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Common hazel
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Common hazel
Common hazel
Common hazel
Common hazel
Add to My Garden
Common hazel
Corylus avellana
Also known as: European filbert, Cobnut, Common filbert
Common hazel (Corylus avellana) is a deciduous shrub species that is cultivated for its edible nuts. Hazelnuts can refer to the nut from any Corylus species, but it most often refers to Corylus avellana. The nuts from common hazel are eaten straight or used in making confectionary. Common hazel is native to Europe and western Asia.
Water
Every 2 weeks
Water
care guide

Care Guide for Common hazel

Water
Water
Common hazel is not very drought-tolerant. Unless you live in an area that gets lots of rain, even throughout the summer, they will need plenty of supplemental watering to ensure they produce a good crop of nuts. Make sure the soil around your Common hazel never dries out, but try to prevent waterlogging too.
Fertilization
Fertilization
Common hazel can do well even in middling soil – but, if you'd like to give your tree an extra nutrient boost, you can fertilize with a balanced, slow-release fertilizer. Trees can be fed once per year, in early spring, or twice per year, once in early spring and once in early summer.
Pruning
Pruning
Trim the dead, diseased, overgrown branches in winter.
Soil
Soil
Loam, Clay, Slightly acidic, Neutral, Alkaline
Sunlight
Sunlight
Full sun, Partial sun
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Common hazel
Water
Water
Every 2 weeks
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
10 - 12
Harvest Time
Harvest Time
Fall
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Common hazel
Water
Water
Every 2 weeks
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
10 - 12
Harvest Time
Harvest Time
Fall
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Common hazel
Water
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Every 2 weeks
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
10 - 12
Harvest Time
Harvest Time
Fall
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Questions About Common hazel

Watering Watering Watering
Pruning Pruning Pruning
How Much Water Do I Need to Water My Common hazel?
The Common hazel generally needs about a gallon of water each schedule,With the potted plants, you might want to water them deeply until you see that the water is dripping at the bottom of the pot. Then, wait for the soil to dry before watering them again. You can use a water calculator or a moisture meter to determine the amount you've given to your plant in a week. Provide plenty of water, especially in the flowering period, but let the moisture evaporate afterwards to prevent root rot.

If Common hazel is planted outdoor with adequate rainfall, it may not need additional watering. When Common hazel is young or newly planted, make sure it gets 1-2 inches of rain per week. As Common hazel continues to grow, it can survive entirely on rainfall. Only when the weather is too hot, or when there is no rainfall at all for 2-3 weeks, then consider giving Common hazel a full watering during the cooler moment of the day to prevent the plant from suffering from high heat damage. Additional watering will be required during persistent dry spells.
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How Often Should I Water My Common hazel?
The Common hazel likes deep and infrequent watering. You would want to soak them in a gallon of water each time, especially when they are planted in pots. The water storage of flower pots is limited and the soil will dry out faster. Watering is required every 3 to 5 days when living in a cold region. Water it early in the morning when the soil is dry, outdoors or indoors. You can also determine if watering is needed by checking the soil inside. When the top 2-3 inches of soil is dry, it is time to give the plant a full watering. During hot days, you may need to check the moisture daily, as the heat can quickly dry out the soil in the pot.
Irrigation of the soil is also required if you have a garden. When you live in a hot climate, you might want to water once a week. Only water when you notice that about 2 to 3 inches of soil become too dry outdoors or indoors. Consider the amount of rainwater on the plant and ensure not to add to it to prevent root rot.You may not need additional watering of the plants if there is a lot of rainfall.Common hazel generally grows during spring and fall. When they are outdoors, you need to add mulch about 3 to 4 inches deep to conserve more water.

You need to water the plants more frequently in sandy soil because this type tends to drain faster. However, with the clay one, you need to water this less frequently where you could go for 2-3 days to dry the plant and not develop any root rot. You could mark the date on the calendar whenever you water and when you notice that the leaves are starting to droop. This can mean that you might be a day late.
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Should I Adjust the Watering Frequency for My Common hazel According to Different Seasons or Climates?
The Common hazel needs outdoors come from rain, with only persistent dry weather requiring watering. Throughout the spring and fall growing seasons, the soil needs to be kept moist but not soggy, and alternating dry and moist soil conditions will allow the Common hazel to grow well. Throughout the summer, hot weather can cause water to evaporate too quickly, and if there is a lack of rainfall, you will need to water more frequently and extra to keep it moist.

