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Arctostaphylos
Arctostaphylos
Arctostaphylos
Arctostaphylos
Arctostaphylos (Arctostaphylos)
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Key Facts About Arctostaphylos

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Distribution of Arctostaphylos

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Exploring the Arctostaphylos Plants

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8 most common species:
Arctostaphylos uva-ursi
Kinnikinnick
Kinnikinnick (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi) is an intricately branching plant native to the Northern Hemisphere. This plant's blossoms have a sweet smell. The Latin name Arctostaphylos uva-ursi means 'grape of the bear,' referring to the plant's berries.
Arctostaphylos patula
Greenleaf Manzanita
Greenleaf Manzanita (Arctostaphylos patula) is an evergreen shrub commonly found at moderate to high elevations in coniferous forests in western North America. Considered drought-tolerant, it flourishes in full sun but reportedly does not tolerate salt. Does best in well-drained soil.
Arctostaphylos pungens
Pointleaf Manzanita
Pointleaf Manzanita (Arctostaphylos pungens) is a woody shrub that will grow from 91 to 305 cm tall. It is native to the western United States and is commonly found growing in medium to high elevation woodlands and chaparrals. It blooms from winter to summer with unique clusters of pink or white urn-shaped flowers.
Arctostaphylos glauca
Bigberry Manzanita
Bigberry Manzanita (Arctostaphylos glauca) can be found growing in chaparral communities and woodlands in its native California and Baja California. This large shrub can live for 100 years or more and does not start to fruit until at least age twenty. This species is dependent on wildfires for survival since its seeds only germinate after exposure to fire.
Arctostaphylos glandulosa
Eastwood's manzanita
Eastwood's manzanita is an uncommon evergreen shrub. It is small and wide, with grayish green leaves, red bark, and white flowers. It is both drought and deer-tolerant and attractive to birds and pollinators.
Arctostaphylos viscida
Whiteleaf manzanita
Whiteleaf manzanita (Arctostaphylos viscida) is a small, evergreen tree that blooms in winter and spring. Fruits are shiny red or greenish-brown. Native to the northwestern United States, it is commonly found growing in coniferous forests and chaparrals. Seeds require fire for germination. Attracts birds, hummingbirds, bees and butterflies.
Arctostaphylos bicolor
Mission manzanita
Mission manzanita (Arctostaphylos bicolor) is indigenous to the west coast of the United States. Mission manzanita produces a fruit that’s almost entirely devoid of flesh. It’s more like an enormous wooden seed than an actual fruit. Despite the lack of flesh on the seed, avian species love to feast on it. These include the scrub jay and the California thrasher.
Arctostaphylos manzanita
Big manzanita
Native to California, the big manzanita (*Arctostaphylos manzanita*) is a tall tree with beautiful curving branches. It is popular with landscape gardeners, florists, cabinetmakers – and pet parrots.Big manzanita timber makes good firewood, and the root burls are used to carve smoking pipes. Its fruits resemble small apples (“manzanita” in Spanish).

