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Propeller Plant
Propeller Plant
Propeller Plant
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Propeller Plant
Crassula perfoliata 'Falcata'
Also known as: Scarlet paintbrush
Propeller Plant is a charming succulent native to the Cape of Good Hope in South Africa. It produces showy, scarlet red flowers in the summer that have a cinnamon-like smell, very attractive to bees. Propeller Plant can sometimes bloom twice a year. Like many succulents and crassula species, propeller Plant is cultivated worldwide for its ornamental features.
Planting Time
Spring, Summer
Planting Time
care guide

Care Guide for Propeller Plant

Drought-tolerant. Allow the soil to dry completely between watering.
Fertilization
Fertilization
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Fertilization once a month during the growing season.
Deadhead (or remove) withered flowers after flowering.
Sunlight
Sunlight
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Full sun, Partial sun
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
See Details
9 to 11
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Propeller Plant
Sunlight
Sunlight
Full sun
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
9 to 11
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Summer
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Propeller Plant
Sunlight
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Full sun
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
9 to 11
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Summer
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Propeller Plant
Sunlight
Sunlight
Full sun
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
9 to 11
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Summer
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Questions About Propeller Plant

Watering Watering Watering
Sunlight Sunlight Sunlight
Temperature Temperature Temperature
Fertilizing Fertilizing Fertilizing
What is the best way to water my Propeller Plant?
The proper way to water Propeller Plant requires some timing. For example, you should wait until the spring, when the new leaves are beginning to grow, before considering adding water to this plant’s pot. Once that season arrives, you can add water when the soil inside the pot has become entirely dry. When watering, you can use either tap water or distilled water. It's best not to water this plant from overhead. Instead, you should water at the base of the plant by applying the water slowly and evenly across the entire surface of the soil. This method will allow you to moisten all parts of the soil consistently without dampening the above-ground portions of the plant, which your Propeller Plant will appreciate. Typically, you can continue adding water until you notice a light stream of excess water draining from the pot’s hole.
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What should I do if I water my Propeller Plant too much or too little?
An overwatered Propeller Plant is a far more common occurrence than one that is underwatered. Overwatering is also incredibly detrimental to your plant's health as it can cause one Propeller Plant to die quite quickly. One way to avoid overwatering is to allow the soil to dry entirely before adding water, as mentioned previously. Especially when it turns into dormancy, lots of people will just water it in the wrong way. As such, we’ll focus on how to remedy the problem of overwatering. When your Propeller Plant shows signs of overwatering, it is often best to remove it from its current pot. After removal, you should access the roots of this plant and remove any that show signs of rot or some other moisture-related disease. While some roots should be removed, others will return to full health after a simple cleaning. After this stage, you should repot your Propeller Plant in soil that has excellent drainage capabilities to lessen the odds of future overwatering.
While unlikely, underwatering can take place too. If that occurs for you, all you need to do is supply your plant with water on a slightly more frequent basis, ensuring that you don't overcorrect the issue and end up overwatering your plant.
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How often should I water my Propeller Plant?
As a succulent plant, the water needs of Propeller Plant are quite low compared to most other plants because this plant hails from a region that is constantly hot and dry.
To give this plant species proper care, you should allow its soil to dry out completely between waterings.
Typically, it will take anywhere from two weeks to a month for the soil to dry entirely, at which time you can add water. Watering frequency tends to be very seasonally related. During the spring to summer period, it will be in a growing state and it may take 2-3 weeks for the soil to dry completely, you can follow this watering frequency. During the summer time, the soil may dry out faster. However, when the temperature falls below 60 degrees or rises above 85 degrees Fahrenheit, most of them will be dormant or semi-dormant, which means that the plant does not need more watering at the moment. Instead, you should reduce or even stop watering to keep the soil dry until the temperature is appropriate again for Propeller Plant to grow, and then restart watering.
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How much water does my Propeller Plant need?
