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Key Facts
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Toxicity
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Azaleas
Azaleas
Azaleas
Azaleas
Azaleas (Rhododendron)
Azaleas are beautiful when planted alone or in a group. Their bright flowers signal the beginning of spring in the southern region of the United States. The flowers almost appear to float on air and come in a variety of colors. The first southern cultivar was established and planted outdoors on a South Carolina plantation in the 19th century. Since then, many southern states have celebrated the blooming of the azaleas with festivals and parades.
Lifespan
Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Plant Type
Shrub
info

Key Facts About Azaleas

Attributes of Azaleas

Plant Height
1.8 m to 3.5 m
Spread
1.8 m to 2.5 m
Flower Size
2.5 cm to 8 cm
Leaf type
Evergreen

Scientific Classification of Azaleas

toxic

Azaleas and Their Toxicity

* The judgment on toxicity and danger is for reference only. We DO NOT GUARANTEE any accuracy of such judgment. Therefore, you SHALL NOT rely on such judgment. It is IMPORTANT TO SEEK PROFESSIONAL ADVICE in advance when necessary.
Toxic to Dogs
Toxic to Dogs
All varieties of azaleas (Rhododendron) are incredibly toxic to dogs, and just a small amount can be lethal. All parts of the plant are toxic and ingestion can first cause vomiting and excessive salivation, leading to weakness, vision loss, and possibly death. If you suspect your dog has consumed even a few leaves, prompt veterinary treatment is needed.
Toxic to Cats
Toxic to Cats
Azaleas poisoning can be an immediate medical emergency for cats. The leaves, twigs, and flowers of the Rhododendron plant contain hazardous grayanotoxins. The first signs of poisoning appear several hours after ingestion and they include excessive salivation, vomiting, diarrhea, bloat, and colic, followed by coma, heart failure, or death.
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Who Is Most at Risk of Plant Poisoning?
Your pets like cats and dogs can be poisoned by them as well!
1
Do not let your lovely pets eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
2
It’s better to kill those growing around your house. Wear long-sleeved shirts, pants and gloves with sharp tools to dig it out completely;
3
Clean the tools with rubbing alcohol or soap and water but do not do that with bare hands;
4
Clean your hands and skin once exposed to plants with soap and water;
5
Consider using barrier creams that contain bentoquatam to prevent poison oak, ivy and sumac rashes;
6
Dump it in special trash cans in sealed garbage packages, and do not let your pets reach it;Do not let your lovely pets eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
7
If you take your pets to hike with you in the wild, please don’t let them eat any plants that you don’t know;
8
Once your pets eat, touch or inhale anything from toxic plants and act abnormally, please call the doctors for help ASAP!
pets
Pets
Some pets are less likely than children to eat and touch just about everything. This is good, as a pet owner. However, you know your pet best, and it is up to you to keep them safe. There are plenty of poisonous weeds that can grow within the confines of your lawn, which might make your dogs or cats ill or worse if they eat them. Try to have an idea of what toxic plants grow in your area and keep them under control and your pets away from them.
pets
Common Toxic Houseplants
Common Toxic Houseplants
When it comes to decorating a house, there is nothing more refreshing than adding some beautiful houseplants. Some common house plants can also be toxic.

Aloe

aloe
Aloe is famous for its sunburn-soothing properties and its gorgeous desert design. However, many people do not realize that the latex the aloe vera plant produces can be mildly toxic to pets and children.

The latex contains a chemical compound known as saponin. Which when ingested, can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and low blood sugar. This, if left unchecked, can lead to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. The proper response is to contact poison control or a veterinarian to know what to do in your particular circumstance if either your child or pet consumes aloe.

The latex of the plant is similar to the sap of the tree. It is inside the leaf, but sticks mainly toward the edges. If aloe gel is prepared properly it should be safe for use, but be sure to apply it only topically when treating burns.

Philodendron

Philodendron
Philodendron, also known as sweetheart vine, has become a resident at many houses and even businesses. They are glossy green and the leaves elegantly split, displaying interesting designs. Behind this beauty there is a needle-like toxin called calcium oxalate crystals.

These crystals are held within the plant and only affect you, your pets, or your loved ones if the plant tissue is broken. If ingested, the crystals can cause severe swelling, difficulty breathing, stomach pain, burning and pain. If they are accidentally caught on the skin, they can cause skin irritation.

If anyone accidentally ingests philodendron and they find it difficult to breathe or their tongue starts to swell up, it is important to seek medical attention immediately to avoid suffocation. If you have very young children or pets who have a tendency to tear at plants, keep them away from any philodendrons.

Peace Lily

Peace Lily
Peace lilies produce stunningly white flowers that bring to mind peace and serenity. This is one reason they are invited into our homes and given a place to stay. However, similar to philodendrons, the peace lily contains oxalate crystals known as raphides.

The raphides, once ingested, will cause swelling and burning sensations and can also cause skin irritation. Both pets and humans can get these symptoms so it is important to keep these plants from anyone who is likely to tear or chew it. Symptoms can become dire if the raphides cause the tongue and throat to swell to a point where the person or pet is having difficulty breathing. Seek proper medical attention if this is the case.

Snake Plant

Snake Plant
The snake plant is an interesting and popular house plant. Its stark architecture and wavy coloring has made it a fan favorite. This plant too, however, is toxic when ingested or if the sap touches your skin.

Snake plant sap will cause rashes if it comes into contact with your skin. In addition, it will cause diarrhea and vomiting when ingested. Again these symptoms are very serious and would be best avoided by keeping snake plants out of reach or by choosing a different houseplant.
Common Toxic Garden Plants
Common Toxic Garden Plants

Daffodil

Daffodil
Daffodils are a strikingly colorful flower. This can sometimes bring them much attention not from just onlooking adults but children as well. Since kids are more drawn to colorful objects, they may have a higher chance of just grabbing the flower and eating it. Adults have also been known to accidentally grab daffodil bulbs instead of onions.

Why are these mistakes so dangerous? Daffodils contain lycorine, which can induce nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It also contains oxalates which can cause swelling and pain. The symptoms can be worse in animals, because if your pets eat daffodils they may experience drowsiness, low blood pressure or even liver damage.

Make sure to call poison control when these symptoms set in. The vomiting and diarrhea have been known to go away after 3 hours, but it is better to be safe than sorry. Ingesting liquids to keep hydration up can be important. If the patient is having difficulty breathing, seek medical attention immediately.

Hydrangea

Hydrangea
Hydrangeas are unique, with their soft blue and pink flowers. They are a great addition to any garden, but should not be snacked on—not that you would want to. Hydrangeas can be especially nasty because they contain compounds known as glycosides. These will release hydrogen cyanide into the bloodstream when consumed. This will block your body’s ability to uptake oxygen to the cells in your body.

The way to combat this kind of poisoning is through getting IVs from the vet or doctor. It is important to contact your medical professional immediately since the symptoms can be fatal within minutes or hours.

Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons
Rhododendron, the state flower of Washington, is also toxic. The multitudinous, pink flowers can be quite dangerous. All parts of this plant are toxic, the leaves and seeds more so than the flowers. However, even the nectar of the flower is toxic and in the Mediterranean, where rhododendrons grow in more dense quantities, the honey from bees who gather rhododendron nectar can be poisonous.

Normally kids and pets do not eat enough to experience the full poisoning effect. However, just eating two leaves is enough to be considered dangerous. The grayanotoxin glycosides within the rhododendron can cause vomiting, diarrhea and irregular heartbeats. Things can get very serious when too much rhododendron is consumed and can lead to necessary medical intervention.

Start by calling poison control first if you suspect anyone has been munching on rhododendrons. The experts there will be able to help guide you through the necessary processes to cure your loved one.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb
Yummy rhubarb has a nasty side to it. While the stems are used in many recipes, including for rhubarb strawberry pie, the leaves are toxic. They contain oxalic acid which is known to blister the mouth, cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and kidney stones. The leaves are known to be more toxic to pets than humans, but in either case, it is important to contact poison control immediately to figure out necessary steps to cure the patient.
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard

Bittersweet Nightshade

Bittersweet Nightshade
Nightshade is an invasive, noxious weed that is extremely poisonous. It has been found along the East and West Coast of the U.S. It makes its home in areas with disturbed soil. This could be near your garden or areas that have recently had bushes/trees put in.

These plants are dark green with purple flowers that develop into bright red berries. The whole plant is toxic and should be avoided by pets and children alike. If ingested it can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The colorful berries are especially enticing to young children. If you see any plants that look similar to tomato or pepper plants that you did not plant in your yard, it is best to just pull them immediately.

Call poison control immediately if you think someone has fallen victim to nightshade.

Buttercups

Buttercups
Buttercups are found throughout the United States, especially in wet areas. The shiny, yellow flowers will pop up in the springtime, accompanying their dandelion friends. However, unlike dandelions, buttercups are not edible.

Buttercups will release a compound called protoanemonin. This toxin is known to cause vomiting, diarrhea, bloody stool, hypersalivation, depression, blisters, and more. These symptoms will affect both humans and animals. The sap may also cause irritation when it comes into contact with skin. These yellow flowers are dangerous and children should be observed cautiously when around them.

Foxgloves

Foxgloves
Foxgloves are beautiful plants that build towers out of vivid purple bell-shaped blossoms. They are very pretty to look at, but they contain a compound known as digoxin. This chemical is used in certain medicines to help people with certain heart conditions. However, the medicine is made by specialists, whereas someone eating foxgloves will receive unregulated amounts of the chemical.

