camera identify
Try for Free
tab list
PictureThis
English
arrow
English
繁體中文
日本語
Español
Français
Deutsch
Pусский
Português
Italiano
한국어
Nederlands
العربية
Svenska
Polskie
ภาษาไทย
Bahasa Melayu
Bahasa Indonesia
PictureThis
Search
Search Plants
Try for Free
Global
English
English
繁體中文
日本語
Español
Français
Deutsch
Pусский
Português
Italiano
한국어
Nederlands
العربية
Svenska
Polskie
ภาษาไทย
Bahasa Melayu
Bahasa Indonesia
This page looks better in the app
about about
About
key_facts key_facts
Key Facts
toxic toxic
Toxicity
distribution_map distribution_map
Distribution
care_detail care_detail
How To Care
children children
All Species
pupular_genus pupular_genus
More Genus
pic top
Lilies
Lilies
Lilies
Lilies
Lilies (Lilium)
Among the florist's favorites, lilies are long-blooming plants and provide large and showy focal points for flower arrangements. They're simple to grow and offer lovely contrasts in terms of color, especially during the middle of summer when many other flowers fade in the heat. In addition to the visual display, lilies emit a sweet scent that fills the air with a lovely fragrance. They are, however, toxic to cats, so care must be taken around pets.
Lifespan
Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Plant Type
Herb/Vine
info

Key Facts About Lilies

feedback
Feedback
feedback

Attributes of Lilies

Plant Height
30 cm to 1.8 m
Spread
20 cm to 60 cm
Flower Size
8 cm to 15 cm
Flower Color
White
Yellow
Red
Orange
Pink
Leaf type
Deciduous
Ideal Temperature
0 - 38 ℃

Scientific Classification of Lilies

toxic

Lilies and Their Toxicity

feedback
Feedback
feedback
* The judgment on toxicity and danger is for reference only. We DO NOT GUARANTEE any accuracy of such judgment. Therefore, you SHALL NOT rely on such judgment. It is IMPORTANT TO SEEK PROFESSIONAL ADVICE in advance when necessary.
Toxic to Cats
Toxic to Cats
It is vital that cats are kept away from all varieties of lilies. Every part of the plant is fatally toxic, as is the water the plant may be kept in. Eating just a tiny bit, or even licking the pollen that might fall upon the cat's fur, can cause severe illness and sometimes death. Symptoms include excessive drooling, vomiting, and loss of appetite. The cat's condition will deteriorate quickly so you must get them medical attention quickly.
icon
Identify toxic plants in your garden
Find out what’s toxic and what’s safe for your loved one.
close
Who Is Most at Risk of Plant Poisoning?
Your pets like cats and dogs can be poisoned by them as well!
1
Do not let your lovely pets eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
2
It’s better to kill those growing around your house. Wear long-sleeved shirts, pants and gloves with sharp tools to dig it out completely;
3
Clean the tools with rubbing alcohol or soap and water but do not do that with bare hands;
4
Clean your hands and skin once exposed to plants with soap and water;
5
Consider using barrier creams that contain bentoquatam to prevent poison oak, ivy and sumac rashes;
6
Dump it in special trash cans in sealed garbage packages, and do not let your pets reach it;Do not let your lovely pets eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
7
If you take your pets to hike with you in the wild, please don’t let them eat any plants that you don’t know;
8
Once your pets eat, touch or inhale anything from toxic plants and act abnormally, please call the doctors for help ASAP!
pets
Pets
Some pets are less likely than children to eat and touch just about everything. This is good, as a pet owner. However, you know your pet best, and it is up to you to keep them safe. There are plenty of poisonous weeds that can grow within the confines of your lawn, which might make your dogs or cats ill or worse if they eat them. Try to have an idea of what toxic plants grow in your area and keep them under control and your pets away from them.
pets
Common Toxic Houseplants
Common Toxic Houseplants
When it comes to decorating a house, there is nothing more refreshing than adding some beautiful houseplants. Some common house plants can also be toxic.

Aloe

aloe
Aloe is famous for its sunburn-soothing properties and its gorgeous desert design. However, many people do not realize that the latex the aloe vera plant produces can be mildly toxic to pets and children.

The latex contains a chemical compound known as saponin. Which when ingested, can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and low blood sugar. This, if left unchecked, can lead to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. The proper response is to contact poison control or a veterinarian to know what to do in your particular circumstance if either your child or pet consumes aloe.

The latex of the plant is similar to the sap of the tree. It is inside the leaf, but sticks mainly toward the edges. If aloe gel is prepared properly it should be safe for use, but be sure to apply it only topically when treating burns.

Philodendron

Philodendron
Philodendron, also known as sweetheart vine, has become a resident at many houses and even businesses. They are glossy green and the leaves elegantly split, displaying interesting designs. Behind this beauty there is a needle-like toxin called calcium oxalate crystals.

These crystals are held within the plant and only affect you, your pets, or your loved ones if the plant tissue is broken. If ingested, the crystals can cause severe swelling, difficulty breathing, stomach pain, burning and pain. If they are accidentally caught on the skin, they can cause skin irritation.

If anyone accidentally ingests philodendron and they find it difficult to breathe or their tongue starts to swell up, it is important to seek medical attention immediately to avoid suffocation. If you have very young children or pets who have a tendency to tear at plants, keep them away from any philodendrons.

Peace Lily

Peace Lily
Peace lilies produce stunningly white flowers that bring to mind peace and serenity. This is one reason they are invited into our homes and given a place to stay. However, similar to philodendrons, the peace lily contains oxalate crystals known as raphides.

The raphides, once ingested, will cause swelling and burning sensations and can also cause skin irritation. Both pets and humans can get these symptoms so it is important to keep these plants from anyone who is likely to tear or chew it. Symptoms can become dire if the raphides cause the tongue and throat to swell to a point where the person or pet is having difficulty breathing. Seek proper medical attention if this is the case.

Snake Plant

Snake Plant
The snake plant is an interesting and popular house plant. Its stark architecture and wavy coloring has made it a fan favorite. This plant too, however, is toxic when ingested or if the sap touches your skin.

Snake plant sap will cause rashes if it comes into contact with your skin. In addition, it will cause diarrhea and vomiting when ingested. Again these symptoms are very serious and would be best avoided by keeping snake plants out of reach or by choosing a different houseplant.
Common Toxic Garden Plants
Common Toxic Garden Plants

Daffodil

Daffodil
Daffodils are a strikingly colorful flower. This can sometimes bring them much attention not from just onlooking adults but children as well. Since kids are more drawn to colorful objects, they may have a higher chance of just grabbing the flower and eating it. Adults have also been known to accidentally grab daffodil bulbs instead of onions.

Why are these mistakes so dangerous? Daffodils contain lycorine, which can induce nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It also contains oxalates which can cause swelling and pain. The symptoms can be worse in animals, because if your pets eat daffodils they may experience drowsiness, low blood pressure or even liver damage.

Make sure to call poison control when these symptoms set in. The vomiting and diarrhea have been known to go away after 3 hours, but it is better to be safe than sorry. Ingesting liquids to keep hydration up can be important. If the patient is having difficulty breathing, seek medical attention immediately.

Hydrangea

Hydrangea
Hydrangeas are unique, with their soft blue and pink flowers. They are a great addition to any garden, but should not be snacked on—not that you would want to. Hydrangeas can be especially nasty because they contain compounds known as glycosides. These will release hydrogen cyanide into the bloodstream when consumed. This will block your body’s ability to uptake oxygen to the cells in your body.

The way to combat this kind of poisoning is through getting IVs from the vet or doctor. It is important to contact your medical professional immediately since the symptoms can be fatal within minutes or hours.

Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons
Rhododendron, the state flower of Washington, is also toxic. The multitudinous, pink flowers can be quite dangerous. All parts of this plant are toxic, the leaves and seeds more so than the flowers. However, even the nectar of the flower is toxic and in the Mediterranean, where rhododendrons grow in more dense quantities, the honey from bees who gather rhododendron nectar can be poisonous.

Normally kids and pets do not eat enough to experience the full poisoning effect. However, just eating two leaves is enough to be considered dangerous. The grayanotoxin glycosides within the rhododendron can cause vomiting, diarrhea and irregular heartbeats. Things can get very serious when too much rhododendron is consumed and can lead to necessary medical intervention.

Start by calling poison control first if you suspect anyone has been munching on rhododendrons. The experts there will be able to help guide you through the necessary processes to cure your loved one.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb
Yummy rhubarb has a nasty side to it. While the stems are used in many recipes, including for rhubarb strawberry pie, the leaves are toxic. They contain oxalic acid which is known to blister the mouth, cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and kidney stones. The leaves are known to be more toxic to pets than humans, but in either case, it is important to contact poison control immediately to figure out necessary steps to cure the patient.
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard

Bittersweet Nightshade

Bittersweet Nightshade
Nightshade is an invasive, noxious weed that is extremely poisonous. It has been found along the East and West Coast of the U.S. It makes its home in areas with disturbed soil. This could be near your garden or areas that have recently had bushes/trees put in.

These plants are dark green with purple flowers that develop into bright red berries. The whole plant is toxic and should be avoided by pets and children alike. If ingested it can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The colorful berries are especially enticing to young children. If you see any plants that look similar to tomato or pepper plants that you did not plant in your yard, it is best to just pull them immediately.

Call poison control immediately if you think someone has fallen victim to nightshade.

Buttercups

Buttercups
Buttercups are found throughout the United States, especially in wet areas. The shiny, yellow flowers will pop up in the springtime, accompanying their dandelion friends. However, unlike dandelions, buttercups are not edible.

Buttercups will release a compound called protoanemonin. This toxin is known to cause vomiting, diarrhea, bloody stool, hypersalivation, depression, blisters, and more. These symptoms will affect both humans and animals. The sap may also cause irritation when it comes into contact with skin. These yellow flowers are dangerous and children should be observed cautiously when around them.

Foxgloves

Foxgloves
Foxgloves are beautiful plants that build towers out of vivid purple bell-shaped blossoms. They are very pretty to look at, but they contain a compound known as digoxin. This chemical is used in certain medicines to help people with certain heart conditions. However, the medicine is made by specialists, whereas someone eating foxgloves will receive unregulated amounts of the chemical.

This toxin can make you vomit and lower your heartbeat. This often causes dizziness and faintness. It is extremely important to call poison control immediately to know what to do in the case of foxglove poisoning. Some people have confused the young leaves of foxglove with borage, making adult foragers at risk as well as kids and pets.
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
Now that you know where to start with toxic plant identification, let us discuss how to either tend to the poisonous plants you decide to keep or get rid of them that plague your yard.

How to Tend to Poisonous Plants

Many plants that are toxic when ingested are also skin irritants. The philodendron is a good example of this. When the sap comes into contact with skin, it can cause a rash to form. To help protect yourself when tending to toxic plants, it is important to wear some sort of gloves.
Tend
Latex gloves may be the best solution due to their disposability. Regular gloves could potentially keep the poisonous sap on their surface. If the gloves aren’t cleaned then you could accidentally touch the irritant or pass it to someone else.

In addition you will want to plan where to keep your deadly beauties. If you have a toxic indoor plant try to keep it up high or out of reach of children and pets. This will keep accidents few and far between. Another idea is keeping your plants in areas that are usually inaccessible to children or pets. Areas such as an office, study room, or guest bedroom could be good locations. If applicable, you could also set up a terrarium for your little plant baby, making it more difficult for curious hands or paws to access.
tend2
If you plan to have outdoor plants, location will be key. You will want to put plants in an area that will be inaccessible to children, pets and even wild animals. You will probably want to avoid planting the plants in the front of your house if kids walk by on a regular basis, just to be cautious. Having the plants behind a fence will be best, but use your discretion when choosing a spot.

How to Get Rid of Poisonous Plants

plants
The easiest but possibly most controversial way to get rid of poisonous plants is by using herbicides. This can be especially easy if you own a grass lawn and use an herbicide that targets broadleaf (non-grass) species. You can find many herbicides meant for yard use by simply searching the term online. Once you have purchased the herbicide you will want to make sure to follow the label posted on the container. If you follow the instructions precisely, then everything should run smoothly for you.

If you don’t plan on using herbicides, there are a few organic methods you can use to try to get rid of toxic plants. You can manually pull the plants out of the ground. This is probably one of the most difficult methods because there is no assurance that you will get the whole plant out this way.