Overall, Propeller Plant does not need a high volume of water. This is mainly due to the fact that this plant must go for a while without receiving water. However, when the time to water this plant does arrive, you should be ready to give it a lot of water. While there is no set amount of water to give this plant, you should not stop watering until the soil is completely moist. The best way to ensure this is the case, provided you grow this plant in a pot, is to water it until you see water trickling through the drainage holes at the bottom of the pot. You can also insert a pencil or some similar object deep into the soil to test if you have watered enough. If you remove the pencil and it is moist, then you have provided enough water.
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How can I tell if i'm watering my Propeller Plant enough?
Generally, overwatering is a far more significant issue than underwatering is. When overwatering occurs, you should notice right away as the leaves will begin to lose their form, become mushy, and change colors. This will be a stark contrast to a healthy set of living stone leaves, which should be relatively sturdy and hold their shape. Underwatering is incredibly rare for Propeller Plant, as this species can often survive with no water at all. However, if underwatering does occur, you will usually notice leaf discoloration and dryness.
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How should I water my Propeller Plant through the seasons?
As mentioned, Propeller Plant needs the most water during the times of year that it is actively growing. By contrast, in winter, when the plant is entirely dormant, you should reduce these already low watering needs. In fact, during winter, you should not water this plant at all. Once spring arrives, wait until your Propeller Plants begin to develop new leaves. Once that occurs, you can return to your regular watering schedule. During the hottest parts of summer, your plant may enter another dormant growth phase, which means its water needs will be lower than normal. As summer ends and fall arrives, you can begin reducing your watering in anticipation of winter. By the time winter arrives, you should cease watering altogether.
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How should I water my Propeller Plant at different growth stages?
By and large, the water needs of Propeller Plant will remain consistent throughout each of its growth stages. Anyway, Propeller Plant prefers dry soil conditions more than moist ones, so watering less is safer for it than watering a lot. However, there are some phases in which your Propeller Plant may need slightly more water than usual. Despite being known for their foliage, Propeller Plants can also provide flowers, but these flowers do not arrive until the plant is at least a few years old. Once flower development is possible, your Propeller Plant may need a minimal uptick in its watering schedule to accommodate flower development. Otherwise, you should not expect to change your watering frequency significantly based on this plant’s growth stages.
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What's the difference between watering Propeller Plant indoors and outdoors?
Growing Propeller Plants outdoors is not an option for most gardeners in hardiness zones colder than zone 9, as this plant loves areas that have warm or hot weather year-round. Only in regions that do not have yearly temperatures that fall below 40 degrees Fahrenheit can this plant species survive. If you live in such an area, you should study the average rainfall in your area as well. If you live where it rains often, your Propeller Plant will likely die from overwatering. But if you live in a warm climate in which it rains occasionally, you may not need to water your Propeller Plants at all.
Those who live in cooler areas of the world should have no issue growing this plant indoors. If that is the approach you take, you can wait until all of the soil in your plant's container has dried out while also following the rest of the general watering advice we've laid out in the sections above.
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Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Propeller Plant based on 10 million real cases
Low light
Low light Low light
Low light
A lack of sunlight will cause the stems and leaves to elongate and appear lighter in color.
Solutions: Low light can only be addressed by increasing light availability, and these measures will only stop further etoliation; current distortion cannot be reversed. Move plant to a position where it receives more light. Check the requirements for specific species, as too much sunlight can cause a plant to burn. Introduce appropriate artificial lighting. Some people choose to prune the longest stems so the plant can concentrate on healthy new growth under the improved lighting.
Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Solutions: If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Flower withering
Flower withering Flower withering
Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Solutions: If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible. For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface. In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well. If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Leaf rot
Leaf rot Leaf rot
Leaf rot
This pathogen can cause the leaves to rot.
Solutions: Bacterial infections need to be treated quickly to prevent the spread to neighboring, healthy plants, potentially wiping out large sections of your indoor or outdoor garden. In mild cases: Use sterilized (10% bleach solution) pruning shears or scissors to remove any infected plant parts, making sure to dispose of them off site. Use a copper-based bactericide to treat the unaffected foliage, as well as the soil, and neighboring plants. Follow the manufacturer’s rate and timing directions found on the product label. In severe cases, where more than half the leaves are affected: Remove all of the infected plants from the garden, disposing of them off site. Treat the soil and neighboring plants using a copper-based bactericide. Follow the manufacturer’s rate and timing directions found on the product label.
