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Angel's-wings 'Albata'
Angel's-wings 'Albata'
Angel's-wings 'Albata'
Opuntia microdasys 'Albata'
Also known as : Bunny ear prickly pear 'Albata', Bunny cactus 'Albata'
Angel's-wings 'Albata' is a charming addition to any garden due to its unique appearance. The bright white spots that cover its flat, oval-shaped pads truly resemble the wings of an angel. However, beware of this plant's spine-covered pads and glochidia, which can cause skin irritation and severe allergic reactions.
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
10 to 13
more
care guide

Care Guide for Angel's-wings 'Albata'

Watering Care
Watering Care
Drought-tolerant. Allow the soil to dry completely between watering.
Details on Watering Care Watering Care
Fertilizing Care
Fertilizing Care
Fertilization once every 2-3 months during the growing season.
Details on Fertilizing Care Fertilizing Care
What Are the Lighting Requirements for Angel's-wings 'Albata'?
What Are the Lighting Requirements for Angel's-wings 'Albata'?
Full sun, Partial sun
Details on Sunlight Requirements What Are the Lighting Requirements for Angel's-wings 'Albata'?
What is the Ideal Temperature Range for Angel's-wings 'Albata'?
What is the Ideal Temperature Range for Angel's-wings 'Albata'?
10 to 13
Details on Temperature What is the Ideal Temperature Range for Angel's-wings 'Albata'?
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Angel's-wings 'Albata'
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
10 to 13
plant_info

Key Facts About Angel's-wings 'Albata'

Attributes of Angel's-wings 'Albata'

Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Height
91 cm
Spread
10 cm
Leaf type
Evergreen

Scientific Classification of Angel's-wings 'Albata'

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pests

Common Pests & Diseases About Angel's-wings 'Albata'

