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About
care_advanced_guide care_advanced_guide
Advanced Care
care_scenes care_scenes
More About How-Tos
care_seasonal_tips care_seasonal_tips
Seasonal Tips
care_pet_and_diseases care_pet_and_diseases
Pests & Diseases
care_more_info care_more_info
More Info

How to Care for Jaboticaba Tree

Jaboticaba tree (Plinia cauliflora) is native to Brazil and related species are found throughout South American countries. In its native range, the fruit is often cultivated for culinary purposes. The tree’s flowers grow directly from the trunk where they then develop into purplish-black berries that can be eaten raw, used in jams, or fermented into wine and liqueurs.
Water
Water
Every 1-2 weeks
Sunlight
Sunlight
Full sun
Jaboticaba tree
Jaboticaba tree
Jaboticaba tree
Jaboticaba tree
Jaboticaba tree
care_advanced_guide

Advanced Care Guide

PlantCare:TransplantSummary

How to Transplant Jaboticaba tree?

The ideal season to transplant jaboticaba tree is between late summer and early fall (S3-S5), as soil conditions promote optimal root establishment. Ensure a sunny, well-drained location for the plant. While transplanting, handle with care to minimize root disturbance.
PlantCare:TransplantSummary
care_scenes

More Info on Jaboticaba Tree Growth and Care

Basic Care Guide
Explore More
Lighting
Full sun
The jaboticaba tree cherishes an abundance of daylight for healthy growth. Its origin habitat typifies regions of open, unobstructed light, hence its need for optimum exposure. Over or underexposure could impair its vitality, signaling sparse foliage or attenuated blossoming respectively. Each growth stage demands a similar sun-engagement.
Best Sunlight Practices
Temperature
5 43 ℃
Jaboticaba tree is originally from a native environment with a temperature range from 68 to 100 °F (20 to 38 ℃). It prefers warmer temperatures and may need seasonal adjustment in colder areas.
Temp for Healthy Growth
Transplant
3-5 feet
The ideal season to transplant jaboticaba tree is between late summer and early fall (S3-S5), as soil conditions promote optimal root establishment. Ensure a sunny, well-drained location for the plant. While transplanting, handle with care to minimize root disturbance.
Transplant Techniques
Overwinter
20 ℃
Jaboticaba tree originates from the tropical climate of Brazil where winters are mild. It thrives in zones 10b-11 and shows some frost resistance, with young plants being more susceptible. During winter, gardeners should ensure jaboticaba tree is well-watered, but not waterlogged. Relocate potted plants indoors if possible or protect with a frost cloth. Check regularly for pests or disease signs as winter stress can make jaboticaba tree more vulnerable.
Winter Techniques
Feng shui direction
Southwest
The jaboticaba tree tree, in Feng Shui, is often seen as a symbol of prosperity and resilience. Owing to its robust nature and ability to produce fruitful yields, it resonates well when placed in the Southwest direction. This placement harmonizes with the Earth element of this direction, particularly bolstering wealth and relationship luck. Remember, though, that Feng Shui remains a subjective art, with interpretations and recommendations varying across different schools and practitioners.
Fengshui Details
care_seasonal_tips

Seasonal Care Tips

more

Spring

more

Summer

more

Fall

more

Winter

Tropical plants like your plant require some care in the spring.

more
1
Early spring is the ideal time to remove any overgrowth and dead vines or branches.
more
2
A monthly application of diluted all-purpose liquid fertilizer will encourage healthy growth and blooming. Make sure to apply the fertilizer before buds start appearing.
more
3
Water whenever the top layer of soil is beginning to dry out.
more
4
Move any container plants to a sunny location to strengthen growth.
more
5
Carefully prune older, new growth for propagation. Coating the cutting in rooting hormone will help establish the new plant.

To encourage flowering or fruiting, the plant requires some care.

more
1
Ensure the plant is receiving plenty of sunlight.
more
2
Keep an eye out for diseases and pests in the summer.
more
3
Watering frequency may also need increasing, depending on the amount of weekly rainfall.
more
4
Continue fertilizing once or twice a month to support flowering or fruiting.
more
5
Container plants receiving more than six or so hours of sunlight a day may require relocating to a partially shady location.
more
6
New plants can be propagated from root or stem shoots. Carefully remove the cutting, coat in a rotting hormone powder, and plant in a container.

While your plant is growing in the fall, continue the monthly fertilization and make sure the plant receives the water and misting it needs to thrive.

more
1
Keep the soil moist, watering whenever the soil becomes dry, and fertilize the plant monthly with a diluted, liquid, all-purpose fertilizer.
more
2
Make sure your plant continues to take in bright sunlight through this season, which will help promote growth throughout the season.
more
3
To propagate the plant, you can take cuttings at this time and repot them.
more
4
Continue to watch out for pests and diseases, such as scales and mealybugs.