Usually, the Common hazel will need less water during the winter. Since the Common hazel will drop their leaves and go dormant, you can put them into a well-draining but moisture-retentive soil mixture like the terracotta to help the water evaporate quicker. Once your Common hazel growing outdoors begins to leaf out and go dormant, you can skip watering altogether and in most cases Common hazel can rely on the fall and winter rains to survive the entire dormant period.

After the spring, you can cultivate your Common hazel and encourage it to grow and bloom when the temperature becomes warmer.This plant is not generally a fan of ponding or drought when flowering. You must ensure that the drainage is good at all times, especially during the winter.

When the plant is in a pot, the plant has limited root growth. Keep them well-watered, especially if they are planted in pots during summer. They don't like cold and wet roots, so provide adequate drainage, especially if they are still growing.

It's always best to water your Common hazel’s diligently. Get the entire root system into a deep soak at least once or twice a week, depending on the weather. It's best to avoid shallow sprinkles that reach the leaves since they generally encourage the growth of fungi and don't reach deep into the roots. Don't allow the Common hazel’s to dry out completely in the fall or winter, even if they are already dormancy.

Don't drown the plants because they generally don't like sitting in water for too long. They can die during winter if the soil does not drain well. Also, apply mulch whenever possible to reduce stress, conserve water, and encourage healthy blooms.
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What Should I Be Careful with When I Water Common hazel in Different Seasons, Climates, or During Different Growing Periods of It?
If planting in the ground, Common hazel mostly relies on rain. However, if there is no rainfall for 2-3 weeks, you may need to give proper consideration to giving the plants a deep watering. If watering Common hazel in summer, you should try to do it in the morning. A large temperature difference between the water temperature and the root system can stress the roots. You need to avoid watering the bushes when it's too hot outside. Start mulching them during the spring when the ground is not too cold.

The age of the plants matter. Lack of water is one of the most common reasons the newly planted ones fail to grow. After they are established, you need to ease off the watering schedule.

Reduce watering them during the fall and winter, especially if they have a water-retaining material in the soil. The dry winds in winter can dry them out, and the newly planted ones can be at risk of drought during windy winter, summer, and fall. Windy seasons mean that there's more watering required. The ones planted in the pot tend to dry out faster, so they need more watering. Once you see that they bloom less, the leaves begin to dry up.

Potted plants are relatively complex to water and fluctuate in frequency. Always be careful that the pot-planted plant don't sit in the water. Avoid putting them in containers with saucers, bowls, and trays. Too much watering in the fall can make the foliage look mottled or yellowish. It's always a good idea to prevent overwatering them regardless of the current climate or season that you might have. During the months when Common hazel begins to flower, you might want to increase the watering frequency but give it a rest once they are fully grown.

Give them an adequate amount of water once every 3 to 5 days but don't give them regular schedules. Make sure the soil is dry by sticking your finger in the pot, or use a moisture meter if you're unsure if it's the right time. Too much root rot can cause them to die, so be careful not to overwater or underwater regardless of the climate or season you have in your area.
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What Should I Do If I Water Common hazel Too Much/Too Little?
An overwatered Common hazel can start to have leaves that turn yellow, drop off and wilt. The plant can also look dull and unhealthy, with signs of mushy stems. When they are beginning to show these signs, it's best to adjust your schedule whenever possible.
The wilting can also be a sign of under watering as well. You might see that the leaves begin to turn crispy and dry while the overwatered ones will have soft wilted leaves. Check the soil when it is dry and watering is not enough, give it a full watering in time. Enough water will make the Common hazel recover again, but the plant will still appear dry and yellow leaves after a few days due to the damaged root system. Once it return to normal, the leave yellowing will stop .

Always check the moisture levels at the pot when you have the Common hazel indoors. Avoid overwatering indoors and see if there are signs of black spots. If these are present, let the soil dry in the pot by giving it a few days of rest from watering.

Overwatering can lead to root rot being present in your plant. If this is the case, you might want to transfer them into a different pot, especially if you see discolored and slimy roots. Always prevent root rot as much as possible, and don't let the soil become too soggy.