You can also try pouring boiling hot water or spraying white vinegar on the target plants. This may take more time than using a synthetic herbicide, but you can feel a little better about using these products.

You can also try to use wood chips to cover a certain area where you do not want anything to grow. This will not stop all the weeds, but the few that make it through can be easily picked by hand.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
qrcode
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
Who Is Most at Risk of Plant Poisoning?
Everyone should keep the following in mind to prevent being poisoned:
1
Do not eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
2
If you need to kill it, wear long-sleeved shirts, pants and gloves with sharp tools to dig it out completely;
3
Clean the tools with rubbing alcohol or soap and water but do not do that with bare hands;
4
Clean your hands and skin once exposed to plants with soap and water;
5
Consider using barrier creams that contain bentoquatam to prevent poison oak, ivy and sumac rashes;
6
Dump it in special trash cans in sealed garbage packages;
7
Wear properly when you hiking or working in the wilderness. Long pants, long sleeves, gloves, hiking shoes, etc., that protect you from being hurt by any plants;
8
Once you or your family aren’t feeling well after eating, touching or inhaling anything from toxic plants, please call your doctor for help ASAP!
Outdoor Workers
Outdoor Workers and Recreationalists
Those who enjoy the outdoors either as a hobby or as part of their work will rarely see a plant and decide to munch on it (although the scenario is not unheard of). However, they do tend to deal with moving through and brushing aside plants. These people are more at risk of being poisoned by touching toxic plants than by ingesting them.
Outdoor Workers
Foragers
Foragers
Foraging for food and medicinal plants is a desirable skill among people who want to feel at one with the land. This hobby can be very useful and enjoyable, but if done wrong , it can lead to disastrous effects. People who forage are picking and grabbing plants with the full intention of using those plants, most of the time to ingest them.
Foragers
Children
Children
While outdoor workers are more likely to touch poison and foragers are more likely to ingest poison, children can easily do both. These bundles of joy just love to run around and explore the world. They enjoy touching things and occasionally shoving random stuff in their mouth; this is a terrible combination with toxic plants in the mix.
If you let your children run about, it is important to know what are the local toxic plants that they could accidentally get into. Try to educate the children and steer them away from where the toxic plants are located.
Children
Common Toxic Houseplants
Common Toxic Houseplants
When it comes to decorating a house, there is nothing more refreshing than adding some beautiful houseplants. Some common house plants can also be toxic.

Aloe

aloe
Aloe is famous for its sunburn-soothing properties and its gorgeous desert design. However, many people do not realize that the latex the aloe vera plant produces can be mildly toxic to pets and children.

The latex contains a chemical compound known as saponin. Which when ingested, can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and low blood sugar. This, if left unchecked, can lead to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. The proper response is to contact poison control or a veterinarian to know what to do in your particular circumstance if either your child or pet consumes aloe.

The latex of the plant is similar to the sap of the tree. It is inside the leaf, but sticks mainly toward the edges. If aloe gel is prepared properly it should be safe for use, but be sure to apply it only topically when treating burns.

Philodendron

Philodendron
Philodendron, also known as sweetheart vine, has become a resident at many houses and even businesses. They are glossy green and the leaves elegantly split, displaying interesting designs. Behind this beauty there is a needle-like toxin called calcium oxalate crystals.

These crystals are held within the plant and only affect you, your pets, or your loved ones if the plant tissue is broken. If ingested, the crystals can cause severe swelling, difficulty breathing, stomach pain, burning and pain. If they are accidentally caught on the skin, they can cause skin irritation.

If anyone accidentally ingests philodendron and they find it difficult to breathe or their tongue starts to swell up, it is important to seek medical attention immediately to avoid suffocation. If you have very young children or pets who have a tendency to tear at plants, keep them away from any philodendrons.

Peace Lily

Peace Lily
Peace lilies produce stunningly white flowers that bring to mind peace and serenity. This is one reason they are invited into our homes and given a place to stay. However, similar to philodendrons, the peace lily contains oxalate crystals known as raphides.

The raphides, once ingested, will cause swelling and burning sensations and can also cause skin irritation. Both pets and humans can get these symptoms so it is important to keep these plants from anyone who is likely to tear or chew it. Symptoms can become dire if the raphides cause the tongue and throat to swell to a point where the person or pet is having difficulty breathing. Seek proper medical attention if this is the case.

Snake Plant

Snake Plant
The snake plant is an interesting and popular house plant. Its stark architecture and wavy coloring has made it a fan favorite. This plant too, however, is toxic when ingested or if the sap touches your skin.

Snake plant sap will cause rashes if it comes into contact with your skin. In addition, it will cause diarrhea and vomiting when ingested. Again these symptoms are very serious and would be best avoided by keeping snake plants out of reach or by choosing a different houseplant.
Common Toxic Garden Plants
Common Toxic Garden Plants

Daffodil

Daffodil
Daffodils are a strikingly colorful flower. This can sometimes bring them much attention not from just onlooking adults but children as well. Since kids are more drawn to colorful objects, they may have a higher chance of just grabbing the flower and eating it. Adults have also been known to accidentally grab daffodil bulbs instead of onions.

Why are these mistakes so dangerous? Daffodils contain lycorine, which can induce nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It also contains oxalates which can cause swelling and pain. The symptoms can be worse in animals, because if your pets eat daffodils they may experience drowsiness, low blood pressure or even liver damage.

Make sure to call poison control when these symptoms set in. The vomiting and diarrhea have been known to go away after 3 hours, but it is better to be safe than sorry. Ingesting liquids to keep hydration up can be important. If the patient is having difficulty breathing, seek medical attention immediately.

Hydrangea

Hydrangea
Hydrangeas are unique, with their soft blue and pink flowers. They are a great addition to any garden, but should not be snacked on—not that you would want to. Hydrangeas can be especially nasty because they contain compounds known as glycosides. These will release hydrogen cyanide into the bloodstream when consumed. This will block your body’s ability to uptake oxygen to the cells in your body.

The way to combat this kind of poisoning is through getting IVs from the vet or doctor. It is important to contact your medical professional immediately since the symptoms can be fatal within minutes or hours.

Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons
Rhododendron, the state flower of Washington, is also toxic. The multitudinous, pink flowers can be quite dangerous. All parts of this plant are toxic, the leaves and seeds more so than the flowers. However, even the nectar of the flower is toxic and in the Mediterranean, where rhododendrons grow in more dense quantities, the honey from bees who gather rhododendron nectar can be poisonous.

Normally kids and pets do not eat enough to experience the full poisoning effect. However, just eating two leaves is enough to be considered dangerous. The grayanotoxin glycosides within the rhododendron can cause vomiting, diarrhea and irregular heartbeats. Things can get very serious when too much rhododendron is consumed and can lead to necessary medical intervention.

Start by calling poison control first if you suspect anyone has been munching on rhododendrons. The experts there will be able to help guide you through the necessary processes to cure your loved one.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb
Yummy rhubarb has a nasty side to it. While the stems are used in many recipes, including for rhubarb strawberry pie, the leaves are toxic. They contain oxalic acid which is known to blister the mouth, cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and kidney stones. The leaves are known to be more toxic to pets than humans, but in either case, it is important to contact poison control immediately to figure out necessary steps to cure the patient.
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard

Bittersweet Nightshade

Bittersweet Nightshade
Nightshade is an invasive, noxious weed that is extremely poisonous. It has been found along the East and West Coast of the U.S. It makes its home in areas with disturbed soil. This could be near your garden or areas that have recently had bushes/trees put in.

These plants are dark green with purple flowers that develop into bright red berries. The whole plant is toxic and should be avoided by pets and children alike. If ingested it can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The colorful berries are especially enticing to young children. If you see any plants that look similar to tomato or pepper plants that you did not plant in your yard, it is best to just pull them immediately.

Call poison control immediately if you think someone has fallen victim to nightshade.

Buttercups

Buttercups
Buttercups are found throughout the United States, especially in wet areas. The shiny, yellow flowers will pop up in the springtime, accompanying their dandelion friends. However, unlike dandelions, buttercups are not edible.

Buttercups will release a compound called protoanemonin. This toxin is known to cause vomiting, diarrhea, bloody stool, hypersalivation, depression, blisters, and more. These symptoms will affect both humans and animals. The sap may also cause irritation when it comes into contact with skin. These yellow flowers are dangerous and children should be observed cautiously when around them.

Foxgloves

Foxgloves
Foxgloves are beautiful plants that build towers out of vivid purple bell-shaped blossoms. They are very pretty to look at, but they contain a compound known as digoxin. This chemical is used in certain medicines to help people with certain heart conditions. However, the medicine is made by specialists, whereas someone eating foxgloves will receive unregulated amounts of the chemical.

This toxin can make you vomit and lower your heartbeat. This often causes dizziness and faintness. It is extremely important to call poison control immediately to know what to do in the case of foxglove poisoning. Some people have confused the young leaves of foxglove with borage, making adult foragers at risk as well as kids and pets.
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
Now that you know where to start with toxic plant identification, let us discuss how to either tend to the poisonous plants you decide to keep or get rid of them that plague your yard.

How to Tend to Poisonous Plants

Many plants that are toxic when ingested are also skin irritants. The philodendron is a good example of this. When the sap comes into contact with skin, it can cause a rash to form. To help protect yourself when tending to toxic plants, it is important to wear some sort of gloves.
Tend
Latex gloves may be the best solution due to their disposability. Regular gloves could potentially keep the poisonous sap on their surface. If the gloves aren’t cleaned then you could accidentally touch the irritant or pass it to someone else.

In addition you will want to plan where to keep your deadly beauties. If you have a toxic indoor plant try to keep it up high or out of reach of children and pets. This will keep accidents few and far between. Another idea is keeping your plants in areas that are usually inaccessible to children or pets. Areas such as an office, study room, or guest bedroom could be good locations. If applicable, you could also set up a terrarium for your little plant baby, making it more difficult for curious hands or paws to access.
tend2
If you plan to have outdoor plants, location will be key. You will want to put plants in an area that will be inaccessible to children, pets and even wild animals. You will probably want to avoid planting the plants in the front of your house if kids walk by on a regular basis, just to be cautious. Having the plants behind a fence will be best, but use your discretion when choosing a spot.

How to Get Rid of Poisonous Plants

plants
The easiest but possibly most controversial way to get rid of poisonous plants is by using herbicides. This can be especially easy if you own a grass lawn and use an herbicide that targets broadleaf (non-grass) species. You can find many herbicides meant for yard use by simply searching the term online. Once you have purchased the herbicide you will want to make sure to follow the label posted on the container. If you follow the instructions precisely, then everything should run smoothly for you.

If you don’t plan on using herbicides, there are a few organic methods you can use to try to get rid of toxic plants. You can manually pull the plants out of the ground. This is probably one of the most difficult methods because there is no assurance that you will get the whole plant out this way.

You can also try pouring boiling hot water or spraying white vinegar on the target plants. This may take more time than using a synthetic herbicide, but you can feel a little better about using these products.

