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Asparagus
Asparagus
Asparagus
Asparagus
Asparagus (Asparagus)
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Key Facts About Asparagus

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Distribution of Asparagus

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Distribution Map of Asparagus

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Exploring the Asparagus Plants

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8 most common species:
Asparagus aethiopicus
Sprenger's asparagus fern
Sprenger's asparagus fern (Asparagus aethiopicus) is a fern species native to South Africa. Despite its common name, this plant is not a true fern by taxonomy. Sprenger's asparagus fern is generally considered to be an invasive species. The common name was established by Carl Ludwig Sprenger who popularized cultivating sprenger's asparagus fern as an ornamental plant.
Asparagus setaceus
Common asparagus fern
Common asparagus fern is not a true fern but does resemble one. This perennial clumping herb gets its Latin name, *Asparagus setaceus*, from the Latin '*seta*', which means hair or hairy. The leaves of the common asparagus fern are often described as hairy or lacy. The flowers are greenish-white and bell-shaped.
Asparagus densiflorus
Foxtail fern
As the Latin name Asparagus densiflorus suggests, the foxtail fern is closely related to asparagus. The plumes from the foxtail fern are often prized for their use in floral arrangements due to their dense and tall plumes.
Asparagus officinalis
Garden asparagus
Garden asparagus (*Asparagus officinalis*) is a flowering plant species that undergoes photosynthesis in its stems and branch lets. Garden asparagus has a long history of cultivation for culinary and agricultural purposes. The ancient Greeks first cultivated this plant 2,500 years ago.
Asparagus asparagoides
Bridal creeper
The bridal creeper (Asparagus asparagoides) is a herbaceous climbing plant native to eastern and Southern Africa. It doesn't have true leaves; instead, it has leaf-like shiny green structures called phylloclades. The bridal creeper is commonly used in floral arrangements and bridal bouquets.
Asparagus acutifolius
Wild asparagus
Wild asparagus is an evergreen perennial plant. Its scientific name, Asparagus acutifolius, means "thorny leaves" for obvious reasons. It will produces small white flowers in late summer and small green berries that ripen in winter. Its young shoots bear many similarities to those of garden asparagus.
Asparagus scandens
Climbing asparagus
Climbing asparagus (Asparagus scandens) is grown ornamentally for its elegant fronded leaves. Its climbing nature means that it grows well on frames and trellises, or it can spread out as ground cover in its preferred shady locations. However, it has escaped cultivation to become a major weed that prevents the growth of local flora in parts of Australia and New Zealand.
Asparagus macowanii
Zulu asparagus
The zulu asparagus is a shrub with a fern-like appearance. It consists of a fleshy and tuberous root system, with flowers that are masses of dainty white used for flower arrangements. This shrub is also a favored plant of bees and butterflies. Zulu asparagus has pretty foliage that provides an accent in mixed borders.