You should dig a little deeper when you plant your Common hazel outdoors. When you check with your fingers and notice that the soil is too dry, it could mean underwatering. Adequate watering is required to help the plant recover.
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What'S the Best Method to Water the Common hazel?
You might want to put a garden hose at the plant base to ensure that you're promoting excellent root development. Avoid directly spraying the leaves, and know that the leaves will require more watering if they are outdoors and facing direct sunlight. You can also use bubblers that you can put on to each plant to moisten the roots. Also, use soaker hoses that can cover the entire garden or bed when adding or removing plants to push the roots deeply. Drain any excess water and wait for the soil to dry before watering. Water at ground level to prevent diseases. On a sunny day, you might want to spray the entire bush with water. Whether potted or in-ground, please remember Common hazel prefers deep watering over light sprinkling.
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Why Should I Water the Common hazel?
Watering the Common hazel helps transport the needed nutrients from the soil to the rest of the plant. The moisture will keep this species healthy if you know how much water to give. The watering requirements will depend on the weather in your area and the plant's soil.

The Common hazel thrives on moist soil, but they can't generally tolerate waterlogging. Ensure to provide enough mulch when planted on the ground and never fall into the trap of watering too little. They enjoy a full can of watering where the water should be moist at the base when they are planted in a pot to get the best blooms.

If they are grown as foliage, you need to water them up to a depth of 10 to 20 inches so they will continue to grow. If it's raining, refrain from watering and let them get the nutrients they need from the rainwater.
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pests