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Low light
plant poor
Low light
A lack of sunlight will cause the stems and leaves to elongate and appear lighter in color.
Overview
Overview
All plants require light, and if they do not receive it in the quantities that they require this distorts their growth in a process known as etiolation. In essence, etiolated plants are diverting all of their energy to growing taller in a desperate attempt to reach a position where they can meet their light requirements. Many other growth factors are harmed by this, and so light-deprived plants can become weak and distorted until they are almost unrecognizable. Low light symptoms are most commonly seen in houseplants, but outdoor specimens can also be affected.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Although symptoms will vary in different plants, the general symptoms of low light are easy to spot.
  1. Plant stems grow tall and lanky.
  2. There are less leaves, and both leaves and stems tend to be pale and insipid looking. This is due to a shortage of chlorophyll.
  3. All plant parts become weakened and may droop, as energy is diverted toward too-fast growth as the plant stretches itself toward any source of light.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Plants need sunlight in varying amounts for photosynthesis – a process that produces energy for growth and fruit and flower production. Low light causes a plant to divert all energy to upward (apical) growth in order to find better light. Plant hormones called auxins are transported from the actively-growing tip of the plant downwards, to suppress lateral growth. A drop in cellular pH triggers expansins, nonenzymatic cell wall proteins, to loosen cell walls and allow them to elongate. This elongation results in the abnormal lengthening of stems, especially internodes, or plant "legginess" which is observed in etoliated plants.
Solutions
Solutions
Low light can only be addressed by increasing light availability, and these measures will only stop further etoliation; current distortion cannot be reversed.
  • Move plant to a position where it receives more light. Check the requirements for specific species, as too much sunlight can cause a plant to burn.
  • Introduce appropriate artificial lighting.
  • Some people choose to prune the longest stems so the plant can concentrate on healthy new growth under the improved lighting.
Prevention
Prevention
To avoid etiolation, provide an adequate amount of light from the beginning.
  1. Choose a location that matches each plant's ideal light needs. Many indoor plants do best in or near a south-facing window, which will provide the longest hours of sunlight. Flowering plants and those with colored leaves typically need more light than purely-green plants, as photosynthesis occurs in the green portions of leaves.
  2. Select plants with light needs that match a location's conditions. Some cultivars and varieties require less light than others.
  3. Use a grow light. Darker locations may require artificial illumination. A grow light may also become more necessary during winter, when sunlit hours are at their shortest.
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Aged yellow and dry
plant poor
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Overview
Overview
Regardless of the type of plant or where it is grown, at some point, it will begin to aged yellow and dry. This is a natural, unavoidable process that happens when the plant has completed all of the steps in its life.
Annual plants go through this process at the end of a single growing season. Perennial plants live for multiple years, if not tens or hundreds of years, but will still ultimately exhibit these symptoms.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
When plants have progressed through their natural developmental stages and are nearing the end of their lifecycle, they begin showing signs of decline. Leaves will start to yellow and droop, and over time they turn papery brown and dry.
Once completely dry, the leaves begin to fall from the plant until the entire plant has dried out.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
At the end of its life, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence or natural aging and death. Cell division stops, and the plant begins catabolizing resources to use in other parts of the plant.
As this happens, the tissues begin yellow and drying until the entire plant is desiccated and perishes.
Solutions
Solutions
If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Prevention
Prevention
Unfortunately, there is no way to prevent plants from dying of “old age.” To help prolong their life, and put off symptoms of aged yellow and dry for as long as possible, take care of them by giving them enough water, fertilizing them appropriately, and making sure they get enough sunlight.
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Flower withering
plant poor
Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Overview
Overview
Flower withering occurs when flowers become weak, droopy, wilted, or faded until they can’t be revived. During withering, they begin to wrinkle and shrink until the flower becomes completely dry or dead.
