camera identify
Try for Free
tab list
PictureThis
English
arrow
English
繁體中文
日本語
Español
Français
Deutsch
Pусский
Português
Italiano
한국어
Nederlands
العربية
Svenska
Polskie
ภาษาไทย
Bahasa Melayu
Bahasa Indonesia
PictureThis
Search
Search Plants
Try for Free
Global
English
English
繁體中文
日本語
Español
Français
Deutsch
Pусский
Português
Italiano
한국어
Nederlands
العربية
Svenska
Polskie
ภาษาไทย
Bahasa Melayu
Bahasa Indonesia
This page looks better in the app
about about
About
plant_info plant_info
More Info
distribution_map distribution_map
Distribution
topic topic
Care FAQ
care_scenes care_scenes
More About How-Tos
pic top
Fire barrel cactus
Fire barrel cactus
Fire barrel cactus
Fire barrel cactus
Fire barrel cactus
Ferocactus gracilis
Native to Mexico, the fire barrel cactus can be found in rocky habitats and gravelly plains. While young, it resembles a barrel in shape, but as it ages it becomes more cylindrical. Some specimens can become exceptionally tall, reaching a height of around 3 meters. This species is known to thrive in a symbiotic relationship with ants.
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
9 to 11
more
plant_info

Key Facts About Fire barrel cactus

feedback
Feedback
feedback

Attributes of Fire barrel cactus

Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Succulent
Bloom Time
Late spring, Early summer
Plant Height
1.5 m
Spread
30 cm
Flower Color
Yellow
Gold
Red
Fruit Color
Yellow
Leaf type
Evergreen
Ideal Temperature
20 - 38 ℃

Scientific Classification of Fire barrel cactus

icon
Find your perfect green friends.
Plan your green oasis based on your criteria: plant type, pet safety, skill level, sites, and more.
distribution