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Common hazel based on 10 million real cases
Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles are a class of colored insects 1 - 2 cm in size. They gnaw on leaves and petals resulting in small, round holes scattered over the surface.
Solutions: For less serious cases: Remove beetles, nymphs, and eggs. Remove all life stages of the beetles and kill them by placing them in a bucket of warm, soapy water. This can be done more easily by placing the bucket under affected leaves and shaking the plant. This method is most effective in the afternoon when leaf beetles are more active. Always dispose of insects in a sealed bag or container to avoid escape and spread. To treat more serious infestations: Apply organic insecticides. Use naturally-derived insecticides before moving on to synthetic insecticides. Neem oil and pyrethrum are naturally-derived insecticides that should be applied following label instructions. Apply synthetic insecticides. Examples of insecticides effective for leaf beetles include carbaryl, permethrin, and bifenthrin. Apply insecticides according to label instructions.
Sap-sucking insects
Sap-sucking insects Sap-sucking insects
Sap-sucking insects
Sap-sucking insects can create dense clusters of small yellow or white spots on the leaves.
Solutions: Sap-sucking insects can be hard to spot, as they are often small and attach to the undersides of plant leaves. If you see signs of an infestation, follow these steps to eradicate it. Hand-pick bugs and remove eggs: Inspect your plants for insects and drop any you find in a container of soapy water. Look carefully at the undersides of plant leaves and squish any egg clusters you find. Use Insecticide: Targeted spraying can take out sap-sucking insects. Small infestations can be controlled with insecticidal soap, though larger outbreaks might require a stronger spray. Introduce natural predators: Many insects, including ladybugs and praying mantises, love to feast on sap-suckers. You can purchase them at garden stores and release them near infected plants, or encourage wild ones by creating habitat space.
Leaf Weevils
Leaf Weevils Leaf Weevils
Leaf Weevils
Leaf Weevils are insects that feed on the leaves of plants.
Solutions: Leaf Weevils are relatively easy to control once their presence is discovered. Here’s what to do: Spray the foliage with an insecticide Place sticky traps around the lower trunks of fruit trees and other woody plants. Weevils can’t fly, and have to crawl up the plants when they emerge from the soil. Dig into the soil around plants with a garden fork and remove and dispose of any larvae. Let chickens roam around the garden, as they love to feed on weevil larvae.
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Leaf beetles
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Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles are a class of colored insects 1 - 2 cm in size. They gnaw on leaves and petals resulting in small, round holes scattered over the surface.
DiseaseOverview
DiseaseOverview
Leaf beetles range in size from 1.5 mm to 2 cm. Both adult beetles and their larvae eat the leaves of many different types of plants. There are over 35,000 different species of leaf beetles, in a variety of colors including gold, green, yellow-striped, and red striped. Some of these have been mistaken for ladybirds because of their shape and coloring. They can be oval, round, or elongated in shape. These insect pests are most active in spring and summer.
If not controlled, leaf beetles can do a lot of damage to vegetable crops and ornamental plants. They feed on the leaves, flowers, stems, roots, and fruits of different plants. They can fly, which means it's easy for them to move from one plant to another. Some species of leaf beetles only target one specific crop, while others will target many different types of plants. Although a lot of the damage that they cause is cosmetic, an infestation can weaken a plant and leave it prone to other more problematic diseases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The first signs of a leaf beetles infestation are small visible holes in leaves. Leaves then become discolored and dark beetle droppings can be seen. As the leaves turn yellow and brown, they will drop off the plant onto the ground. Some leaves will appear skeletonized with only the veins still remaining.
Infestation begins in spring, when the adult beetles emerge from the soil and lay their eggs on the leaves of plants. When these eggs hatch, the young nymphs start munching on the leaves as they grow up. Once leaf beetles are large and mature, they'll fall to the ground and pupate in the soil over winter before starting the cycle all over again.
Leaf beetles also eat holes in fruits and vegetables. These can be seen as small round holes that sometimes have a larger brown area surrounding them.
Solutions
Solutions
For less serious cases:
  1. Remove beetles, nymphs, and eggs. Remove all life stages of the beetles and kill them by placing them in a bucket of warm, soapy water. This can be done more easily by placing the bucket under affected leaves and shaking the plant. This method is most effective in the afternoon when leaf beetles are more active. Always dispose of insects in a sealed bag or container to avoid escape and spread.
To treat more serious infestations:
  1. Apply organic insecticides. Use naturally-derived insecticides before moving on to synthetic insecticides. Neem oil and pyrethrum are naturally-derived insecticides that should be applied following label instructions.
  2. Apply synthetic insecticides. Examples of insecticides effective for leaf beetles include carbaryl, permethrin, and bifenthrin. Apply insecticides according to label instructions.
Prevention
Prevention
To prevent infestations of leaf beetles, follow these practices.
  1. Regularly check for beetles. To prevent large pest infestations, be proactive about frequently checking plants for pests and removing them quickly.
  2. Clear debris. Clear weeds and debris to remove areas where these beetles may overwinter and hide.