Any flowers, regardless of the plant type or the climate they are grown in, are susceptible to withering. It is a worldwide problem across houseplants, herbs, flowering ornamentals, trees, shrubs, garden vegetables, and food crops.
Unlike wilting—which withering is often confused with—withering can be caused by different things and is often due to more than a lack of water. Withering can be fatal in severe cases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Flower withering progresses from very mild cases to severe occurrences that kill the flower. The severity of the symptoms is related to the cause and how long the condition is allowed to progress before action is taken.
  • Wilted, droopy flowers
  • Petals and leaves begin to wrinkle
  • Brown papery streaks or spots appear on the petals and leaf tips
  • Flowerhead shrink in size
  • Petal color fades
  • Yellowing leaves
  • Complete death of the flower
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The main causes of flower withering include natural age progress, lack of water, nutritional deficiencies, and bacterial or fungal diseases. It’s critical to determine the underlying cause when flower withering is noticed. This will guide the best course of action, if treatment is possible.
Check the soil for moisture and then closely examine the entire plant for signs of nutrient deficiencies. If neither of those appears to be the cause then cut open the stem below a flower. If a cross-section reveals brown or rust-colored stains it is safe to assume that this is a bacterial or fungal infection.
If the flower is nearing the end of its normal lifespan, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence, or cell aging and death. Cell division stops and the plant begins breaking down resources within the flower to use in other parts of the plant.
In all other cases, flower withering happens when the plant seals off the stem as a defense mechanism, stopping transport within the vascular system. This prevents further water loss through the flowers but also stops bacteria and fungi from moving to healthy parts of the plant. Once water and nutrient transport stops, the flower begins to wither and ultimately die.
Solutions
Solutions
If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface.
In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well.
If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Prevention
Prevention
This is definitely one of those instances where prevention is more effective than cure. Here are some preventative measures for avoiding premature flower withering.
  • Water plants according to their needs -- either keep the soil slightly moist or allow the top inch or two to dry out before watering again.
  • Fertilize lightly on a consistent basis, depending upon the plant’s growth. Quick-growing plants and those that flower or develop fruit will need more frequent fertilizing than slow-growing plants.
  • Purchase plants that are certified disease- or pathogen-free.
  • Look for disease-resistant cultivars.
  • Isolate plants showing disease symptoms to prevent the spread to neighboring plants.
  • Practice good plant hygiene by removing any fallen plant material as soon as possible.
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Leaf rot
plant poor
Leaf rot
This pathogen can cause the leaves to rot.
Overview
Overview
Leaf rot is very common among both house plants and garden plants. It affects foliage and occurs mainly when the leaves become wet due to rain or misting by the gardener. The cause is fungal disease and this is facilitated by the fungal spores adhering to wet leaves then penetrating the leaf and expanding rapidly. Damp conditions and poor air circulation will increase chances of infection taking place. Another factor are leaves that are damaged or have been penetrated by sap sucking insects that facilitate plant penetration.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
  1. Spores are able to cling to a damp leaf and penetrate, often through an existing wound.
  2. A small dark brown mark appears which expands rapidly as sporulation starts to take place.
  3. Quite quickly these bull's eye like circles can link together and the whole leaf turns dark and loses texture.
  4. Leaf drop occurs.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
These symptoms are caused by a bacterial infection invading the plant. Bacteria from many sources in the environment (air, water, soil, diseased plants) enter a plant through wounds, or in some cases the stomata when they are open. Once inside the leaf tissue, the bacteria feed and reproduce quickly, breaking down healthy leaves.
Bacterial infections threaten most plant species, and are more prominent in wet weather that more easily transfers the bacteria from plant to plant, or from soil to plant.
Solutions
Solutions
Bacterial infections need to be treated quickly to prevent the spread to neighboring, healthy plants, potentially wiping out large sections of your indoor or outdoor garden.
