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Distribution
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Maca
Maca
Maca
Lepidium meyenii
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Fall
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Key Facts About Maca

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Attributes of Maca

Lifespan
Biennial, Perennial, Annual
Plant Type
Herb
Planting Time
Spring, Fall
Bloom Time
Summer, Fall
Leaf type
Evergreen
Ideal Temperature
20 - 35 ℃

Scientific Classification of Maca

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distribution

Distribution of Maca

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Distribution Map of Maca

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Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
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Questions About Maca

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Watering Watering Watering
Sunlight Sunlight Sunlight
Temperature Temperature Temperature
What is the best way to water my Maca?
Not only does the Maca have certain preferences regarding how much water it receives, but it also cares deeply about how you provide that water. In fact, if you don't use the proper watering technique, you risk harming your tomatoes. The best way to water Maca is to apply the water directly to the soil in a slow and gentle manner. You should not pour all of the water into the soil at once, and you should not do overhead watering for your Maca. Although you should water slowly, you should also water deeply to ensure that all of the soil in which your Maca grows is sufficiently moist.
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What should I do if I water my Maca too much or too little?
If you find that you have overwatered your Maca and you are concerned about the associated risk of disease, you should intervene immediately. Often the best approach for an overwatered Maca is to uproot it from its current growing location. Once the plant is out of the ground, you can allow its roots to dry a bit before planting it in a new growing location. Ensure that the new growing location has soil with good drainage. If you grow in pots, you may also want to move your plant to a pot with more or larger drainage holes. In the case of underwatering, all you will need to do is increase the frequency with which you supply water to your plant.
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How often should I water my Maca?
Overall, Maca requires a significant amount of water throughout the growing season. To meet that high water need, you'll need to water early and often throughout the spring and summer. During the earlier parts of the growing season, you should water your Maca about once or twice per week. As the season progresses, you should increase your watering frequency. You may need to water it twice per day or more during summer, depending on the weather. After your Maca have gone through their major seasonal growth phases, you can reduce the frequency of your watering to about once per week until the end of the growing season.
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How much water does my Maca need?
Since Maca are incredibly popular, with many professional and amateur gardeners growing them successfully, we have a pretty clear idea of how to care for these plants. That understanding includes specific knowledge about the precise volume of water an average Maca should receive. Generally, Maca will require about 1 - 1.5 inches of water per week. That volume should be dispersed evenly through your weekly watering. As the weather gets warmer, you may need to supply more water, but in most cases, two inches per week is a good baseline amount.
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How can I tell if i'm watering my Maca enough?
Underwatering and overwatering can both occur as problems for your Maca, and both these problems can manifest with similar symptoms. For example, foliage discoloration and wilting can both result from either overwatering or underwatering. When your Maca is underwatered, its leaves will be curling and drooping at the beginning. You will see a bunch of leaves turn less vigorous. Underwatering is also likely to cause stunted growth and poor overall development as both the flowers and this plant require a high amount of water. Overwatering is more likely to lead to disease, including rot. Overwatering may also lead to unpleasant smells rising from your plant's soil. The symptoms of underwatering will show up quicker than overwatering. Overwatering can also be evident in soil conditions. Mainly, if you notice a lot of standing water or waterlogged soils, overwatering is likely to occur.
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How should I water my Maca through the seasons?
As alluded to above, your Maca's water needs will repeatedly change throughout the seasons. During most of spring and summer, you should water your Maca about once every week. As the heat of summer arrives, you should plan to increase your watering frequency to once or twice per day. In the late summer and fall, towards the end of the harvest period, you can reduce your watering frequency to about once per week. After harvest has ended, you can cease watering as your Maca has reached the end of its life cycle and will require no further soil moisture. The maintenance schedule of Maca will require you to alter the amount of water you provide depending on the plant's current growth stage. Early on, especially if you grow your Maca from seeds, you'll need to provide water often enough to maintain consistent soil moisture, which encourages root development. When the plant becomes old enough to produce flowers, it will likely need even more water. During the fruit development growth stage, your Maca will likely need the most water out of any growth period, at times requiring water more than twice per day. Following that phase, the water needs of Maca will decline significantly.
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What's the difference between watering Maca indoors and outdoors?
Whether you grow Maca indoors or outdoors can also play a role in how you water them. Maca that grows outdoors may receive water from natural rainfall, which will reduce the amount of supplemental water you should supply. However, it is incredibly rare for rainfall to adequately replace your watering entirely. Plants that grow indoors, along with any Maca that grows in a container, will need to be watered more frequently than those that grow in the ground outdoors. If you choose this route, please make sure that the plant gets enough water by checking the soil moisture within your pot often to keep your Maca healthy.
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Plants Related to Maca