  3. Attract natural predators. Birds and other insects, such as wasps and ladybugs, are effective natural predators of leaf beetles. Encourage them to visit by including a diverse array of plants to provide habitat and food. Also, avoid applying broad-spectrum herbicides that can harm and kill beneficial insects.
  4. Plant aromatic herbs like mint, garlic, or rosemary, as these can repel leaf beetles.
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Sap-sucking insects
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Sap-sucking insects
Sap-sucking insects can create dense clusters of small yellow or white spots on the leaves.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Your plant has developed tiny yellowish spots scattered across the leaves that look like mold or mildew. If these marks won't wipe off, they are likely caused by sap-sucking insects like aphids, squash bugs, scale bugs, leafhoppers, whiteflies, mites, mealybugs, and more.
Each of these pests uses mouthparts to pierce leaf tissues and suck the sap. uses mouthparts to pierce leaf tissues and suck the sap. Signs of damage are difficult to spot at first, but a large infestation can quickly compromise the whole plant. You're most likely to see sap-sucking insects during the hottest months because plants make easier targets when already weakened from heat or drought.
Though sap-sucking insects are unlikely to kill your plant on their own, they can severely weaken it and make it more susceptible to disease. They may also spread viruses from one plant to another as they feed.
Solutions
Solutions
Sap-sucking insects can be hard to spot, as they are often small and attach to the undersides of plant leaves. If you see signs of an infestation, follow these steps to eradicate it.
  1. Hand-pick bugs and remove eggs: Inspect your plants for insects and drop any you find in a container of soapy water. Look carefully at the undersides of plant leaves and squish any egg clusters you find.
  2. Use Insecticide: Targeted spraying can take out sap-sucking insects. Small infestations can be controlled with insecticidal soap, though larger outbreaks might require a stronger spray.
  3. Introduce natural predators: Many insects, including ladybugs and praying mantises, love to feast on sap-suckers. You can purchase them at garden stores and release them near infected plants, or encourage wild ones by creating habitat space.
Prevention
Prevention
Healthy plants are less likely to suffer from sap-sucker attacks. Keep them fortified with fertilizer and the right amounts of water and sunlight. Plants that receive excess nitrogen are also more susceptible to attack, so don’t overfertilize. You should also remove weeds and tall grasses surrounding your outdoor plants so as not to create habitat space for the pests.
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Leaf Weevils
plant poor
Leaf Weevils
Leaf Weevils are insects that feed on the leaves of plants.
DiseaseOverview
DiseaseOverview
Leaf Weevils are insects that feed on the leaves of plants. They can cause major damage to both edible and non-edible plants. Watch out for these garden pests and use control measures to get rid of them as soon as the problem is noticed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Leaf Weevils are small flightless insects that are typically around 6 mm long. They have a hard body that is oval shaped and covered in short hairs, a long snout on their head that is downward facing, and 3 pairs of legs with hooked claws.
Once mated, the female weevil with lay around 20 eggs at one time, either in leaf litter on the ground or sometimes on the soil. Weevils generally only produce one batch of eggs a year but may produce 2 if conditions are ideal.
The eggs take around 6 to 15 days to hatch. When the larva emerges, it burrows into the soil. These larvae have chewing mouth parts and no legs. They feed on the roots of the plants. When this happens, you may see signs of wilting of the leaves, stems, and flowers as the plant can’t deliver enough water from the roots to the above-ground growing parts.
Eventually, the larva evolves into a soft white pupa. The pupating period normally takes around 1 to 3 weeks. After this, the adult leaf weevil will emerge and crawl up the plant to feed on the leaves.
Adult leaf Weevils feed on young leaves, stems, flowers, and buds of almost any plant. This includes many varieties of fruits and vegetables as well as ornamental plants. This creates irregular round holes in the leaves. These holes normally start at the edges of the leaf. Holes may also be made in flowers, lesions may be caused on the skin of fruit, and sometimes whole stems are chewed off.
These insects prefer a humid environment with warm temperatures. They are mostly active during the night and will hide in leaf litter, mulch, and other debris during the day.
Solutions
Solutions
Leaf Weevils are relatively easy to control once their presence is discovered. Here’s what to do:
  • Spray the foliage with an insecticide
  • Place sticky traps around the lower trunks of fruit trees and other woody plants. Weevils can’t fly, and have to crawl up the plants when they emerge from the soil.
  • Dig into the soil around plants with a garden fork and remove and dispose of any larvae.
  • Let chickens roam around the garden, as they love to feed on weevil larvae.
Prevention
Prevention
There are various ways to keep leaf Weevils away from plants.
  • Remove weeds such as dandelion, capeweed, portulaca, mallow, sorrel, and dock. Leaf Weevils are attracted to these weeds and will set up a colony.
  • Make sure fruit trees are well spaced from each other. This ensures that the weevils and their larvae don’t spread from one tree to the next.
  • Cultivate the soil before planting a new crop. This allows any larvae or pupae in the soil to be unearthed and disposed of.
  • Regularly fertilize the soil to encourage both earthworm and microbial activity.
  • Check plants regularly to see any signs of leaf weevil activity. Also check under loose bark, mulch, leaf litter, and in the junction of stems on the plant.
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distribution