In mild cases: Use sterilized (10% bleach solution) pruning shears or scissors to remove any infected plant parts, making sure to dispose of them off site. Use a copper-based bactericide to treat the unaffected foliage, as well as the soil, and neighboring plants. Follow the manufacturer’s rate and timing directions found on the product label.
In severe cases, where more than half the leaves are affected: Remove all of the infected plants from the garden, disposing of them off site. Treat the soil and neighboring plants using a copper-based bactericide. Follow the manufacturer’s rate and timing directions found on the product label.
Prevention
Prevention
  1. Clean up garden debris at the end of the season, especially if it contains any diseased plant tissue. Diseases can overwinter from season to season and infect new plants.
  2. Avoid overhead watering to prevent transferring pathogens from one plant to another, and to keep foliage dry.
  3. Mulch around the base of plants to prevent soil-borne bacteria from splashing up onto uninfected plants.
  4. Sterilize cutting tools using a 10% bleach solution when gardening and moving from one plant to another.
  5. Do not work in your garden when it is wet.
  6. Rotate crops to prevent the buildup of bacteria in one site due to continuous cropping.
  7. Use a copper or streptomycin-containing bactericide in early spring to prevent infection. Read label directions carefully as they are not suitable for all plants.
  8. Ensure plants are well spaced and thin leaves on densely leaved plants so that air circulation is maximised.
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More Info

Flower Color
Flower Color
Red
Orange
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Spring, Mid winter, Late winter
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green

Usages

Garden Use
Propeller Plant is a lovely ornamental that works well in sunny, dry rock or succulent gardens and patio pots. While the unique leaves provide interest throughout every season, it produces showy red flowers in the summer. It can grow quite tall, making it perfect as a border plant or accent plant alongside other succulents.
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Cat paw (Cotyledon ladismithiensis 'konekonotume') is a rare perennial succulent that originates in South Africa. Cat paw is sometimes also called Fuzzy Bear Paws due to its unusual shape. This species is considered easy to grow, but is rarely sold in succulent markets.
Garden Usage
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Boston fern
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The Nephrolepis exaltata is commonly known as the boston fern or sword fern. It is a common and popular houseplant that is native to tropical environments. While the boston fern can survive droughts, it prefers humid environments and should be misted regularly. It is generally considered non-toxic and is pet friendly.
Garden Usage
Boston fern is a perfect plant to grow out of hanging baskets or pots as it will sprout abundance of long, light green leaves, graciously dropping from the pot. It's a kind of easy-to-grow fern, not prone to diseases or pests and just requires a steady water regime and room temperature to grow healthy. It's perfect for your kitchen or even bathroom as it love humidity, bringing rustic ambiance to your home.
Bearded iris
Bearded iris
The bearded iris is a flowering plant that appears in many different colors. It is a popular garden plant because it's easy to grow. Though their native lands are in Europe, bearded irises are often grown in Iranian cemeteries.
Bloom Time
Spring
Garden Usage
Bearded iris, a member of the Iris genus, is a beautiful herbaceous plant. It blossoms in spring and summer with big, gorgeous flowers in multiple colors, adding rich hues to your garden. Different varieties bloom at different times, allowing the savvy gardener to enjoy a long bloom season. It is best used in garden borders but can also be potted, and you can harvest the flowers for decorations. It's medium-level difficult to care for and requires simple daily care.
Alder
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Alnus acuminata’s flowers are generally pollinated by the wind. It's an evergreen tree that can grow up to 30 m, and its maximum age can reach up to 60 years. Its timber preserves well and dries easily. It has odorless, brown-yellow wood used for broom handles, particle boards, and plywood cores.
Air plant
Air plant
Air plant (Tillandsia ionantha) is a plant species native to Central America, Mexico, Costa Rica, and South America. The air plant has become naturalized in Florida. This species is a popularly sought-after air plant for home cultivation. It is popular because it is considered hearty and requires minimal care. Air plant grows best in warm, humid rooms with occasional misting with water.
Bloom Time
Spring
Garden Usage
Air plant has unique leaves and flowers and is sure to light up your room. It is hung in the air or attached to barks, driftwood, and other materials as decoration, but grows without soil and requires little care.