Continue to care for your plant during winter, even though it won’t need as much attention as during the months of active growth.

more
1
Keep this plant indoors in freezing winter climates to best protect it and allow it to regrow during the spring.
more
2
During the winter, your plant isn't greedy for water, but does require bright light. You can reduce watering to a minimum during this time.
more
3
Keep the plant in bright sunlight even during the winter. Avoid feeding the plant during this restful season. Other than giving it some cold protection and sunlight, you can almost leave the plant to itself.
care_pet_and_diseases

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Jaboticaba tree based on 10 million real cases
Longhorn beetles
Longhorn beetles Longhorn beetles
Longhorn beetles
The longhorn beetle is a medium- to large-sized insect with very long antennae and strong jaws. Both its adult and larval stages gnaw on tree trunks, leaving small, round holes.
Solutions: Some longhorn beetles species are native insects, and they cause little damage. Therefore, these don't warrant control. Other longhorn beetles species are invasive pests that were recently introduced from other areas. These species can cause a great deal of damage to hardwood trees. Apply an insecticide containing imidacloprid as a soil injection or trunk injection following product instructions. This will enter into new grow and kill adults who feed on foliage. This will not help save trees that are already infested with large amounts of larvae, but it will save trees located near an infested tree. Contact an arborist for best control practices regarding infected trees. To properly control longhorn beetles, all host plants in a given area must be treated. Contact a local extension agent or state agency. Tracking the spread of longhorn beetles is a key component of their control.
Crown gall
Crown gall Crown gall
Crown gall
Bacterial infections can cause abnormal brown or black growths on the trunk of the tree. These are also called crown galls.
Solutions: Remove infected tissue. Established trees can survive a crown gall infection, but the galls should be removed to improve the plant's appearance. Use pruning shears to remove the gall, then treat the wound with a pruning sealer. Discard pruned material by putting it in the trash or burning it to avoid infecting other plants. Sterilize the pruning shears after removing the galls. Remove the entire plant. If a small plant is infected with a serious case of crown gall, the best option is to remove the entire plant and burn it. This will prevent bacteria from spreading to other plants. Sterilize the soil. After removing infected tissue, sterilize the soil using heat. Alternatively, plant a gall-resistant plant in the same spot.
Fruit mold
Fruit mold Fruit mold
Fruit mold
Fungal infections can cause mold to grow on the surface of the fruit and may also cause decay.
Solutions: There are some relatively easy steps to stop the spread of fruit mold, but swift action must be taken. Prune away infected fruits or flowers. As soon as lesions or fuzz are seen, cut away the infected parts and dispose of them. Do not compost. Apply fungicide to plants with mild infections (those with severe infections may need to be destroyed). Increase airflow. Since spores are mainly wind born, increasing the airflow around your plants will make them less susceptible to infection. Maintain maximum space between plants and open branch structures during the pruning season.
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AI-powered plant doctor helps you diagnose plant problems in seconds.
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Longhorn beetles
plant poor
Longhorn beetles
The longhorn beetle is a medium- to large-sized insect with very long antennae and strong jaws. Both its adult and larval stages gnaw on tree trunks, leaving small, round holes.
Overview
Overview
Longhorn beetles are characterized by extremely long antennae which are often as long as, or longer, than the beetle's body. Adult longhorn beetles vary in size, shape, and coloration, depending upon the species. They may be 6 to 76 mm long. The larvae are worm-like with a wrinkled, white to yellowish body and a brown head.
Longhorn beetles are active throughout the year, but adults are most active in the summer and fall. Larvae feed on wood throughout the year.
Both larvae and adults feed on woody tissue. Some of the most susceptible species include ash, birch, elm, poplar, and willow.
If left untreated, longhorn beetles can kill trees.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Longhorn beetles are attracted to wounded, dying, or freshly-cut hardwood trees. Adults lay their eggs in the spring, summer, and fall on the bark of greenwood. There may be sap around egg-laying sites.
Once the eggs hatch, larvae called round-headed borers burrow into the trunk to feed. They may tunnel for one to three years depending on the wood's nutritional content. As the larvae feed, they release sawdust-like frass at the base of the tree.
Eventually, the larvae turn into pupae and then adults. When the adults emerge, they leave 1 cm holes in the bark on their way out. Adults feed on leaves, bark, and shoots of trees before laying eggs.
After a few years of being fed upon by longhorn beetles, a tree will begin losing leaves. Eventually, it will die.
Solutions
Solutions
Some longhorn beetles species are native insects, and they cause little damage. Therefore, these don't warrant control.
Other longhorn beetles species are invasive pests that were recently introduced from other areas. These species can cause a great deal of damage to hardwood trees.
  • Apply an insecticide containing imidacloprid as a soil injection or trunk injection following product instructions. This will enter into new grow and kill adults who feed on foliage. This will not help save trees that are already infested with large amounts of larvae, but it will save trees located near an infested tree.
  • Contact an arborist for best control practices regarding infected trees.
  • To properly control longhorn beetles, all host plants in a given area must be treated.
  • Contact a local extension agent or state agency. Tracking the spread of longhorn beetles is a key component of their control.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
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qrcode
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Crown gall
plant poor
Crown gall
Bacterial infections can cause abnormal brown or black growths on the trunk of the tree. These are also called crown galls.
Overview
Overview
Crown gall is a bacterial disease that affects many different species of shrubs. It produces unsightly growths called galls on stems, branches, and roots. These galls stunt the growth of plants and weaken them. This is because they disrupt the flow of water and nutrients from the roots up to other areas of the plant.
Crown gall growth is generally more rapid during warm weather. There are no chemical solutions available that will kill this disease. The presence of galls does not usually cause the death of a plant, however. These galls can easily be spread to other plants through contaminated tools or soil.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Crown gall is most often seen on lower branches. This disease appears as deformed growths on stems, branches, or roots that gradually enlarge over time.
As the galls enlarge, they become hard and woody. Their appearance is usually brown and corky. The plant will show symptoms of stunted growth and there may be evidence of tip dieback.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Crown gall is caused by the bacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens. This bacteria lives in the soil, and can survive there for many years. It is spread onto the plant by water splashing up from contaminated soil. Infected pruning tools can also spread the disease onto plants.
The bacteria enter the plant through open wounds. These could be caused by chewing insects or damage from gardening tools such as lawnmowers. Pruning cuts that have not been treated can also be infected by this bacterial disease.
Once the bacteria have entered the plant, they stimulate rapid growth in plant cells, and this is what causes the abnormal growths.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
qrcode
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
Fruit mold
plant poor
Fruit mold
Fungal infections can cause mold to grow on the surface of the fruit and may also cause decay.
Overview
Overview
Fruit mold is the result of fungal infection by one or more of a wide variety of fungal species. Favoring damp and cool conditions, this problem can have a devastating effect on most fruit crops as it tends to occur just when fruit are reaching maturity. Once mold establishes itself, the fruit quickly decays and becomes inedible. The fungus is capable of spreading quickly to other fruit, either or the same plant or on neighboring plants.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Symptoms tend to be obvious but are quick to develop.
  1. Brown lesions form on the fruit and occasionally the blossoms. These lesions become soft, mushy, and develop a fuzzy gray or brown coating.
  2. The infection will very quickly spread to any fruit in contact with those that are infected.
  3. Fruit may drop or remain on the plant and mummify over time.
  4. Infection may spread to leaves and new branches, eventually leading to demise of the entire plant .
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
This condition is caused by one of a number of fungal species which all follow a similar cycle. Spores remain dormant on dead plant material over the winter months and then emerge during the spring when they are carried by the wind or insect vectors to the host plant. Once they land on a plant, often facilitated by damp conditions, the spores will gain entry and breed (sporulate) rapidly. Entry to the plant is often through damage caused by sap-sucking insects.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
qrcode
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
care_more_info