Distribution Map

Habitat

Woodland garden secondary, sunny edge, dappled shade, hedge
distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
habit
plant_info

More Info

Plant Type
Plant Type
Tree, Shrub
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Spring, Winter
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green
Yellow

Name story

Common hazel
The scientific name Corylus avellana refers to Avella, an Italian town where the tree flourished. In the 16th century,the species was called the “wild nut of Avella.”

Symbolism

Fertility

Usages

Garden Use
Common hazel is a shrub and tree cultivated commercially for itsedible nuts. It serves as a privacy plant in hedges, plant screens, and borders. It is ideal in naturalized garden spaces like cottage or prairie gardens, meadows, and woodlands.
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Knotweed
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Common hazel
Common hazel
Common hazel
Common hazel
Common hazel
Add to My Garden
Common hazel
Corylus avellana
Also known as: European filbert, Cobnut, Common filbert
Water
Every 2 weeks
Water
care guide

Care Guide for Common hazel

Water
Water
Common hazel is not very drought-tolerant. Unless you live in an area that gets lots of rain, even throughout the summer, they will need plenty of supplemental watering to ensure they produce a good crop of nuts. Make sure the soil around your Common hazel never dries out, but try to prevent waterlogging too.
Fertilization
Fertilization
Common hazel can do well even in middling soil – but, if you'd like to give your tree an extra nutrient boost, you can fertilize with a balanced, slow-release fertilizer. Trees can be fed once per year, in early spring, or twice per year, once in early spring and once in early summer.
Pruning
Pruning
Trim the dead, diseased, overgrown branches in winter.
Soil
Soil
Loam, Clay, Slightly acidic, Neutral, Alkaline
Sunlight
Sunlight
Full sun, Partial sun
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Tips, advice, and instructions for over 13,000 species that you will find nowhere else
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Common hazel
Corylus avellana
Water
Water
Every 2 weeks
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
10 - 12
Harvest Time
Harvest Time
Fall
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Questions About Common hazel

Watering Watering Watering
Pruning Pruning Pruning
How Much Water Do I Need to Water My Common hazel?
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How Often Should I Water My Common hazel?
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Should I Adjust the Watering Frequency for My Common hazel According to Different Seasons or Climates?
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What Should I Be Careful with When I Water Common hazel in Different Seasons, Climates, or During Different Growing Periods of It?
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What Should I Do If I Water Common hazel Too Much/Too Little?
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pests