This toxin can make you vomit and lower your heartbeat. This often causes dizziness and faintness. It is extremely important to call poison control immediately to know what to do in the case of foxglove poisoning. Some people have confused the young leaves of foxglove with borage, making adult foragers at risk as well as kids and pets.
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
Now that you know where to start with toxic plant identification, let us discuss how to either tend to the poisonous plants you decide to keep or get rid of them that plague your yard.

How to Tend to Poisonous Plants

Many plants that are toxic when ingested are also skin irritants. The philodendron is a good example of this. When the sap comes into contact with skin, it can cause a rash to form. To help protect yourself when tending to toxic plants, it is important to wear some sort of gloves.
Tend
Latex gloves may be the best solution due to their disposability. Regular gloves could potentially keep the poisonous sap on their surface. If the gloves aren’t cleaned then you could accidentally touch the irritant or pass it to someone else.

In addition you will want to plan where to keep your deadly beauties. If you have a toxic indoor plant try to keep it up high or out of reach of children and pets. This will keep accidents few and far between. Another idea is keeping your plants in areas that are usually inaccessible to children or pets. Areas such as an office, study room, or guest bedroom could be good locations. If applicable, you could also set up a terrarium for your little plant baby, making it more difficult for curious hands or paws to access.
tend2
If you plan to have outdoor plants, location will be key. You will want to put plants in an area that will be inaccessible to children, pets and even wild animals. You will probably want to avoid planting the plants in the front of your house if kids walk by on a regular basis, just to be cautious. Having the plants behind a fence will be best, but use your discretion when choosing a spot.

How to Get Rid of Poisonous Plants

plants
The easiest but possibly most controversial way to get rid of poisonous plants is by using herbicides. This can be especially easy if you own a grass lawn and use an herbicide that targets broadleaf (non-grass) species. You can find many herbicides meant for yard use by simply searching the term online. Once you have purchased the herbicide you will want to make sure to follow the label posted on the container. If you follow the instructions precisely, then everything should run smoothly for you.

If you don’t plan on using herbicides, there are a few organic methods you can use to try to get rid of toxic plants. You can manually pull the plants out of the ground. This is probably one of the most difficult methods because there is no assurance that you will get the whole plant out this way.

You can also try pouring boiling hot water or spraying white vinegar on the target plants. This may take more time than using a synthetic herbicide, but you can feel a little better about using these products.

You can also try to use wood chips to cover a certain area where you do not want anything to grow. This will not stop all the weeds, but the few that make it through can be easily picked by hand.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
qrcode
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
Who Is Most at Risk of Plant Poisoning?
Everyone should keep the following in mind to prevent being poisoned:
1
Do not eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
2
If you need to kill it, wear long-sleeved shirts, pants and gloves with sharp tools to dig it out completely;
3
Clean the tools with rubbing alcohol or soap and water but do not do that with bare hands;
4
Clean your hands and skin once exposed to plants with soap and water;
5
Consider using barrier creams that contain bentoquatam to prevent poison oak, ivy and sumac rashes;
6
Dump it in special trash cans in sealed garbage packages;
7
Wear properly when you hiking or working in the wilderness. Long pants, long sleeves, gloves, hiking shoes, etc., that protect you from being hurt by any plants;
8
Once you or your family aren’t feeling well after eating, touching or inhaling anything from toxic plants, please call your doctor for help ASAP!
Outdoor Workers
Outdoor Workers and Recreationalists
Those who enjoy the outdoors either as a hobby or as part of their work will rarely see a plant and decide to munch on it (although the scenario is not unheard of). However, they do tend to deal with moving through and brushing aside plants. These people are more at risk of being poisoned by touching toxic plants than by ingesting them.
Outdoor Workers
Foragers
Foragers
Foraging for food and medicinal plants is a desirable skill among people who want to feel at one with the land. This hobby can be very useful and enjoyable, but if done wrong , it can lead to disastrous effects. People who forage are picking and grabbing plants with the full intention of using those plants, most of the time to ingest them.
Foragers
Children
Children
While outdoor workers are more likely to touch poison and foragers are more likely to ingest poison, children can easily do both. These bundles of joy just love to run around and explore the world. They enjoy touching things and occasionally shoving random stuff in their mouth; this is a terrible combination with toxic plants in the mix.
If you let your children run about, it is important to know what are the local toxic plants that they could accidentally get into. Try to educate the children and steer them away from where the toxic plants are located.
Children
Common Toxic Houseplants
Common Toxic Houseplants
When it comes to decorating a house, there is nothing more refreshing than adding some beautiful houseplants. Some common house plants can also be toxic.

Aloe

aloe
Aloe is famous for its sunburn-soothing properties and its gorgeous desert design. However, many people do not realize that the latex the aloe vera plant produces can be mildly toxic to pets and children.

The latex contains a chemical compound known as saponin. Which when ingested, can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and low blood sugar. This, if left unchecked, can lead to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. The proper response is to contact poison control or a veterinarian to know what to do in your particular circumstance if either your child or pet consumes aloe.

The latex of the plant is similar to the sap of the tree. It is inside the leaf, but sticks mainly toward the edges. If aloe gel is prepared properly it should be safe for use, but be sure to apply it only topically when treating burns.

Philodendron

Philodendron
Philodendron, also known as sweetheart vine, has become a resident at many houses and even businesses. They are glossy green and the leaves elegantly split, displaying interesting designs. Behind this beauty there is a needle-like toxin called calcium oxalate crystals.

These crystals are held within the plant and only affect you, your pets, or your loved ones if the plant tissue is broken. If ingested, the crystals can cause severe swelling, difficulty breathing, stomach pain, burning and pain. If they are accidentally caught on the skin, they can cause skin irritation.

If anyone accidentally ingests philodendron and they find it difficult to breathe or their tongue starts to swell up, it is important to seek medical attention immediately to avoid suffocation. If you have very young children or pets who have a tendency to tear at plants, keep them away from any philodendrons.

Peace Lily

Peace Lily
Peace lilies produce stunningly white flowers that bring to mind peace and serenity. This is one reason they are invited into our homes and given a place to stay. However, similar to philodendrons, the peace lily contains oxalate crystals known as raphides.

The raphides, once ingested, will cause swelling and burning sensations and can also cause skin irritation. Both pets and humans can get these symptoms so it is important to keep these plants from anyone who is likely to tear or chew it. Symptoms can become dire if the raphides cause the tongue and throat to swell to a point where the person or pet is having difficulty breathing. Seek proper medical attention if this is the case.

Snake Plant

Snake Plant
The snake plant is an interesting and popular house plant. Its stark architecture and wavy coloring has made it a fan favorite. This plant too, however, is toxic when ingested or if the sap touches your skin.

Snake plant sap will cause rashes if it comes into contact with your skin. In addition, it will cause diarrhea and vomiting when ingested. Again these symptoms are very serious and would be best avoided by keeping snake plants out of reach or by choosing a different houseplant.
Common Toxic Garden Plants
Common Toxic Garden Plants

Daffodil

Daffodil
Daffodils are a strikingly colorful flower. This can sometimes bring them much attention not from just onlooking adults but children as well. Since kids are more drawn to colorful objects, they may have a higher chance of just grabbing the flower and eating it. Adults have also been known to accidentally grab daffodil bulbs instead of onions.

Why are these mistakes so dangerous? Daffodils contain lycorine, which can induce nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It also contains oxalates which can cause swelling and pain. The symptoms can be worse in animals, because if your pets eat daffodils they may experience drowsiness, low blood pressure or even liver damage.

Make sure to call poison control when these symptoms set in. The vomiting and diarrhea have been known to go away after 3 hours, but it is better to be safe than sorry. Ingesting liquids to keep hydration up can be important. If the patient is having difficulty breathing, seek medical attention immediately.

Hydrangea

Hydrangea
Hydrangeas are unique, with their soft blue and pink flowers. They are a great addition to any garden, but should not be snacked on—not that you would want to. Hydrangeas can be especially nasty because they contain compounds known as glycosides. These will release hydrogen cyanide into the bloodstream when consumed. This will block your body’s ability to uptake oxygen to the cells in your body.

The way to combat this kind of poisoning is through getting IVs from the vet or doctor. It is important to contact your medical professional immediately since the symptoms can be fatal within minutes or hours.

Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons
Rhododendron, the state flower of Washington, is also toxic. The multitudinous, pink flowers can be quite dangerous. All parts of this plant are toxic, the leaves and seeds more so than the flowers. However, even the nectar of the flower is toxic and in the Mediterranean, where rhododendrons grow in more dense quantities, the honey from bees who gather rhododendron nectar can be poisonous.

Normally kids and pets do not eat enough to experience the full poisoning effect. However, just eating two leaves is enough to be considered dangerous. The grayanotoxin glycosides within the rhododendron can cause vomiting, diarrhea and irregular heartbeats. Things can get very serious when too much rhododendron is consumed and can lead to necessary medical intervention.

Start by calling poison control first if you suspect anyone has been munching on rhododendrons. The experts there will be able to help guide you through the necessary processes to cure your loved one.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb
Yummy rhubarb has a nasty side to it. While the stems are used in many recipes, including for rhubarb strawberry pie, the leaves are toxic. They contain oxalic acid which is known to blister the mouth, cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and kidney stones. The leaves are known to be more toxic to pets than humans, but in either case, it is important to contact poison control immediately to figure out necessary steps to cure the patient.
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard

Bittersweet Nightshade

Bittersweet Nightshade
Nightshade is an invasive, noxious weed that is extremely poisonous. It has been found along the East and West Coast of the U.S. It makes its home in areas with disturbed soil. This could be near your garden or areas that have recently had bushes/trees put in.

These plants are dark green with purple flowers that develop into bright red berries. The whole plant is toxic and should be avoided by pets and children alike. If ingested it can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The colorful berries are especially enticing to young children. If you see any plants that look similar to tomato or pepper plants that you did not plant in your yard, it is best to just pull them immediately.