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Sea fig
Sea fig
Sea fig is an edible, ornamental succulent. The plant's leaves can be eaten raw in salads or cooked. However, its fruit is very sour if it is not ripe. In warm temperate coastal areas, it has become an invasive weed.
Wingstem
Wingstem
Wingstem (Verbesina alternifolia) is a flowering plant native to wooded areas of central and eastern North America. Wingstem is also referred to as yellow ironweed. This plant attracts moths and butterflies by serving as their larval host.
Portia Tree
Portia Tree
Portia Tree (Thespesia populnea) is a tropical, evergreen tree valued for its rich, dark wood. Commonly found growing in coastal areas. Thrives in full sun with moist but well-drained soil. It is drought, wind and salt-tolerant. Edible leaves and fruit can be eaten fresh or cooked. The bark, roots, leaves, flowers and fruit have been used medicinally.
Chamber bitter
Chamber bitter
Chamber bitter is blooms in summer. Its striking branched leaf pattern makes it an attractive ornamental, but it is a weedy plant that takes careful management to stop its seeds from spreading to unwanted areas. It is considered invasive in the southern United States.
New Zealand laurel
New Zealand laurel
The bitter pulp of the new Zealand laurel tree is edible, but use caution, as the fresh kernels are toxic. The Moriori people have historically been known to use a detailed processing method to eat the fruit, but the slightest error could have grave implications.
Artillery plant
Artillery plant
The artillery plant is often utilized as a groundcover or an ornamental in many landscapes. It's commonly named the "artillery plant" because the males generally produce pollen in an explosive way. It grows best in a humid environment in partial shade or indirect sunlight. It's a particularly popular plant in indoor rock gardens.
Poison ivy
Poison ivy
In pop culture, poison ivy is a symbol of an obnoxious weed because, despite its unthreatening looks, it gives a highly unpleasant contact rash to the unfortunate person who touches it. Still, it is commonly eaten by many animals, and the seeds are a favorite with birds. The leaves turn bright red in fall. Its sister species, Western poison ivy (Toxicodendron rydbergii), is not considered to be invasive in the United States, but is noxious in Australia and New Zealand.
Pokeweed
Pokeweed
Although its berries look juicy and tempting, the fruits and the root of pokeweed are toxic and should not be eaten. Pokeweed is considered a pest species by farmers but is nevertheless often grown as an ornamental plant. Its berries can be made into pokeberry ink as well.
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Maca
Maca
Maca
Lepidium meyenii
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Fall
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plant_info

Key Facts About Maca

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Feedback
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Attributes of Maca

Lifespan
Biennial, Perennial, Annual
Plant Type
Herb
Planting Time
Spring, Fall
Bloom Time
Summer, Fall
Leaf type
Evergreen
Ideal Temperature
20 - 35 ℃
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Scientific Classification of Maca

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distribution

Distribution of Maca

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Feedback
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Distribution Map of Maca

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
question

Questions About Maca

feedback
Feedback
feedback
Watering Watering Watering
Sunlight Sunlight Sunlight
Temperature Temperature Temperature
What is the best way to water my Maca?
more
What should I do if I water my Maca too much or too little?
more
How often should I water my Maca?
more
How much water does my Maca need?
more
How can I tell if i'm watering my Maca enough?
more
How should I water my Maca through the seasons?
more
What's the difference between watering Maca indoors and outdoors?
more
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Keep your plants happy and healthy with our guide to watering, lighting, feeding and more.
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plant_info

Plants Related to Maca

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Your Ultimate Guide to Plants
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