More About Jaboticaba Tree

Plant Type
Plant Type
Tree
Lifespan
Lifespan
Perennial
Spread
Spread
2.5 m
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Spring, Winter
Flower Color
Flower Color
White
Yellow
Green
Brown
Plant Height
Plant Height
3 to 8 m
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About
Advanced Care
More About How-Tos
Seasonal Tips
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More Info
Jaboticaba tree
Jaboticaba tree
Jaboticaba tree
Jaboticaba tree
Jaboticaba tree

How to Care for Jaboticaba Tree

Jaboticaba tree (Plinia cauliflora) is native to Brazil and related species are found throughout South American countries. In its native range, the fruit is often cultivated for culinary purposes. The tree’s flowers grow directly from the trunk where they then develop into purplish-black berries that can be eaten raw, used in jams, or fermented into wine and liqueurs.
Water
Every 1-2 weeks
Water
Sunlight
Full sun
Sunlight Sunlight detail
care_advanced_guide

Advanced Care Guide

PlantCare:TransplantSummary

How to Transplant Jaboticaba tree?

PlantCare:TransplantSummary
The ideal season to transplant jaboticaba tree is between late summer and early fall (S3-S5), as soil conditions promote optimal root establishment. Ensure a sunny, well-drained location for the plant. While transplanting, handle with care to minimize root disturbance.
care_seasonal_tips

Seasonal Care Tips

more

Spring

more

Summer

more

Fall

more

Winter

Tropical plants like your plant require some care in the spring.

more
1
Early spring is the ideal time to remove any overgrowth and dead vines or branches.
more
2
A monthly application of diluted all-purpose liquid fertilizer will encourage healthy growth and blooming. Make sure to apply the fertilizer before buds start appearing.
more
3
Water whenever the top layer of soil is beginning to dry out.
more
4
Move any container plants to a sunny location to strengthen growth.
more
5
Carefully prune older, new growth for propagation. Coating the cutting in rooting hormone will help establish the new plant.

To encourage flowering or fruiting, the plant requires some care.

more
1
Ensure the plant is receiving plenty of sunlight.
more
2
Keep an eye out for diseases and pests in the summer.
more
3
Watering frequency may also need increasing, depending on the amount of weekly rainfall.
more
4
Continue fertilizing once or twice a month to support flowering or fruiting.
more
5
Container plants receiving more than six or so hours of sunlight a day may require relocating to a partially shady location.
more
6
New plants can be propagated from root or stem shoots. Carefully remove the cutting, coat in a rotting hormone powder, and plant in a container.

While your plant is growing in the fall, continue the monthly fertilization and make sure the plant receives the water and misting it needs to thrive.

more
1
Keep the soil moist, watering whenever the soil becomes dry, and fertilize the plant monthly with a diluted, liquid, all-purpose fertilizer.
more
2
Make sure your plant continues to take in bright sunlight through this season, which will help promote growth throughout the season.
more
3
To propagate the plant, you can take cuttings at this time and repot them.
more
4
Continue to watch out for pests and diseases, such as scales and mealybugs.