Common issues for Angel's-wings 'Albata' based on 10 million real cases
Scars
Scars Scars
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Solutions: Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Fruit Spot
Fruit Spot Fruit Spot
Fruit Spot
Pathogenic infections can cause spots (typically black or brown) to appear on the fruit.
Solutions: Prune regularly - prune as a preventative measure as well as to remove any plants and plant parts affected by fruit Spot. Improve air circulation and drainage Fertilize as needed Spray applications - there are few programs that are effective at controlling fruit Spot for home growers, but the local cooperative extension may be able to provide information regarding potential chemical treatments if the disease is severe.
Dieback
Dieback Dieback
Dieback
There are several possible causes for dieback.
Solutions: There are a few things to try when dieback becomes apparent: Fertilize and water the plants - these two steps, along with judicious pruning, can help reduce the stress on the root system and encourage renewed vigor Have an arborist check to see if plant roots are girdling Test soil pH and adjust accordingly Remove and destroy infected twigs and branches
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Scars
plant poor
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Scars form when the plant repairs wounds. They can be the result of people or pets passing by and scraping the plant. Once the underlying issue is resolved, the plant will heal but a scar may remain.
Pests and pathogens can also cause scarring. Insects may attack the plant for a meal, resulting in extensive scarring when a few invaders turn into an infestation. Diseases such as fungus and bacteria can weaken the plant, causing brown spots, mushy areas, or blisters that lead to scars.
Scars occur on stems when a leaf or bud has been lost and the plant has healed. The harder tissue is like a scab that protects a wound.
On other occasions, scars can signal problems from environmental conditions, such as overexposure to sunlight or heat. It might surprise you to know that plants can suffer from sunburn, even desert dwellers like cactus!
Solutions
Solutions
Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover.
  1. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes.
  2. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray.
  3. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs.
  4. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Prevention
Prevention
Preventing some sources of scarring is easier than others, but all start with careful attention to your plants once you decide to bring them home.
  1. Review specific guidelines for your plant, including soil drainage, watering, and fertilizer requirements.
  2. Inspect plants before planting and use sterile pots and fresh potting soil or media to limit transfer of fungi or bacteria.
  3. Once established, check your plants regularly for signs of scarring or the presence of pests, as it is better to catch problems as early as possible.
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Fruit Spot
plant poor
Fruit Spot
Pathogenic infections can cause spots (typically black or brown) to appear on the fruit.
Overview
Overview
If there are brown or black spots on the unripened fruits of plants, there is a good chance that fruit Spot could be to blame. This is an informal term used to describe several types of diseases that all cause these same symptoms: unattractive spots on fruits and vegetables.
There are a few different culprits behind fruit Spot, including bacterial spot, bacterial speck, and other related diseases (like early blight). Here are some symptoms and potential solutions to consider.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The symptoms of fruit Spot vary depending on which type of plant is affected as well as by which specific pathogen is to blame. Just about every type of plant can be affected by fruit Spot, including tomatoes, pears, plums, onions, strawberries, celery, peaches, and more.
Here are some examples of potential symptoms:
Small Fruit Spot
Small spots are most commonly associated with bacterial speck.
  • Spots may appear on fruits as well as leaves and other aboveground areas of the plant
  • Small black specks appear on infected fruits (spots are less than 1/16” in diameter)
  • Spots are raised with distinct margins, developing into sunken pits as the fruit matures
  • Fruit tissue near the spot stays green longer than the rest of the fruit
  • Spots are dark brown to black in color, with nearby spots often growing together
Large Fruit Spot
Large spots are often seen on plants suffering from bacterial spot, early blight, and related diseases.
  • Spots are large, sometimes larger than 1.3 cm
  • Some spots may look like targets with a brown to greyish coloration
  • Older spots are black and raised with lobed borders
  • Spots are superficial only, not penetrating into the seed cavity
  • Spots may turn into sunken pits, turning into craters as they get older
  • The skin of the fruit can be cracked and produce a water-soaked border
  • Some spots may ooze a gelatinous substance
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
There are a few culprits behind the fruit Spot. These depend on the pathogen as well as the type of plant. Bacterial speck and bacterial spot are both common diseases that can affect tomatoes, ground cherries, and other plants.
Bacterial speck is caused by Pseudomonas syringae. First discovered in the United States in 1933, it is most common in tomatoes and nearby weeds but can affect other kinds of plants and their fruits, too. It is more prevalent in low temperatures (less than 24 ℃) and high moisture.
Bacterial spot is caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. Vesicatoria. First discovered in Texas in 1912, this disease is more common in warm weather and conditions of high moisture.
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Dieback
plant poor
Dieback
There are several possible causes for dieback.
Overview
Overview
Dealing with dieback in plants can be tricky, in part because this is both the name of a disease itself and a common symptom of many other types of diseases. Dieback can be characterized by the progressive, gradual death of shoots, twigs, roots, and branches, generally starting first at the tips.
In many cases, dieback is caused by fungi or bacteria. These pathogens can produce cankers, wilts, stem or root rots, and even anthracnose, but the most common symptom, of course, is that various plant parts (or the entire plant) will begin to die back.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The symptoms of dieback can be gradual or slightly more abrupt. Usually, however, they are slow in developing and tend to be uniform among the various parts of a plant.
Some plants may have more localized symptoms, with all twigs affected or all branches affected but not the rest of the plant. Some potential symptoms include:
  • Dead or dying branches and twigs
  • Dieback that starts in the top of a plant and progresses downward (though it can start lower, especially for conifers)
  • A delayed flush of growth in the spring
  • Leaf margins become scorched
  • Pale green or yellow leaves
  • Leaves that are small or otherwise distorted
  • Early leaf drop
  • Reduced growth of twigs and stems
  • Thinning of crown foliage
  • Production of suckers on trunk and branches
  • Premature fall coloration (in tree species like birch, sweetgum, maple, oak, ash, etc)
The symptoms of dieback can occur within just one season or become worse each and every year.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
There are several types of dieback, each of which has a different cause with which it is associated.
"dieback" as a standalone issue, including the condition known as Staghead, is caused by fungal or bacterial infections. Staghead is a slow dieback that occurs on the upper branches of a tree, named as such because the dead limbs look much like the head of a stag.
Other causes of dieback symptoms include:
  • Cankers or wilts
  • Stem or root rots
  • Nematodes
  • Stem or root boring insects
  • Pavement being placed over root systems
  • Winter injury from cold
  • Salt damage
  • Lack of moisture (or excess of moisture)
  • Lack of an essential nutrient or element
Trees and shrubs that are attacked by insects, exposed to extremely high or low temperatures, or experience severe and frequent fluctuations in soil moisture are the most likely to suffer from dieback. These stress factors alone or in combination with each other can reduce leaf and shoot growth, and progress into death of twigs and branches.
Although any of these issues can lead to dieback, the most serious consequences tend to occur when the roots of a plant are damaged. Similarly, trees and shrubs that are planted improperly or in unfavorable locations are more likely to develop this condition.
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More Info on Angel's-wings 'albata' Growth and Care