Call poison control immediately if you think someone has fallen victim to nightshade.

Buttercups

Buttercups
Buttercups are found throughout the United States, especially in wet areas. The shiny, yellow flowers will pop up in the springtime, accompanying their dandelion friends. However, unlike dandelions, buttercups are not edible.

Buttercups will release a compound called protoanemonin. This toxin is known to cause vomiting, diarrhea, bloody stool, hypersalivation, depression, blisters, and more. These symptoms will affect both humans and animals. The sap may also cause irritation when it comes into contact with skin. These yellow flowers are dangerous and children should be observed cautiously when around them.

Foxgloves

Foxgloves
Foxgloves are beautiful plants that build towers out of vivid purple bell-shaped blossoms. They are very pretty to look at, but they contain a compound known as digoxin. This chemical is used in certain medicines to help people with certain heart conditions. However, the medicine is made by specialists, whereas someone eating foxgloves will receive unregulated amounts of the chemical.

This toxin can make you vomit and lower your heartbeat. This often causes dizziness and faintness. It is extremely important to call poison control immediately to know what to do in the case of foxglove poisoning. Some people have confused the young leaves of foxglove with borage, making adult foragers at risk as well as kids and pets.
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
Now that you know where to start with toxic plant identification, let us discuss how to either tend to the poisonous plants you decide to keep or get rid of them that plague your yard.

How to Tend to Poisonous Plants

Many plants that are toxic when ingested are also skin irritants. The philodendron is a good example of this. When the sap comes into contact with skin, it can cause a rash to form. To help protect yourself when tending to toxic plants, it is important to wear some sort of gloves.
Tend
Latex gloves may be the best solution due to their disposability. Regular gloves could potentially keep the poisonous sap on their surface. If the gloves aren’t cleaned then you could accidentally touch the irritant or pass it to someone else.

In addition you will want to plan where to keep your deadly beauties. If you have a toxic indoor plant try to keep it up high or out of reach of children and pets. This will keep accidents few and far between. Another idea is keeping your plants in areas that are usually inaccessible to children or pets. Areas such as an office, study room, or guest bedroom could be good locations. If applicable, you could also set up a terrarium for your little plant baby, making it more difficult for curious hands or paws to access.
tend2
If you plan to have outdoor plants, location will be key. You will want to put plants in an area that will be inaccessible to children, pets and even wild animals. You will probably want to avoid planting the plants in the front of your house if kids walk by on a regular basis, just to be cautious. Having the plants behind a fence will be best, but use your discretion when choosing a spot.

How to Get Rid of Poisonous Plants

plants
The easiest but possibly most controversial way to get rid of poisonous plants is by using herbicides. This can be especially easy if you own a grass lawn and use an herbicide that targets broadleaf (non-grass) species. You can find many herbicides meant for yard use by simply searching the term online. Once you have purchased the herbicide you will want to make sure to follow the label posted on the container. If you follow the instructions precisely, then everything should run smoothly for you.

If you don’t plan on using herbicides, there are a few organic methods you can use to try to get rid of toxic plants. You can manually pull the plants out of the ground. This is probably one of the most difficult methods because there is no assurance that you will get the whole plant out this way.

You can also try pouring boiling hot water or spraying white vinegar on the target plants. This may take more time than using a synthetic herbicide, but you can feel a little better about using these products.

You can also try to use wood chips to cover a certain area where you do not want anything to grow. This will not stop all the weeds, but the few that make it through can be easily picked by hand.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
qrcode
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
distribution

Distribution of Azaleas

Distribution Map of Azaleas

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
habit
care detail

How to Grow and Care for Azaleas

how to grow and care
The azaleas genus, known for its vibrant flowers, command specific care needs. Basic care includes moderate sunlight, regular watering, cool temperatures, and acid-rich well-drained soil. Gardeners often face challenges with pests like Vine Weevil and diseases like Honey Fungus, along with a sensitivity to high alkaline soil. Seasonal considerations involve more watering in summer, protection from cold winds in winter, prompt dead-heading in spring, and applying mulch in autumn for nutrient replenishment.
More Info About Caring for Azaleas
species

Exploring the Azaleas Plants

8 most common species:
Rhododendron indicum
Evergreen azalea
Evergreen azalea is a bushy, sprawling Japanese native semi-evergreen shrub. It features magnificent cerise pink flowers with everlasting foliage. Because it has low tolerance to wet soils, drought, and immoderate fertilizer, this plant prefers well-drained soils in partial shade. The overall components of the plant are ideal for decoration, but it is toxic and should not be used for consumption.
Rhododendron ferrugineum
Alpen rose
Alpen rose is a small evergreen shrub native to high mountain ranges of Europe, where it grows on acidic soil above the tree line. It is renowned for its bell-shaped, pink, summer flowers. It is moderately toxic and should not be ingested.
Rhododendron ponticum
Pontic rhododendron
Pontic rhododendron (Rhododendron ponticum) is a dense shrub species that is one of the most extensively cultivated Rhododendron species in western Europe. Pontic rhododendron is native to southern Europe and southwest Asia. This species is widely cultivated for ornamental purposes, and considered invasive in western Europe. Honey produced from the pollen of this species is poisonous.
Rhododendron mucronatum
White azalea
White azalea (Rhododendron mucronatum) is a multi-stemmed evergreen shrub that will grow to 1.5 m tall and 1.5 m wide. It blooms in spring with clusters of snow-white flowers accented with light-gray spots. These trumpet-shaped blossoms are lightly scented and make a beautiful hedge or background plant in the garden. Prefers full sun to partial shade in moist well-drained soil.
Rhododendron mariesii
Maries' rhododendron
Maries' rhododendron (Rhododendron mariesii) is a deciduous shrub or tree that will grow from 91 to 274 cm tall. It blooms in spring with yellowish-brown flowers with purplish-red throats. Fruits ripen from summer to fall. Native to China and commonly found growing in open forests.
Rhododendron mucronulatum
Korean rhododendron
Korean rhododendron (Rhododendron mucronulatum) is a deciduous perennial shrub that will grow from 1.2 to 2.5 m tall. It blooms in spring with lavender flowers. Flowers appear before foliage returns in spring. Leaves are green and change color in fall to gold and then red. Prefers partial shade to full shade. Best grown in organically rich well-drained soil. Makes a nice hedge.
Rhododendron macrophyllum
Pacific rhododendron
Pacific rhododendron (Rhododendron macrophyllum) is a perennial evergreen shrub that grows from 1.5 to 8 m tall. Flower clusters of bell-shaped blossoms appear spring through summer. The State Flower of Washington State these blooms range in color from pink to deep purple. Poisonous to people and animals this shrub thrives in partial shade to full shade in moist well-drained soil.
Rhododendron dauricum
Dahurian rhododendron
Dahurian rhododendron is a beautiful frost-resistant deciduous or semi-evergreen rhododendron that blooms in midwinter and early spring when other plants are still in survival mode. The specific epithet refers to its initial discovery in Dauria, a mountainous region in southeastern Siberia. This plant should never be ingested as it is poisonous.