Continue to care for your plant during winter, even though it won’t need as much attention as during the months of active growth.

more
1
Keep this plant indoors in freezing winter climates to best protect it and allow it to regrow during the spring.
more
2
During the winter, your plant isn't greedy for water, but does require bright light. You can reduce watering to a minimum during this time.
more
3
Keep the plant in bright sunlight even during the winter. Avoid feeding the plant during this restful season. Other than giving it some cold protection and sunlight, you can almost leave the plant to itself.
care_pet_and_diseases

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Jaboticaba tree based on 10 million real cases
Longhorn beetles
Longhorn beetles Longhorn beetles Longhorn beetles
The longhorn beetle is a medium- to large-sized insect with very long antennae and strong jaws. Both its adult and larval stages gnaw on tree trunks, leaving small, round holes.
Solutions: Some longhorn beetles species are native insects, and they cause little damage. Therefore, these don't warrant control. Other longhorn beetles species are invasive pests that were recently introduced from other areas. These species can cause a great deal of damage to hardwood trees. Apply an insecticide containing imidacloprid as a soil injection or trunk injection following product instructions. This will enter into new grow and kill adults who feed on foliage. This will not help save trees that are already infested with large amounts of larvae, but it will save trees located near an infested tree. Contact an arborist for best control practices regarding infected trees. To properly control longhorn beetles, all host plants in a given area must be treated. Contact a local extension agent or state agency. Tracking the spread of longhorn beetles is a key component of their control.
Learn More About the Longhorn beetles more
Crown gall
Crown gall Crown gall Crown gall
Bacterial infections can cause abnormal brown or black growths on the trunk of the tree. These are also called crown galls.
Solutions: Remove infected tissue. Established trees can survive a crown gall infection, but the galls should be removed to improve the plant's appearance. Use pruning shears to remove the gall, then treat the wound with a pruning sealer. Discard pruned material by putting it in the trash or burning it to avoid infecting other plants. Sterilize the pruning shears after removing the galls. Remove the entire plant. If a small plant is infected with a serious case of crown gall, the best option is to remove the entire plant and burn it. This will prevent bacteria from spreading to other plants. Sterilize the soil. After removing infected tissue, sterilize the soil using heat. Alternatively, plant a gall-resistant plant in the same spot.
Learn More About the Crown gall more
Fruit mold
Fruit mold Fruit mold Fruit mold
Fungal infections can cause mold to grow on the surface of the fruit and may also cause decay.
Solutions: There are some relatively easy steps to stop the spread of fruit mold, but swift action must be taken. Prune away infected fruits or flowers. As soon as lesions or fuzz are seen, cut away the infected parts and dispose of them. Do not compost. Apply fungicide to plants with mild infections (those with severe infections may need to be destroyed). Increase airflow. Since spores are mainly wind born, increasing the airflow around your plants will make them less susceptible to infection. Maintain maximum space between plants and open branch structures during the pruning season.
Learn More About the Fruit mold more
autodiagnose

Treat and prevent plant diseases.