Basic Care Guide
Lighting
Full sun
Temperature
5 45 ℃
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Care Guide
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Pests & Diseases
More About How-Tos
Angel's-wings 'Albata'
Angel's-wings 'Albata'
Angel's-wings 'Albata'
Opuntia microdasys 'Albata'
Also known as: Bunny ear prickly pear 'Albata', Bunny cactus 'Albata'
Angel's-wings 'Albata' is a charming addition to any garden due to its unique appearance. The bright white spots that cover its flat, oval-shaped pads truly resemble the wings of an angel. However, beware of this plant's spine-covered pads and glochidia, which can cause skin irritation and severe allergic reactions.
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
10 to 13
more
plant_info

Key Facts About Angel's-wings 'Albata'

Attributes of Angel's-wings 'Albata'

Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Height
91 cm
Spread
10 cm
Leaf type
Evergreen
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Scientific Classification of Angel's-wings 'Albata'

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pests

Common Pests & Diseases About Angel's-wings 'Albata'

Common issues for Angel's-wings 'Albata' based on 10 million real cases
Scars
Scars Scars Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Solutions: Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Learn More About the Scars more
Fruit Spot
Fruit Spot Fruit Spot Fruit Spot
Pathogenic infections can cause spots (typically black or brown) to appear on the fruit.
Solutions: Prune regularly - prune as a preventative measure as well as to remove any plants and plant parts affected by fruit Spot. Improve air circulation and drainage Fertilize as needed Spray applications - there are few programs that are effective at controlling fruit Spot for home growers, but the local cooperative extension may be able to provide information regarding potential chemical treatments if the disease is severe.
Learn More About the Fruit Spot more
Dieback
Dieback Dieback Dieback
There are several possible causes for dieback.
Solutions: There are a few things to try when dieback becomes apparent: Fertilize and water the plants - these two steps, along with judicious pruning, can help reduce the stress on the root system and encourage renewed vigor Have an arborist check to see if plant roots are girdling Test soil pH and adjust accordingly Remove and destroy infected twigs and branches
Learn More About the Dieback more
icon
Treat and prevent plant diseases.
AI-powered plant doctor helps you diagnose plant problems in seconds.
Download the App
close
Scars
plant poor
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Scars form when the plant repairs wounds. They can be the result of people or pets passing by and scraping the plant. Once the underlying issue is resolved, the plant will heal but a scar may remain.
Pests and pathogens can also cause scarring. Insects may attack the plant for a meal, resulting in extensive scarring when a few invaders turn into an infestation. Diseases such as fungus and bacteria can weaken the plant, causing brown spots, mushy areas, or blisters that lead to scars.
Scars occur on stems when a leaf or bud has been lost and the plant has healed. The harder tissue is like a scab that protects a wound.
On other occasions, scars can signal problems from environmental conditions, such as overexposure to sunlight or heat. It might surprise you to know that plants can suffer from sunburn, even desert dwellers like cactus!
Solutions
Solutions
Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover.
  1. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes.
  2. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray.
  3. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs.
  4. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Prevention
Prevention
Preventing some sources of scarring is easier than others, but all start with careful attention to your plants once you decide to bring them home.
  1. Review specific guidelines for your plant, including soil drainage, watering, and fertilizer requirements.
  2. Inspect plants before planting and use sterile pots and fresh potting soil or media to limit transfer of fungi or bacteria.
  3. Once established, check your plants regularly for signs of scarring or the presence of pests, as it is better to catch problems as early as possible.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
close
Fruit Spot
plant poor
Fruit Spot
Pathogenic infections can cause spots (typically black or brown) to appear on the fruit.
Overview
Overview
If there are brown or black spots on the unripened fruits of plants, there is a good chance that fruit Spot could be to blame. This is an informal term used to describe several types of diseases that all cause these same symptoms: unattractive spots on fruits and vegetables.
There are a few different culprits behind fruit Spot, including bacterial spot, bacterial speck, and other related diseases (like early blight). Here are some symptoms and potential solutions to consider.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The symptoms of fruit Spot vary depending on which type of plant is affected as well as by which specific pathogen is to blame. Just about every type of plant can be affected by fruit Spot, including tomatoes, pears, plums, onions, strawberries, celery, peaches, and more.
Here are some examples of potential symptoms:
Small Fruit Spot
Small spots are most commonly associated with bacterial speck.
  • Spots may appear on fruits as well as leaves and other aboveground areas of the plant
  • Small black specks appear on infected fruits (spots are less than 1/16” in diameter)
  • Spots are raised with distinct margins, developing into sunken pits as the fruit matures
  • Fruit tissue near the spot stays green longer than the rest of the fruit
  • Spots are dark brown to black in color, with nearby spots often growing together
Large Fruit Spot
Large spots are often seen on plants suffering from bacterial spot, early blight, and related diseases.
  • Spots are large, sometimes larger than 1.3 cm
  • Some spots may look like targets with a brown to greyish coloration
  • Older spots are black and raised with lobed borders
  • Spots are superficial only, not penetrating into the seed cavity
  • Spots may turn into sunken pits, turning into craters as they get older
