wind.
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Aged yellow and dry
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Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Overview
Overview
Regardless of the type of plant or where it is grown, at some point, it will begin to aged yellow and dry. This is a natural, unavoidable process that happens when the plant has completed all of the steps in its life.
Annual plants go through this process at the end of a single growing season. Perennial plants live for multiple years, if not tens or hundreds of years, but will still ultimately exhibit these symptoms.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
When plants have progressed through their natural developmental stages and are nearing the end of their lifecycle, they begin showing signs of decline. Leaves will start to yellow and droop, and over time they turn papery brown and dry.
Once completely dry, the leaves begin to fall from the plant until the entire plant has dried out.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
At the end of its life, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence or natural aging and death. Cell division stops, and the plant begins catabolizing resources to use in other parts of the plant.
As this happens, the tissues begin yellow and drying until the entire plant is desiccated and perishes.
Solutions
Solutions
If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Prevention
Prevention
Unfortunately, there is no way to prevent plants from dying of “old age.” To help prolong their life, and put off symptoms of aged yellow and dry for as long as possible, take care of them by giving them enough water, fertilizing them appropriately, and making sure they get enough sunlight.
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More About Common Basil 'african Blue'

Plant Type
Plant Type
Herb
Lifespan
Lifespan
Annual
Spread
Spread
50 cm
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Summer
Flower Color
Flower Color
Pink
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green
Silver
Purple
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Common Problems

Why do the leaves turn yellow or wither?

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There are many reasons for yellowing leaves. Leaves turn yellow if the temperature is lower than 13 ℃. Therefore, it is best to move plants inside in winter if the ambient temperature is too low. If the soil is dry for a long time or the soil is poorly drained, diseases may result. Keep soil moist and well-drained. If they don't get enough sunlight, plants can't produce enough energy through photosynthesis, and leaves turn yellow or wither. Your plant should be exposed to 6 or more hours of sunlight. It is also possible that insufficient soil fertility causes the leaves to turn yellow or wither, and a suitable amount of organic fertilizer can be applied to improve the plant's condition.

Why do the leaf tips wither?

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Leaf tips can wither from insufficient water or sunlight. The flowerpot may be changed and the water amount should be well controlled. Lighting should be adjusted in summer and winter to avoid blazing sunlight in summer and ensure sufficient sunlight in winter.

Why do the leaves curl and shrink?

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If the plant cannot obtain sufficient water, leaves shrink due to water shortage, so you must control how much water it gets. It is also possible that the root got damaged during a flowerpot change. The plant absorbs water from the soil through the root, so the root damage can cause water shortage. It will take some time for the plant to recover in such a case. It may also be affected by insects, such as aphids, which feed on the sap in the plant, causing the young leaves to curl and shrink. Insects can be washed away with water and/or special pesticides applied.

Why doesn't the plant have an aroma, or only a light aroma?

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The aromas of common basil 'African Blue' vary from variety to variety, just like that of the lilac flower. Some aromas are slightly peppermint, slightly sweet, or slightly spicy. Light aromas may be caused by insufficient sunlight or fertilizer. The average time of daily sunlight exposure should be above 4 hours and slow-release fertilizer should be added.

Why doesn't it ever bloom?

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Insufficiency of sunlight or fertilizer can keep a plant from blooming. Put the plant in a bright, ventilated place, and apply a proper amount of nutrient solution each time you water. It may also be due to the long-term use of tap water with high mineral salts, so it is recommended to water with rainwater or distilled water instead of tap water.

Why do the roots of common basil 'African Blue' rot?

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Common basil 'African Blue' is a deep-rooted plant; roots grow up to 51 to 102 cm long. Therefore, the size and depth of the flowerpot must be considerable. In addition, the growth of the root is closely related to the quality of soil, so poor drainage, permeability, and improper watering can cause the roots to rot. Sandy loam, or soil with good drainage and permeability, is preferred. Water more in summer and less in winter.
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Lighting
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Indoor
Indoor
Outdoor
Choose a site here for personalized care tips.
Requirements
Full sun
Ideal
Above 6 hours sunlight
Partial sun
Tolerance
About 3-6 hours sunlight
Watch how sunlight gracefully moves through your garden, and choose spots that provide the perfect balance of light and shade for your plants, ensuring their happiness.
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Temperature
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Indoor
Outdoor
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Requirements
Ideal
Tolerable
Unsuitable
Just like people, each plant has its own preferences. Learn about your plants' temperature needs and create a comforting environment for them to flourish. As you care for your plants, your bond with them will deepen. Trust your intuition as you learn about their temperature needs, celebrating the journey you share. Lovingly monitor the temperature around your plants and adjust their environment as needed. A thermometer can be your ally in this heartfelt endeavor. Be patient and gentle with yourself as you explore your plants' temperature needs. Cherish your successes, learn from challenges, and nurture your garden with love, creating a haven that reflects the warmth of your care.
Discover care info about seasonal tips, plant diseases, and more?
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