All Species of Arctostaphylos

Kinnikinnick
Arctostaphylos uva-ursi
Kinnikinnick
Kinnikinnick (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi) is an intricately branching plant native to the Northern Hemisphere. This plant's blossoms have a sweet smell. The Latin name Arctostaphylos uva-ursi means 'grape of the bear,' referring to the plant's berries.
Greenleaf Manzanita
Arctostaphylos patula
Greenleaf Manzanita
Greenleaf Manzanita (Arctostaphylos patula) is an evergreen shrub commonly found at moderate to high elevations in coniferous forests in western North America. Considered drought-tolerant, it flourishes in full sun but reportedly does not tolerate salt. Does best in well-drained soil.
Pointleaf Manzanita
Arctostaphylos pungens
Pointleaf Manzanita
Pointleaf Manzanita (Arctostaphylos pungens) is a woody shrub that will grow from 91 to 305 cm tall. It is native to the western United States and is commonly found growing in medium to high elevation woodlands and chaparrals. It blooms from winter to summer with unique clusters of pink or white urn-shaped flowers.
Bigberry Manzanita
Arctostaphylos glauca
Bigberry Manzanita
Bigberry Manzanita (Arctostaphylos glauca) can be found growing in chaparral communities and woodlands in its native California and Baja California. This large shrub can live for 100 years or more and does not start to fruit until at least age twenty. This species is dependent on wildfires for survival since its seeds only germinate after exposure to fire.
Eastwood's manzanita
Arctostaphylos glandulosa
Eastwood's manzanita
Eastwood's manzanita is an uncommon evergreen shrub. It is small and wide, with grayish green leaves, red bark, and white flowers. It is both drought and deer-tolerant and attractive to birds and pollinators.
Whiteleaf manzanita
Arctostaphylos viscida
Whiteleaf manzanita
Whiteleaf manzanita (Arctostaphylos viscida) is a small, evergreen tree that blooms in winter and spring. Fruits are shiny red or greenish-brown. Native to the northwestern United States, it is commonly found growing in coniferous forests and chaparrals. Seeds require fire for germination. Attracts birds, hummingbirds, bees and butterflies.
Mission manzanita
Arctostaphylos bicolor
Mission manzanita
Mission manzanita (Arctostaphylos bicolor) is indigenous to the west coast of the United States. Mission manzanita produces a fruit that’s almost entirely devoid of flesh. It’s more like an enormous wooden seed than an actual fruit. Despite the lack of flesh on the seed, avian species love to feast on it. These include the scrub jay and the California thrasher.
Big manzanita
Arctostaphylos manzanita
Big manzanita
Native to California, the big manzanita (*Arctostaphylos manzanita*) is a tall tree with beautiful curving branches. It is popular with landscape gardeners, florists, cabinetmakers – and pet parrots.Big manzanita timber makes good firewood, and the root burls are used to carve smoking pipes. Its fruits resemble small apples (“manzanita” in Spanish).
Alpine ptarmigan berry
Arctostaphylos alpinus
Alpine ptarmigan berry
Alpine ptarmigan berry(Arctostaphylos alpinus) is typically found growing in mountainous, alpine terrain, hence its common and Latin name. This is a woody shrub that lies along the ground instead of being held upright, growing only to about 15 cm high. Quite different from other shrubs! The berries it produces are adored by the native birds, and the plant shares a symbiotic relationship with fungi to get its nutrients.
Hairy manzanita
Arctostaphylos columbiana
Hairy manzanita
Hairy manzanita (Arctostaphylos columbiana) is a perennial evergreen shrub with fuzzy pale green foliage. It blooms from spring to summer with clusters of pinkish-white urn-shaped flowers. Bears deer and other wild animals are attracted to the bright red berries that ripen in summer.
Pinemat manzanita
Arctostaphylos nevadensis
Pinemat manzanita
The pinemat manzanita can often be found growing under hardwood trees in densely wooded areas. It produces fruit that ripens in the late summer. The pinemat manzanita prefers high-elevation environments with cold winters. It is occasionally artificially planted on mountain slopes to anchor the soil and reduce erosion.
Red fruit bearberry
Arctostaphylos rubra
Red fruit bearberry
Red fruit bearberry is a small, low-spreading shrub uniquely adapted to arctic and subarctic climates. Bearberry is named after its biggest fan, the bear. Bearberries are enjoyed by local wildlife and resemble cranberries. Written records of the plant date as far back as the 13th century.
Vine hill manzanita
Arctostaphylos densiflora
Vine hill manzanita
Arctostaphylos densiflora is a small shrub growing in low, spreading clumps under one meter in height. The shiny green leaves are oval to widely lance-shaped and less than three centimeters long. It bears inflorescences of light to bright pink urn-shaped flowers. The fruit is a drupe about half a centimeter wide.
Montara manzanita
Arctostaphylos montaraensis
Montara manzanita
Arctostaphylos montaraensis is a mounding to erect shrub that can grow to heights from 0.5 metres (on exposed granite outcrops) to 5 metres. The multiple trunks and stems have a deep reddish−brown bark. The twigs and nascent inflorescence axis are coated in glandular bristles.
Common bearberry
Arctostaphylos uva-ursi subsp. uva-ursi