Air plant
Air plant
Graced with strong, silvery leaves, air plant (Tillandsia xerographica) is one of a number of species colloquially known as "air plants." This name references their preference to grow, suspended, in the highest branches of tropical trees. Quite remarkably, the air plant does not necessarily need soil, instead absorbing water through its leaves.
Bloom Time
All year around
Garden Usage
Air plant has unique leaves and flowers and is sure to light up your room. It is hung in the air or attached to barks, driftwood, and other materials as decoration, but grows without soil and requires little care.
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Propeller Plant
Propeller Plant
Propeller Plant
Add to My Garden
Propeller Plant
Crassula perfoliata 'Falcata'
Also known as: Scarlet paintbrush
Propeller Plant is a charming succulent native to the Cape of Good Hope in South Africa. It produces showy, scarlet red flowers in the summer that have a cinnamon-like smell, very attractive to bees. Propeller Plant can sometimes bloom twice a year. Like many succulents and crassula species, propeller Plant is cultivated worldwide for its ornamental features.
Planting Time
Spring, Summer
Planting Time
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Questions About Propeller Plant

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Sunlight Sunlight Sunlight
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pests

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Propeller Plant based on 10 million real cases
Low light
Low light  Low light  Low light
A lack of sunlight will cause the stems and leaves to elongate and appear lighter in color.
Solutions: Low light can only be addressed by increasing light availability, and these measures will only stop further etoliation; current distortion cannot be reversed. Move plant to a position where it receives more light. Check the requirements for specific species, as too much sunlight can cause a plant to burn. Introduce appropriate artificial lighting. Some people choose to prune the longest stems so the plant can concentrate on healthy new growth under the improved lighting.
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Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry  Aged yellow and dry  Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Solutions: If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
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Flower withering
Flower withering  Flower withering  Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Solutions: If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible. For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface. In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well. If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Learn More more
Leaf rot
Leaf rot  Leaf rot  Leaf rot
This pathogen can cause the leaves to rot.
Solutions: Bacterial infections need to be treated quickly to prevent the spread to neighboring, healthy plants, potentially wiping out large sections of your indoor or outdoor garden. In mild cases: Use sterilized (10% bleach solution) pruning shears or scissors to remove any infected plant parts, making sure to dispose of them off site. Use a copper-based bactericide to treat the unaffected foliage, as well as the soil, and neighboring plants. Follow the manufacturer’s rate and timing directions found on the product label. In severe cases, where more than half the leaves are affected: Remove all of the infected plants from the garden, disposing of them off site. Treat the soil and neighboring plants using a copper-based bactericide. Follow the manufacturer’s rate and timing directions found on the product label.
Learn More more
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Low light
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Low light
A lack of sunlight will cause the stems and leaves to elongate and appear lighter in color.
Overview
Overview
All plants require light, and if they do not receive it in the quantities that they require this distorts their growth in a process known as etiolation. In essence, etiolated plants are diverting all of their energy to growing taller in a desperate attempt to reach a position where they can meet their light requirements. Many other growth factors are harmed by this, and so light-deprived plants can become weak and distorted until they are almost unrecognizable. Low light symptoms are most commonly seen in houseplants, but outdoor specimens can also be affected.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Although symptoms will vary in different plants, the general symptoms of low light are easy to spot.
  1. Plant stems grow tall and lanky.
  2. There are less leaves, and both leaves and stems tend to be pale and insipid looking. This is due to a shortage of chlorophyll.
  3. All plant parts become weakened and may droop, as energy is diverted toward too-fast growth as the plant stretches itself toward any source of light.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Plants need sunlight in varying amounts for photosynthesis – a process that produces energy for growth and fruit and flower production. Low light causes a plant to divert all energy to upward (apical) growth in order to find better light. Plant hormones called auxins are transported from the actively-growing tip of the plant downwards, to suppress lateral growth. A drop in cellular pH triggers expansins, nonenzymatic cell wall proteins, to loosen cell walls and allow them to elongate. This elongation results in the abnormal lengthening of stems, especially internodes, or plant "legginess" which is observed in etoliated plants.