You can also try to use wood chips to cover a certain area where you do not want anything to grow. This will not stop all the weeds, but the few that make it through can be easily picked by hand.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
qrcode
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
distribution

Distribution of Lilies

feedback
Feedback
feedback

Distribution Map of Lilies

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
habit
care detail

How to Grow and Care for Lilies

feedback
Feedback
feedback
how to grow and care
The lilies genus require careful attention to detail for successful cultivation. Basic care includes full sun exposure with some afternoon shade, consistent moisture without waterlogging, well-drained soil and cooler temperature requirements for the bulb. Common challenges encompass susceptibility to lily beetle, viral diseases, and vulnerability to frost. Seasonal considerations involve providing added mulch for winter protection, regular watering in growth phase during spring, and dead-heading in autumn to optimize energy focus on bulb development.
More Info About Caring for Lilies
species

Exploring the Lilies Plants

feedback
Feedback
feedback
8 most common species:
Lilium candidum
Madonna lily
Madonna lily (Lilium candidum) is a plant species that forms bulbs at ground level and has been cultivated by humans for over 3,000 years. Madonna lily is native to the Balkans and Middle East. This species has great symbolic value in many different cultures. For example, it is a symbol of purity in Roman Catholicism. Madonna lily is susceptible to viral and fungal diseases.
Lilium bulbiferum
Orange lily
Orange lily (Lilium bulbiferum) is a flowering herbaceous lily species native to Europe. This species is toxic to cats. Its scientific name means "bearing bulbs." orange lily is the symbol of the Orange Order, a protestant fraternal order in Ireland.
Lilium longiflorum
Easter lily
Lilium longiflorum, commonly known as easter lily is a perennial bulb, famous for the beautiful fragrance of its large, trumpet-shaped white flowers. It plays an important role in Christianity, as it symbolizes the resurrection of Jesus Christ celebrated during Easter (hence the common name). Easter lily is most often cultivated for cut flowers.
Lilium martagon
Martagon lily
Martagon lily (*Lilium martagon*) is a lily plant native to Europe and Asia, from Portugal to Mongolia. Martagon lily is a commonly cultivated ornamental garden plant, and it is toxic to cats.
Lilium brownii var. viridulum
Lily
Lily (Lilium brownii var. viridulum) is a perennial flower native to Central China. It has trumpet-shaped flowers and its bulb can be cooked and consumed like potatoes. The grated bulb provides starch which is used to thicken soups, and the plant's dried petals are used to flavor soup.
Lilium lancifolium
Tiger lily
Tiger lily gets its name from its flower color: black marks on orange background resemble the skin of a tiger. But keep it away from housecats because it’s poisonous to our feline friends. This is an extremely hardy plant, making it popular in chilly New England.
Lilium formosanum
Formosa lily
Formosa lily (Lilium formosanum) is endemic to Tawain but has become naturalized in certain parts of the Americas, Africa, and Australia. The plant can grow up to 2 m tall and produces large, white, trumpet-shaped flowers that may be up to 30 cm in length. The flowers develop into attractive seed pods that are sometimes used in dried arrangements.
Lilium pensylvanicum
Siberian lily
The siberian lily (Lilium pensylvanicum) is a flowering plant native to Siberia, Mongolia, Korea, northeastern China, and Hokkaido in Japan. The original Latin name Lilium pensylvanicum by botanist John Bellenden Ker is misleading. Siberian lily is considered easy to grow. It is sensitive to drought conditions.