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Common hazel based on 10 million real cases
Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles  Leaf beetles  Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles are a class of colored insects 1 - 2 cm in size. They gnaw on leaves and petals resulting in small, round holes scattered over the surface.
Solutions: For less serious cases: Remove beetles, nymphs, and eggs. Remove all life stages of the beetles and kill them by placing them in a bucket of warm, soapy water. This can be done more easily by placing the bucket under affected leaves and shaking the plant. This method is most effective in the afternoon when leaf beetles are more active. Always dispose of insects in a sealed bag or container to avoid escape and spread. To treat more serious infestations: Apply organic insecticides. Use naturally-derived insecticides before moving on to synthetic insecticides. Neem oil and pyrethrum are naturally-derived insecticides that should be applied following label instructions. Apply synthetic insecticides. Examples of insecticides effective for leaf beetles include carbaryl, permethrin, and bifenthrin. Apply insecticides according to label instructions.
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Sap-sucking insects
Sap-sucking insects  Sap-sucking insects  Sap-sucking insects
Sap-sucking insects can create dense clusters of small yellow or white spots on the leaves.
Solutions: Sap-sucking insects can be hard to spot, as they are often small and attach to the undersides of plant leaves. If you see signs of an infestation, follow these steps to eradicate it. Hand-pick bugs and remove eggs: Inspect your plants for insects and drop any you find in a container of soapy water. Look carefully at the undersides of plant leaves and squish any egg clusters you find. Use Insecticide: Targeted spraying can take out sap-sucking insects. Small infestations can be controlled with insecticidal soap, though larger outbreaks might require a stronger spray. Introduce natural predators: Many insects, including ladybugs and praying mantises, love to feast on sap-suckers. You can purchase them at garden stores and release them near infected plants, or encourage wild ones by creating habitat space.
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Leaf Weevils
Leaf Weevils  Leaf Weevils  Leaf Weevils
Leaf Weevils are insects that feed on the leaves of plants.
Solutions: Leaf Weevils are relatively easy to control once their presence is discovered. Here’s what to do: Spray the foliage with an insecticide Place sticky traps around the lower trunks of fruit trees and other woody plants. Weevils can’t fly, and have to crawl up the plants when they emerge from the soil. Dig into the soil around plants with a garden fork and remove and dispose of any larvae. Let chickens roam around the garden, as they love to feed on weevil larvae.
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Leaf beetles
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Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles are a class of colored insects 1 - 2 cm in size. They gnaw on leaves and petals resulting in small, round holes scattered over the surface.
DiseaseOverview
DiseaseOverview
Leaf beetles range in size from 1.5 mm to 2 cm. Both adult beetles and their larvae eat the leaves of many different types of plants. There are over 35,000 different species of leaf beetles, in a variety of colors including gold, green, yellow-striped, and red striped. Some of these have been mistaken for ladybirds because of their shape and coloring. They can be oval, round, or elongated in shape. These insect pests are most active in spring and summer.
If not controlled, leaf beetles can do a lot of damage to vegetable crops and ornamental plants. They feed on the leaves, flowers, stems, roots, and fruits of different plants. They can fly, which means it's easy for them to move from one plant to another. Some species of leaf beetles only target one specific crop, while others will target many different types of plants. Although a lot of the damage that they cause is cosmetic, an infestation can weaken a plant and leave it prone to other more problematic diseases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The first signs of a leaf beetles infestation are small visible holes in leaves. Leaves then become discolored and dark beetle droppings can be seen. As the leaves turn yellow and brown, they will drop off the plant onto the ground. Some leaves will appear skeletonized with only the veins still remaining.
Infestation begins in spring, when the adult beetles emerge from the soil and lay their eggs on the leaves of plants. When these eggs hatch, the young nymphs start munching on the leaves as they grow up. Once leaf beetles are large and mature, they'll fall to the ground and pupate in the soil over winter before starting the cycle all over again.
Leaf beetles also eat holes in fruits and vegetables. These can be seen as small round holes that sometimes have a larger brown area surrounding them.
Solutions
Solutions
For less serious cases:
  1. Remove beetles, nymphs, and eggs. Remove all life stages of the beetles and kill them by placing them in a bucket of warm, soapy water. This can be done more easily by placing the bucket under affected leaves and shaking the plant. This method is most effective in the afternoon when leaf beetles are more active. Always dispose of insects in a sealed bag or container to avoid escape and spread.
To treat more serious infestations:
  1. Apply organic insecticides. Use naturally-derived insecticides before moving on to synthetic insecticides. Neem oil and pyrethrum are naturally-derived insecticides that should be applied following label instructions.
  2. Apply synthetic insecticides. Examples of insecticides effective for leaf beetles include carbaryl, permethrin, and bifenthrin. Apply insecticides according to label instructions.
Prevention
Prevention
To prevent infestations of leaf beetles, follow these practices.
  1. Regularly check for beetles. To prevent large pest infestations, be proactive about frequently checking plants for pests and removing them quickly.
  2. Clear debris. Clear weeds and debris to remove areas where these beetles may overwinter and hide.
  3. Attract natural predators. Birds and other insects, such as wasps and ladybugs, are effective natural predators of leaf beetles. Encourage them to visit by including a diverse array of plants to provide habitat and food. Also, avoid applying broad-spectrum herbicides that can harm and kill beneficial insects.