All Species of Azaleas

Evergreen azalea
Rhododendron indicum
Evergreen azalea
Evergreen azalea is a bushy, sprawling Japanese native semi-evergreen shrub. It features magnificent cerise pink flowers with everlasting foliage. Because it has low tolerance to wet soils, drought, and immoderate fertilizer, this plant prefers well-drained soils in partial shade. The overall components of the plant are ideal for decoration, but it is toxic and should not be used for consumption.
Alpen rose
Rhododendron ferrugineum
Alpen rose
Alpen rose is a small evergreen shrub native to high mountain ranges of Europe, where it grows on acidic soil above the tree line. It is renowned for its bell-shaped, pink, summer flowers. It is moderately toxic and should not be ingested.
Pontic rhododendron
Rhododendron ponticum
Pontic rhododendron
Pontic rhododendron (Rhododendron ponticum) is a dense shrub species that is one of the most extensively cultivated Rhododendron species in western Europe. Pontic rhododendron is native to southern Europe and southwest Asia. This species is widely cultivated for ornamental purposes, and considered invasive in western Europe. Honey produced from the pollen of this species is poisonous.
White azalea
Rhododendron mucronatum
White azalea
White azalea (Rhododendron mucronatum) is a multi-stemmed evergreen shrub that will grow to 1.5 m tall and 1.5 m wide. It blooms in spring with clusters of snow-white flowers accented with light-gray spots. These trumpet-shaped blossoms are lightly scented and make a beautiful hedge or background plant in the garden. Prefers full sun to partial shade in moist well-drained soil.
Maries' rhododendron
Rhododendron mariesii
Maries' rhododendron
Maries' rhododendron (Rhododendron mariesii) is a deciduous shrub or tree that will grow from 91 to 274 cm tall. It blooms in spring with yellowish-brown flowers with purplish-red throats. Fruits ripen from summer to fall. Native to China and commonly found growing in open forests.
Korean rhododendron
Rhododendron mucronulatum
Korean rhododendron
Korean rhododendron (Rhododendron mucronulatum) is a deciduous perennial shrub that will grow from 1.2 to 2.5 m tall. It blooms in spring with lavender flowers. Flowers appear before foliage returns in spring. Leaves are green and change color in fall to gold and then red. Prefers partial shade to full shade. Best grown in organically rich well-drained soil. Makes a nice hedge.
Pacific rhododendron
Rhododendron macrophyllum
Pacific rhododendron
Pacific rhododendron (Rhododendron macrophyllum) is a perennial evergreen shrub that grows from 1.5 to 8 m tall. Flower clusters of bell-shaped blossoms appear spring through summer. The State Flower of Washington State these blooms range in color from pink to deep purple. Poisonous to people and animals this shrub thrives in partial shade to full shade in moist well-drained soil.
Dahurian rhododendron
Rhododendron dauricum
Dahurian rhododendron
Dahurian rhododendron is a beautiful frost-resistant deciduous or semi-evergreen rhododendron that blooms in midwinter and early spring when other plants are still in survival mode. The specific epithet refers to its initial discovery in Dauria, a mountainous region in southeastern Siberia. This plant should never be ingested as it is poisonous.
Western azalea
Rhododendron occidentale
Western azalea
Western azalea (Rhododendron occidentale) is a flowering shrub native to western North America. Western azalea has historically been cultivated and bred in a way that has contributed to the current azalea species in Great Britain.
Royal azalea
Rhododendron schlippenbachii
Royal azalea
The fragrant blossoms of the royal azalea attract butterflies, hummingbirds, and bees. In South Korea, it is frequently used as a local symbol. Baron von Schlippenbach, a Russian commander who collected the species in 1854, inspired its species name, "schlippenbachii."
Chinese azalea
Rhododendron molle
Chinese azalea
Chinese azalea is a species of Rhododendron most famous as the parent of many yellow-flowered hybrids. Cultivation is rare, and the plant grows most commonly in pine woods and grassland. It is highly toxic and will cause considerable harm if eaten.
Swamp Azalea
Rhododendron viscosum
Swamp Azalea
Rhododendron viscosum is a deciduous shrub native to the eastern United States that attracts hummingbirds and butterflies. Also known as swamp Azalea, it grows up to 2.5 m tall and is widely used in woodland gardens, rain gardens and shrub borders. Prefers partial shade.
Sweet azalea
Rhododendron arborescens
Sweet azalea
Sweet azalea (Rhododendron arborescens) is a perennial shrub that will grow from 1.5 to 1.8 m tall. It blooms in summer with fragrant white lily-like flowers. A profuse bloomer, the funnel-shaped blossoms attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Leaves change from green to reddish-purple in fall. Thrives in full sun to partial shade and grows well in moist, humus-rich soil.
Labrador tea
Rhododendron groenlandicum
Labrador tea
Labrador tea (Rhododendron groenlandicum) is a low-growing, evergreen flowering shrub with fragrant, sticky flowers. Labrador tea is native to Greenland. This species can be made into herbal tea.
Early azalea
Rhododendron prinophyllum
Early azalea
Early azalea (Rhododendron prinophyllum) is a perennial shrub that can grow to be 1.2 to 2.5 m tall and 1.2 to 2.5 m wide. Early azalea blooms in spring and produces showy fragrant pink flowers. It attracts hummingbirds and butterflies. This species has green foliage that turns bronze in fall. It is commonly found growing in wooded areas ravines and along streams.
Alpine rose
Rhododendron hirsutum
Alpine rose
Alpine rose is a dwarf Rhododendron whose lovely pink flowers make it popular among gardeners. It naturally occurs in mountainous regions but is perfect for garden displays in moderate climates. This evergreen shrub contains toxic compounds, so it should not be consumed. It is the state flower of West Virginia, USA.
Western labrador tea
Rhododendron columbianum
Western labrador tea
Western labrador tea is grown throughout Canada and some parts of the United States. It is at home up to elevation of 3353 m. Western labrador tea can have toxic effects like some Rhododendron plants. The leaves' fragrance also has a repellant effect on some insects.
Huading rhododendron
Rhododendron huadingense
Huading rhododendron
Huading rhododendron are beautiful when planted alone or in a group. Their bright flowers signal the beginning of spring in the southern region of the United States. The flowers almost appear to float on air and come in a variety of colors. The first southern cultivar was established and planted outdoors on a South Carolina plantation in the 19th century. Since then, many southern states have celebrated the blooming of the huading rhododendron with festivals and parades.
Rhododendron hippophaeoides
Rhododendron hippophaeoides
Rhododendron hippophaeoides
Rhododendron hippophaeoides is a dwarf sun lover that is liked for its compact growth habit, making it a suitable ornamental for winter-time perennial beds. It is an upright evergreen shrub that is naturally found in well-drained but moist areas. Rhododendron hippophaeoides is easy to grow in an informal garden.
Lobed rhododendron
Rhododendron auriculatum
Lobed rhododendron
Rhododendron auriculatum grows as an evergreen shrub or small tree, which can reach stature heights of 5 to 10 meters. The bark is greyish. The bark of young branches is densely glandular-hairy (indument), while older branches are bare.
Rhododendron argyrophyllum subsp. omeiense
Rhododendron argyrophyllum subsp. omeiense
Rhododendron argyrophyllum subsp. omeiense
Rhododendron argyrophyllum subsp. omeiense (Rhododendron argyrophyllum subsp. omeiense) is only rarely encountered in the wild; its viability as a species is greatly dependent upon purposeful cultivation. It is distinguished by other subspecies by the particular smallness of its leaves. The white, almost translucent flowers bloom in late spring.
Japanese azalea
Rhododendron japonicum
Japanese azalea
Japanese azalea is a stunning shrub native to Japan. Its vibrant blooms range from white to pink and are known for their sweet fragrance. This plant contains toxic compounds that have been used in traditional medicine for their anti-inflammatory properties. Its bold foliage and colorful flowers make it a popular choice in gardens and landscapes.
Piedmont rhododendron
Rhododendron minus
Piedmont rhododendron
Rhododendron minus, the Piedmont rhododendron, is a rhododendron species native to Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama. It has two subspecies: Rhododendron minus var. chapmanii and Rhododendron minus var. minus (the latter also known as Rhododendron carolinianum).
Azaleas 'Koster's Brilliant Red'
Rhododendron mollis 'Koster's Brilliant Red'
Azaleas 'Koster's Brilliant Red'
Azaleas 'Koster's Brilliant Red' is a real garden performer, named for the brilliant red flowers that are dramatically different from the pale blue and pink flowers of the parent plant (Azalea). Smaller than most other varieties, this upright shrub only grows to 1.5 m. This striking cultivar is an ideal feature plant for many garden positions, so it is popular among gardeners.
Rhododendron mariae
Rhododendron mariae
Rhododendron mariae
Rhododendron mariae are beautiful when planted alone or in a group. Their bright flowers signal the beginning of spring in the southern region of the United States. The flowers almost appear to float on air and come in a variety of colors. The first southern cultivar was established and planted outdoors on a South Carolina plantation in the 19th century. Since then, many southern states have celebrated the blooming of the rhododendron mariae with festivals and parades.
Honey-bell rhododendron 'Harvest Moon'
Rhododendron campylocarpum 'Harvest Moon'
Honey-bell rhododendron 'Harvest Moon'
Honey-bell rhododendron 'Harvest Moon' is a Honey-bell rhododendron cultivar selected to have more attractive flowers than its parent plant, which features pale yellow flowers. This cultivar boasts more vivid yellow flowers with centers that are slightly darker.
Rhododendron fortunei 'Lodauric Iceberg'
Rhododendron fortunei 'Lodauric Iceberg'
Rhododendron fortunei 'Lodauric Iceberg'
The rhododendron fortunei 'Lodauric Iceberg' has ellipse-shaped leaves with fragrant, frilly white flowers that each feature a red blotch at their base, making this large evergreen shrub different from its kin. It was cultivated from the Loderi Group x auriculatum by Slocock who possibly named it for Sir Edmund Giles Loder. This is a hardy plant liked by gardeners for its ability to withstand cold.
Rhododendron sargentianum 'Sarled'
Rhododendron sargentianum 'Sarled'
Rhododendron sargentianum 'Sarled'
Rhododendron sargentianum 'Sarled' is a dwarf cultivar smaller than the parent plants. It is a Rhododendron hybrid developed by Collingwood Ingram when he crossed R. sargentianum and R. trichostomum. This cultivar has received the Royal Horticultural Society's prestigious Award of Garden Merit for the garden appeal of its pink flowers and glossy leaves.
Azaleas 'Golden Lights'
Rhododendron × atlanticum 'Golden Lights'
Azaleas 'Golden Lights'
Azaleas 'Golden Lights' are beautiful when planted alone or in a group. Their bright flowers signal the beginning of spring in the southern region of the United States. The flowers almost appear to float on air and come in a variety of colors. The first southern cultivar was established and planted outdoors on a South Carolina plantation in the 19th century. Since then, many southern states have celebrated the blooming of the azaleas 'Golden Lights' with festivals and parades.
Rhododendron cinnabarinum 'Conroy'
Rhododendron cinnabarinum 'Conroy'
Rhododendron cinnabarinum 'Conroy'
Rhododendron cinnabarinum 'Conroy' flowers have a mainly orange color with a rose tinge over blue-green foliage which marks it out from others of its species. This is a cinnabarinum ssp cinnabarinum 'Roylei' x cinnabarinum ssp xanthocodon hybrid. Gardeners like rhododendron cinnabarinum 'Conroy' because it is very cold hardy.
Azaleas 'Teal'
Rhododendron 'Teal'
Azaleas 'Teal'
A cultivar of rhododendron, azaleas 'Teal' has been bred for its evergreen foliage and appealing blossoms. Despite its name, the flowers, which appear in spring, are not teal-colored but are instead a delicate shade of creamy yellow. This plant can endure partial shade but prefers full sun to reach its maximum blooming potential.
Azaleas 'Winsome'