All Species of Asparagus

Sprenger's asparagus fern
Asparagus aethiopicus
Sprenger's asparagus fern
Sprenger's asparagus fern (Asparagus aethiopicus) is a fern species native to South Africa. Despite its common name, this plant is not a true fern by taxonomy. Sprenger's asparagus fern is generally considered to be an invasive species. The common name was established by Carl Ludwig Sprenger who popularized cultivating sprenger's asparagus fern as an ornamental plant.
Common asparagus fern
Asparagus setaceus
Common asparagus fern
Common asparagus fern is not a true fern but does resemble one. This perennial clumping herb gets its Latin name, *Asparagus setaceus*, from the Latin '*seta*', which means hair or hairy. The leaves of the common asparagus fern are often described as hairy or lacy. The flowers are greenish-white and bell-shaped.
Foxtail fern
Asparagus densiflorus
Foxtail fern
As the Latin name Asparagus densiflorus suggests, the foxtail fern is closely related to asparagus. The plumes from the foxtail fern are often prized for their use in floral arrangements due to their dense and tall plumes.
Garden asparagus
Asparagus officinalis
Garden asparagus
Garden asparagus (*Asparagus officinalis*) is a flowering plant species that undergoes photosynthesis in its stems and branch lets. Garden asparagus has a long history of cultivation for culinary and agricultural purposes. The ancient Greeks first cultivated this plant 2,500 years ago.
Bridal creeper
Asparagus asparagoides
Bridal creeper
The bridal creeper (Asparagus asparagoides) is a herbaceous climbing plant native to eastern and Southern Africa. It doesn't have true leaves; instead, it has leaf-like shiny green structures called phylloclades. The bridal creeper is commonly used in floral arrangements and bridal bouquets.
Wild asparagus
Asparagus acutifolius
Wild asparagus
Wild asparagus is an evergreen perennial plant. Its scientific name, Asparagus acutifolius, means "thorny leaves" for obvious reasons. It will produces small white flowers in late summer and small green berries that ripen in winter. Its young shoots bear many similarities to those of garden asparagus.
Climbing asparagus
Asparagus scandens
Climbing asparagus
Climbing asparagus (Asparagus scandens) is grown ornamentally for its elegant fronded leaves. Its climbing nature means that it grows well on frames and trellises, or it can spread out as ground cover in its preferred shady locations. However, it has escaped cultivation to become a major weed that prevents the growth of local flora in parts of Australia and New Zealand.
Zulu asparagus
Asparagus macowanii
Zulu asparagus
The zulu asparagus is a shrub with a fern-like appearance. It consists of a fleshy and tuberous root system, with flowers that are masses of dainty white used for flower arrangements. This shrub is also a favored plant of bees and butterflies. Zulu asparagus has pretty foliage that provides an accent in mixed borders.
White asparagus
Asparagus albus
White asparagus
White asparagus is an evergreen shrub within the asparagus family. Its attractive red berries and white flower clusters make it an attractive ornamental plant. In the wild, the shrub grows in high-level scrub and hedges. It is not to be confused with cultivated asparagus.
Wild asparagus
Asparagus cochinchinensis
Wild asparagus
Wild asparagus (Asparagus cochinchinensis) is a plant native to East Asia from Japan to Vietnam to the Philippines. Its tiny white berries often grow in pairs. Though attractive, the berries are poisonous. Some portions of the plant find use as poisonous deterrents against fly and mosquito larvae.
Narrow-leaved asparagus
Asparagus tenuifolius
Narrow-leaved asparagus
Narrow-leaved asparagus is a herbaceous perennial that was first described, with its name validly published, by Jean-Baptiste Lamarck in 1783. This winter-hardy plant is often grown for its cloud-like, gorgeously dissected foliage. It is also known for its scarlet pee-sized berries in mid-summer.
Siberian asparagus
Asparagus schoberioides
Siberian asparagus
Siberian asparagus (Asparagus schoberioides) is a striking evergreen asparagus that is grown ornamentally both in its natural form and as a hybrid. Its red berries are pleasing to the eye, and can only be produced when both male and female plants are present. This wild asparagus is particularly attractive in fall when its green leaves turn yellow.
Grey asparagus
Asparagus horridus
Grey asparagus
The key feature of grey asparagus (Asparagus horridus) is right in its Latin name: "horridus" means prickly or rough, referring to the pervasive spiny leaves that cover the plant. The pale green of the leaves differentiates it from other asparagus species. Grey asparagus somewhat softens its appearance with creamy yellow flowers in the spring.
Asparagus densiftorus 'Myersii'
Asparagus densiftorus 'Myersii'
Asparagus densiftorus 'Myersii'
Noted for its upright and compact nature, the asparagus densiftorus 'Myersii' has smaller thorns than other asparagus ferns. It is believed that the common name is in honor of agricultural explorer Frank Nicholas Meyer. The asparagus densiftorus 'Myersii' is drought-resistant and easy to grow, providing texture for gardens in beds and borders.
Asparagus oligoclonos
Asparagus oligoclonos
Asparagus oligoclonos
Asparagus oligoclonos is a perennial herb with a bushy appearance, typically found in sunny, open fields. Its green, slender stems are complemented by fine, feathery foliage, resembling a delicate lacework of leaves. In its flowering season, asparagus oligoclonos produces small, inconspicuous yellow-green blooms. This species thrives in well-drained soil, and its deep root system allows for resilience during dry spells.
Fern asparagus
Asparagus filicinus
Fern asparagus
Fern asparagus is an alluring green gem boasting its finesse both in the culinary world and in landscape design. Its feathery, fern-like foliage adds a delicate flair to gardens and containers, rippling subtly in the breeze. In the kitchen, its tender shoots are a delicate asparagus substitute. Despite its charm, be cautious as it can be invasive, proliferating quickly under optimal conditions.
Large forest asparagus
Asparagus falcatus
Large forest asparagus
Large forest asparagus is a thorny, creeping shrub whose sharp spines and quick growth make it an excellent barrier against intruders and animals. Contrasting its protective qualities are small, sweet-smelling white flowers and red berries that attract birds.
Garden asparagus 'Backlim'
Asparagus officinalis 'Backlim'
Garden asparagus 'Backlim'
Garden asparagus 'Backlim' is a male cultivar of Garden asparagus that has purple tips on the shoots, and foliage that is more compact than the parent plant. Though it is usually the classic light-green color that asparagus is known for, it may turn white in the summer.
Asparagus fern
Asparagus densiflorus 'Sprengeri'
Asparagus fern
The light, airy cladophylls (needle-like structures that are extensions of the stem) of the asparagus fern give this cultivar an almost feather-like appearance. This variety is prized for its gracefully arching fronds and its bright green coloration. This handsome little plant is often grown as a houseplant, in hanging baskets, or as groundcover.
Ming fern
Asparagus retrofractus
Ming fern
Ming fern produces delicate, lacy foliage that cascades gracefully from a hanging basket. Its name is popularized by its resemblance to Chinese lanterns, making it a favorite addition to Asian-themed gardens and landscaping projects.
Greater asparagus
Asparagus aphyllus
Greater asparagus
The Latin name of the greater asparagus (Asparagus aphyllus) means "leafless," as the long, threadlike greens along the stems are technically shoots called cladodes. Like the green asparagus in American grocery stores, the stem of the greater asparagus is edible and commonly prepared in the Mediterranean where the plant grows.
asparagus 'Guelph Eclipse'
asparagus 'Guelph Eclipse'
asparagus 'Guelph Eclipse'
Asparagus 'Guelph Eclipse' is known for its tolerance of poor weather conditions and offers spears that are thicker and more succulent than standard varieties. It is a cultivar of the asparagus plant, bred at the University of Guelph, Canada, from where it gets its name. Plant into soil rich in organic compost to add it to your home vegetable garden.
Garden asparagus 'Guelph Millennium'
Asparagus officinalis 'Guelph Millennium'
Garden asparagus 'Guelph Millennium'
Garden asparagus 'Guelph Millennium' is bred from the asparagus plant, and its cultivar name comes from its development at the University of Guelph in Canada. The outstanding features of this cultivar crop include higher quality and better yields. It can be grown in heavier soils, not just the common sandy soil, enabling it to be produced in different areas than before.
Foxtail fern 'Myersii'
Asparagus densiflorus 'Myersii'
Foxtail fern 'Myersii'
Foxtail fern 'Myersii' is an attractive evergreen fern offering needle-like leaves that are a bright green color. In summer it blooms with small white and pink flowers. It is a cultivar of Asparagus densiflorus, named after the nurseryman Meyers from East London, South Africa. Gardeners favor this plant as it is low maintenance, ideal for coastal gardens, and produces fewer berries than other plants in this genus.
Foxtail fern 'Myers'
Asparagus densiflorus 'Myers'
Foxtail fern 'Myers'
The foxtail fern 'Myers' is a highly-distinctive, ornamental cultivar of the asparagus fern. When viewed from a short distance, these plants' dense green fronds can appear bushy or even fuzzy, which is why it is called the "foxtail fern." foxtail fern 'Myers' can also be distinguished from other asparagus ferns by the length of its fronds, which are shorter and don't arch as much as some other cultivars', making it more compact and upright than its relatives.
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More Popular Genus