All Species of Lilies

Madonna lily
Lilium candidum
Madonna lily
Madonna lily (Lilium candidum) is a plant species that forms bulbs at ground level and has been cultivated by humans for over 3,000 years. Madonna lily is native to the Balkans and Middle East. This species has great symbolic value in many different cultures. For example, it is a symbol of purity in Roman Catholicism. Madonna lily is susceptible to viral and fungal diseases.
Orange lily
Lilium bulbiferum
Orange lily
Orange lily (Lilium bulbiferum) is a flowering herbaceous lily species native to Europe. This species is toxic to cats. Its scientific name means "bearing bulbs." orange lily is the symbol of the Orange Order, a protestant fraternal order in Ireland.
Easter lily
Lilium longiflorum
Easter lily
Lilium longiflorum, commonly known as easter lily is a perennial bulb, famous for the beautiful fragrance of its large, trumpet-shaped white flowers. It plays an important role in Christianity, as it symbolizes the resurrection of Jesus Christ celebrated during Easter (hence the common name). Easter lily is most often cultivated for cut flowers.
Martagon lily
Lilium martagon
Martagon lily
Martagon lily (*Lilium martagon*) is a lily plant native to Europe and Asia, from Portugal to Mongolia. Martagon lily is a commonly cultivated ornamental garden plant, and it is toxic to cats.
Lily
Lilium brownii var. viridulum
Lily
Lily (Lilium brownii var. viridulum) is a perennial flower native to Central China. It has trumpet-shaped flowers and its bulb can be cooked and consumed like potatoes. The grated bulb provides starch which is used to thicken soups, and the plant's dried petals are used to flavor soup.
Tiger lily
Lilium lancifolium
Tiger lily
Tiger lily gets its name from its flower color: black marks on orange background resemble the skin of a tiger. But keep it away from housecats because it’s poisonous to our feline friends. This is an extremely hardy plant, making it popular in chilly New England.
Formosa lily
Lilium formosanum
Formosa lily
Formosa lily (Lilium formosanum) is endemic to Tawain but has become naturalized in certain parts of the Americas, Africa, and Australia. The plant can grow up to 2 m tall and produces large, white, trumpet-shaped flowers that may be up to 30 cm in length. The flowers develop into attractive seed pods that are sometimes used in dried arrangements.
Siberian lily
Lilium pensylvanicum
Siberian lily
The siberian lily (Lilium pensylvanicum) is a flowering plant native to Siberia, Mongolia, Korea, northeastern China, and Hokkaido in Japan. The original Latin name Lilium pensylvanicum by botanist John Bellenden Ker is misleading. Siberian lily is considered easy to grow. It is sensitive to drought conditions.
Wood lily
Lilium philadelphicum
Wood lily
Wood lily (Lilium philadelphicum) is a flowering perennial species that attracts butterflies, birds and bees. Wood lily grows best in well-drained soil and cannot tolerate flooded areas. This plant species is becoming endangered due to people harvesting the flowers without allowing the bulbs to recover.
Golden-rayed lily
Lilium auratum
Golden-rayed lily
The golden-rayed lily has white blossoms with golden radial patterns and orange dots. The flowers of this lily are the largest of any lily species and are highly fragrant. This plant's bulbs are utilized in Japanese and Chinese cuisine.
Columbia lily
Lilium columbianum
Columbia lily
Columbia lily (Lilium columbianum) is a lily native to Western North America with a habitat that stretches from Canada down to Northern California. In the wild, you'll come across it in open woodland. If you're cultivating it, plant it in moist soil that's well-drained in the late autumn.
Trumpet lily
Lilium sulphureum
Trumpet lily
Lilium sulphureum reaches a height of 1 to 1.8 m. The bulbs are large, roundish and reach a diameter of about 10 cm, they are covered with red to purple scales. The stalk is hard and straight. The leaves are narrow and linear to lanceolate, between 7 and 13 cm long and between 0.8 and 1.6 cm wide.
Turk's-Cap Lily
Lilium superbum
Turk's-Cap Lily
Eye-catching tangerine-colored blooms perch on top of the tall stems of the turk's-Cap Lily (Lilium superbum) in mid-summer. Its bulb and flowers are considered edible. The blooms are attractive to hummingbirds and butterflies.
Showy lily
Lilium speciosum
Showy lily
The Lilium speciosum is an East Asian plant native to southern Japan and China. Commonly called the showy lily it only blooms from summer to fall. This flowering plant is mostly grown in gardens because of its attractive aesthetics.
Pyrenean lily
Lilium pyrenaicum
Pyrenean lily
Pyrenean lily is a flowering plant whose common name refers to its origins in the Pyrenees Mountains. The heavy-headed flowers form a unique "Turks-cap" shape that gives off an unpleasant scent. Pyrenean lily is the earliest of the European natives to bloom each year. It is an ideal ornamental lily for rock gardens and soils rich in limestone.
Michigan Lily
Lilium michiganense
Michigan Lily
Michigan Lily (Lilium michiganense) is a perennial plant that attracts butterflies and hummingbirds but is toxic to cats. Showy orange flowers bloom in summer before giving way to seed pods that open and disperse. Best results are achieved when grown from a bulb. Prefers full sun to partial shade. Thrives in loamy to moist soils.
Humboldt's lily
Lilium humboldtii
Humboldt's lily
The humboldt's lily (Lilium humboldtii) is a perennial herb named after explorer Alexander von Humboldt. It has huge, spectacular golden-orange flowers with maroon patches and glossy and wavy-edged leaves. It grows in clay but thrives in a well-drained loam. This moderately simple-to-maintain plant is native and indigenous to California.
Royal Lily
Lilium regale
Royal Lily
Royal Lily (Lilium regale) is a perennial plant known for its fragrant and rather large white trumpet flowers. A prolific bloomer, it can produce up to 25 blossoms per stem. It makes a terrific border plant, offering a mix of color with its golden-throated blossoms that feature pinkish-purple streaks against its pure white exterior. Grows from 1.2 to 1.8 m tall and prefers full sun to partial shade.
Pitkin marsh lily
Lilium pardalinum
Pitkin marsh lily
Lilium pardalinum is a flowering bulbous plant that's native to the west coast of North America specifically California and Baja California. It produces red-orange spotted flowers usually in summer. Specialty plant nurseries cultivate pitkin marsh lily as an ornamental plant.
Henry's lily
Lilium henryi
Henry's lily
Henry's lily (Lilium henryi) is native to the highlands of central China. Its long-lasting spotted flowers have heavily recurved petals, and are prized as ornamentals. Though henry's lily is not generally dangerous to humans, it is very toxic to cats, very often becoming fatal. They should not be planted where cats are expected.
Canada lily
Lilium canadense
Canada lily
Canada lily (Lilium canadense) is native to eastern North America and is sometimes cultivated as an ornamental plant in Europe. The flowers of the canada lily are various shades of yellow, orange, and red, with darker spots. The buds and roots have traditionally been gathered by local indigenous peoples for food. White-tailed deer also enjoy eating the plant.
Sierra tiger lily
Lilium parvum
Sierra tiger lily
The Lilium parvum is part of the lily species that is commonly known as the sierra tiger lily. It originates from the mountains in the western part of the United States. It is small and has a rounded bell shape, contrasting to other lilies.
Carolina lily
Lilium michauxii
Carolina lily
The carolina lily is native to the southeastern United States and scientifically known as the Lilium michauxii. It blooms in summer and sometimes into fall. The plant is North Carolina's official state wildflower.
Coral lily
Lilium pumilum
Coral lily
Native to cold regions of Asia coral lily is a popular garden plant prized for its fragrant coral-red flowers that bloom in summer. This perennial flower is a favorite of many types of bees and butterflies but take care if you have pets because it's toxic to cats.
Pine lily
Lilium catesbaei
Pine lily
Pine lily (*Lilium catesbaei*) is a type of lily that grows in coastal portions of the southeastern United States. It is one of the few lily species that prefer hot, wet conditions and acidic soils. Each pine lily stalk produces only a single spotted flower, giving rise to other names like leopard lily and southern red lily.
Kelley's lily
Lilium kelleyanum
Kelley's lily
Kelley's lily (Lilium kelleyanum) is an attractive lily that thrives in wetlands. The plant's flowers attract butterflies, particularly members of the Swallowtail family. Despite its striking flowers this lily is not commonly grown ornamentally, probably because it is quite demanding to care for.
Twilight lily
Lilium tsingtauense
Twilight lily
Lilium tsingtauense (also known as "Twilight Lily") is an East Asian species of plants in the lily family. It is native to Korea and eastern China (Anhui + Shandong Provinces). Lilium tsingtauense is an herb up to 85 cm tall, growing as a single stem from a scaly bulb. It has smooth, inversely lanceolate leaves, about 13 centimetres (5.1 in) long and mostly in 2 whorls. The plant bears loose umbels of 6 (but may be up to 15) upright, unscented, shallow trumpet-shaped flowers, that blossom under partial sunlight. These appear in midsummer and are orange or reddish-orange with maroon spots. It is named for the city of Tsingtao (Qingdao) in The People's Republic of China.
Red lily
Lilium pomponium
Red lily
formerly included Lilium pomponium var. carniolicum, now called Lilium carniolicum Lilium pomponium subsp. pyrenaicum, now called Lilium pyrenaicum
Lilium davidii var. willmottiae
Lilium davidii var. willmottiae
Lilium davidii var. willmottiae
Lilium davidii var. willmottiae is characterized by its striking trumpet-shaped flowers, which display a vivid orange speckled with purple spots. Typically growing in mountainous regions, the robust stems reach skyward, supporting a cascade of blossoms that unfurl in the warmth of summer. Its hardy nature allows it to thrive in rocky alpine environments, evoking a wild, natural elegance.
Lilies 'Golden Splendor'
Lilium 'Golden Splendor'
Lilies 'Golden Splendor'
Lilies 'Golden Splendor' boasts trumpet-shaped blossoms in a vibrant golden-yellow hue with gracefully recurved petals. These fragrant flowers emerge from tall, sturdy stems that can reach several feet in height, piercing through emerald green foliage. A favorite in summer gardens, it thrives in well-drained soil with adequate sunlight, its radiant blooms attracting both admiring eyes and pollinators alike.
Lilies 'Starlight Express'
Lilium 'Starlight Express'
Lilies 'Starlight Express'
Lilies 'Starlight Express' is a spectacular and highly popular Lily cultivar, noted for its pleasant fragrance and outstandingly large, rose-pink flowers with magenta spots and ruffled white edges. This tall cultivar with sturdy stems is often used as a cut flower, and makes a great choice for flower arrangements.
Lilies 'Silk Road' aka 'Friso'
Lilium 'Silk Road' aka 'Friso'
Lilies 'Silk Road' aka 'Friso'
More disease-resistant and more tolerant of heat, cold, and drought than other lilies, the lilies 'Silk Road' aka 'Friso' variety is both a beautiful and relatively easy-to-maintain garden plant. A hybrid of an oriental lily and a trumpet lily, this variety has a large, white and crimson-colored flower and can grow up to 1.8 m tall.
Martagon lily 'Terrace City'
Lilium martagon 'Terrace City'
Martagon lily 'Terrace City'
The intricate detail in martagon lily 'Terrace City' blooms is what differentiates it from the rest. Included in the Martagon Hybrid Division, this plant was cultivated from either L. martagon, L. medeoloides, L. hansonii, L. danhansonii, or L. tsingtauense. Martagon lily 'Terrace City' gains its admiration for its flowers, unique in color and form, with its blooms looking down but petals curving upwards.
Martagon lily 'Album'
Lilium martagon 'Album'
Martagon lily 'Album'
Martagon lily 'Album' is distinct for its flowers which appear pure white, strongly recurved, and dangling downward. A cultivar of Lilium martagon, its name comes from the Latin word for white. This plant is prized for its dainty, abundant flowers that reach 5 cm across and grow in clusters of up to 40 per stalk.
Lilies 'Easy Waltz'
Lilium 'Easy Waltz'
Lilies 'Easy Waltz'
Lilies 'Easy Waltz' is an Asiatic lily that has been bred so that it has no pollen or scent, meaning that it doesn’t stain clothes. This lily, as elegant and cultured as the dance it is named for, is a copyrighted hybrid and can be recognized and identified by its beautiful large flowers that shade from light pink in the center to darker pink petal tips.
Lilies 'Rosella's Dream'
Lilium asiatic 'Rosella's Dream'
Lilies 'Rosella's Dream'
Lilies 'Rosella's Dream' is a hybrid lily (Lilium spp.) cultivar that belongs to Division I of lily hybrids called Asiatic lilies. This cultivar was selected for its showy, creamy flowers with pink tips, chocolate freckles, and dark stamens. It is prized as one of the earliest-blooming Asiatic lilies.
Lilies 'Easy Samba'
Lilium 'Easy Samba'
Lilies 'Easy Samba'
Lilies 'Easy Samba' is a type of lily that has remarkable orange flowers with dark maroon stripes This is a pollenless variant, which is good for gardeners who have pollen allergies. It has a sweet fragrance and the plants last for a few years so there is no need to replant annually.
Martagon lily 'Pink Morning'
Lilium martagon 'Pink Morning'
Martagon lily 'Pink Morning'
Martagon lily 'Pink Morning' is distinct for its pale pink flowers that sport white edges and spots of darker pink. A cultivar of Lilium martagon, its name comes from its coloration, which is a pink version of other cultivars with “Morning” names. This plant is prized for its abundant, showy flowers, growing in clusters of up to 50 per stalk.
Lilies 'Citronella'
Lilium 'Citronella'
Lilies 'Citronella'
The lilies 'Citronella' is notable for its bright, decorative flowers that are yellow in color and spotted throughout with red. An Asiatic lily, it will typically bloom earlier than other lilies. The variety is also distinguished by the fact its flowers do not face up to the sun, but rather hang like a bell from the stem.
Lilies 'Tom Pouce'
Lilium orientale 'Tom Pouce'
Lilies 'Tom Pouce'
Visually stunning with bubble-gum pink petals licked up the center in banana yellow, the lilies 'Tom Pouce' is certain to be the focal point of any display. They are toxic to cats, so it is advised to keep them from the reach of any beloved felines. These showy flowers would make a nice adornment to high flower boxes, offering a purely spring-esque burst of color.
Lilies 'Tiny Todd'
Lilium asiatic 'Tiny Todd'
Lilies 'Tiny Todd'
Lilies 'Tiny Todd' is a hybrid lily (Lilium spp.) cultivar that belongs to Division I of lily hybrids called Asiatic lilies. This cultivar was selected for its dwarf growth habit (thus the name) and remarkably beautiful blossoms. The pink-flushed white flowers with contrasting yellow-orange stamens appear early in the season. They are slightly fragrant.
Lilies 'Push Off'
Lilium 'Push Off'
Lilies 'Push Off'
Lilies 'Push Off' is an hybrid lily as popular with gardeners as with bees and butterflies. The striking white and maroon flowers are the most desirable trait of this variant. They bloom in early to midsummer and do well in beds, borders, and containers. Their blooms are also prized for cut arrangements. Its heritage is unknown.
Martagon lily 'Orange Marmalade'
Lilium martagon 'Orange Marmalade'
Martagon lily 'Orange Marmalade'
Martagon lily 'Orange Marmalade' is distinct for its bright orange, slightly pendulous flowers. A cultivar of Lilium martagon, its name refers to its color. This plant is prized for its showy, abundant flowers - which can grow in clusters of up to 30 per stalk - as well as for its hardiness.
Lilies 'Muscadet'
Lilium 'Muscadet'
Lilies 'Muscadet'
Lilies 'Muscadet' is an oriental lily hybrid cultivar, selected to bear large, outward-facing, pure white flowers, adorned with reddish-pink freckles, pink stripes across each petal, and prominent orange-yellow anthers. The cultivar was named after the famous French wine "Muscadet".
Lilies 'Dizzy'
Lilium oriental 'Dizzy'
Lilies 'Dizzy'
Lilies 'Dizzy' is an Oriental lily with large, outward-facing, white petals containing pink to raspberry-red stripes and dark red spots. The petals have a delightful fragrance, and the stems grow erect and tall (about 91 to 122 cm) with dark-green leaves.
Lilies 'Dot Com'
Lilium 'Dot Com'
Lilies 'Dot Com'
The lilies 'Dot Com' is named for the burgundy dots on its inner petals. Like many other Division I Asiatic hybrid lilies, it is easy to grow for beginners and enjoyed for its large flowers and use in floral arrangements. Flowers will be larger if grown outside in beds rather than in pots.
Lilies 'White Twinkle'
Lilium trigrinum 'White Twinkle'
Lilies 'White Twinkle'
The downward-facing blooms of the lilies 'White Twinkle' are creamy white with deep red markings near the center of the flower. The variety was introduced in 2000 and is valued by gardeners for its unique yet elegant coloration and its attractiveness to pollinators. The flowers also do well in a vase.
Lilies 'Black Out'
Lilium 'Black Out'
Lilies 'Black Out'
An elegant and showy flower, the lilies 'Black Out' is a Division I Asiatic hybrid lily which has been specifically grown for large, beautiful flowers that are popular in cut arrangements. The name comes from the color, which is dark red but shades into black in the inners of the blooms.
Lilies 'Nymph'
Lilium 'Nymph'
Lilies 'Nymph'
With its enchanting trumpet-shaped flowers, lilies 'Nymph' graces gardens with large, vividly colored blossoms, comprising white petals brushed with pink streaks. The towering stems can reach up to four feet, allowing the blooms to dance elegantly above lower foliage. Dappled sunlight and well-drained soil optimize lilies 'Nymph''s growth, reflecting its woodland heritage where light filters through canopies.
Lilies 'Scheherazade'
Lilium 'Scheherazade'
Lilies 'Scheherazade'
The lilies 'Scheherazade' is a striking lily hybrid with elegantly recurved petals, known for its bold, red exterior streaks and a creamy yellow interior. These fragrant flowers tower on stems that can reach up to six feet, thriving in well-drained soils with ample sunlight. Its late-summer blooms attract pollinators, adding vibrant drama to any garden.
Lilies 'Altari'
Lilium orientale 'Altari'
Lilies 'Altari'