Distribution of Fire barrel cactus

feedback
Feedback
feedback

Distribution Map of Fire barrel cactus

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
habit
question

Questions About Fire barrel cactus

feedback
Feedback
feedback
Watering Watering Watering
Sunlight Sunlight Sunlight
Temperature Temperature Temperature
What should I do if I water my Fire barrel cactus too much or too little?
Underwatered Fire barrel cactus
Fire barrel cactus and other succulents can endure long periods without water, so it’s unusual to find one of these suffering from underwatering. But, if you somehow forgot about your plant and neglected to water it for a month or more, you’ll probably find your Fire barrel cactus looking thirsty or with some damage from lack of watering.
It is very easy to identify an underwatered Fire barrel cactus. Plant look lacklustre and wrinkled. Some may have dried up completely, turned brown and crispy, or dropped off the plant. And of course, the soil will be completely dried out.
If your Fire barrel cactus is thirsty and underwatered, give it plenty of water as soon as possible. Submerging the pot entirely in water for about 5-10 minutes is a good way to make sure the soil and plant are rehydrated properly. When you feel a sense of moisture on the surface of the soil with your finger, it means the watering is done properly.
Overwatered Fire barrel cactus
Overwatering is dangerous to Fire barrel cactus and can be fatal to your plant if you don’t remedy the situation. Too much moisture over time leads to root rot, which prevents the roots from being able to absorb nutrients and water from the soil. Root rot occurs when wet conditions allow fungi and bacteria to flourish in the soil and feed on roots. When you find that it's overwatered, you'd better change the growing conditions, place it somewhere with more air ventilation and adjust water frequency, for example.
The symptoms of overwatering are yellow, swollen, and translucent organs that may even burst open from being over-full with water. If the problem continues without being treated, plant might turn brown or black, and fall off the plant at the slightest touch. Be sure to check the soil to determine if overwatering is the culprit, as some other issues can cause similar symptoms.
It’s a bit difficult (but not impossible) to save an overwatered plant. The key is catching it early before a lot of damage has occurred. If the roots become rotten, it is likely to kill the entire plant. If you suspect you have overwatered your Fire barrel cactus, the first step is to remove it from its pot and check the roots and soil.
After removing the plant from its pot, gently remove wet soil from around the roots and then rinse them clean in room-temperature water. This helps with removing fungus that might be lurking in the soil and allows you to get a better sense of how healthy the roots are. If your plant has already developed root rot, you will see roots that are dark brown or black, soft, mushy, or slimy.
If the majority of the roots are already affected by root rot, it may not be possible to save the plant. In this case, it is best to remove any healthy stem and try to use these to propagate a new Fire barrel cactus. If, on the other hand, only a portion of the roots have succumbed to rot and other healthy roots still remain, there is a chance it can be saved.
Use a sterilized cutting tool to remove any unhealthy-looking roots. Once you're left with only the firm, pale roots, it’s a good idea to dip them in a fungicide to kill off any remaining spores. After that you can repot your Fire barrel cactus in fresh, free-draining potting soil. While this does not always work to save a succulent with root rot, in most cases this plant will be able to make a full recovery and will put out new growth starting in the next growing season.
Read More more
How often should I water my Fire barrel cactus?
There’s not a hard-and-fast rule for how often to water Fire barrel cactus. The best way to determine this is to check the soil and only water when it’s bone dry. You can either stick your finger in the pot or use a moisture meter to check the soil below the surface. When you plant it in a deep pot, you can do this with a stick or chopstick. If it feels even a little bit moist, wait a few days and check it again.
Most people will need to water Fire barrel cactus about every two weeks in summer and once a month in winter, but there are several factors that can change the frequency. The section below lists some considerations that can help you to determine how often to water.
Read More more
What should I consider when watering my Fire barrel cactus?
There are several environmental conditions that will affect how your Fire barrel cactus needs to be watered, including the container size, soil type, temperature, and humidity.
First off, the container and soil you use will determine how often to water and how much water to use each time. Be sure you use a container with plenty of drainage holes in the bottom so extra water can escape the pot. A small container has less room for soil, meaning it won’t hold as much moisture, while a larger pot will stay wet longer and need to be watered less often. It’s important not to keep your Fire barrel cactus in an oversized pot as this can easily lead to overwatering. When repotting, move to just one size larger than the current container. A shallow container works better than a deep one, since Fire barrel cactus has shallow root systems.
Fire barrel cactus will need to be watered less often in winter and more often in the active growing season in spring and autumn. During the winter, growth slows down considerably and the plant isn’t using much energy or water. There is less water lost to evaporation in cooler winter air, meaning that soil stays wet for much longer than it would in the summer.
This also applies to the general climate around your home. If you live in a humid location with a lot of rain, you will need to water less often than if you live in a dry, arid climate. Remember that conditions at the same geographic location can vary significantly with the season and the use of indoor heating and air conditioning.
Outdoor Planting
If Fire barrel cactus is planted in the ground, after establishing a root system, it shouldn’t need supplemental water beyond what it receives through precipitation and dew. But if there is a long dry period, you may want to water occasionally. In other areas where Fire barrel cactus can only be grown in a container, this plant can be moved outside in the spring and summer when the temperature is proper and then brought back inside when temperatures start to drop. A potted Fire barrel cactus kept outside usually needs more water than the same plant kept indoors, because there is a lot more sun exposure even on a shaded porch.
Read More more
How to water Fire barrel cactus?
The best way to water Fire barrel cactus is to soak it thoroughly and then allow it to dry out before it gets watered again. Since this plant is somewhat drought tolerant, you can let it get quite dry before watering again. It is always better to give this type of plant too little water over too much.
When you water, make sure the soil gets thoroughly soaked throughout the whole pot. Don’t pour the water in just one spot, but rather try to go around the whole rim of the planter to be sure that it has a chance to get wet on all sides of the plant. The correct amount of water will depend on the size of your container and how much water your soil absorbs. Give your Fire barrel cactus enough water that it drains out from the drainage holes and then (ideally) leave the drained water in the saucer for about 20-30 minutes to absorb into dry pockets of soil. After that, discard any excess water that’s still in the saucer to avoid the soil getting waterlogged.
Bottom-watering is also an excellent method for Fire barrel cactus, as you can be sure that the soil gets thoroughly moistened. This process involves placing the pot into a saucer of water and allowing the soil to absorb moisture through the drainage holes. You will know that the soil has absorbed enough water when the top layer is moist. This takes a bit more time than top-watering, but is almost foolproof in getting an even distribution of water throughout the pot.
The original habitat of Fire barrel cactus is relatively dry with little rain, but when it rains, the soil will be thoroughly moistened. So you can mimic this situation by bottom-watering your plant when the soil is totally dry. Deep soil bathing is better than frequent light watering for Fire barrel cactus.
Read More more
icon
Get tips and tricks for your plants.
Keep your plants happy and healthy with our guide to watering, lighting, feeding and more.
close
care_scenes