Common bearberry
Also known as common bearberry, this evergreen shrub produces red berries that are enjoyed by wildlife. Look for it in rocky or sandy areas in the northern hemisphere, including the boreal forests of North America and Europe.
Ohlone manzanita
Arctostaphylos ohloneana
Ohlone manzanita
Ohlone manzanita is a rare and specialized shrub found exclusively in the sandy soils of its native habitat. It sports twisted branches bearing small, leathery leaves that are adapted to conserve water. Each spring, ohlone manzanita boasts clusters of delicate pinkish-white bell-shaped flowers, which later yield red berry-like fruits. This plant's low-growing, hardy nature is a clear testament to its resilience in a challenging ecosystem.
Pacific manzanita
Arctostaphylos pacifica
Pacific manzanita
Pacific manzanita is a hardy evergreen shrub flourishing in sandy, coastal regions. With its leathery leaves and clusters of bell-shaped pink or white flowers, pacific manzanita exudes a subtle charm. These blooms give way to red or brownish fruits that provide sustenance for local wildlife. Distinctively, pacific manzanita thrives in nutrient-poor soils, relying on a symbiotic relationship with soil fungi to survive in its challenging habitat.
Mt. diablo manzanita
Arctostaphylos auriculata
Mt. diablo manzanita
Mt. diablo manzanita boasts a graceful profile with leathery leaves and delicate, urn-shaped flowers that predominantly bloom in shades of pink and white. This perennial shrub is uniquely adapted to its native environment, often developing a deep-root system to thrive in dry, sandy soils. It features a distinctive branching pattern that provides habitat and food for local wildlife, demonstrating its integral role in the ecosystem.
Pinkbracted manzanita
Arctostaphylos pringlei
Pinkbracted manzanita
Pinkbracted manzanita is a robust, evergreen shrub found in arid, mountainous terrains. It flourishes with leathery, dark green leaves and clusters of bell-shaped, pinkish-white flowers that attract pollinators. Adapting to its harsh environment, pinkbracted manzanita has a deep root system for water scarcity and its thick foliage provides protection against intense sunlight.
Alameda manzanita
Arctostaphylos pallida
Alameda manzanita
Alameda manzanita is a rare, endangered plant that is only found in a few locations in California. Identify it by its leaves, which have stems so short that they seem to be directly attached to the branches, as well as its thick, smooth, red bark and the white flowers that appear in the winter. This plant is vulnerable to the fire-adaptation methods used to suppress wildfires in the area.
Santa catalina island manzanita
Arctostaphylos catalinae
Santa catalina island manzanita
Santa catalina island manzanita is a woody shrub native to the Channel Islands off California. It has leathery green leaves and displays clusters of lovely pink to white urn-shaped flowers, which attract local pollinators. Adapting to its island habitat, santa catalina island manzanita thrives on rocky, well-drained slopes helped by a deep root system to withstand dry conditions.
Stanford's manzanita
Arctostaphylos stanfordiana
Stanford's manzanita
Stanford's manzanita is a shrub with tough evergreen leaves and clusters of urn-shaped pink to white flowers. Recognizable by its red, peeling bark and twisted branches, it thrives in California's coastal chaparral ecosystem, adapting to dry, rocky soils. Its berries attract wildlife, contributing to ecosystem dynamics.
Island manzanita
Arctostaphylos insularis
Island manzanita
Island manzanita is a captivating evergreen shrub, native to the Channel Islands of California. It boasts a sculptural form with twisting branches and a rugged bark. Clusters of pink-tinged white flowers emerge, attracting pollinators, while its red berries nourish local wildlife. This plant’s waxy, green leaves reflect its adaptation to the dry, coastal conditions it thrives in.
Pecho manzanita
Arctostaphylos pechoensis
Pecho manzanita
Pecho manzanita is a low-growing shrub endemic to California's coastal regions, thriving in sandy soils. It features leathery, oval leaves and clusters of urn-shaped, pinkish-white flowers, which blossom in the spring, attracting pollinators. Adaptable to its arid habitat, pecho manzanita possesses a deep root system, essential for drought resilience.
Ione manzanita
Arctostaphylos myrtifolia
Ione manzanita
Ione manzanita (Arctostaphylos myrtifolia) is a rare evergreen shrub that is under threat in the wild because it needs wildfires to successfully propagate. A further threat to the plant's survival is two fungal diseases that have destroyed many stands of ione manzanita in its native Sierra Nevada foothills of California.
Bonny doon manzanita
Arctostaphylos silvicola
Bonny doon manzanita
Bonny doon manzanita is a resilient evergreen shrub native to the sandy soils of coastal California. It thrives amidst forest clearings, boasting smooth red bark and leathery green foliage. Spring witnesses a bloom of bell-shaped, white to pink flowers, which give way to red to purple berries, inviting a variety of wildlife. Bonny doon manzanita's roots harbor a symbiotic relationship with fungi, aiding its survival in nutrient-poor soils.
Fort bragg manzanita
Arctostaphylos nummularia
Fort bragg manzanita