The flowers of the lilies 'Altari' have a funnel shape that opens into a six-sided star, curling slightly under at the tips. The petals have rich raspberry throats bordered in creamy white, with a yellowed spear at the interior base of each petal. Gardeners delight in having this luxuriant flower on display near patios, where its beauty and alluring scent can be admired by visitors.
Lilies 'African Queen'
Lilium 'African Queen'
Lilies 'African Queen'
Lilies 'African Queen' stands out from the crowd because of its complex coloration. It has immense, apricot-colored trumpets streaked with brown on the outer side of its petals. This plant is an Aurelian and Trumpet Hybrid Lily, whose name "African Queen" refers to the group of lilies it belongs to. Lilies 'African Queen' receives adoration for its long-lasting profusion of striking blooms.
Tiger lily 'Flore Pleno'
Lilium lancifolium 'Flore Pleno'
Tiger lily 'Flore Pleno'
Tiger lily 'Flore Pleno' is a Tiger lily cultivar, selected to have stunning, outward-facing, double flowers, and has hair on it's stems and buds, contrasting most other lilies. It's black and purple spots resemble the fur of a tiger, hence where it got it's name. Tiger lily 'Flore Pleno' can also produce as much as 36 tepals.
Lilies 'Robert Swanson'
Lilium 'Robert Swanson'
Lilies 'Robert Swanson'
Lilies 'Robert Swanson' stands out from other lilies because of its striking two-colored flowers which have bright yellow outers and brown-red petal centers. This is a late-summer lily that flowers profusely and the flowers can grow to 18 cm wide. This cultivar is particularly easy-growing, making it ideal for cut flowers. It is named Robert after the breeder who created it.
Lilies 'Apricot Fudge'
Lilium 'Apricot Fudge'
Lilies 'Apricot Fudge'
Lilies 'Apricot Fudge' is a type of Asiatic hybrid lily that is in all likelihood named for its unusual color combination of brown stamens and pale, peachy orange petals. These flowers are shaped rather like roses, unlikely many other hybrid lilies, and this unique shape is a feature of the cultivar enjoyed by many gardeners. They have a delightful fragrance and are also enjoyed as cut flowers.
Lilies 'Regale'
Lilium 'Regale'
Lilies 'Regale'
Lilies 'Regale', sometimes known as regal lily, is a highly fragrant lily cultivar known for its height and its large, 15 cm long flowers. This cultivar blooms in summer and can produce up to 25 flowers on each stem. These are long-lasting both on the plant and in cut arrangements.
Lilies 'Brindisi'
Lilium 'Brindisi'
Lilies 'Brindisi'
Lilies 'Brindisi' is a distinctive lily hybrid notable for its upward-facing flowers which are a delicate pink color. This lily has particularly aromatic flowers, attracting bees and butterflies. Lilies 'Brindisi' is named for the city of Brindisi in Southern Italy.
Morning star lily
Lilium concolor
Morning star lily
Lilium concolor (also known as morning star lily) is a species of flowering plant in the lily family which occurs naturally in China, Japan, Korea and Russia. Its relationship with other species is not clear, although it has some similarities to Lilium pumilum.
Lilies 'Anastasia'
Lilium 'Anastasia'
Lilies 'Anastasia'
Lilies 'Anastasia' is a strikingly tall hybrid lily that boasts large, outward-facing flowers. A lush canvas of fragrant, white blooms is brushed with soft pink strokes and speckles, evocative of a painter's delicate touch. The sturdy stems tower over the garden, reaching up to 6 feet, and thrive in well-drained soil bathed in full sun or partial shade. The dramatic height and vibrant blossoms make lilies 'Anastasia' a captivating sight in mid to late summer.
Tiger lily 'Splendens'
Lilium lancifolium 'Splendens'
Tiger lily 'Splendens'
Very similar to its parent plant, tiger lily 'Splendens' is a Tiger lily cultivar distinguished by downward-facing, orange flowers with prominent chocolate brown spots. It has fewer spots than most Tiger Lilies, and its flowers are larger and the entire plant is shorter than most as well.
Lilies 'Casa Blanca'
Lilium oriental 'Casa Blanca'
Lilies 'Casa Blanca'
Lilies 'Casa Blanca' is an Oriental downward-facing lily with pure white flowers with reddish-orange anthers that bloom in mid to late summer. These pristine white flowers give the lilies 'Casa Blanca' its name as 'Casa Blanca' translates to 'white home.' In 1993, this lovely lily won the Award of Garden Merit by the Royal Horticultural Society.
Lilies 'Crimson Pixie'
Lilium asiatic 'Crimson Pixie'
Lilies 'Crimson Pixie'
Lilies 'Crimson Pixie' is a hybrid lily (Lilium spp.) cultivar that belongs to Division I of the lily hybrids called Asiatic lilies. This cultivar was selected for its impressive flowers and dwarf growth habit. It features large, upward-facing, crimson-red blooms, well-known for their beauty, but not for their fragrance. The color and delicate appearance of these flowers also inspired the cultivar's name.
Leichtlin's lily
Lilium leichtlinii
Leichtlin's lily
Leichtlin's lily features downward-facing blossoms with curved petals. The highly fragrant flowers bloom in late spring to early summer and are attractive to hummingbirds and butterflies.
Lilies 'Chill Out'
Lilium 'Chill Out'
Lilies 'Chill Out'
Lilies 'Chill Out' is an Oriental lily cultivar bred for its large, fragrant flowers, which last particularly well when cut and used in arrangements. This cultivar is a showy and decorative plant that blooms profusely in the summer months. It requires plenty of water and doesn't tolerate too much direct sunlight.
Lilies 'Miss Peculiar'
Lilium 'Miss Peculiar'
Lilies 'Miss Peculiar'
As indicated by its name, lilies 'Miss Peculiar' has striking, large flowers that are predominantly white and transition toward yellow and pink at their center. This flower is a hybrid of oriental and trumpet lilies.
Showy lily 'Black Beauty'
Lilium speciosum 'Black Beauty'
Showy lily 'Black Beauty'
Recognized as nearly indestructible, the showy lily 'Black Beauty' is a lily cultivar celebrated as being both disease tolerant and resistant to pests like beetles. While gardeners may love the physical appearance of this cultivar, the showy lily 'Black Beauty' also tolerates alkaline to acidic soils.
Lilies 'Salmon Twinkle'
Lilium 'Salmon Twinkle'
Lilies 'Salmon Twinkle'
Given its name for good reason, lilies 'Salmon Twinkle' has salmon-pink blooms with orange brushed along the center. Lilies 'Salmon Twinkle' is an Asiatic hybrid produced by crossing Oriental lilies with Trumpet lilies. Asiatic hybrids are a favorite in the horticulture world because they are both easy to grow and early to bloom.
Lilies 'Brunello'
Lilium asiaticum 'Brunello'
Lilies 'Brunello'
A vibrant orange cultivar, the lilies 'Brunello' is floriferous and popular for its ease to grow and maintain. It is cold hardy and consistent, providing good cut flowers even when planted in containers. Gardeners will be interested in its ornamental value as their blooms are very large with an upwards facing habit.
Lilies 'Limelight'
Lilium 'Limelight'
Lilies 'Limelight'
The lilies 'Limelight' is a variety of lily that has light yellow flowers with accents of green. The flowers' coloring is reflected in the variety's name. A long bloomer in mid- to late-summer, the flowers are often used by gardeners to add a splash of color to a border or amid shrubbery.
Lilies 'Tigerwoods'
Lilium 'Tigerwoods'
Lilies 'Tigerwoods'
The lilies 'Tigerwoods' is a particularly large and fragrant lily cultivar. Its inner petals have a scattering of tiger stripes and spots, which explains the name. For the gardener, a thick, strong stem makes it an attractive addition to both garden borders and cut arrangements.
Royal lily 'Album'
Lilium regale 'Album'
Royal lily 'Album'
Royal lily 'Album' is a highly popular Royal lily cultivar, appreciated for its very large, glistening white flowers with a golden throat and intense fragrance. It can have up to 25 blossoms per stem and is excellent for borders and as a cut flower. Royal lily 'Album' was introduced to England in 1903 by Ernest Henry Wilson. The origin of its name is unknown.
Lilies 'Patricia's Pride'
Lilium 'Patricia's Pride'
Lilies 'Patricia's Pride'
Lilies 'Patricia's Pride' boasts elegant, large, white trumpet-shaped flowers with contrasting purple-black centers, drawing pollinators to its nectar-rich blooms. Thriving in well-drained soil and full sun, its sturdy stems rise above lance-shaped leaves, creating a striking vertical accent in temperate gardens. This hardy perennial typically flowers in midsummer, gracing landscapes with its dramatic coloration and sweet fragrance.
Lilies 'Lady Alice'
Lilium 'Lady Alice'
Lilies 'Lady Alice'
Lilies 'Lady Alice' has white flowers transitioning to apricot-orange toward the centers with cinnamon-colored speckles. The flowers are also fragrant. This cultivar is a hybrid of Lilium henryi and is a Division 6, or Trumpet, hybrid lily.
Common turk's cap lily
Lilium martagon var. martagon
Common turk's cap lily
Numerous names have been proposed at the levels of subspecies and varieties. Only two are recognized by the World Checklist.
Lilies 'Star Gazer'
Lilium oriental 'Star Gazer'
Lilies 'Star Gazer'
Lilies 'Star Gazer' is an upward-facing lily with distinctive petals of pink, red, and white. These upward-facing petals give the lilies 'Star Gazer' its name, as it was the first Oriental lily hybrid to face the heavens rather than the ground. The exact parentage of this lily is unknown.
Martagon lily 'Claude Shride'
Lilium martagon 'Claude Shride'
Martagon lily 'Claude Shride'
Martagon lily 'Claude Shride' is a gorgeous plant bred from the Martagon lily, named for a famous breeder, Claude Shride, from the US Pacific Northwest. Its unique features include its stunning dark red, orange-spotted flowers and interesting upturned petals that resemble a Turk's cap. It is popular for its very early spring blooming and its hardiness in surviving cold winters.
Martagon lily 'Manitoba Morning'
Lilium martagon 'Manitoba Morning'
Martagon lily 'Manitoba Morning'
This cultivar from the lily family, martagon lily 'Manitoba Morning', was bred to create an upside-down appearance with pinkish petals that are covered with yellow and brown dots. One stalk contains multiple blooms instead of only one. Sometimes they can have up to fifty flowers per bulb, and they are highly fragrant. They are often added to landscapes and gardens as ornamental plants.
Tiger lily 'King Pete'
Lilium lancifolium 'King Pete'
Tiger lily 'King Pete'
Tiger lily 'King Pete' is a cultivar of the Tiger lily distinguished by its creamy-yellow, outward-facing flowers with slightly darker, orange central parts, lightly covered with reddish brown freckles. This cultivar is known as one of the few outward-facing lilies among the Asiatic lily hybrid group.
Lilies 'Pollyanna'
Lilium 'Pollyanna'
Lilies 'Pollyanna'
Unique for its color pattern, vigor, hardiness, and improved disease resistance, the lilies 'Pollyanna''s seed parent is the Lilium wilsonii 'Flavum' and its pollen parent is the "Connecticut King.' Merriam-Webster defines a Pollyanna as "characterized by irrepressible optimism and a tendency to find good in everything," an epithet that one finds fitting with one glance at this Asiatic lily. Gardeners can plant the lilies 'Pollyanna' in containers and in cutting gardens.
Lilies 'Easy Vanilla'
Lilium 'Easy Vanilla'
Lilies 'Easy Vanilla'
Lilies 'Easy Vanilla' is a pollen-free cultivar that looks exactly like a vanilla bean flower with its creamy light yellow color and star-shaped blooms. Hybridized from other varieties of lily, this variant was named for its vanilla-like color and appearance. Lilies 'Easy Vanilla' gained its popularity for being allergen-free, unique color and shape, and long-living blossoms.
Lilies 'Pink Perfection'
Lilium 'Pink Perfection'
Lilies 'Pink Perfection'
A winner of the Garden Award of Merit, lilies 'Pink Perfection' is special with its distinct color, huge blossoms, and tolerance of drought. This cultivar is a member of the Trumpet and Aurelian Hybrids Division and was named succinctly after its pink color and perfect habits. Lilies 'Pink Perfection' is very popular for its fragrance, unique color, and ease of care.
Lilies 'Barbara North'
Lilium 'Barbara North'
Lilies 'Barbara North'
Lilies 'Barbara North' is a lovely and prolific lily variety with a light fragrance and dark green leaves. Cultivated as a hybrid of other Turk's-cap lilies, it was named after its location of cultivation, which is Santa Barbara. Lilies 'Barbara North' is popular as a back border plant for its tall and striking flowers, evergreen foliage, and ease of care.
Lilies 'Cavoli'
Lilium asiatic 'Cavoli'
Lilies 'Cavoli'
Lilies 'Cavoli' is an Asiatic lily hybrid that is distinguished by its lightly scented dark purplish-red petals that face upward. Though smaller than the average lily, lilies 'Cavoli' is sturdier and more hardy than other lily cultivars. The petals of this lily are waxier, more weather-resistant, and longer-lasting than petals of other lilies. In Italian, 'Cavoli' means 'cabbage.'
Lilies 'Forever Marjolein'
Lilium 'Forever Marjolein'
Lilies 'Forever Marjolein'
Lilies 'Forever Marjolein' is a very hardy Asiatic hybrid lily cultivar that blooms in exotic blends of apricot and pink. The colors burst in late spring and early summer adding exotic flair to any garden. It is recommended to use them for color and texture in a border or potted in containers where the soil can be well-drained.
Lilies 'Monte Negro'
Lilium 'Monte Negro'
Lilies 'Monte Negro'
An hybrid lily, lilies 'Monte Negro' was developed for its large, plentiful, bright flowers. They are attractive in the garden, where they draw in bees and butterflies, but are also enjoyed in a cutting garden to produce flower arrangements. They are considered reliable and easy to grow.
Easter lily 'White American'
Lilium longiflorum 'White American'
Easter lily 'White American'
Easter lily 'White American' is distinct for its very large, fragrant white flowers. A cultivar of Lilium longiflorum, its name refers to its color and probably where it was originally cultivated. This plant is prized for its elegant flowers, which bloom in early to mid-summer and attract bees and butterflies.
Lilies 'Star Gazer'
Lilium 'Star Gazer'
Lilies 'Star Gazer'
Lilies 'Star Gazer' is a variant of Oriental lily which is particularly easy to grow. While most Oriental lily flowers hang down, the large, spectacular blooms of this variant face upwards, hence its poetic name. They can grow as tall as 1.8 m making them a popular choice to add drama to a garden.
Lily
Lilium brownii
Lily
Lily is a captivating plant with a rich history. This ornamental flower is known for its vibrant colors and delicate petals, making it a favorite in gardens and floral arrangements. Interestingly, the Lilium brownii is highly sought after for its medicinal properties, having been used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries. Keep an eye out for the Lilium brownii in gardens and be sure to enjoy its stunning display of color and fragrance.
Manchurian turk's cap lily
Lilium distichum
Manchurian turk's cap lily
Lilium distichum is an Asian species herbaceous plant of the lily family which is native to northeastern China (Heilongjiang Jilin Liaoning) Korea and eastern Russia (Primorye Amur Krai Khabarovsk). Lilium distichum flourishes among shrubs and in forests. It grows from 2–4 ft (61–122 cm) tall. The stem is cylindrical and slender with a single whorl of leaves mid–way up the stem. It also has much smaller oval leaves sparsely alternately on the upper stem. The flowers are yellow–orange or orange–vermillion with the petals spotted in purple somewhat ‘flatfaced’ in appearance with irregular distribution of petals around the face of the flower forming a fanshape. The tips of the petals are reflexed. 2–10 flowers are carried on an inflorescence in summer. The name distichum refers to the two types of leaves the plant carries.
Lily
Lilium davidii
Lily
Lily is a stunning perennial wildflower native to China. Its trumpet-shaped flowers range in color from deep red to orange and are marked with maroon spots. Notably, this species is resistant to the devastating lily disease, Botrytis elliptica. Its unique beauty and medicinal properties make it a sought-after addition to gardens and traditional medicine practices alike.
Lilium hybrid
Lilium hybrid
Lilium hybrid
Lilium hybrid boasts large, vibrant blooms often in trumpet shapes, surrounded by long, sturdy stems. These floriferous perennials typically exude a sweet fragrance, attracting various pollinators. They flourish in well-drained soils, needing ample sunlight, and are prominent in temperate gardens. Lilium hybrid's numerous color varieties are a testament to its vast hybridization, making it a garden favorite for its ornamental appeal.
Lilies 'Fire King'
Lilium 'Fire King'
Lilies 'Fire King'
The name lilies 'Fire King' is reflective of this lily variety's large, vivid red-orange flowers that sit on 91 to 122 cm tall stems. Easy to grow in full sun or part shade, gardeners appreciate the lilies 'Fire King' lily both for its attractiveness to pollinators and for its visual impact. 
Nodding lily
Lilium cernuum
Nodding lily
Lilium cernuum is a species of lily native to Korea, the Primorye region of Russia, and northeastern China (Provinces of Jilin + Liaoning). Lilium cernuum typically grows to 50 cm tall. The flowers are white to purple, though usually pink with maroon spots, and are scented. The species is similar in many respects to Lilium pumilum. The name cernuum refers to its nodding (hanging) flowers.
Lilies 'Enchantment'
Lilium 'Enchantment'
Lilies 'Enchantment'
The lilies 'Enchantment' was the first lily cultivar to bear upright flowers, causing the demand for its cut flowers. A selection from a mid-century group, the meaning of the lilies 'Enchantment''s name has not been disclosed. Easy to grow and naturalize, this flower is a gardener's favorite for its showy flower heads and has even won the Hall of Fame from the North American Lily Society.
Lilies 'Starfighter'
Lilium oriental 'Starfighter'
Lilies 'Starfighter'
Lilies 'Starfighter' is an extravagant flower with purplish-red petals that contain maroon dots and white edges. This Oriental lily represents its parent, Lilies ‘Star Gazer’ with its flamboyant colors, upward-facing petals (that also gaze at the stars), and rich fragrance. However, lilies 'Starfighter' has larger flowers and shorter stems than its parent.
Lilies 'Dimension'
Lilium 'Dimension'
Lilies 'Dimension'
Lilies 'Dimension' has large, striking, and dark red-purple flowers with curved petals. This plant is popular in gardens due to its large size and frost tolerance. This plant is an Asiatic hybrid lily.
popular genus