AI-powered plant doctor helps you diagnose plant problems in seconds.
close
Longhorn beetles
plant poor
Longhorn beetles
The longhorn beetle is a medium- to large-sized insect with very long antennae and strong jaws. Both its adult and larval stages gnaw on tree trunks, leaving small, round holes.
Overview
Overview
Longhorn beetles are characterized by extremely long antennae which are often as long as, or longer, than the beetle's body. Adult longhorn beetles vary in size, shape, and coloration, depending upon the species. They may be 6 to 76 mm long. The larvae are worm-like with a wrinkled, white to yellowish body and a brown head.
Longhorn beetles are active throughout the year, but adults are most active in the summer and fall. Larvae feed on wood throughout the year.
Both larvae and adults feed on woody tissue. Some of the most susceptible species include ash, birch, elm, poplar, and willow.
If left untreated, longhorn beetles can kill trees.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Longhorn beetles are attracted to wounded, dying, or freshly-cut hardwood trees. Adults lay their eggs in the spring, summer, and fall on the bark of greenwood. There may be sap around egg-laying sites.
Once the eggs hatch, larvae called round-headed borers burrow into the trunk to feed. They may tunnel for one to three years depending on the wood's nutritional content. As the larvae feed, they release sawdust-like frass at the base of the tree.
Eventually, the larvae turn into pupae and then adults. When the adults emerge, they leave 1 cm holes in the bark on their way out. Adults feed on leaves, bark, and shoots of trees before laying eggs.
After a few years of being fed upon by longhorn beetles, a tree will begin losing leaves. Eventually, it will die.
Solutions
Solutions
Some longhorn beetles species are native insects, and they cause little damage. Therefore, these don't warrant control.
Other longhorn beetles species are invasive pests that were recently introduced from other areas. These species can cause a great deal of damage to hardwood trees.
  • Apply an insecticide containing imidacloprid as a soil injection or trunk injection following product instructions. This will enter into new grow and kill adults who feed on foliage. This will not help save trees that are already infested with large amounts of larvae, but it will save trees located near an infested tree.
  • Contact an arborist for best control practices regarding infected trees.
  • To properly control longhorn beetles, all host plants in a given area must be treated.
  • Contact a local extension agent or state agency. Tracking the spread of longhorn beetles is a key component of their control.
Prevention
Prevention
  • Keeping trees healthy, uninjured, and unstressed will help prevent beetle infestation. Water trees appropriately, giving neither too much nor too little.
  • Check with local tree companies about which tree species have fewer problems.
  • Avoid moving firewood as this can introduce exotic longhorn beetles.
  • Routine spraying of persistent, broad-spectrum insecticides will help prevent re-infestation of previously affected trees or infestation of unaffected trees.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
close
Crown gall
plant poor
Crown gall
Bacterial infections can cause abnormal brown or black growths on the trunk of the tree. These are also called crown galls.
Overview
Overview
Crown gall is a bacterial disease that affects many different species of shrubs. It produces unsightly growths called galls on stems, branches, and roots. These galls stunt the growth of plants and weaken them. This is because they disrupt the flow of water and nutrients from the roots up to other areas of the plant.
Crown gall growth is generally more rapid during warm weather. There are no chemical solutions available that will kill this disease. The presence of galls does not usually cause the death of a plant, however. These galls can easily be spread to other plants through contaminated tools or soil.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Crown gall is most often seen on lower branches. This disease appears as deformed growths on stems, branches, or roots that gradually enlarge over time.
As the galls enlarge, they become hard and woody. Their appearance is usually brown and corky. The plant will show symptoms of stunted growth and there may be evidence of tip dieback.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Crown gall is caused by the bacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens. This bacteria lives in the soil, and can survive there for many years. It is spread onto the plant by water splashing up from contaminated soil. Infected pruning tools can also spread the disease onto plants.
The bacteria enter the plant through open wounds. These could be caused by chewing insects or damage from gardening tools such as lawnmowers. Pruning cuts that have not been treated can also be infected by this bacterial disease.
Once the bacteria have entered the plant, they stimulate rapid growth in plant cells, and this is what causes the abnormal growths.
Solutions
Solutions
  1. Remove infected tissue. Established trees can survive a crown gall infection, but the galls should be removed to improve the plant's appearance. Use pruning shears to remove the gall, then treat the wound with a pruning sealer. Discard pruned material by putting it in the trash or burning it to avoid infecting other plants. Sterilize the pruning shears after removing the galls.
  2. Remove the entire plant. If a small plant is infected with a serious case of crown gall, the best option is to remove the entire plant and burn it. This will prevent bacteria from spreading to other plants.
  3. Sterilize the soil. After removing infected tissue, sterilize the soil using heat. Alternatively, plant a gall-resistant plant in the same spot.
Prevention
Prevention
To prevent crown gall, avoid introducing and spreading the bacteria that causes it.
  1. Avoid infected plants. Inspect all new plants for symptoms. Dispose of any plants that show signs of crown gall.
  2. Sanitize pruning tools. Use an approved sanitizing solution to treat pruning shears both before and after use. A freshly-mixed solution of 1 part bleach to 9 parts water will be most effective.
  3. Avoid mounding soil around the crown of the plant, keeping this area as dry as possible. Remove dead branches and leaves to prevent the occurrence of pests and diseases.
  4. Utilize beneficial bacteria. The beneficial bacterium Agrobacterium radiobacter strain 84 can be used during planting to prevent crown gall. To use, simply dip bare-rooted plants in the solution, or water rooted plants with a solution of the aforementioned bacteria.
  5. Correct overly alkaline soils. Crown gall-causing bacteria thrive in alkaline soils, so check the pH level of the soil and reduce the alkalinity.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
close
Fruit mold
plant poor
Fruit mold
Fungal infections can cause mold to grow on the surface of the fruit and may also cause decay.
Overview
Overview
Fruit mold is the result of fungal infection by one or more of a wide variety of fungal species. Favoring damp and cool conditions, this problem can have a devastating effect on most fruit crops as it tends to occur just when fruit are reaching maturity. Once mold establishes itself, the fruit quickly decays and becomes inedible. The fungus is capable of spreading quickly to other fruit, either or the same plant or on neighboring plants.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Symptoms tend to be obvious but are quick to develop.
  1. Brown lesions form on the fruit and occasionally the blossoms. These lesions become soft, mushy, and develop a fuzzy gray or brown coating.
  2. The infection will very quickly spread to any fruit in contact with those that are infected.
  3. Fruit may drop or remain on the plant and mummify over time.
  4. Infection may spread to leaves and new branches, eventually leading to demise of the entire plant .
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
This condition is caused by one of a number of fungal species which all follow a similar cycle. Spores remain dormant on dead plant material over the winter months and then emerge during the spring when they are carried by the wind or insect vectors to the host plant. Once they land on a plant, often facilitated by damp conditions, the spores will gain entry and breed (sporulate) rapidly. Entry to the plant is often through damage caused by sap-sucking insects.
Solutions
Solutions
There are some relatively easy steps to stop the spread of fruit mold, but swift action must be taken.
  1. Prune away infected fruits or flowers. As soon as lesions or fuzz are seen, cut away the infected parts and dispose of them. Do not compost.
  2. Apply fungicide to plants with mild infections (those with severe infections may need to be destroyed).
  3. Increase airflow. Since spores are mainly wind born, increasing the airflow around your plants will make them less susceptible to infection. Maintain maximum space between plants and open branch structures during the pruning season.
Prevention
Prevention
There are easy, preventative steps the gardener can take to stop mold from attacking fruits and fruit-bearing plants:
  1. Rake up rotting debris when the growing season is over. Fungi can overwinter on rotting debris and reinfect plants the following season. Clear the ground beneath fruit trees and remove hanging mummified fruit.
  2. Prune off any infected branches.
  3. Burn all infected debris.
  4. Preemptively apply fungicide to susceptible plants, especially in the spring. This can help prevent infections from progressing to a stage where fruits are affected.
  5. Don't overcrowd when planting. Overcrowding will reduce air circulation, leaving plants wetter for longer and increasing the chance of infection.
  6. Use drip irrigation instead of overhead irrigation. This will help keep plant surfaces free of moisture, while still ensuring roots are getting enough water. Hose-watering should be performed early in the day, with the spray directed at the base of plants.
  7. Don't over-fertilize early in the spring. Added nutrients will increase leaf size. As leaves can hold moisture and provide a surface for spores to adhere to, this can increase the chance that mold grows on the plant. Fertilizing later in the season, when fruits are ripening, means additional nutrients will be directed towards those fruits, rather than leaves.
  8. Insect prevention measures will reduce wounds on plants and decrease access points for fungal spores.
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More About Jaboticaba Tree