  • The skin of the fruit can be cracked and produce a water-soaked border
  • Some spots may ooze a gelatinous substance
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
There are a few culprits behind the fruit Spot. These depend on the pathogen as well as the type of plant. Bacterial speck and bacterial spot are both common diseases that can affect tomatoes, ground cherries, and other plants.
Bacterial speck is caused by Pseudomonas syringae. First discovered in the United States in 1933, it is most common in tomatoes and nearby weeds but can affect other kinds of plants and their fruits, too. It is more prevalent in low temperatures (less than 24 ℃) and high moisture.
Bacterial spot is caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. Vesicatoria. First discovered in Texas in 1912, this disease is more common in warm weather and conditions of high moisture.
Solutions
Solutions
  • Prune regularly - prune as a preventative measure as well as to remove any plants and plant parts affected by fruit Spot.
  • Improve air circulation and drainage
  • Fertilize as needed
  • Spray applications - there are few programs that are effective at controlling fruit Spot for home growers, but the local cooperative extension may be able to provide information regarding potential chemical treatments if the disease is severe.
Prevention
Prevention
There are several ways to prevent both types of fruit Spot from affecting yields and harvests:
  • Rotate crops - do not plant the same kind of plant in the same spot each year, instead switching out locations every two to three years
  • Use disease-free seeds and transplants - using a hot water treatment to sterilize seeds before planting can also be effective
  • Irrigate early in the day to give plants time to dry off before nightfall
  • Avoid working around plants when they are wet
  • Control weeds
  • Remove debris or plow it under at the end of the growing season
  • Fertilize with higher amounts of nitrogen and use less calcium
  • Plant resistant cultivars when available
  • Do not clip plants when transplanting
  • Dispose of affected plant parts immediately (do not compost)
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
close
Dieback
plant poor
Dieback
There are several possible causes for dieback.
Overview
Overview
Dealing with dieback in plants can be tricky, in part because this is both the name of a disease itself and a common symptom of many other types of diseases. Dieback can be characterized by the progressive, gradual death of shoots, twigs, roots, and branches, generally starting first at the tips.
In many cases, dieback is caused by fungi or bacteria. These pathogens can produce cankers, wilts, stem or root rots, and even anthracnose, but the most common symptom, of course, is that various plant parts (or the entire plant) will begin to die back.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The symptoms of dieback can be gradual or slightly more abrupt. Usually, however, they are slow in developing and tend to be uniform among the various parts of a plant.
Some plants may have more localized symptoms, with all twigs affected or all branches affected but not the rest of the plant. Some potential symptoms include:
  • Dead or dying branches and twigs
  • Dieback that starts in the top of a plant and progresses downward (though it can start lower, especially for conifers)
  • A delayed flush of growth in the spring
  • Leaf margins become scorched
  • Pale green or yellow leaves
  • Leaves that are small or otherwise distorted
  • Early leaf drop
  • Reduced growth of twigs and stems
  • Thinning of crown foliage
  • Production of suckers on trunk and branches
  • Premature fall coloration (in tree species like birch, sweetgum, maple, oak, ash, etc)
The symptoms of dieback can occur within just one season or become worse each and every year.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
There are several types of dieback, each of which has a different cause with which it is associated.
"dieback" as a standalone issue, including the condition known as Staghead, is caused by fungal or bacterial infections. Staghead is a slow dieback that occurs on the upper branches of a tree, named as such because the dead limbs look much like the head of a stag.
Other causes of dieback symptoms include:
  • Cankers or wilts
  • Stem or root rots
  • Nematodes
  • Stem or root boring insects
  • Pavement being placed over root systems
  • Winter injury from cold
  • Salt damage
  • Lack of moisture (or excess of moisture)
  • Lack of an essential nutrient or element
Trees and shrubs that are attacked by insects, exposed to extremely high or low temperatures, or experience severe and frequent fluctuations in soil moisture are the most likely to suffer from dieback. These stress factors alone or in combination with each other can reduce leaf and shoot growth, and progress into death of twigs and branches.
Although any of these issues can lead to dieback, the most serious consequences tend to occur when the roots of a plant are damaged. Similarly, trees and shrubs that are planted improperly or in unfavorable locations are more likely to develop this condition.
Solutions
Solutions
There are a few things to try when dieback becomes apparent:
  • Fertilize and water the plants - these two steps, along with judicious pruning, can help reduce the stress on the root system and encourage renewed vigor
  • Have an arborist check to see if plant roots are girdling
  • Test soil pH and adjust accordingly
  • Remove and destroy infected twigs and branches
Prevention
Prevention
The best way to prevent dieback is to match the plant to the site. Make sure the conditions provided for a new planting match its needs.
  • Plant properly in deep, fertile well-draining soil
  • Make sure plant roots won’t be confined when the plant reaches its mature size
  • Avoid changes to the growing site
  • If soil compaction might be an issue, apply a few inches of wood chips and eliminate traffic over the root area
  • Fertilize and water appropriately
It is also important to avoid potential infection with pathogens that can cause dieback:
  • Avoid binding or wounding the roots and trunk whenever possible
  • Avoid excessive pruning
  • Disinfect all tools before working with plants to reduce the spread of disease
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
care_scenes