More Popular Genus

feedback
Feedback
feedback
Dracaena
Dracaena
Dracaena are popular house plants that are easy to grow. They can tolerate low-light conditions and require little watering. Their leaves range from variegated to dark green. Their characteristic traits include woody stems that grow slowly but offer a striking appearance for small spaces such as apartments or offices.
Ficus
Fig trees
Fig trees have been cultivated in many regions for their fruits, particularly the common fig, F. carica. Most of the species have edible fruits, although the common fig is the only one of commercial value. Fig trees are also important food sources for wildlife in the tropics, including monkeys, bats, and insects.
Rubus
Brambles
Brambles are members of the rose family, and there are hundreds of different types to be found throughout the European countryside. They have been culturally significant for centuries; Christian folklore stories hold that when the devil was thrown from heaven, he landed on a bramble bush. Their vigorous growth habit can tangle into native plants and take over.
Acer
Maples
The popular tree family known as maples change the color of their leaves in the fall. Many cultural traditions encourage people to watch the colors change, such as momijigari in Japan. Maples popular options for bonsai art. Alternately, their sap is used to create maple syrup.
Prunus
Prunus
Prunus is a genus of flowering fruit trees that includes almonds, cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines, and apricots. These are often known as "stone fruits" because their pits are large seeds or "stones." When prunus trees are damaged, they exhibit "gummosis," a condition in which the tree's gum (similar to sap) is secreted to the bark to help heal external wounds.
Solanum
Nightshades
Nightshades is a large and diverse genus of plants, with more than 1500 different types worldwide. This genus incorporates both important staple food crops like tomato, potato, and eggplant, but also dangerous poisonous plants from the nightshade family. The name was coined by Pliny the Elder almost two thousand years ago.
Rosa
Roses
Most species of roses are shrubs or climbing plants that have showy flowers and sharp thorns. They are commonly cultivated for cut flowers or as ornamental plants in gardens due to their attractive appearance, pleasant fragrance, and cultural significance in many countries. The rose hips (fruits) can also be used in jams and teas.
Quercus
Oaks
Oaks are among the world's longest-lived trees, sometimes growing for over 1,000 years! The oldest known oak tree is in the southern United States and is over 1,500 years old. Oaks produce an exceedingly popular type of wood which is used to make different products, from furniture and flooring to wine barrels and even cosmetic creams.
close
product icon
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
Your Ultimate Guide to Plants
Identify grow and nurture the better way!
product icon
17,000 local species +400,000 global species studied
product icon
Nearly 5 years of research
product icon
80+ scholars in botany and gardening
ad
ad
Botanist in your pocket
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
About
Key Facts
Toxicity
Distribution
How To Care
All Species
More Genus
Lilies
Lilies
Lilies
Lilies
Lilies
Lilies
Lilies
Lilium
Among the florist's favorites, lilies are long-blooming plants and provide large and showy focal points for flower arrangements. They're simple to grow and offer lovely contrasts in terms of color, especially during the middle of summer when many other flowers fade in the heat. In addition to the visual display, lilies emit a sweet scent that fills the air with a lovely fragrance. They are, however, toxic to cats, so care must be taken around pets.
Lifespan
Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Plant Type
Herb/Vine
info

Key Facts About Lilies

feedback
Feedback
feedback

Attributes of Lilies

Plant Height
30 cm to 1.8 m
Spread
20 cm to 60 cm
Flower Size
8 cm to 15 cm
Flower Color
White
Yellow
Red
Orange
Pink
Leaf type
Deciduous
Ideal Temperature
0 - 38 ℃

Scientific Classification of Lilies

toxic

Lilies and Their Toxicity

feedback
Feedback
feedback
* The judgment on toxicity and danger is for reference only. We DO NOT GUARANTEE any accuracy of such judgment. Therefore, you SHALL NOT rely on such judgment. It is IMPORTANT TO SEEK PROFESSIONAL ADVICE in advance when necessary.
Toxic to Cats
It is vital that cats are kept away from all varieties of lilies. Every part of the plant is fatally toxic, as is the water the plant may be kept in. Eating just a tiny bit, or even licking the pollen that might fall upon the cat's fur, can cause severe illness and sometimes death. Symptoms include excessive drooling, vomiting, and loss of appetite. The cat's condition will deteriorate quickly so you must get them medical attention quickly.
icon
Identify toxic plants in your garden
Find out what’s toxic and what’s safe for your loved one.
Download the App
close
Who Is Most at Risk of Plant Poisoning?
Your pets like cats and dogs can be poisoned by them as well!
1
Do not let your lovely pets eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
2
It’s better to kill those growing around your house. Wear long-sleeved shirts, pants and gloves with sharp tools to dig it out completely;
3
Clean the tools with rubbing alcohol or soap and water but do not do that with bare hands;
4
Clean your hands and skin once exposed to plants with soap and water;
5
Consider using barrier creams that contain bentoquatam to prevent poison oak, ivy and sumac rashes;
6
Dump it in special trash cans in sealed garbage packages, and do not let your pets reach it;Do not let your lovely pets eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
7
If you take your pets to hike with you in the wild, please don’t let them eat any plants that you don’t know;
8
Once your pets eat, touch or inhale anything from toxic plants and act abnormally, please call the doctors for help ASAP!
pets
Pets
Some pets are less likely than children to eat and touch just about everything. This is good, as a pet owner. However, you know your pet best, and it is up to you to keep them safe. There are plenty of poisonous weeds that can grow within the confines of your lawn, which might make your dogs or cats ill or worse if they eat them. Try to have an idea of what toxic plants grow in your area and keep them under control and your pets away from them.
pets
Common Toxic Houseplants
Common Toxic Houseplants
When it comes to decorating a house, there is nothing more refreshing than adding some beautiful houseplants. Some common house plants can also be toxic.

Aloe

aloe
Aloe is famous for its sunburn-soothing properties and its gorgeous desert design. However, many people do not realize that the latex the aloe vera plant produces can be mildly toxic to pets and children.

The latex contains a chemical compound known as saponin. Which when ingested, can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and low blood sugar. This, if left unchecked, can lead to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. The proper response is to contact poison control or a veterinarian to know what to do in your particular circumstance if either your child or pet consumes aloe.

The latex of the plant is similar to the sap of the tree. It is inside the leaf, but sticks mainly toward the edges. If aloe gel is prepared properly it should be safe for use, but be sure to apply it only topically when treating burns.

Philodendron

Philodendron
Philodendron, also known as sweetheart vine, has become a resident at many houses and even businesses. They are glossy green and the leaves elegantly split, displaying interesting designs. Behind this beauty there is a needle-like toxin called calcium oxalate crystals.

These crystals are held within the plant and only affect you, your pets, or your loved ones if the plant tissue is broken. If ingested, the crystals can cause severe swelling, difficulty breathing, stomach pain, burning and pain. If they are accidentally caught on the skin, they can cause skin irritation.

If anyone accidentally ingests philodendron and they find it difficult to breathe or their tongue starts to swell up, it is important to seek medical attention immediately to avoid suffocation. If you have very young children or pets who have a tendency to tear at plants, keep them away from any philodendrons.

Peace Lily

Peace Lily
Peace lilies produce stunningly white flowers that bring to mind peace and serenity. This is one reason they are invited into our homes and given a place to stay. However, similar to philodendrons, the peace lily contains oxalate crystals known as raphides.

The raphides, once ingested, will cause swelling and burning sensations and can also cause skin irritation. Both pets and humans can get these symptoms so it is important to keep these plants from anyone who is likely to tear or chew it. Symptoms can become dire if the raphides cause the tongue and throat to swell to a point where the person or pet is having difficulty breathing. Seek proper medical attention if this is the case.

Snake Plant

Snake Plant
The snake plant is an interesting and popular house plant. Its stark architecture and wavy coloring has made it a fan favorite. This plant too, however, is toxic when ingested or if the sap touches your skin.

Snake plant sap will cause rashes if it comes into contact with your skin. In addition, it will cause diarrhea and vomiting when ingested. Again these symptoms are very serious and would be best avoided by keeping snake plants out of reach or by choosing a different houseplant.
Common Toxic Garden Plants
Common Toxic Garden Plants

Daffodil

Daffodil
Daffodils are a strikingly colorful flower. This can sometimes bring them much attention not from just onlooking adults but children as well. Since kids are more drawn to colorful objects, they may have a higher chance of just grabbing the flower and eating it. Adults have also been known to accidentally grab daffodil bulbs instead of onions.

Why are these mistakes so dangerous? Daffodils contain lycorine, which can induce nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It also contains oxalates which can cause swelling and pain. The symptoms can be worse in animals, because if your pets eat daffodils they may experience drowsiness, low blood pressure or even liver damage.

Make sure to call poison control when these symptoms set in. The vomiting and diarrhea have been known to go away after 3 hours, but it is better to be safe than sorry. Ingesting liquids to keep hydration up can be important. If the patient is having difficulty breathing, seek medical attention immediately.

Hydrangea

Hydrangea
Hydrangeas are unique, with their soft blue and pink flowers. They are a great addition to any garden, but should not be snacked on—not that you would want to. Hydrangeas can be especially nasty because they contain compounds known as glycosides. These will release hydrogen cyanide into the bloodstream when consumed. This will block your body’s ability to uptake oxygen to the cells in your body.

The way to combat this kind of poisoning is through getting IVs from the vet or doctor. It is important to contact your medical professional immediately since the symptoms can be fatal within minutes or hours.

Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons
Rhododendron, the state flower of Washington, is also toxic. The multitudinous, pink flowers can be quite dangerous. All parts of this plant are toxic, the leaves and seeds more so than the flowers. However, even the nectar of the flower is toxic and in the Mediterranean, where rhododendrons grow in more dense quantities, the honey from bees who gather rhododendron nectar can be poisonous.

Normally kids and pets do not eat enough to experience the full poisoning effect. However, just eating two leaves is enough to be considered dangerous. The grayanotoxin glycosides within the rhododendron can cause vomiting, diarrhea and irregular heartbeats. Things can get very serious when too much rhododendron is consumed and can lead to necessary medical intervention.