Plant Type
Plant Type
Tree
Lifespan
Lifespan
Perennial
Spread
Spread
2.5 m
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Spring, Winter
Flower Color
Flower Color
White
Yellow
Green
Brown
Plant Height
Plant Height
3 to 8 m
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Lighting
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Indoor
Indoor
Outdoor
Choose a site here for personalized care tips.
Requirements
Full sun
Ideal
Above 6 hours sunlight
Watch how sunlight gracefully moves through your garden, and choose spots that provide the perfect balance of light and shade for your plants, ensuring their happiness.
Essentials
The jaboticaba tree cherishes an abundance of daylight for healthy growth. Its origin habitat typifies regions of open, unobstructed light, hence its need for optimum exposure. Over or underexposure could impair its vitality, signaling sparse foliage or attenuated blossoming respectively. Each growth stage demands a similar sun-engagement.
Preferred
Tolerable
Unsuitable
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Artificial lighting
Indoor plants require adequate lighting for optimal growth. When natural sunlight is insufficient, particularly in winter or in less sunny spaces, artificial lights offer a vital solution, promoting faster, healthier growth.
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Indoor plants require adequate lighting for optimal growth. When natural sunlight is insufficient, particularly in winter or in less sunny spaces, artificial lights offer a vital solution, promoting faster, healthier growth.
1. Choose the right type of artificial light: LED lights are a popular choice for indoor plant lighting because they can be customized to provide the specific wavelengths of light that your plants need.
Full sun plants need 30-50W/sq ft of artificial light, partial sun plants need 20-30W/sq ft, and full shade plants need 10-20W/sq ft.
2. Determine the appropriate distance: Place the light source 12-36 inches above the plant to mimic natural sunlight.
3. Determine the duration: Mimic the length of natural daylight hours for your plant species. most plants need 8-12 hours of light per day.
Important Symptoms
Insufficient light
Jaboticaba tree thrives in full sunlight but can tolerate partial shade. However, when cultivated indoors during winter, it's often placed in rooms with insufficient lighting, leading to easily noticeable symptoms of light deficiency.
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(Symptom details and solutions)
Small leaves
New leaves may grow smaller in size compared to the previous ones once they have matured.
Leggy or sparse growth
The spaces between leaves or stems of your Jaboticaba tree may become longer, resulting in a thin and stretched-out appearance. This can make the plant look sparse and weak, and it may easily break or lean due to its own weight.
Faster leaf drop
When plants are exposed to low light conditions, they tend to shed older leaves early to conserve resources. Within a limited time, these resources can be utilized to grow new leaves until the plant's energy reserves are depleted.
Slower or no new growth
Jaboticaba tree enters a survival mode when light conditions are poor, which leads to a halt in leaf production. As a result, the plant's growth becomes delayed or stops altogether.
Lighter-colored new leaves
Insufficient sunlight can cause leaves to develop irregular color patterns or appear pale. This indicates a lack of chlorophyll and essential nutrients.
Solutions
1. To ensure optimal growth, gradually move plants to a sunnier location each week, until they receive at least 6 hours of direct sunlight daily. Use a south-facing window and keep curtains open during the day for maximum sunlight exposure and nutrient accumulation.2. To provide additional light for your plant, consider using artificial light if it's large or not easily movable. Keep a desk or ceiling lamp on for at least 8 hours daily, or invest in professional plant grow lights for ample light.
Excessive light
Jaboticaba tree thrives in full sun exposure but can also tolerate partial shade. They have a remarkable resilience to intense sunlight, and symptoms of sunburn may not be easily visible.
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(Symptom details and solutions)
Chlorosis
Chlorosis is a condition where the plant's leaves lose their green color and turn yellow. This is due to the breakdown of chlorophyll from excessive sunlight, which negatively affects the plant's ability to photosynthesize.
Sunscald
Sunscald occurs when the plant's leaves or stems are damaged by intense sunlight exposure. It appears as pale, bleached, or necrotic areas on the plant tissue and can reduce the plant's overall health.
Leaf Curling
Leaf curling is a symptom where leaves curl or twist under extreme sunlight conditions. This is a defense mechanism used by the plant to reduce its surface area exposed to sunlight, minimizing water loss and damage.
Wilting
Wilting occurs when a plant loses turgor pressure and its leaves and stems begin to droop. Overexposure to sunlight can cause wilting by increasing the plant's water loss through transpiration, making it difficult for the plant to maintain adequate hydration.
Leaf Scorching
Leaf scorching is a symptom characterized by the appearance of brown, dry, and crispy edges or patches on leaves due to excessive sunlight. This can lead to a reduction in photosynthetic capacity and overall plant health.
Solutions