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Dracaena
Dracaena
Dracaena are popular house plants that are easy to grow. They can tolerate low-light conditions and require little watering. Their leaves range from variegated to dark green. Their characteristic traits include woody stems that grow slowly but offer a striking appearance for small spaces such as apartments or offices.
Ficus
Fig trees
Fig trees have been cultivated in many regions for their fruits, particularly the common fig, F. carica. Most of the species have edible fruits, although the common fig is the only one of commercial value. Fig trees are also important food sources for wildlife in the tropics, including monkeys, bats, and insects.
Rubus
Brambles
Brambles are members of the rose family, and there are hundreds of different types to be found throughout the European countryside. They have been culturally significant for centuries; Christian folklore stories hold that when the devil was thrown from heaven, he landed on a bramble bush. Their vigorous growth habit can tangle into native plants and take over.
Acer
Maples
The popular tree family known as maples change the color of their leaves in the fall. Many cultural traditions encourage people to watch the colors change, such as momijigari in Japan. Maples popular options for bonsai art. Alternately, their sap is used to create maple syrup.
Prunus
Prunus
Prunus is a genus of flowering fruit trees that includes almonds, cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines, and apricots. These are often known as "stone fruits" because their pits are large seeds or "stones." When prunus trees are damaged, they exhibit "gummosis," a condition in which the tree's gum (similar to sap) is secreted to the bark to help heal external wounds.
Solanum
Nightshades
Nightshades is a large and diverse genus of plants, with more than 1500 different types worldwide. This genus incorporates both important staple food crops like tomato, potato, and eggplant, but also dangerous poisonous plants from the nightshade family. The name was coined by Pliny the Elder almost two thousand years ago.
Rosa
Roses
Most species of roses are shrubs or climbing plants that have showy flowers and sharp thorns. They are commonly cultivated for cut flowers or as ornamental plants in gardens due to their attractive appearance, pleasant fragrance, and cultural significance in many countries. The rose hips (fruits) can also be used in jams and teas.
Quercus
Oaks
Oaks are among the world's longest-lived trees, sometimes growing for over 1,000 years! The oldest known oak tree is in the southern United States and is over 1,500 years old. Oaks produce an exceedingly popular type of wood which is used to make different products, from furniture and flooring to wine barrels and even cosmetic creams.
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Key Facts About Asparagus