More Info on Fire Barrel Cactus Growth and Care

feedback
Feedback
Basic Care Guide
Temperature
0 - 43 ℃
Fire barrel cactus is indigenous to warm environments, favoring temperatures between 68 to 100 °F (20 to 38 ℃). It appreciates milder climates and may require modified care—less watering and possibly insulating—in colder or hotter conditions.
Temp for Healthy Growth
close
product icon
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
Your Ultimate Guide to Plants
Identify grow and nurture the better way!
product icon
17,000 local species +400,000 global species studied
product icon
Nearly 5 years of research
product icon
80+ scholars in botany and gardening
ad
ad
Botanist in your pocket
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
About
More Info
Distribution
Care FAQ
More About How-Tos
Fire barrel cactus
Fire barrel cactus
Fire barrel cactus
Fire barrel cactus
Fire barrel cactus
Ferocactus gracilis
Native to Mexico, the fire barrel cactus can be found in rocky habitats and gravelly plains. While young, it resembles a barrel in shape, but as it ages it becomes more cylindrical. Some specimens can become exceptionally tall, reaching a height of around 3 meters. This species is known to thrive in a symbiotic relationship with ants.
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
9 to 11
more
plant_info

Key Facts About Fire barrel cactus

feedback
Feedback
feedback

Attributes of Fire barrel cactus

Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Succulent
Bloom Time
Late spring, Early summer
Plant Height
1.5 m
Spread
30 cm
Flower Color
Yellow
Gold
Red
Fruit Color
Yellow
Leaf type
Evergreen
Ideal Temperature
20 - 38 ℃
icon
Gain more valuable plant knowledge
Explore a rich botanical encyclopedia for deeper insights
Download the App

Scientific Classification of Fire barrel cactus

icon
Never miss a care task again!
Plant care made easier than ever with our tailor-made smart care reminder.
Download the App
distribution

Distribution of Fire barrel cactus

feedback
Feedback
feedback

Distribution Map of Fire barrel cactus

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
question

Questions About Fire barrel cactus

feedback
Feedback
feedback
Watering Watering Watering
Sunlight Sunlight Sunlight
Temperature Temperature Temperature
What should I do if I water my Fire barrel cactus too much or too little?
more
How often should I water my Fire barrel cactus?
more
What should I consider when watering my Fire barrel cactus?
more
How to water Fire barrel cactus?
more
icon
Get tips and tricks for your plants.
Keep your plants happy and healthy with our guide to watering, lighting, feeding and more.
Download the App
close
care_scenes