Rhododendron yakushimanum 'Winsome'
Azaleas 'Winsome'
Azaleas 'Winsome' are beautiful when planted alone or in a group. Their bright flowers signal the beginning of spring in the southern region of the United States. The flowers almost appear to float on air and come in a variety of colors. The first southern cultivar was established and planted outdoors on a South Carolina plantation in the 19th century. Since then, many southern states have celebrated the blooming of the azaleas 'Winsome' with festivals and parades.
Azaleas 'Else Frye'
Rhododendron 'Else Frye'
Azaleas 'Else Frye'
Azaleas 'Else Frye' are beautiful when planted alone or in a group. Their bright flowers signal the beginning of spring in the southern region of the United States. The flowers almost appear to float on air and come in a variety of colors. The first southern cultivar was established and planted outdoors on a South Carolina plantation in the 19th century. Since then, many southern states have celebrated the blooming of the azaleas 'Else Frye' with festivals and parades.
Azaleas 'Blue Jay'
Rhododendron 'Blue Jay'
Azaleas 'Blue Jay'
Azaleas 'Blue Jay' is known and loved for its frilly-fringed lavender petals adorned with a deep-purple spotty centre. It's a Rhododendron Hybrid with little history; the ancestral plant is unspecified, although it's known that 2 Rhododendron species were crossed. What's also unknown is the reasoning behind the allocation of the name "Blue Jay".
Azaleas 'Royal Lodge'
Rhododendron 'Royal Lodge'
Azaleas 'Royal Lodge'
Azaleas 'Royal Lodge' is a compact deciduous azalea that takes 10 years to reach full height. This makes it a useful ornamental plant for smaller gardens. Unlike other azaleas, this plant blooms comparatively late in the season. Its petite red blooms are used as cut flowers, and, if left on the plant, will attract bees.
Azaleas 'Bric'
Rhododendron 'Bric'
Azaleas 'Bric'
Azaleas 'Bric' is so named because it boasts a profusion of unusually small white flowers that contrast dramatically with the larger pink and blue blooms of the parent plants, the leucaspis and moupinense rhododendrons. Bric-a-brac means 'small decorative objects', which fits these plentiful flowers. This prize-winning hybrid was developed by Lionel de Rothschild in 1945.
Azaleas 'Fragrantissimum'
Rhododendron 'Fragrantissimum'
Azaleas 'Fragrantissimum'
As the name suggests, gardeners will find the azaleas 'Fragrantissimum' an amazing, richly-scented cultivar of rhododendron. It is one of the most fragrant azaleas available with a scent reminiscent of honeysuckle. This is a midseason cultivar that blooms heavily. The flowers are frilly and white with yellow throats and a touch of pink on the outside.
Azaleas 'Temple Belle'
Rhododendron 'Temple Belle'
Azaleas 'Temple Belle'
Azaleas 'Temple Belle' are beautiful when planted alone or in a group. Their bright flowers signal the beginning of spring in the southern region of the United States. The flowers almost appear to float on air and come in a variety of colors. The first southern cultivar was established and planted outdoors on a South Carolina plantation in the 19th century. Since then, many southern states have celebrated the blooming of the azaleas 'Temple Belle' with festivals and parades.
Azaleas 'Choremia'
Rhododendron 'Choremia'
Azaleas 'Choremia'
Azaleas 'Choremia' are beautiful when planted alone or in a group. Their bright flowers signal the beginning of spring in the southern region of the United States. The flowers almost appear to float on air and come in a variety of colors. The first southern cultivar was established and planted outdoors on a South Carolina plantation in the 19th century. Since then, many southern states have celebrated the blooming of the azaleas 'Choremia' with festivals and parades.
Azaleas 'Lem's Monarch'
Rhododendron 'Lem's Monarch'
Azaleas 'Lem's Monarch'
Azaleas 'Lem's Monarch' are beautiful when planted alone or in a group. Their bright flowers signal the beginning of spring in the southern region of the United States. The flowers almost appear to float on air and come in a variety of colors. The first southern cultivar was established and planted outdoors on a South Carolina plantation in the 19th century. Since then, many southern states have celebrated the blooming of the azaleas 'Lem's Monarch' with festivals and parades.
Azaleas 'Susan'
Rhododendron 'Susan'
Azaleas 'Susan'
Azaleas 'Susan' are beautiful when planted alone or in a group. Their bright flowers signal the beginning of spring in the southern region of the United States. The flowers almost appear to float on air and come in a variety of colors. The first southern cultivar was established and planted outdoors on a South Carolina plantation in the 19th century. Since then, many southern states have celebrated the blooming of the azaleas 'Susan' with festivals and parades.
Azaleas 'Mrs T.H. Lowinsky'
Rhododendron 'Mrs T.H. Lowinsky'
Azaleas 'Mrs T.H. Lowinsky'
Azaleas 'Mrs T.H. Lowinsky' is a hardy Rhododendron hybrid that boasts large white blooms speckled with a cluster of orange-red dots on its upper petal. This plant is believed to have originated from R. ponticum (with purple flowers), R. maximum (white flowers with a green splotch), and R. catawbiense (pink blooms).
Azaleas 'Christmas Cheer'
Rhododendron 'Christmas Cheer'
Azaleas 'Christmas Cheer'
Azaleas 'Christmas Cheer' is a stunning deciduous shrub with lustrous green leaves. Its beautiful pink flowers bloom in early to mid-spring and have a sweet fragrance. This hardy plant is easy to grow and can tolerate sun or shade. Plus, its nectar-rich flowers attract butterflies, bees, and other pollinators to your garden.
Azaleas 'Fastuosum Flore Pleno'
Rhododendron 'Fastuosum Flore Pleno'
Azaleas 'Fastuosum Flore Pleno'
Azaleas 'Fastuosum Flore Pleno' are beautiful when planted alone or in a group. Their bright flowers signal the beginning of spring in the southern region of the United States. The flowers almost appear to float on air and come in a variety of colors. The first southern cultivar was established and planted outdoors on a South Carolina plantation in the 19th century. Since then, many southern states have celebrated the blooming of the azaleas 'Fastuosum Flore Pleno' with festivals and parades.
Azaleas 'Cosmopolitan'
Rhododendron 'Cosmopolitan'
Azaleas 'Cosmopolitan'
The azaleas 'Cosmopolitan' is a hardy rhododendron hybrid that is distinguished, in part, by the fact that it may bloom again in the fall. It is also an early spring bloomer. Established in the early 20th century, it is a hybrid of the Cunningham's White and Vesuvius varieties. Gardeners frequently use it as a hedge plant.
Azaleas 'Crest'
Rhododendron 'Crest'
Azaleas 'Crest'
Azaleas 'Crest' has pale yellow flowers and shiny leaves that give it a highly unusual look. It's a yellow Rhododendron Hybrid whose exact ancestral history is still yet to be determined. With azaleas 'Crest' there's not a lot to dislike, which is what makes it so popular amongst gardeners.
Azaleas 'Curlew'
Rhododendron 'Curlew'
Azaleas 'Curlew'
The azaleas 'Curlew' cultivar differs from its family as a result of its uniquely colored flowers and very small size. An Award of Garden Merit winner, this variant is a cultivated Dwarf Lepidote Hybrid and is included in the group known as Bird Hybrids, which is how it got its name azaleas 'Curlew'. This variant is a best seller for use in small gardens and ability to attract pollinators.
Azaleas 'Nancy Evans'
Rhododendron 'Nancy Evans'
Azaleas 'Nancy Evans'
This bushy cultivar is known for its bronze leaves that morph into deep green as the foliage matures. Bred by E. C. Brockenbrough by crossing the 'Hotei' seedling and the 'Lem's Cameo,' it is named Azaleas 'Nancy Evans' after Nancy Evans, the wife of Washington Governor Dan Evans. The azaleas 'Nancy Evans' is a popular yellow cultivar with a round and compact habit.
Azaleas 'Norma'
Rhododendron 'Norma'
Azaleas 'Norma'
Azaleas 'Norma' is a deciduous azalea of the rustica hybrid type, with salmon-pink flowers that grow in a distinctive spherical head. Its parent cultivars are unknown. This cultivar has foliage that starts green but turns into various shades of pink and orange in fall. It is lightly and pleasantly scented and often used in beds or borders.
Azaleas 'Goldflimmer'
Rhododendron 'Goldflimmer'
Azaleas 'Goldflimmer'
A Rhododendron variety with a mounding, compact habit, the azaleas 'Goldflimmer' can take a decade to grow to 91 cm. Its flowers grow up to 5 cm across and are light purple or lavender in color. Unlike most Rhododendron varieties, azaleas 'Goldflimmer' has variegated foliage.
Azaleas 'Razorbill'
Rhododendron 'Razorbill'
Azaleas 'Razorbill'
The azaleas 'Razorbill' is a compact variety of rhododendron, growing only to 91 cm tall. The small, conical bright pink flowers adorn green foliage, creating a striking combination — with the flowers' shape adding to the plant's attractiveness. It works well planted alongside walls, on trellises, or even on slopes and banks.
Azaleas 'Lady Eleanor Cathcart'
Rhododendron 'Lady Eleanor Cathcart'
Azaleas 'Lady Eleanor Cathcart'
An evergreen shrub, Azaleas 'Lady Eleanor Cathcart' was hybridized by John Waterer in the mid-1800s and named after Lady Eleanor Cathcart. Azaleas 'Lady Eleanor Cathcart' is a low-maintenance azalea cultivar, ideal for both garden beds and borders due to it's round clusters of pink flowers that tend to bloom from late spring to early summer.
Azaleas 'Germania'
Rhododendron 'Germania'
Azaleas 'Germania'
Azaleas 'Germania' is a vibrant pink-flowered azalea cultivar with trumpet-shaped ruffled blooms. The evergreen foliage is a lighter shade of green than most azaleas. Gardeners love this variety for the color that this brings to their garden in late spring and early summer as well as its hardiness. The name obviously refers to Germany, which is home to a rhododendron gene bank and the German Rhododendron Society.
Azaleas 'Dora Amateis'
Rhododendron 'Dora Amateis'
Azaleas 'Dora Amateis'
This extremely packed variety of azalea produces boatloads of delicate white flowers that exude a deliciously spicy fragrance. Azaleas 'Dora Amateis' was cultivated as an azalea hybrid and named after the cultivator's mother. It won multiple awards for its abundance of beautiful blooms, dark green foliage, and extremely reliable growth and care.
Azaleas 'Gomer Waterer'
Rhododendron 'Gomer Waterer'
Azaleas 'Gomer Waterer'
The azaleas 'Gomer Waterer' comes from the Madame Carvalho and Pink Pearl rhododendrons. It is distinct because of its white, pink-stained, showy flowers. Its name recognizes a patriarch in the Waterer family of Knaphill Nursery, since a descendant is responsible for this cultivar. Gardeners can plant the azaleas 'Gomer Waterer' in cool regions as an accent.
Azaleas 'Gibraltar'
Rhododendron 'Gibraltar'
Azaleas 'Gibraltar'
The azaleas 'Gibraltar' won the Award of Garden Merit and Rhododendron of the Year Award for its stunning flowers, attractive habits, and pest and disease resistance. Cultivated as an Exbury hybrid, azaleas 'Gibraltar' has much brighter and more uniquely colored flowers than its mother plants. It was named after its location of origin, Gibraltar, the British territory.
Azaleas 'Shamrock'
Rhododendron 'Shamrock'
Azaleas 'Shamrock'
Beauty bundled into a small space, this evergreen shrub with an abundance of pale yellow flowers is highly admired and innately individual. Azaleas 'Shamrock' is an American Dwarf Hybrid Rhododendron, meaning it's smaller than other Rhododendron species. The exact species to which it was cultivated are unknown. It's ambiguous why azaleas 'Shamrock' took on its cultivar name, as no part of the plant resembles a shamrock.
Catawba rosebay 'Nova Zembla'
Rhododendron catawbiense 'Nova Zembla'
Catawba rosebay 'Nova Zembla'
Catawba rosebay 'Nova Zembla' is an evergreen, small shrub offering bright red, trumpet-shaped flowers with deep maroon. This cultivar of Catawba rosebay was first grown by Koster & Sons Nurseries, Netherlands in 1902. It was named for the Russian island of Nova Zembla (also known as Novaya Zemlya). Blooming from mid-spring, it makes a showy display in garden beds and borders.
Catawba rosebay 'English Roseum'
Rhododendron catawbiense 'English Roseum'
Catawba rosebay 'English Roseum'
The catawba rosebay 'English Roseum' is a stunning rhododendron with clusters of funnel-shaped lilac pink flowers (a rosy color that likely inspired this cultivar's name) that have yellow marks spattering their throats. These shrubs sport elliptic, glossy leaves and have a 75-100 year lifespan. Their nectar brings in butterflies and hummingbirds, making this evergreen a lively addition to the garden.