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Attributes of Asparagus

Leaf type
Evergreen
Ideal Temperature
0 - 41 ℃

Scientific Classification of Asparagus

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Distribution of Asparagus

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Distribution Map of Asparagus

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Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
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care detail

How to Grow and Care for Asparagus

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More Info About Caring for Asparagus
species

Exploring the Asparagus Plants

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8 most common species:
Asparagus aethiopicus
Sprenger's asparagus fern
Sprenger's asparagus fern (Asparagus aethiopicus) is a fern species native to South Africa. Despite its common name, this plant is not a true fern by taxonomy. Sprenger's asparagus fern is generally considered to be an invasive species. The common name was established by Carl Ludwig Sprenger who popularized cultivating sprenger's asparagus fern as an ornamental plant.
Asparagus setaceus
Common asparagus fern
Common asparagus fern is not a true fern but does resemble one. This perennial clumping herb gets its Latin name, *Asparagus setaceus*, from the Latin '*seta*', which means hair or hairy. The leaves of the common asparagus fern are often described as hairy or lacy. The flowers are greenish-white and bell-shaped.
Asparagus densiflorus
Foxtail fern
As the Latin name Asparagus densiflorus suggests, the foxtail fern is closely related to asparagus. The plumes from the foxtail fern are often prized for their use in floral arrangements due to their dense and tall plumes.
Asparagus officinalis
Garden asparagus
Garden asparagus (*Asparagus officinalis*) is a flowering plant species that undergoes photosynthesis in its stems and branch lets. Garden asparagus has a long history of cultivation for culinary and agricultural purposes. The ancient Greeks first cultivated this plant 2,500 years ago.
Show More Species

All Species of Asparagus

popular genus

More Popular Genus

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Dracaena
Dracaena
Dracaena are popular house plants that are easy to grow. They can tolerate low-light conditions and require little watering. Their leaves range from variegated to dark green. Their characteristic traits include woody stems that grow slowly but offer a striking appearance for small spaces such as apartments or offices.
Ficus
Fig trees
Fig trees have been cultivated in many regions for their fruits, particularly the common fig, F. carica. Most of the species have edible fruits, although the common fig is the only one of commercial value. Fig trees are also important food sources for wildlife in the tropics, including monkeys, bats, and insects.
Rubus
Brambles
Brambles are members of the rose family, and there are hundreds of different types to be found throughout the European countryside. They have been culturally significant for centuries; Christian folklore stories hold that when the devil was thrown from heaven, he landed on a bramble bush. Their vigorous growth habit can tangle into native plants and take over.
Acer
Maples
The popular tree family known as maples change the color of their leaves in the fall. Many cultural traditions encourage people to watch the colors change, such as momijigari in Japan. Maples popular options for bonsai art. Alternately, their sap is used to create maple syrup.
Prunus
Prunus
Prunus is a genus of flowering fruit trees that includes almonds, cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines, and apricots. These are often known as "stone fruits" because their pits are large seeds or "stones." When prunus trees are damaged, they exhibit "gummosis," a condition in which the tree's gum (similar to sap) is secreted to the bark to help heal external wounds.
Solanum
Nightshades
Nightshades is a large and diverse genus of plants, with more than 1500 different types worldwide. This genus incorporates both important staple food crops like tomato, potato, and eggplant, but also dangerous poisonous plants from the nightshade family. The name was coined by Pliny the Elder almost two thousand years ago.
Rosa
Roses
Most species of roses are shrubs or climbing plants that have showy flowers and sharp thorns. They are commonly cultivated for cut flowers or as ornamental plants in gardens due to their attractive appearance, pleasant fragrance, and cultural significance in many countries. The rose hips (fruits) can also be used in jams and teas.
Quercus
Oaks
Oaks are among the world's longest-lived trees, sometimes growing for over 1,000 years! The oldest known oak tree is in the southern United States and is over 1,500 years old. Oaks produce an exceedingly popular type of wood which is used to make different products, from furniture and flooring to wine barrels and even cosmetic creams.
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