Solutions
Solutions
Low light can only be addressed by increasing light availability, and these measures will only stop further etoliation; current distortion cannot be reversed.
  • Move plant to a position where it receives more light. Check the requirements for specific species, as too much sunlight can cause a plant to burn.
  • Introduce appropriate artificial lighting.
  • Some people choose to prune the longest stems so the plant can concentrate on healthy new growth under the improved lighting.
Prevention
Prevention
To avoid etiolation, provide an adequate amount of light from the beginning.
  1. Choose a location that matches each plant's ideal light needs. Many indoor plants do best in or near a south-facing window, which will provide the longest hours of sunlight. Flowering plants and those with colored leaves typically need more light than purely-green plants, as photosynthesis occurs in the green portions of leaves.
  2. Select plants with light needs that match a location's conditions. Some cultivars and varieties require less light than others.
  3. Use a grow light. Darker locations may require artificial illumination. A grow light may also become more necessary during winter, when sunlit hours are at their shortest.
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Aged yellow and dry
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Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Overview
Overview
Regardless of the type of plant or where it is grown, at some point, it will begin to aged yellow and dry. This is a natural, unavoidable process that happens when the plant has completed all of the steps in its life.
Annual plants go through this process at the end of a single growing season. Perennial plants live for multiple years, if not tens or hundreds of years, but will still ultimately exhibit these symptoms.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
When plants have progressed through their natural developmental stages and are nearing the end of their lifecycle, they begin showing signs of decline. Leaves will start to yellow and droop, and over time they turn papery brown and dry.
Once completely dry, the leaves begin to fall from the plant until the entire plant has dried out.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
At the end of its life, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence or natural aging and death. Cell division stops, and the plant begins catabolizing resources to use in other parts of the plant.
As this happens, the tissues begin yellow and drying until the entire plant is desiccated and perishes.
Solutions
Solutions
If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Prevention
Prevention
Unfortunately, there is no way to prevent plants from dying of “old age.” To help prolong their life, and put off symptoms of aged yellow and dry for as long as possible, take care of them by giving them enough water, fertilizing them appropriately, and making sure they get enough sunlight.
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Flower withering
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Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Overview
Overview
Flower withering occurs when flowers become weak, droopy, wilted, or faded until they can’t be revived. During withering, they begin to wrinkle and shrink until the flower becomes completely dry or dead.
Any flowers, regardless of the plant type or the climate they are grown in, are susceptible to withering. It is a worldwide problem across houseplants, herbs, flowering ornamentals, trees, shrubs, garden vegetables, and food crops.
Unlike wilting—which withering is often confused with—withering can be caused by different things and is often due to more than a lack of water. Withering can be fatal in severe cases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Flower withering progresses from very mild cases to severe occurrences that kill the flower. The severity of the symptoms is related to the cause and how long the condition is allowed to progress before action is taken.
  • Wilted, droopy flowers
  • Petals and leaves begin to wrinkle
  • Brown papery streaks or spots appear on the petals and leaf tips
  • Flowerhead shrink in size
  • Petal color fades
  • Yellowing leaves
  • Complete death of the flower
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The main causes of flower withering include natural age progress, lack of water, nutritional deficiencies, and bacterial or fungal diseases. It’s critical to determine the underlying cause when flower withering is noticed. This will guide the best course of action, if treatment is possible.
Check the soil for moisture and then closely examine the entire plant for signs of nutrient deficiencies. If neither of those appears to be the cause then cut open the stem below a flower. If a cross-section reveals brown or rust-colored stains it is safe to assume that this is a bacterial or fungal infection.
If the flower is nearing the end of its normal lifespan, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence, or cell aging and death. Cell division stops and the plant begins breaking down resources within the flower to use in other parts of the plant.
In all other cases, flower withering happens when the plant seals off the stem as a defense mechanism, stopping transport within the vascular system. This prevents further water loss through the flowers but also stops bacteria and fungi from moving to healthy parts of the plant. Once water and nutrient transport stops, the flower begins to wither and ultimately die.