  4. Plant aromatic herbs like mint, garlic, or rosemary, as these can repel leaf beetles.
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Sap-sucking insects
plant poor
Sap-sucking insects
Sap-sucking insects can create dense clusters of small yellow or white spots on the leaves.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Your plant has developed tiny yellowish spots scattered across the leaves that look like mold or mildew. If these marks won't wipe off, they are likely caused by sap-sucking insects like aphids, squash bugs, scale bugs, leafhoppers, whiteflies, mites, mealybugs, and more.
Each of these pests uses mouthparts to pierce leaf tissues and suck the sap. uses mouthparts to pierce leaf tissues and suck the sap. Signs of damage are difficult to spot at first, but a large infestation can quickly compromise the whole plant. You're most likely to see sap-sucking insects during the hottest months because plants make easier targets when already weakened from heat or drought.
Though sap-sucking insects are unlikely to kill your plant on their own, they can severely weaken it and make it more susceptible to disease. They may also spread viruses from one plant to another as they feed.
Solutions
Solutions
Sap-sucking insects can be hard to spot, as they are often small and attach to the undersides of plant leaves. If you see signs of an infestation, follow these steps to eradicate it.
  1. Hand-pick bugs and remove eggs: Inspect your plants for insects and drop any you find in a container of soapy water. Look carefully at the undersides of plant leaves and squish any egg clusters you find.
  2. Use Insecticide: Targeted spraying can take out sap-sucking insects. Small infestations can be controlled with insecticidal soap, though larger outbreaks might require a stronger spray.
  3. Introduce natural predators: Many insects, including ladybugs and praying mantises, love to feast on sap-suckers. You can purchase them at garden stores and release them near infected plants, or encourage wild ones by creating habitat space.
Prevention
Prevention
Healthy plants are less likely to suffer from sap-sucker attacks. Keep them fortified with fertilizer and the right amounts of water and sunlight. Plants that receive excess nitrogen are also more susceptible to attack, so don’t overfertilize. You should also remove weeds and tall grasses surrounding your outdoor plants so as not to create habitat space for the pests.
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Leaf Weevils
plant poor
Leaf Weevils
Leaf Weevils are insects that feed on the leaves of plants.
DiseaseOverview
DiseaseOverview
Leaf Weevils are insects that feed on the leaves of plants. They can cause major damage to both edible and non-edible plants. Watch out for these garden pests and use control measures to get rid of them as soon as the problem is noticed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Leaf Weevils are small flightless insects that are typically around 6 mm long. They have a hard body that is oval shaped and covered in short hairs, a long snout on their head that is downward facing, and 3 pairs of legs with hooked claws.
Once mated, the female weevil with lay around 20 eggs at one time, either in leaf litter on the ground or sometimes on the soil. Weevils generally only produce one batch of eggs a year but may produce 2 if conditions are ideal.
The eggs take around 6 to 15 days to hatch. When the larva emerges, it burrows into the soil. These larvae have chewing mouth parts and no legs. They feed on the roots of the plants. When this happens, you may see signs of wilting of the leaves, stems, and flowers as the plant can’t deliver enough water from the roots to the above-ground growing parts.
Eventually, the larva evolves into a soft white pupa. The pupating period normally takes around 1 to 3 weeks. After this, the adult leaf weevil will emerge and crawl up the plant to feed on the leaves.
Adult leaf Weevils feed on young leaves, stems, flowers, and buds of almost any plant. This includes many varieties of fruits and vegetables as well as ornamental plants. This creates irregular round holes in the leaves. These holes normally start at the edges of the leaf. Holes may also be made in flowers, lesions may be caused on the skin of fruit, and sometimes whole stems are chewed off.
These insects prefer a humid environment with warm temperatures. They are mostly active during the night and will hide in leaf litter, mulch, and other debris during the day.
Solutions
Solutions
Leaf Weevils are relatively easy to control once their presence is discovered. Here’s what to do:
  • Spray the foliage with an insecticide
  • Place sticky traps around the lower trunks of fruit trees and other woody plants. Weevils can’t fly, and have to crawl up the plants when they emerge from the soil.
  • Dig into the soil around plants with a garden fork and remove and dispose of any larvae.
  • Let chickens roam around the garden, as they love to feed on weevil larvae.
Prevention
Prevention
There are various ways to keep leaf Weevils away from plants.
  • Remove weeds such as dandelion, capeweed, portulaca, mallow, sorrel, and dock. Leaf Weevils are attracted to these weeds and will set up a colony.
  • Make sure fruit trees are well spaced from each other. This ensures that the weevils and their larvae don’t spread from one tree to the next.
  • Cultivate the soil before planting a new crop. This allows any larvae or pupae in the soil to be unearthed and disposed of.
  • Regularly fertilize the soil to encourage both earthworm and microbial activity.
  • Check plants regularly to see any signs of leaf weevil activity. Also check under loose bark, mulch, leaf litter, and in the junction of stems on the plant.
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distribution

Distribution Map

Habitat

Woodland garden secondary, sunny edge, dappled shade, hedge

Map

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
plant_info

More Info

Plant Type
Plant Type
Tree, Shrub
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Spring, Winter
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green
Yellow

Name story

Common hazel
The scientific name Corylus avellana refers to Avella, an Italian town where the tree flourished. In the 16th century,the species was called the “wild nut of Avella.”

Symbolism

Fertility

Usages

Garden Use
Common hazel is a shrub and tree cultivated commercially for itsedible nuts. It serves as a privacy plant in hedges, plant screens, and borders. It is ideal in naturalized garden spaces like cottage or prairie gardens, meadows, and woodlands.
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