Western azalea 'Irene Koster'
Rhododendron occidentale 'Irene Koster'
Western azalea 'Irene Koster'
Western azalea 'Irene Koster' is a popular azalea with a long history, being introduced by Koster & Sons of The Netherlands way back in 1895. Where the wild plant has white flowers, this hybrid has complicated rose-pink flower petals featuring yellow and brown details. This plant was awarded The Royal Horticultural Society's Order of Merit in 1993.
White azalea 'Narcissiflorum'
Rhododendron mucronatum 'Narcissiflorum'
White azalea 'Narcissiflorum'
The white azalea 'Narcissiflorum' has uniquely scented double flowers that distinguish it from other Azaleas. The parentage is unknown although it is thought to have been hybridized in the 1850s. Its name is derived from its resemblance to daffodils (the genus Narcissus) and the word, ‘florum,’ meaning flower, in full meaning ‘daffodil-like flowers.’ The white azalea 'Narcissiflorum' is good for small gardens.
Rhododendron spiciferum
Rhododendron spiciferum
Rhododendron spiciferum
Rhododendron spiciferum are beautiful when planted alone or in a group. Their bright flowers signal the beginning of spring in the southern region of the United States. The flowers almost appear to float on air and come in a variety of colors. The first southern cultivar was established and planted outdoors on a South Carolina plantation in the 19th century. Since then, many southern states have celebrated the blooming of the rhododendron spiciferum with festivals and parades.
Rhododendron hyperythrum
Rhododendron hyperythrum
Rhododendron hyperythrum
Rhododendron hyperythrum (微笑杜鹃, wei xiao du juan) is a Rhododendron species endemic to China at 900–1200 meters altitude. It grows as a shrub or small tree with leathery leaves, elliptic-lanceolate to oblong-lanceolate, 7–12 × 2–3.5 cm in size, with white flowers.
Rhododendron formosanum
Rhododendron formosanum
Rhododendron formosanum
Rhododendron formosanum are beautiful when planted alone or in a group. Their bright flowers signal the beginning of spring in the southern region of the United States. The flowers almost appear to float on air and come in a variety of colors. The first southern cultivar was established and planted outdoors on a South Carolina plantation in the 19th century. Since then, many southern states have celebrated the blooming of the rhododendron formosanum with festivals and parades.
Azaleas 'Nancy Waterer'
Rhododendron × gandavense 'Nancy Waterer'
Azaleas 'Nancy Waterer'
Azaleas 'Nancy Waterer' are beautiful when planted alone or in a group. Their bright flowers signal the beginning of spring in the southern region of the United States. The flowers almost appear to float on air and come in a variety of colors. The first southern cultivar was established and planted outdoors on a South Carolina plantation in the 19th century. Since then, many southern states have celebrated the blooming of the azaleas 'Nancy Waterer' with festivals and parades.
Azaleas 'Directeur Moerlands'
Rhododendron 'Directeur Moerlands'
Azaleas 'Directeur Moerlands'
Azaleas 'Directeur Moerlands' is a deciduous mollis-type azalea. It was developed for its large, pale orange flowers and for its cold-hardiness. This type of azalea is fairly tolerant of all soil types, although it must be well-drained. The flowers are showy and long-lasting and have an excellent fragrance.
Azaleas 'Nestucca'
Rhododendron 'Nestucca'
Azaleas 'Nestucca'
Azaleas 'Nestucca' is an azalea hybrid resulting from a cross between Rhododendron fortunei subsp fortunei and Rhododendron degronianum subsp yakushimanum. While both parents sport pale pink to white flowers, the hybrid's blooms are pure white. Furthermore, it is slightly shorter than its parents, reaching 1.2 m instead of 1.8 to 2.5 m. Gardeners love this hybrid for its incredible hardiness and heat tolerance. This variety may be named after the Nestucca Bay in Oregon of the United States.
Azaleas 'Earl of Donoughmore'
Rhododendron 'Earl of Donoughmore'
Azaleas 'Earl of Donoughmore'
Azaleas 'Earl of Donoughmore' is an azalea cultivar named after one of the Earls of Donoughmore. It has unusually large bright red or pink flowers that bloom in late spring through early summer. Gardeners love this variety for its huge blooms, height, and hardiness.
Azaleas 'Ken Janeck'
Rhododendron yakushimanum 'Ken Janeck'
Azaleas 'Ken Janeck'
Azaleas 'Ken Janeck' was introduced by Kenneth Janeck of Tacoma, Washington, and eponymously named. Azaleas 'Ken Janeck' has a compact habit and large flowers, which have made it a very popular and award-winning cultivar. Its flowers start as deep pink buds and then open to a much paler solid pink.
Azaleas 'Saint Tudy'
Rhododendron 'Saint Tudy'
Azaleas 'Saint Tudy'
A cross between Rhododendron augustinii and R. impeditum, azaleas 'Saint Tudy' is a small bush up to 1 m that produces abundant masses of delicate violet-blue flowers. The cultivar is prized among gardeners for its compact shape, flower color, and frost hardiness. It was named after the town of St Tudy, UK, where it was bred.
Azaleas 'Lem's Cameo'
Rhododendron 'Lem's Cameo'
Azaleas 'Lem's Cameo'
Azaleas 'Lem's Cameo' are beautiful when planted alone or in a group. Their bright flowers signal the beginning of spring in the southern region of the United States. The flowers almost appear to float on air and come in a variety of colors. The first southern cultivar was established and planted outdoors on a South Carolina plantation in the 19th century. Since then, many southern states have celebrated the blooming of the azaleas 'Lem's Cameo' with festivals and parades.
Azaleas 'Mrs Charles E. Pearson'
Rhododendron 'Mrs Charles E. Pearson'
Azaleas 'Mrs Charles E. Pearson'
Azaleas 'Mrs Charles E. Pearson' are beautiful when planted alone or in a group. Their bright flowers signal the beginning of spring in the southern region of the United States. The flowers almost appear to float on air and come in a variety of colors. The first southern cultivar was established and planted outdoors on a South Carolina plantation in the 19th century. Since then, many southern states have celebrated the blooming of the azaleas 'Mrs Charles E. Pearson' with festivals and parades.
Azaleas 'Champagne'
Rhododendron 'Champagne'
Azaleas 'Champagne'
Azaleas 'Champagne' are beautiful when planted alone or in a group. Their bright flowers signal the beginning of spring in the southern region of the United States. The flowers almost appear to float on air and come in a variety of colors. The first southern cultivar was established and planted outdoors on a South Carolina plantation in the 19th century. Since then, many southern states have celebrated the blooming of the azaleas 'Champagne' with festivals and parades.
Azaleas 'Coccineum Speciosum'
Rhododendron 'Coccineum Speciosum'
Azaleas 'Coccineum Speciosum'
Azaleas 'Coccineum Speciosum' is a deciduous azalea with unknown parentage. It is named for its beautiful orange-red blooms, as 'Coccineum Speciosum' roughly translates from Latin to 'beautiful scarlet.' This is one of the hardiest azaleas available, tolerating temperatures as low as -26 ℃! It is a smaller azalea, only reaching about 1 m in maturity.
Azaleas 'Golden Oriole'
Rhododendron 'Golden Oriole'
Azaleas 'Golden Oriole'
A hybrid of Asian and United States azalea varieties, the azaleas 'Golden Oriole' was bred during the late 19th century. The plant's name reflects the unique orange-yellow color of its plentiful flowers. Though often used as a hedge or to attract hummingbirds, the plant is toxic to humans and animals.
Rhododendron racemosum 'Rock Rose'
Rhododendron racemosum 'Rock Rose'
Rhododendron racemosum 'Rock Rose'
Rhododendron racemosum 'Rock Rose' produces rich and abundant blooms of rose-pink flowers that are larger and showier than the paler whitish-pink flowers of its parent. This popular hybrid will be the highlight of the garden in late spring, when the whole shrub is festooned with flowers.
Azaleas 'Pink Cherub'
Rhododendron yakushimanum 'Pink Cherub'
Azaleas 'Pink Cherub'
Azaleas 'Pink Cherub', true to its name, has pink flowers with darker pink edges that fade to pale pink later in the season. This plant has a compact growth form, making it suitable for use in both garden beds and containers. This cultivar is derived from Rhododendron yakushimanum and Rhododendron 'Doncaster'.
Yellow azalea 'Whitethroat'
Rhododendron luteum 'Whitethroat'
Yellow azalea 'Whitethroat'
Yellow azalea 'Whitethroat' is a yellow Azalea that's not, as you'd expect, yellow, and this goes some way in explaining its name, 'Whitethroat'! This smaller Azalea produces beautiful pure white double flowers in late spring, and then in autumn its leaves turn to sunset shades of crimson and orange. This popular garden shrub grows to a maximum height of 1.2 m.
Rhododendron dauricum 'Mid'
Rhododendron dauricum 'Mid'
Rhododendron dauricum 'Mid'
Rhododendron dauricum 'Mid' is so-named because this early-flowering hybrid blooms in mid-to-late winter, earlier than the late-winter to spring blooming period of the parent plant. The bright purple-pink flowers bring great color to winter gardens. This cultivar was given the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit in recognition of this quality.
Hiryu azalea 'Hatsugiri'
Rhododendron obtusum 'Hatsugiri'
Hiryu azalea 'Hatsugiri'
Hiryu azalea 'Hatsugiri' is a cultivar of the Obtusum Group of Hiryu azaleas with vibrant funnel-shaped reddish-purple flowers. Unlike other specimens of the group, this cultivar has elliptical leaves rather than lanced or oval. It also grows more compactly than other Obtusum Hiryu azaleas, spreading only 60 cm instead of 1 m.
Rhododendron sinogrande 'Faggetter's Favourite'
Rhododendron sinogrande 'Faggetter's Favourite'
Rhododendron sinogrande 'Faggetter's Favourite'
The rhododendron sinogrande 'Faggetter's Favourite' has highly fragrant white-and-pink flowers with slightly green bases above dark shiny leaves. This fortunei hybrid is named for its propagator Edwin Faggetter of Knaphill Nursery in England. In the US, gardeners like this plant because it is resistant to vine weevil attacks.
Catawba rosebay 'Cunningham's White'
Rhododendron catawbiense 'Cunningham's White'
Catawba rosebay 'Cunningham's White'
Catawba rosebay 'Cunningham's White' is a variant of rhododendron or rosebay with attractive white flowers. It is named for the person who selected it in 1850. This popular shrub maintains fine evergreen foliage throughout the year and produces large clusters of flowers in summer.
Yellow azalea 'Satan'
Rhododendron luteum 'Satan'
Yellow azalea 'Satan'
Unlike its parent plant, the Yellow azalea, which is named after its yellow flowers, yellow azalea 'Satan' is a cultivar bred to have a different flower color and offer multi-seasonal interest. The trumpet-shaped, orange-red flowers with long anthers emerge from dark red flower buds in the early summer. This cultivar is also distinguished by its spectacular fall color when mid-green leaves turn orange, bronze, and red.
Swamp azalea 'Fragrant Star'
Rhododendron viscosum 'Fragrant Star'
Swamp azalea 'Fragrant Star'
Swamp azalea 'Fragrant Star' gets its individuation from its strong, pleasing fragrance, much more pungent than that of its parent plant. It's a cultivar of the Swamp azalea (Rhododendron viscosum), and a popular one at that. You couldn't get a much more self-explanatory name than "Fragrant Star" – this plant produces highly aromatic, star-shaped blooms.
Pontic rhododendron 'GRAZIELLA'
Rhododendron ponticum 'GRAZIELLA'
Pontic rhododendron 'GRAZIELLA'
Pontic rhododendron 'GRAZIELLA' produces brightly colored dark pink flowers that are quite different from the deeper purple-white color of its parent's floration. Pontic rhododendron 'GRAZIELLA' is richly deserving of its feminine name. This hybrid also has distinctive narrow leaves that are thinner than those of its parent. This hardy, low-maintenance plant is a popular feature shrub in many ornamental gardens.
Catawba rosebay 'Purple Splendour'
Rhododendron catawbiense 'Purple Splendour'
Catawba rosebay 'Purple Splendour'
Most Catawba rosebays have flowers in the pale blue to lilac spectrum, but catawba rosebay 'Purple Splendour' boasts spectacularly intense purple blooms. This evergreen shrub only grows to 2 m in height after ten years, so it's a little more slow growing than the parent plant.
popular genus