Fort bragg manzanita is a low-growing, evergreen shrub native to the coastal regions of western North America. It boasts glossy, round leaves and clusters of pinkish-white bell-shaped flowers that flourish under the full sun. Adapting to sandy, well-drained soils, fort bragg manzanita's deep root system helps it thrive in its dune-based habitat, often binding the shifting sands together. This durable plant courageously withstands the salty conditions that others cannot, making it an ecological stronghold in its native terrain.
Santa cruz island manzanita
Arctostaphylos crustacea
Santa cruz island manzanita
Santa cruz island manzanita is a resilient evergreen shrub, renowned for its twisted branches and small, leathery leaves. This hardy species boasts clusters of pinkish-white, bell-shaped flowers that lend a delicate beauty in contrast to its rugged, flaky bark. Thriving in sandy, well-drained soils, santa cruz island manzanita is adapted to flourish within the challenging coastal conditions, often forming dense thickets that provide shelter for local wildlife.
Indian manzanita
Arctostaphylos mewukka
Indian manzanita
Indian manzanita is an important species to the Sierra Nevada, as it prevents soil erosion and helps restore vegetation after wildfires with its regenerative and durable root system. It is also popular in gardens designed to attract birds, which love the dark and tasty fruit this plant produces.
Woollyleaf manzanita
Arctostaphylos tomentosa
Woollyleaf manzanita
Woollyleaf manzanita, a woody shrub native to California's coastal regions, flaunts a textured tapestry of woolly, oval leaves. Adorned with clusters of small, bell-shaped pink to white flowers, this plant thrives on sun-bathed slopes, its deep roots embracing the gritty soil, conferring resilience against drought and fire.
Kings mountain manzanita
Arctostaphylos regismontana
Kings mountain manzanita
Kings mountain manzanita is a resilient shrub endemic to mountainous regions, with leathery green leaves that provide a stark contrast to its red-barked, twisting branches. Springtime heralds the arrival of its small, bell-shaped pink or white flowers, which in time give way to red or orange berries, a crucial food source for local wildlife. Unique for its tolerance of rocky, nutrient-poor soils, kings mountain manzanita thrives where few other plants dare to establish.
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Dracaena
Dracaena
Dracaena are popular house plants that are easy to grow. They can tolerate low-light conditions and require little watering. Their leaves range from variegated to dark green. Their characteristic traits include woody stems that grow slowly but offer a striking appearance for small spaces such as apartments or offices.
Ficus
Fig trees
Fig trees have been cultivated in many regions for their fruits, particularly the common fig, F. carica. Most of the species have edible fruits, although the common fig is the only one of commercial value. Fig trees are also important food sources for wildlife in the tropics, including monkeys, bats, and insects.
Rubus
Brambles
Brambles are members of the rose family, and there are hundreds of different types to be found throughout the European countryside. They have been culturally significant for centuries; Christian folklore stories hold that when the devil was thrown from heaven, he landed on a bramble bush. Their vigorous growth habit can tangle into native plants and take over.
Acer
Maples
The popular tree family known as maples change the color of their leaves in the fall. Many cultural traditions encourage people to watch the colors change, such as momijigari in Japan. Maples popular options for bonsai art. Alternately, their sap is used to create maple syrup.
Prunus
Prunus
Prunus is a genus of flowering fruit trees that includes almonds, cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines, and apricots. These are often known as "stone fruits" because their pits are large seeds or "stones." When prunus trees are damaged, they exhibit "gummosis," a condition in which the tree's gum (similar to sap) is secreted to the bark to help heal external wounds.
Solanum
Nightshades
Nightshades is a large and diverse genus of plants, with more than 1500 different types worldwide. This genus incorporates both important staple food crops like tomato, potato, and eggplant, but also dangerous poisonous plants from the nightshade family. The name was coined by Pliny the Elder almost two thousand years ago.
Rosa
Roses
Most species of roses are shrubs or climbing plants that have showy flowers and sharp thorns. They are commonly cultivated for cut flowers or as ornamental plants in gardens due to their attractive appearance, pleasant fragrance, and cultural significance in many countries. The rose hips (fruits) can also be used in jams and teas.
Quercus
Oaks
Oaks are among the world's longest-lived trees, sometimes growing for over 1,000 years! The oldest known oak tree is in the southern United States and is over 1,500 years old. Oaks produce an exceedingly popular type of wood which is used to make different products, from furniture and flooring to wine barrels and even cosmetic creams.
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Arctostaphylos
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Key Facts About Arctostaphylos