Start by calling poison control first if you suspect anyone has been munching on rhododendrons. The experts there will be able to help guide you through the necessary processes to cure your loved one.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb
Yummy rhubarb has a nasty side to it. While the stems are used in many recipes, including for rhubarb strawberry pie, the leaves are toxic. They contain oxalic acid which is known to blister the mouth, cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and kidney stones. The leaves are known to be more toxic to pets than humans, but in either case, it is important to contact poison control immediately to figure out necessary steps to cure the patient.
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard

Bittersweet Nightshade

Bittersweet Nightshade
Nightshade is an invasive, noxious weed that is extremely poisonous. It has been found along the East and West Coast of the U.S. It makes its home in areas with disturbed soil. This could be near your garden or areas that have recently had bushes/trees put in.

These plants are dark green with purple flowers that develop into bright red berries. The whole plant is toxic and should be avoided by pets and children alike. If ingested it can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The colorful berries are especially enticing to young children. If you see any plants that look similar to tomato or pepper plants that you did not plant in your yard, it is best to just pull them immediately.

Call poison control immediately if you think someone has fallen victim to nightshade.

Buttercups

Buttercups
Buttercups are found throughout the United States, especially in wet areas. The shiny, yellow flowers will pop up in the springtime, accompanying their dandelion friends. However, unlike dandelions, buttercups are not edible.

Buttercups will release a compound called protoanemonin. This toxin is known to cause vomiting, diarrhea, bloody stool, hypersalivation, depression, blisters, and more. These symptoms will affect both humans and animals. The sap may also cause irritation when it comes into contact with skin. These yellow flowers are dangerous and children should be observed cautiously when around them.

Foxgloves

Foxgloves
Foxgloves are beautiful plants that build towers out of vivid purple bell-shaped blossoms. They are very pretty to look at, but they contain a compound known as digoxin. This chemical is used in certain medicines to help people with certain heart conditions. However, the medicine is made by specialists, whereas someone eating foxgloves will receive unregulated amounts of the chemical.

This toxin can make you vomit and lower your heartbeat. This often causes dizziness and faintness. It is extremely important to call poison control immediately to know what to do in the case of foxglove poisoning. Some people have confused the young leaves of foxglove with borage, making adult foragers at risk as well as kids and pets.
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
Now that you know where to start with toxic plant identification, let us discuss how to either tend to the poisonous plants you decide to keep or get rid of them that plague your yard.

How to Tend to Poisonous Plants

Many plants that are toxic when ingested are also skin irritants. The philodendron is a good example of this. When the sap comes into contact with skin, it can cause a rash to form. To help protect yourself when tending to toxic plants, it is important to wear some sort of gloves.
Tend
Latex gloves may be the best solution due to their disposability. Regular gloves could potentially keep the poisonous sap on their surface. If the gloves aren’t cleaned then you could accidentally touch the irritant or pass it to someone else.

In addition you will want to plan where to keep your deadly beauties. If you have a toxic indoor plant try to keep it up high or out of reach of children and pets. This will keep accidents few and far between. Another idea is keeping your plants in areas that are usually inaccessible to children or pets. Areas such as an office, study room, or guest bedroom could be good locations. If applicable, you could also set up a terrarium for your little plant baby, making it more difficult for curious hands or paws to access.
tend2
If you plan to have outdoor plants, location will be key. You will want to put plants in an area that will be inaccessible to children, pets and even wild animals. You will probably want to avoid planting the plants in the front of your house if kids walk by on a regular basis, just to be cautious. Having the plants behind a fence will be best, but use your discretion when choosing a spot.

How to Get Rid of Poisonous Plants

plants
The easiest but possibly most controversial way to get rid of poisonous plants is by using herbicides. This can be especially easy if you own a grass lawn and use an herbicide that targets broadleaf (non-grass) species. You can find many herbicides meant for yard use by simply searching the term online. Once you have purchased the herbicide you will want to make sure to follow the label posted on the container. If you follow the instructions precisely, then everything should run smoothly for you.

If you don’t plan on using herbicides, there are a few organic methods you can use to try to get rid of toxic plants. You can manually pull the plants out of the ground. This is probably one of the most difficult methods because there is no assurance that you will get the whole plant out this way.

You can also try pouring boiling hot water or spraying white vinegar on the target plants. This may take more time than using a synthetic herbicide, but you can feel a little better about using these products.

You can also try to use wood chips to cover a certain area where you do not want anything to grow. This will not stop all the weeds, but the few that make it through can be easily picked by hand.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
close
Who Is Most at Risk of Plant Poisoning?
Everyone should keep the following in mind to prevent being poisoned:
1
Do not eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
2
If you need to kill it, wear long-sleeved shirts, pants and gloves with sharp tools to dig it out completely;
3
Clean the tools with rubbing alcohol or soap and water but do not do that with bare hands;
4
Clean your hands and skin once exposed to plants with soap and water;
5
Consider using barrier creams that contain bentoquatam to prevent poison oak, ivy and sumac rashes;
6
Dump it in special trash cans in sealed garbage packages;
7
Wear properly when you hiking or working in the wilderness. Long pants, long sleeves, gloves, hiking shoes, etc., that protect you from being hurt by any plants;
8
Once you or your family aren’t feeling well after eating, touching or inhaling anything from toxic plants, please call your doctor for help ASAP!
Outdoor Workers
Outdoor Workers and Recreationalists
Those who enjoy the outdoors either as a hobby or as part of their work will rarely see a plant and decide to munch on it (although the scenario is not unheard of). However, they do tend to deal with moving through and brushing aside plants. These people are more at risk of being poisoned by touching toxic plants than by ingesting them.
Outdoor Workers
Foragers
Foragers
Foraging for food and medicinal plants is a desirable skill among people who want to feel at one with the land. This hobby can be very useful and enjoyable, but if done wrong , it can lead to disastrous effects. People who forage are picking and grabbing plants with the full intention of using those plants, most of the time to ingest them.
Foragers
Children
Children
While outdoor workers are more likely to touch poison and foragers are more likely to ingest poison, children can easily do both. These bundles of joy just love to run around and explore the world. They enjoy touching things and occasionally shoving random stuff in their mouth; this is a terrible combination with toxic plants in the mix.
If you let your children run about, it is important to know what are the local toxic plants that they could accidentally get into. Try to educate the children and steer them away from where the toxic plants are located.
Children
Common Toxic Houseplants
Common Toxic Houseplants
When it comes to decorating a house, there is nothing more refreshing than adding some beautiful houseplants. Some common house plants can also be toxic.

Aloe

aloe
Aloe is famous for its sunburn-soothing properties and its gorgeous desert design. However, many people do not realize that the latex the aloe vera plant produces can be mildly toxic to pets and children.

The latex contains a chemical compound known as saponin. Which when ingested, can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and low blood sugar. This, if left unchecked, can lead to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. The proper response is to contact poison control or a veterinarian to know what to do in your particular circumstance if either your child or pet consumes aloe.

The latex of the plant is similar to the sap of the tree. It is inside the leaf, but sticks mainly toward the edges. If aloe gel is prepared properly it should be safe for use, but be sure to apply it only topically when treating burns.

Philodendron

Philodendron
Philodendron, also known as sweetheart vine, has become a resident at many houses and even businesses. They are glossy green and the leaves elegantly split, displaying interesting designs. Behind this beauty there is a needle-like toxin called calcium oxalate crystals.

These crystals are held within the plant and only affect you, your pets, or your loved ones if the plant tissue is broken. If ingested, the crystals can cause severe swelling, difficulty breathing, stomach pain, burning and pain. If they are accidentally caught on the skin, they can cause skin irritation.

If anyone accidentally ingests philodendron and they find it difficult to breathe or their tongue starts to swell up, it is important to seek medical attention immediately to avoid suffocation. If you have very young children or pets who have a tendency to tear at plants, keep them away from any philodendrons.

Peace Lily

Peace Lily
Peace lilies produce stunningly white flowers that bring to mind peace and serenity. This is one reason they are invited into our homes and given a place to stay. However, similar to philodendrons, the peace lily contains oxalate crystals known as raphides.

The raphides, once ingested, will cause swelling and burning sensations and can also cause skin irritation. Both pets and humans can get these symptoms so it is important to keep these plants from anyone who is likely to tear or chew it. Symptoms can become dire if the raphides cause the tongue and throat to swell to a point where the person or pet is having difficulty breathing. Seek proper medical attention if this is the case.

Snake Plant

Snake Plant
The snake plant is an interesting and popular house plant. Its stark architecture and wavy coloring has made it a fan favorite. This plant too, however, is toxic when ingested or if the sap touches your skin.

Snake plant sap will cause rashes if it comes into contact with your skin. In addition, it will cause diarrhea and vomiting when ingested. Again these symptoms are very serious and would be best avoided by keeping snake plants out of reach or by choosing a different houseplant.
Common Toxic Garden Plants
Common Toxic Garden Plants

Daffodil

Daffodil
Daffodils are a strikingly colorful flower. This can sometimes bring them much attention not from just onlooking adults but children as well. Since kids are more drawn to colorful objects, they may have a higher chance of just grabbing the flower and eating it. Adults have also been known to accidentally grab daffodil bulbs instead of onions.

Why are these mistakes so dangerous? Daffodils contain lycorine, which can induce nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It also contains oxalates which can cause swelling and pain. The symptoms can be worse in animals, because if your pets eat daffodils they may experience drowsiness, low blood pressure or even liver damage.

Make sure to call poison control when these symptoms set in. The vomiting and diarrhea have been known to go away after 3 hours, but it is better to be safe than sorry. Ingesting liquids to keep hydration up can be important. If the patient is having difficulty breathing, seek medical attention immediately.

Hydrangea

Hydrangea
Hydrangeas are unique, with their soft blue and pink flowers. They are a great addition to any garden, but should not be snacked on—not that you would want to. Hydrangeas can be especially nasty because they contain compounds known as glycosides. These will release hydrogen cyanide into the bloodstream when consumed. This will block your body’s ability to uptake oxygen to the cells in your body.

The way to combat this kind of poisoning is through getting IVs from the vet or doctor. It is important to contact your medical professional immediately since the symptoms can be fatal within minutes or hours.

Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons
Rhododendron, the state flower of Washington, is also toxic. The multitudinous, pink flowers can be quite dangerous. All parts of this plant are toxic, the leaves and seeds more so than the flowers. However, even the nectar of the flower is toxic and in the Mediterranean, where rhododendrons grow in more dense quantities, the honey from bees who gather rhododendron nectar can be poisonous.

Normally kids and pets do not eat enough to experience the full poisoning effect. However, just eating two leaves is enough to be considered dangerous. The grayanotoxin glycosides within the rhododendron can cause vomiting, diarrhea and irregular heartbeats. Things can get very serious when too much rhododendron is consumed and can lead to necessary medical intervention.

Start by calling poison control first if you suspect anyone has been munching on rhododendrons. The experts there will be able to help guide you through the necessary processes to cure your loved one.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb
Yummy rhubarb has a nasty side to it. While the stems are used in many recipes, including for rhubarb strawberry pie, the leaves are toxic. They contain oxalic acid which is known to blister the mouth, cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and kidney stones. The leaves are known to be more toxic to pets than humans, but in either case, it is important to contact poison control immediately to figure out necessary steps to cure the patient.
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard

Bittersweet Nightshade

Bittersweet Nightshade
Nightshade is an invasive, noxious weed that is extremely poisonous. It has been found along the East and West Coast of the U.S. It makes its home in areas with disturbed soil. This could be near your garden or areas that have recently had bushes/trees put in.

These plants are dark green with purple flowers that develop into bright red berries. The whole plant is toxic and should be avoided by pets and children alike. If ingested it can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The colorful berries are especially enticing to young children. If you see any plants that look similar to tomato or pepper plants that you did not plant in your yard, it is best to just pull them immediately.

Call poison control immediately if you think someone has fallen victim to nightshade.

Buttercups

Buttercups
Buttercups are found throughout the United States, especially in wet areas. The shiny, yellow flowers will pop up in the springtime, accompanying their dandelion friends. However, unlike dandelions, buttercups are not edible.

Buttercups will release a compound called protoanemonin. This toxin is known to cause vomiting, diarrhea, bloody stool, hypersalivation, depression, blisters, and more. These symptoms will affect both humans and animals. The sap may also cause irritation when it comes into contact with skin. These yellow flowers are dangerous and children should be observed cautiously when around them.

Foxgloves

Foxgloves
Foxgloves are beautiful plants that build towers out of vivid purple bell-shaped blossoms. They are very pretty to look at, but they contain a compound known as digoxin. This chemical is used in certain medicines to help people with certain heart conditions. However, the medicine is made by specialists, whereas someone eating foxgloves will receive unregulated amounts of the chemical.