1. Move your plant to the optimal position where it can receive abundant sunlight but also have some shade. An east-facing window is an ideal choice as the morning sunlight is gentler. This way, your plant can enjoy ample sunlight while reducing the risk of sunburn.2. It is recommended to trim off any completely dehydrated or withered parts of the plant.
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Temperature
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Indoor
Indoor
Outdoor
Choose a site here for personalized care tips.
Requirements
Ideal
Tolerable
Unsuitable
Just like people, each plant has its own preferences. Learn about your plants' temperature needs and create a comforting environment for them to flourish. As you care for your plants, your bond with them will deepen. Trust your intuition as you learn about their temperature needs, celebrating the journey you share. Lovingly monitor the temperature around your plants and adjust their environment as needed. A thermometer can be your ally in this heartfelt endeavor. Be patient and gentle with yourself as you explore your plants' temperature needs. Cherish your successes, learn from challenges, and nurture your garden with love, creating a haven that reflects the warmth of your care.
Essentials
Jaboticaba tree is originally from a native environment with a temperature range from 68 to 100 °F (20 to 38 ℃). It prefers warmer temperatures and may need seasonal adjustment in colder areas.
Regional wintering strategies
Jaboticaba tree is extremely heat-loving, and any cold temperatures can cause harm to it. In the autumn, it is recommended to bring outdoor-grown Jaboticaba tree indoors and place it near a bright window, but it should be kept at a certain distance from heaters. Maintaining temperatures above {Suitable_growth_temperature_min} during winter is beneficial for plant growth. Any temperatures approaching {Tolerable_growing_temperature_min} are detrimental to the plant.
Important Symptoms
Low Temperature
Jaboticaba tree prefers warm temperatures and is not tolerant of low temperatures. It thrives best when the temperature is above {Suitable_growth_temperature_min}. During winter, it should be kept above {Tolerable_growing_temperature_min}. When the temperature falls below {Limit_growth_temperature}, the leaves may lighten in color. After frost damage, the color gradually turns brown or black, and symptoms such as wilting and drooping may occur.
Solutions
Trim off the frost-damaged parts. Immediately move indoors to a warm environment for cold protection. Choose a spot near a south-facing window to place the plant, ensuring ample sunlight. Additionally, avoid placing the plant near heaters or air conditioning vents to prevent excessive dryness in the air.
High Temperature
During summer, Jaboticaba tree should be kept below {Suitable_growth_temperature_max}. When the temperature exceeds {Tolerable_growing_temperature_max}, the color of the leaves becomes lighter, and the plant becomes more susceptible to sunburn.
Solutions
Trim away the sunburned and dried-up parts. Move the plant to a location that provides shade from the midday and afternoon sun. Water the plant in the morning and evening to keep the soil moist.
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Transplant
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How to Successfully Transplant Jaboticaba Tree?
The ideal season to transplant jaboticaba tree is between late summer and early fall (S3-S5), as soil conditions promote optimal root establishment. Ensure a sunny, well-drained location for the plant. While transplanting, handle with care to minimize root disturbance.
What Preparations are Needed Before Transplanting Jaboticaba Tree?
What is the Ideal Time for Transplanting Jaboticaba Tree?
The optimal season to transplant jaboticaba tree is late winter to early spring. This time allows jaboticaba tree to settle before new growth begins, facilitating better root development. Transplanting in this period benefits jaboticaba tree immensely - it gets a robust head start for spring and enjoys healthier and faster growth. Do remember, good preparation beforehand such as soil conditioning and watering can significantly enhance the transplanting success.
How Much Space Should You Leave Between Jaboticaba Tree Plants?
When transplanting your jaboticaba tree, you want to ensure it has adequate space to grow. Ideally, a distance of around 3-5 feet (0.9-1.5 meters) between each plant would promote optimal growth. This encourages proper aeration and reduces plant competition for nutrients.
What is the Best Soil Mix for Jaboticaba Tree Transplanting?
The jaboticaba tree thrives in well-draining, fertile soil. Prep your soil by mixing in compost or organic matter, which will feed your plant as it grows. A slow-release base fertilizer can be added at planting time to provide sustained nutrients.
Where Should You Relocate Your Jaboticaba Tree?
Select a location with plenty of sunlight for jaboticaba tree as it enjoys full sun. However, it can tolerate partial shade. Remember, a sunlit spot promotes healthier growth and abundant fruit production. But avoid overly hot areas, as intense heat could harm your plant.
What Equipments Should You Prepare Before Transplantation Jaboticaba Tree?
Garden Shovel
This tool will be used to remove the jaboticaba tree plant from its current location and to dig the hole in the new planting area.
Gardening Gloves
To protect your hands while working with the soil and plant. Ensure to use gloves as the jaboticaba tree has a slightly rough texture which can be uncomfortable to the touch.