More Info on Fire Barrel Cactus Growth and Care

feedback
Basic Care Guide
product icon close
Your Ultimate Guide to Plants
Identify grow and nurture the better way!
product icon
17,000 local species +400,000 global species studied
product icon
Nearly 5 years of research
product icon
80+ scholars in botany and gardening
ad
product icon close
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
Temperature
close
Indoor
Indoor
Outdoor
Choose a site here for personalized care tips.
Requirements
Ideal
Tolerable
Unsuitable
Just like people, each plant has its own preferences. Learn about your plants' temperature needs and create a comforting environment for them to flourish. As you care for your plants, your bond with them will deepen. Trust your intuition as you learn about their temperature needs, celebrating the journey you share. Lovingly monitor the temperature around your plants and adjust their environment as needed. A thermometer can be your ally in this heartfelt endeavor. Be patient and gentle with yourself as you explore your plants' temperature needs. Cherish your successes, learn from challenges, and nurture your garden with love, creating a haven that reflects the warmth of your care.
Essentials
Fire barrel cactus is indigenous to warm environments, favoring temperatures between 68 to 100 °F (20 to 38 ℃). It appreciates milder climates and may require modified care—less watering and possibly insulating—in colder or hotter conditions.
Regional wintering strategies
Fire barrel cactus is a heat-loving plant that gradually stops growing and enters a dormant state during the winter. When the outdoor temperature drops below {Tolerable_growing_temperature_min}, it should be moved indoors for cultivation. Choose a location near a south-facing window to provide as much sunlight as possible. If there is insufficient natural light, supplemental lighting can be used. When the temperature falls below {Suitable_growth_temperature_min}, the plant's growth slows down, and watering should be reduced or stopped to prevent root rot. For Fire barrel cactus grown outdoors, watering should be completely halted during low temperatures. If feasible, you can set up a temporary greenhouse for insulation or use materials such as plastic film or fabric to wrap the plant during cold temperatures.
Important Symptoms
Symptoms of Low Temperature in Fire barrel cactus
Fire barrel cactus thrives in high temperatures and is not tolerant of low temperatures. It grows best when the temperature is above {Suitable_growth_temperature_min}. During winter, it should be kept above {Tolerable_growing_temperature_min}. When the temperature falls below {Limit_growth_temperature}, the plant may become weak, wilt, and be prone to root rot. In cases of mild frost damage, there may not be any initial symptoms, but after a week, the plant will gradually wither.
Solutions
Trim off the frostbitten areas, paying attention to whether the roots have rotted. If the roots have rotted, they need to be cut off, and the plant can be propagated through cuttings. Immediately move indoors to a warm environment and place the plant near a south-facing window to ensure ample sunlight. If there is insufficient light, you can use supplemental lighting.
Symptoms of High Temperature in Fire barrel cactus
During summer, Fire barrel cactus should be kept below {Suitable_growth_temperature_max}. When the temperature exceeds {Tolerable_growing_temperature_max}, the plant's growth will cease, it will experience water loss, wilting, and becomes more susceptible to sunburn.
Solutions
Remove the sunburned and rotten parts. Shield the plant from afternoon sunlight until it recovers and starts growing again. For plants with root rot, stop watering until new roots begin to emerge.
Discover information about plant diseases, toxicity, weed control and more.
Cookie Management Tool
In addition to managing cookies through your browser or device, you can change your cookie settings below.
Necessary Cookies
Necessary cookies enable core functionality. The website cannot function properly without these cookies, and can only be disabled by changing your browser preferences.
Analytical Cookies
Analytical cookies help us to improve our application/website by collecting and reporting information on its usage.
Cookie Name Source Purpose Lifespan
_ga Google Analytics These cookies are set because of our use of Google Analytics. They are used to collect information about your use of our application/website. The cookies collect specific information, such as your IP address, data related to your device and other information about your use of the application/website. Please note that the data processing is essentially carried out by Google LLC and Google may use your data collected by the cookies for own purposes, e.g. profiling and will combine it with other data such as your Google Account. For more information about how Google processes your data and Google’s approach to privacy as well as implemented safeguards for your data, please see here. 1 Year
_pta PictureThis Analytics We use these cookies to collect information about how you use our site, monitor site performance, and improve our site performance, our services, and your experience. 1 Year
Cookie Name
_ga
Source
Google Analytics
Purpose
These cookies are set because of our use of Google Analytics. They are used to collect information about your use of our application/website. The cookies collect specific information, such as your IP address, data related to your device and other information about your use of the application/website. Please note that the data processing is essentially carried out by Google LLC and Google may use your data collected by the cookies for own purposes, e.g. profiling and will combine it with other data such as your Google Account. For more information about how Google processes your data and Google’s approach to privacy as well as implemented safeguards for your data, please see here.
Lifespan
1 Year

Cookie Name
_pta
Source
PictureThis Analytics
Purpose
We use these cookies to collect information about how you use our site, monitor site performance, and improve our site performance, our services, and your experience.
Lifespan
1 Year
Marketing Cookies
Marketing cookies are used by advertising companies to serve ads that are relevant to your interests.
Cookie Name Source Purpose Lifespan
_fbp Facebook Pixel A conversion pixel tracking that we use for retargeting campaigns. Learn more here. 1 Year
_adj Adjust This cookie provides mobile analytics and attribution services that enable us to measure and analyze the effectiveness of marketing campaigns, certain events and actions within the Application. Learn more here. 1 Year
Cookie Name
_fbp
Source
Facebook Pixel
Purpose
A conversion pixel tracking that we use for retargeting campaigns. Learn more here.
Lifespan
1 Year

Cookie Name
_adj
Source
Adjust
Purpose
This cookie provides mobile analytics and attribution services that enable us to measure and analyze the effectiveness of marketing campaigns, certain events and actions within the Application. Learn more here.
Lifespan
1 Year
This page looks better in the app
Open