More Popular Genus

Dracaena
Dracaena
Dracaena are popular house plants that are easy to grow. They can tolerate low-light conditions and require little watering. Their leaves range from variegated to dark green. Their characteristic traits include woody stems that grow slowly but offer a striking appearance for small spaces such as apartments or offices.
Ficus
Fig trees
Fig trees have been cultivated in many regions for their fruits, particularly the common fig, F. carica. Most of the species have edible fruits, although the common fig is the only one of commercial value. Fig trees are also important food sources for wildlife in the tropics, including monkeys, bats, and insects.
Rubus
Brambles
Brambles are members of the rose family, and there are hundreds of different types to be found throughout the European countryside. They have been culturally significant for centuries; Christian folklore stories hold that when the devil was thrown from heaven, he landed on a bramble bush. Their vigorous growth habit can tangle into native plants and take over.
Acer
Maples
The popular tree family known as maples change the color of their leaves in the fall. Many cultural traditions encourage people to watch the colors change, such as momijigari in Japan. Maples popular options for bonsai art. Alternately, their sap is used to create maple syrup.
Prunus
Prunus
Prunus is a genus of flowering fruit trees that includes almonds, cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines, and apricots. These are often known as "stone fruits" because their pits are large seeds or "stones." When prunus trees are damaged, they exhibit "gummosis," a condition in which the tree's gum (similar to sap) is secreted to the bark to help heal external wounds.
Solanum
Nightshades
Nightshades is a large and diverse genus of plants, with more than 1500 different types worldwide. This genus incorporates both important staple food crops like tomato, potato, and eggplant, but also dangerous poisonous plants from the nightshade family. The name was coined by Pliny the Elder almost two thousand years ago.
Rosa
Roses
Most species of roses are shrubs or climbing plants that have showy flowers and sharp thorns. They are commonly cultivated for cut flowers or as ornamental plants in gardens due to their attractive appearance, pleasant fragrance, and cultural significance in many countries. The rose hips (fruits) can also be used in jams and teas.
Quercus
Oaks
Oaks are among the world's longest-lived trees, sometimes growing for over 1,000 years! The oldest known oak tree is in the southern United States and is over 1,500 years old. Oaks produce an exceedingly popular type of wood which is used to make different products, from furniture and flooring to wine barrels and even cosmetic creams.
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About
Key Facts
Toxicity
Distribution
How To Care
All Species
More Genus
Azaleas
Azaleas
Azaleas
Azaleas
Azaleas
Azaleas
Azaleas
Rhododendron
Azaleas are beautiful when planted alone or in a group. Their bright flowers signal the beginning of spring in the southern region of the United States. The flowers almost appear to float on air and come in a variety of colors. The first southern cultivar was established and planted outdoors on a South Carolina plantation in the 19th century. Since then, many southern states have celebrated the blooming of the azaleas with festivals and parades.
Lifespan
Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Plant Type
Shrub
info

Key Facts About Azaleas

Attributes of Azaleas

Plant Height
1.8 m to 3.5 m
Spread
1.8 m to 2.5 m
Flower Size
2.5 cm to 8 cm
Leaf type
Evergreen