Bucket/Wheelbarrow
To transfer the jaboticaba tree plant from original location to the new location.
Watering Can or Hose
To water the jaboticaba tree plant before and after transplanting.
Organic Mulch
To aid in retaining moisture and deter weeds after transplanting.
How Do You Remove Jaboticaba Tree from the Soil?
From Ground: Water the jaboticaba tree plant thoroughly a day prior to the planned transplant to help ease the removal of the plant. Then, using a garden shovel, dig a wide trench around the root ball of the plant, leaving enough room to keep the root system intact. Gently slide the shovel beneath the root ball to lift the plant. Be very careful as to not damage any roots during this process.
From Pot: Similar to the ground method, water the plant first then gently tip the pot sideways and work the plant out. Try not to pull on the stems or the trunk of the jaboticaba tree to avoid any unnecessary damage. If the plant is stuck, gently tap the sides and the bottom of the pot to loosen the root ball.
From Seedling Tray: For seedlings, make sure that the jaboticaba tree has developed a robust root system before transplanting. Use a spoon or a small garden tool to scoop out the seedling along with its roots to avoid any damage.
Step-by-Step Guide for Transplanting Jaboticaba Tree
Step1 Preparation
Using your gardening gloves, prepare the new hole for the jaboticaba tree plant. The hole should be three times the diameter of the plant root ball and the same depth as the root ball to ensure that it fits snugly.
Step2 Transfer
Very carefully, transfer the jaboticaba tree using the bucket or wheelbarrow to its new location.
Step3 Planting
Place the jaboticaba tree in the hole and backfill with the removed soil. Gently press the soil around the plant's base to remove any air pockets. The top of the root ball should be level with or slightly below ground level.
Step4 Watering
After planting, water thoroughly with the watering can or hose. This provokes the roots to expand and take hold in their new location.
Step5 Mulching
Apply a cover of organic mulch around the jaboticaba tree plant. This helps maintain moisture levels and keep down weed competition.
How Do You Care For Jaboticaba Tree After Transplanting?
Watering
The jaboticaba tree plant prefers a deep watering rather than frequent light watering. Ensure that the plant is watered thoroughly immediately after transplanting, and establish a regular watering schedule depending on the climate and season.
Pruning
Remove any damaged or dead branches to encourage a healthy growth.
Protection
As a young plant, jaboticaba tree may need protection from extreme weather conditions such as frost. In colder months, consider a frost blanket or relocating the plant if it's container-grown.
Monitoring
Keep an eye on your jaboticaba tree plant's overall health post-transplant. Look for any signs of stress or disease, and take necessary actions as soon as possible to alleviate any issues.
Troubleshooting Common Issues with Jaboticaba Tree Transplantation.
When is the best time to transplant a jaboticaba tree tree?
The ideal time to transplant jaboticaba tree trees is during the late spring to early fall ('S3-S5' seasons). This gives them the best chance to establish before winter.
What should be the ideal spacing between jaboticaba tree seedlings during transplantation?
To give your jaboticaba tree optimal room to grow, maintain a spacing of approximately 3-5 feet (around 0.9-1.5 meters) between each tree during the transplanting process.
Why are the leaves on my transplanted jaboticaba tree turning yellow?
Yellowing leaves may indicate stress, often due to lack of water or shock from transplantation. Ensure regular watering and avoid moving the tree again soon.
What size planting hole should I dig for my jaboticaba tree tree?
The hole should be twice as wide as and about as deep as the root ball. So typically 18-24 inches (45-60 cm) for a young jaboticaba tree tree is sufficient.
Is it a must to stake my newly transplanted jaboticaba tree tree?
Staking provides support to the newly transplanted jaboticaba tree, but isn't always necessary. If the tree stands upright without support, you can skip it.
Why isn't my transplanted jaboticaba tree tree showing new growth?
Transplanted jaboticaba tree may take time to establish and show new growth. Be patient, ensure consistent watering, good light and avoid transplant shock through abrupt environmental changes.
How often should I water a newly transplanted jaboticaba tree tree?
Newly transplanted jaboticaba tree trees need to be watered immediately, then once a day for the first week, then every other day for following weeks to maintain moist soil.
Can my jaboticaba tree tree be transplanted in a pot?
Jaboticaba tree can be container-grown, but remember that pot-sized confines can restrict growth. Ensure the pot is large enough, has drainage holes and use rich, well-draining soil.
Why is my jaboticaba tree tree dropping fruit after transplanting?
Dropped fruit may be due to transplant shock. The jaboticaba tree redirects energy to root and foliage growth. Regular watering and good care should help it recover.
Should I prune my jaboticaba tree tree after transplanting?
Light pruning can be done to remove dead or damaged parts. But avoid heavy pruning post-transplant as it might stress the jaboticaba tree during its recovery phase.
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