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Attributes of Arctostaphylos

Leaf type
Semi-evergreen
Ideal Temperature
15 - 38 ℃

Scientific Classification of Arctostaphylos

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Distribution of Arctostaphylos

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Distribution Map of Arctostaphylos

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Cultivated
Invasive
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How to Grow and Care for Arctostaphylos

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Exploring the Arctostaphylos Plants

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8 most common species:
Arctostaphylos uva-ursi
Kinnikinnick
Kinnikinnick (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi) is an intricately branching plant native to the Northern Hemisphere. This plant's blossoms have a sweet smell. The Latin name Arctostaphylos uva-ursi means 'grape of the bear,' referring to the plant's berries.
Arctostaphylos patula
Greenleaf Manzanita
Greenleaf Manzanita (Arctostaphylos patula) is an evergreen shrub commonly found at moderate to high elevations in coniferous forests in western North America. Considered drought-tolerant, it flourishes in full sun but reportedly does not tolerate salt. Does best in well-drained soil.
Arctostaphylos pungens
Pointleaf Manzanita
Pointleaf Manzanita (Arctostaphylos pungens) is a woody shrub that will grow from 91 to 305 cm tall. It is native to the western United States and is commonly found growing in medium to high elevation woodlands and chaparrals. It blooms from winter to summer with unique clusters of pink or white urn-shaped flowers.
Arctostaphylos glauca
Bigberry Manzanita
Bigberry Manzanita (Arctostaphylos glauca) can be found growing in chaparral communities and woodlands in its native California and Baja California. This large shrub can live for 100 years or more and does not start to fruit until at least age twenty. This species is dependent on wildfires for survival since its seeds only germinate after exposure to fire.
Show More Species

All Species of Arctostaphylos

popular genus

More Popular Genus

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Dracaena
Dracaena
Dracaena are popular house plants that are easy to grow. They can tolerate low-light conditions and require little watering. Their leaves range from variegated to dark green. Their characteristic traits include woody stems that grow slowly but offer a striking appearance for small spaces such as apartments or offices.
Ficus
Fig trees
Fig trees have been cultivated in many regions for their fruits, particularly the common fig, F. carica. Most of the species have edible fruits, although the common fig is the only one of commercial value. Fig trees are also important food sources for wildlife in the tropics, including monkeys, bats, and insects.
Rubus
Brambles
Brambles are members of the rose family, and there are hundreds of different types to be found throughout the European countryside. They have been culturally significant for centuries; Christian folklore stories hold that when the devil was thrown from heaven, he landed on a bramble bush. Their vigorous growth habit can tangle into native plants and take over.
Acer
Maples
The popular tree family known as maples change the color of their leaves in the fall. Many cultural traditions encourage people to watch the colors change, such as momijigari in Japan. Maples popular options for bonsai art. Alternately, their sap is used to create maple syrup.
Prunus
Prunus
Prunus is a genus of flowering fruit trees that includes almonds, cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines, and apricots. These are often known as "stone fruits" because their pits are large seeds or "stones." When prunus trees are damaged, they exhibit "gummosis," a condition in which the tree's gum (similar to sap) is secreted to the bark to help heal external wounds.
Solanum
Nightshades
Nightshades is a large and diverse genus of plants, with more than 1500 different types worldwide. This genus incorporates both important staple food crops like tomato, potato, and eggplant, but also dangerous poisonous plants from the nightshade family. The name was coined by Pliny the Elder almost two thousand years ago.
Rosa
Roses
Most species of roses are shrubs or climbing plants that have showy flowers and sharp thorns. They are commonly cultivated for cut flowers or as ornamental plants in gardens due to their attractive appearance, pleasant fragrance, and cultural significance in many countries. The rose hips (fruits) can also be used in jams and teas.
Quercus
Oaks
Oaks are among the world's longest-lived trees, sometimes growing for over 1,000 years! The oldest known oak tree is in the southern United States and is over 1,500 years old. Oaks produce an exceedingly popular type of wood which is used to make different products, from furniture and flooring to wine barrels and even cosmetic creams.
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