More Info on Angel's-wings 'albata' Growth and Care

Basic Care Guide
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Your Ultimate Guide to Plants
Identify grow and nurture the better way!
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17,000 local species +400,000 global species studied
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Nearly 5 years of research
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80+ scholars in botany and gardening
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unlimited guides at your fingertips...
Lighting
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Outdoor
Choose a site here for personalized care tips.
Requirements
Full sun
Ideal
Above 6 hours sunlight
Partial sun
Tolerance
About 3-6 hours sunlight
Watch how sunlight gracefully moves through your garden, and choose spots that provide the perfect balance of light and shade for your plants, ensuring their happiness.
Discover information about plant diseases, toxicity, weed control and more.
Temperature
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Indoor
Outdoor
Choose a site here for personalized care tips.
Requirements
Ideal
Tolerable
Unsuitable
Just like people, each plant has its own preferences. Learn about your plants' temperature needs and create a comforting environment for them to flourish. As you care for your plants, your bond with them will deepen. Trust your intuition as you learn about their temperature needs, celebrating the journey you share. Lovingly monitor the temperature around your plants and adjust their environment as needed. A thermometer can be your ally in this heartfelt endeavor. Be patient and gentle with yourself as you explore your plants' temperature needs. Cherish your successes, learn from challenges, and nurture your garden with love, creating a haven that reflects the warmth of your care.
Discover information about plant diseases, toxicity, weed control and more.
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