This toxin can make you vomit and lower your heartbeat. This often causes dizziness and faintness. It is extremely important to call poison control immediately to know what to do in the case of foxglove poisoning. Some people have confused the young leaves of foxglove with borage, making adult foragers at risk as well as kids and pets.
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
Now that you know where to start with toxic plant identification, let us discuss how to either tend to the poisonous plants you decide to keep or get rid of them that plague your yard.

How to Tend to Poisonous Plants

Many plants that are toxic when ingested are also skin irritants. The philodendron is a good example of this. When the sap comes into contact with skin, it can cause a rash to form. To help protect yourself when tending to toxic plants, it is important to wear some sort of gloves.
Tend
Latex gloves may be the best solution due to their disposability. Regular gloves could potentially keep the poisonous sap on their surface. If the gloves aren’t cleaned then you could accidentally touch the irritant or pass it to someone else.

In addition you will want to plan where to keep your deadly beauties. If you have a toxic indoor plant try to keep it up high or out of reach of children and pets. This will keep accidents few and far between. Another idea is keeping your plants in areas that are usually inaccessible to children or pets. Areas such as an office, study room, or guest bedroom could be good locations. If applicable, you could also set up a terrarium for your little plant baby, making it more difficult for curious hands or paws to access.
tend2
If you plan to have outdoor plants, location will be key. You will want to put plants in an area that will be inaccessible to children, pets and even wild animals. You will probably want to avoid planting the plants in the front of your house if kids walk by on a regular basis, just to be cautious. Having the plants behind a fence will be best, but use your discretion when choosing a spot.

How to Get Rid of Poisonous Plants

plants
The easiest but possibly most controversial way to get rid of poisonous plants is by using herbicides. This can be especially easy if you own a grass lawn and use an herbicide that targets broadleaf (non-grass) species. You can find many herbicides meant for yard use by simply searching the term online. Once you have purchased the herbicide you will want to make sure to follow the label posted on the container. If you follow the instructions precisely, then everything should run smoothly for you.

If you don’t plan on using herbicides, there are a few organic methods you can use to try to get rid of toxic plants. You can manually pull the plants out of the ground. This is probably one of the most difficult methods because there is no assurance that you will get the whole plant out this way.

You can also try pouring boiling hot water or spraying white vinegar on the target plants. This may take more time than using a synthetic herbicide, but you can feel a little better about using these products.

You can also try to use wood chips to cover a certain area where you do not want anything to grow. This will not stop all the weeds, but the few that make it through can be easily picked by hand.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
distribution

Distribution of Lilies

feedback
Feedback
feedback

Distribution Map of Lilies

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
care detail

How to Grow and Care for Lilies

feedback
Feedback
feedback
The lilies genus require careful attention to detail for successful cultivation. Basic care includes full sun exposure with some afternoon shade, consistent moisture without waterlogging, well-drained soil and cooler temperature requirements for the bulb. Common challenges encompass susceptibility to lily beetle, viral diseases, and vulnerability to frost. Seasonal considerations involve providing added mulch for winter protection, regular watering in growth phase during spring, and dead-heading in autumn to optimize energy focus on bulb development.
More Info About Caring for Lilies
species

Exploring the Lilies Plants

feedback
Feedback
feedback
8 most common species:
Lilium candidum
Madonna lily
Madonna lily (Lilium candidum) is a plant species that forms bulbs at ground level and has been cultivated by humans for over 3,000 years. Madonna lily is native to the Balkans and Middle East. This species has great symbolic value in many different cultures. For example, it is a symbol of purity in Roman Catholicism. Madonna lily is susceptible to viral and fungal diseases.
Lilium bulbiferum
Orange lily
Orange lily (Lilium bulbiferum) is a flowering herbaceous lily species native to Europe. This species is toxic to cats. Its scientific name means "bearing bulbs." orange lily is the symbol of the Orange Order, a protestant fraternal order in Ireland.
Lilium longiflorum
Easter lily
Lilium longiflorum, commonly known as easter lily is a perennial bulb, famous for the beautiful fragrance of its large, trumpet-shaped white flowers. It plays an important role in Christianity, as it symbolizes the resurrection of Jesus Christ celebrated during Easter (hence the common name). Easter lily is most often cultivated for cut flowers.
Lilium martagon
Martagon lily
Martagon lily (*Lilium martagon*) is a lily plant native to Europe and Asia, from Portugal to Mongolia. Martagon lily is a commonly cultivated ornamental garden plant, and it is toxic to cats.
Show More Species

All Species of Lilies

Madonna lily
Orange lily
Easter lily
Martagon lily
Lily
Tiger lily
Formosa lily
Siberian lily
Wood lily
Golden-rayed lily
Columbia lily
Trumpet lily
Turk's-Cap Lily
Showy lily
Pyrenean lily
Michigan Lily
Humboldt's lily
Royal Lily
Pitkin marsh lily
Henry's lily
Canada lily
Sierra tiger lily
Carolina lily
Coral lily
Pine lily
Kelley's lily
Twilight lily
Red lily
Lilium davidii var. willmottiae
Lilies 'Golden Splendor'
Lilies 'Starlight Express'
Lilies 'Silk Road' aka 'Friso'
Martagon lily 'Terrace City'
Martagon lily 'Album'
Lilies 'Easy Waltz'
Lilies 'Rosella's Dream'
Lilies 'Easy Samba'
Martagon lily 'Pink Morning'
Lilies 'Citronella'
Lilies 'Tom Pouce'
Lilies 'Tiny Todd'
Lilies 'Push Off'
Martagon lily 'Orange Marmalade'
Lilies 'Muscadet'
Lilies 'Dizzy'
Lilies 'Dot Com'
Lilies 'White Twinkle'
Lilies 'Black Out'
Lilies 'Nymph'
Lilies 'Scheherazade'
Lilies 'Altari'
Lilies 'African Queen'
Tiger lily 'Flore Pleno'
Lilies 'Robert Swanson'
Lilies 'Apricot Fudge'
Lilies 'Regale'
Lilies 'Brindisi'
Morning star lily
Lilies 'Anastasia'
Tiger lily 'Splendens'
Lilies 'Casa Blanca'
Lilies 'Crimson Pixie'
Leichtlin's lily
Lilies 'Chill Out'
Lilies 'Miss Peculiar'
Showy lily 'Black Beauty'
Lilies 'Salmon Twinkle'
Lilies 'Brunello'
Lilies 'Limelight'
Lilies 'Tigerwoods'
Royal lily 'Album'
Lilies 'Patricia's Pride'
Lilies 'Lady Alice'
Common turk's cap lily
Lilies 'Star Gazer'
Martagon lily 'Claude Shride'
Martagon lily 'Manitoba Morning'
Tiger lily 'King Pete'
Lilies 'Pollyanna'
Lilies 'Easy Vanilla'
Lilies 'Pink Perfection'
Lilies 'Barbara North'
Lilies 'Cavoli'
Lilies 'Forever Marjolein'
Lilies 'Monte Negro'
Easter lily 'White American'
Lilies 'Star Gazer'
Lily
Manchurian turk's cap lily
Lily
Lilium hybrid
Lilies 'Fire King'
Nodding lily
Lilies 'Enchantment'
Lilies 'Starfighter'
Lilies 'Dimension'
popular genus

More Popular Genus

feedback
Feedback
feedback
Dracaena
Dracaena
Dracaena are popular house plants that are easy to grow. They can tolerate low-light conditions and require little watering. Their leaves range from variegated to dark green. Their characteristic traits include woody stems that grow slowly but offer a striking appearance for small spaces such as apartments or offices.
Ficus
Fig trees
Fig trees have been cultivated in many regions for their fruits, particularly the common fig, F. carica. Most of the species have edible fruits, although the common fig is the only one of commercial value. Fig trees are also important food sources for wildlife in the tropics, including monkeys, bats, and insects.
Rubus
Brambles
Brambles are members of the rose family, and there are hundreds of different types to be found throughout the European countryside. They have been culturally significant for centuries; Christian folklore stories hold that when the devil was thrown from heaven, he landed on a bramble bush. Their vigorous growth habit can tangle into native plants and take over.
Acer
Maples
The popular tree family known as maples change the color of their leaves in the fall. Many cultural traditions encourage people to watch the colors change, such as momijigari in Japan. Maples popular options for bonsai art. Alternately, their sap is used to create maple syrup.
Prunus
Prunus
Prunus is a genus of flowering fruit trees that includes almonds, cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines, and apricots. These are often known as "stone fruits" because their pits are large seeds or "stones." When prunus trees are damaged, they exhibit "gummosis," a condition in which the tree's gum (similar to sap) is secreted to the bark to help heal external wounds.
Solanum
Nightshades
Nightshades is a large and diverse genus of plants, with more than 1500 different types worldwide. This genus incorporates both important staple food crops like tomato, potato, and eggplant, but also dangerous poisonous plants from the nightshade family. The name was coined by Pliny the Elder almost two thousand years ago.
Rosa
Roses
Most species of roses are shrubs or climbing plants that have showy flowers and sharp thorns. They are commonly cultivated for cut flowers or as ornamental plants in gardens due to their attractive appearance, pleasant fragrance, and cultural significance in many countries. The rose hips (fruits) can also be used in jams and teas.
Quercus
Oaks
Oaks are among the world's longest-lived trees, sometimes growing for over 1,000 years! The oldest known oak tree is in the southern United States and is over 1,500 years old. Oaks produce an exceedingly popular type of wood which is used to make different products, from furniture and flooring to wine barrels and even cosmetic creams.
product icon close
Your Ultimate Guide to Plants
Identify grow and nurture the better way!
product icon
17,000 local species +400,000 global species studied
product icon
Nearly 5 years of research
product icon
80+ scholars in botany and gardening
ad
product icon close
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
Cookie Management Tool
In addition to managing cookies through your browser or device, you can change your cookie settings below.
Necessary Cookies
Necessary cookies enable core functionality. The website cannot function properly without these cookies, and can only be disabled by changing your browser preferences.
Analytical Cookies
Analytical cookies help us to improve our application/website by collecting and reporting information on its usage.
Cookie Name Source Purpose Lifespan
_ga Google Analytics These cookies are set because of our use of Google Analytics. They are used to collect information about your use of our application/website. The cookies collect specific information, such as your IP address, data related to your device and other information about your use of the application/website. Please note that the data processing is essentially carried out by Google LLC and Google may use your data collected by the cookies for own purposes, e.g. profiling and will combine it with other data such as your Google Account. For more information about how Google processes your data and Google’s approach to privacy as well as implemented safeguards for your data, please see here. 1 Year
_pta PictureThis Analytics We use these cookies to collect information about how you use our site, monitor site performance, and improve our site performance, our services, and your experience. 1 Year
Cookie Name
_ga
Source
Google Analytics
Purpose
These cookies are set because of our use of Google Analytics. They are used to collect information about your use of our application/website. The cookies collect specific information, such as your IP address, data related to your device and other information about your use of the application/website. Please note that the data processing is essentially carried out by Google LLC and Google may use your data collected by the cookies for own purposes, e.g. profiling and will combine it with other data such as your Google Account. For more information about how Google processes your data and Google’s approach to privacy as well as implemented safeguards for your data, please see here.
Lifespan
1 Year

Cookie Name
_pta
Source
PictureThis Analytics
Purpose
We use these cookies to collect information about how you use our site, monitor site performance, and improve our site performance, our services, and your experience.
Lifespan
1 Year
Marketing Cookies
Marketing cookies are used by advertising companies to serve ads that are relevant to your interests.
Cookie Name Source Purpose Lifespan
_fbp Facebook Pixel A conversion pixel tracking that we use for retargeting campaigns. Learn more here. 1 Year
_adj Adjust This cookie provides mobile analytics and attribution services that enable us to measure and analyze the effectiveness of marketing campaigns, certain events and actions within the Application. Learn more here. 1 Year
Cookie Name
_fbp
Source
Facebook Pixel
Purpose
A conversion pixel tracking that we use for retargeting campaigns. Learn more here.
Lifespan
1 Year

Cookie Name
_adj
Source
Adjust
Purpose
This cookie provides mobile analytics and attribution services that enable us to measure and analyze the effectiveness of marketing campaigns, certain events and actions within the Application. Learn more here.
Lifespan
1 Year
This page looks better in the app
Open