Solutions
Solutions
If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface.
In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well.
If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Prevention
Prevention
This is definitely one of those instances where prevention is more effective than cure. Here are some preventative measures for avoiding premature flower withering.
  • Water plants according to their needs -- either keep the soil slightly moist or allow the top inch or two to dry out before watering again.
  • Fertilize lightly on a consistent basis, depending upon the plant’s growth. Quick-growing plants and those that flower or develop fruit will need more frequent fertilizing than slow-growing plants.
  • Purchase plants that are certified disease- or pathogen-free.
  • Look for disease-resistant cultivars.
  • Isolate plants showing disease symptoms to prevent the spread to neighboring plants.
  • Practice good plant hygiene by removing any fallen plant material as soon as possible.
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Leaf rot
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Leaf rot
This pathogen can cause the leaves to rot.
Overview
Overview
Leaf rot is very common among both house plants and garden plants. It affects foliage and occurs mainly when the leaves become wet due to rain or misting by the gardener. The cause is fungal disease and this is facilitated by the fungal spores adhering to wet leaves then penetrating the leaf and expanding rapidly. Damp conditions and poor air circulation will increase chances of infection taking place. Another factor are leaves that are damaged or have been penetrated by sap sucking insects that facilitate plant penetration.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
  1. Spores are able to cling to a damp leaf and penetrate, often through an existing wound.
  2. A small dark brown mark appears which expands rapidly as sporulation starts to take place.
  3. Quite quickly these bull's eye like circles can link together and the whole leaf turns dark and loses texture.
  4. Leaf drop occurs.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
These symptoms are caused by a bacterial infection invading the plant. Bacteria from many sources in the environment (air, water, soil, diseased plants) enter a plant through wounds, or in some cases the stomata when they are open. Once inside the leaf tissue, the bacteria feed and reproduce quickly, breaking down healthy leaves.
Bacterial infections threaten most plant species, and are more prominent in wet weather that more easily transfers the bacteria from plant to plant, or from soil to plant.
Solutions
Solutions
Bacterial infections need to be treated quickly to prevent the spread to neighboring, healthy plants, potentially wiping out large sections of your indoor or outdoor garden.
In mild cases: Use sterilized (10% bleach solution) pruning shears or scissors to remove any infected plant parts, making sure to dispose of them off site. Use a copper-based bactericide to treat the unaffected foliage, as well as the soil, and neighboring plants. Follow the manufacturer’s rate and timing directions found on the product label.
In severe cases, where more than half the leaves are affected: Remove all of the infected plants from the garden, disposing of them off site. Treat the soil and neighboring plants using a copper-based bactericide. Follow the manufacturer’s rate and timing directions found on the product label.
Prevention
Prevention
  1. Clean up garden debris at the end of the season, especially if it contains any diseased plant tissue. Diseases can overwinter from season to season and infect new plants.
  2. Avoid overhead watering to prevent transferring pathogens from one plant to another, and to keep foliage dry.
  3. Mulch around the base of plants to prevent soil-borne bacteria from splashing up onto uninfected plants.
  4. Sterilize cutting tools using a 10% bleach solution when gardening and moving from one plant to another.
  5. Do not work in your garden when it is wet.
  6. Rotate crops to prevent the buildup of bacteria in one site due to continuous cropping.
  7. Use a copper or streptomycin-containing bactericide in early spring to prevent infection. Read label directions carefully as they are not suitable for all plants.
  8. Ensure plants are well spaced and thin leaves on densely leaved plants so that air circulation is maximised.
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plant_info

More Info

Flower Color
Flower Color
Red
Orange
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Spring, Mid winter, Late winter
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green

Usages

Garden Use
Propeller Plant is a lovely ornamental that works well in sunny, dry rock or succulent gardens and patio pots. While the unique leaves provide interest throughout every season, it produces showy red flowers in the summer. It can grow quite tall, making it perfect as a border plant or accent plant alongside other succulents.
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