Scientific Classification of Azaleas

toxic

Azaleas and Their Toxicity

* The judgment on toxicity and danger is for reference only. We DO NOT GUARANTEE any accuracy of such judgment. Therefore, you SHALL NOT rely on such judgment. It is IMPORTANT TO SEEK PROFESSIONAL ADVICE in advance when necessary.
Toxic to Dogs
All varieties of azaleas (Rhododendron) are incredibly toxic to dogs, and just a small amount can be lethal. All parts of the plant are toxic and ingestion can first cause vomiting and excessive salivation, leading to weakness, vision loss, and possibly death. If you suspect your dog has consumed even a few leaves, prompt veterinary treatment is needed.
Toxic to Cats
Azaleas poisoning can be an immediate medical emergency for cats. The leaves, twigs, and flowers of the Rhododendron plant contain hazardous grayanotoxins. The first signs of poisoning appear several hours after ingestion and they include excessive salivation, vomiting, diarrhea, bloat, and colic, followed by coma, heart failure, or death.
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Who Is Most at Risk of Plant Poisoning?
Your pets like cats and dogs can be poisoned by them as well!
1
Do not let your lovely pets eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
2
It’s better to kill those growing around your house. Wear long-sleeved shirts, pants and gloves with sharp tools to dig it out completely;
3
Clean the tools with rubbing alcohol or soap and water but do not do that with bare hands;
4
Clean your hands and skin once exposed to plants with soap and water;
5
Consider using barrier creams that contain bentoquatam to prevent poison oak, ivy and sumac rashes;
6
Dump it in special trash cans in sealed garbage packages, and do not let your pets reach it;Do not let your lovely pets eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
7
If you take your pets to hike with you in the wild, please don’t let them eat any plants that you don’t know;
8
Once your pets eat, touch or inhale anything from toxic plants and act abnormally, please call the doctors for help ASAP!
pets
Pets
Some pets are less likely than children to eat and touch just about everything. This is good, as a pet owner. However, you know your pet best, and it is up to you to keep them safe. There are plenty of poisonous weeds that can grow within the confines of your lawn, which might make your dogs or cats ill or worse if they eat them. Try to have an idea of what toxic plants grow in your area and keep them under control and your pets away from them.
pets
Common Toxic Houseplants
Common Toxic Houseplants
When it comes to decorating a house, there is nothing more refreshing than adding some beautiful houseplants. Some common house plants can also be toxic.

Aloe

aloe
Aloe is famous for its sunburn-soothing properties and its gorgeous desert design. However, many people do not realize that the latex the aloe vera plant produces can be mildly toxic to pets and children.

The latex contains a chemical compound known as saponin. Which when ingested, can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and low blood sugar. This, if left unchecked, can lead to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. The proper response is to contact poison control or a veterinarian to know what to do in your particular circumstance if either your child or pet consumes aloe.

The latex of the plant is similar to the sap of the tree. It is inside the leaf, but sticks mainly toward the edges. If aloe gel is prepared properly it should be safe for use, but be sure to apply it only topically when treating burns.

Philodendron

Philodendron
Philodendron, also known as sweetheart vine, has become a resident at many houses and even businesses. They are glossy green and the leaves elegantly split, displaying interesting designs. Behind this beauty there is a needle-like toxin called calcium oxalate crystals.

These crystals are held within the plant and only affect you, your pets, or your loved ones if the plant tissue is broken. If ingested, the crystals can cause severe swelling, difficulty breathing, stomach pain, burning and pain. If they are accidentally caught on the skin, they can cause skin irritation.

If anyone accidentally ingests philodendron and they find it difficult to breathe or their tongue starts to swell up, it is important to seek medical attention immediately to avoid suffocation. If you have very young children or pets who have a tendency to tear at plants, keep them away from any philodendrons.

Peace Lily

Peace Lily
Peace lilies produce stunningly white flowers that bring to mind peace and serenity. This is one reason they are invited into our homes and given a place to stay. However, similar to philodendrons, the peace lily contains oxalate crystals known as raphides.

The raphides, once ingested, will cause swelling and burning sensations and can also cause skin irritation. Both pets and humans can get these symptoms so it is important to keep these plants from anyone who is likely to tear or chew it. Symptoms can become dire if the raphides cause the tongue and throat to swell to a point where the person or pet is having difficulty breathing. Seek proper medical attention if this is the case.

Snake Plant

Snake Plant
The snake plant is an interesting and popular house plant. Its stark architecture and wavy coloring has made it a fan favorite. This plant too, however, is toxic when ingested or if the sap touches your skin.

Snake plant sap will cause rashes if it comes into contact with your skin. In addition, it will cause diarrhea and vomiting when ingested. Again these symptoms are very serious and would be best avoided by keeping snake plants out of reach or by choosing a different houseplant.
Common Toxic Garden Plants
Common Toxic Garden Plants

Daffodil

Daffodil
Daffodils are a strikingly colorful flower. This can sometimes bring them much attention not from just onlooking adults but children as well. Since kids are more drawn to colorful objects, they may have a higher chance of just grabbing the flower and eating it. Adults have also been known to accidentally grab daffodil bulbs instead of onions.

Why are these mistakes so dangerous? Daffodils contain lycorine, which can induce nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It also contains oxalates which can cause swelling and pain. The symptoms can be worse in animals, because if your pets eat daffodils they may experience drowsiness, low blood pressure or even liver damage.

Make sure to call poison control when these symptoms set in. The vomiting and diarrhea have been known to go away after 3 hours, but it is better to be safe than sorry. Ingesting liquids to keep hydration up can be important. If the patient is having difficulty breathing, seek medical attention immediately.

Hydrangea

Hydrangea
Hydrangeas are unique, with their soft blue and pink flowers. They are a great addition to any garden, but should not be snacked on—not that you would want to. Hydrangeas can be especially nasty because they contain compounds known as glycosides. These will release hydrogen cyanide into the bloodstream when consumed. This will block your body’s ability to uptake oxygen to the cells in your body.

The way to combat this kind of poisoning is through getting IVs from the vet or doctor. It is important to contact your medical professional immediately since the symptoms can be fatal within minutes or hours.

Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons
Rhododendron, the state flower of Washington, is also toxic. The multitudinous, pink flowers can be quite dangerous. All parts of this plant are toxic, the leaves and seeds more so than the flowers. However, even the nectar of the flower is toxic and in the Mediterranean, where rhododendrons grow in more dense quantities, the honey from bees who gather rhododendron nectar can be poisonous.

Normally kids and pets do not eat enough to experience the full poisoning effect. However, just eating two leaves is enough to be considered dangerous. The grayanotoxin glycosides within the rhododendron can cause vomiting, diarrhea and irregular heartbeats. Things can get very serious when too much rhododendron is consumed and can lead to necessary medical intervention.

Start by calling poison control first if you suspect anyone has been munching on rhododendrons. The experts there will be able to help guide you through the necessary processes to cure your loved one.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb
Yummy rhubarb has a nasty side to it. While the stems are used in many recipes, including for rhubarb strawberry pie, the leaves are toxic. They contain oxalic acid which is known to blister the mouth, cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and kidney stones. The leaves are known to be more toxic to pets than humans, but in either case, it is important to contact poison control immediately to figure out necessary steps to cure the patient.
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard

Bittersweet Nightshade

Bittersweet Nightshade
Nightshade is an invasive, noxious weed that is extremely poisonous. It has been found along the East and West Coast of the U.S. It makes its home in areas with disturbed soil. This could be near your garden or areas that have recently had bushes/trees put in.

These plants are dark green with purple flowers that develop into bright red berries. The whole plant is toxic and should be avoided by pets and children alike. If ingested it can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The colorful berries are especially enticing to young children. If you see any plants that look similar to tomato or pepper plants that you did not plant in your yard, it is best to just pull them immediately.

Call poison control immediately if you think someone has fallen victim to nightshade.

Buttercups

Buttercups
Buttercups are found throughout the United States, especially in wet areas. The shiny, yellow flowers will pop up in the springtime, accompanying their dandelion friends. However, unlike dandelions, buttercups are not edible.

Buttercups will release a compound called protoanemonin. This toxin is known to cause vomiting, diarrhea, bloody stool, hypersalivation, depression, blisters, and more. These symptoms will affect both humans and animals. The sap may also cause irritation when it comes into contact with skin. These yellow flowers are dangerous and children should be observed cautiously when around them.

Foxgloves

Foxgloves
Foxgloves are beautiful plants that build towers out of vivid purple bell-shaped blossoms. They are very pretty to look at, but they contain a compound known as digoxin. This chemical is used in certain medicines to help people with certain heart conditions. However, the medicine is made by specialists, whereas someone eating foxgloves will receive unregulated amounts of the chemical.

This toxin can make you vomit and lower your heartbeat. This often causes dizziness and faintness. It is extremely important to call poison control immediately to know what to do in the case of foxglove poisoning. Some people have confused the young leaves of foxglove with borage, making adult foragers at risk as well as kids and pets.
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
Now that you know where to start with toxic plant identification, let us discuss how to either tend to the poisonous plants you decide to keep or get rid of them that plague your yard.

How to Tend to Poisonous Plants

Many plants that are toxic when ingested are also skin irritants. The philodendron is a good example of this. When the sap comes into contact with skin, it can cause a rash to form. To help protect yourself when tending to toxic plants, it is important to wear some sort of gloves.
Tend
Latex gloves may be the best solution due to their disposability. Regular gloves could potentially keep the poisonous sap on their surface. If the gloves aren’t cleaned then you could accidentally touch the irritant or pass it to someone else.

In addition you will want to plan where to keep your deadly beauties. If you have a toxic indoor plant try to keep it up high or out of reach of children and pets. This will keep accidents few and far between. Another idea is keeping your plants in areas that are usually inaccessible to children or pets. Areas such as an office, study room, or guest bedroom could be good locations. If applicable, you could also set up a terrarium for your little plant baby, making it more difficult for curious hands or paws to access.
tend2
If you plan to have outdoor plants, location will be key. You will want to put plants in an area that will be inaccessible to children, pets and even wild animals. You will probably want to avoid planting the plants in the front of your house if kids walk by on a regular basis, just to be cautious. Having the plants behind a fence will be best, but use your discretion when choosing a spot.

How to Get Rid of Poisonous Plants

plants
The easiest but possibly most controversial way to get rid of poisonous plants is by using herbicides. This can be especially easy if you own a grass lawn and use an herbicide that targets broadleaf (non-grass) species. You can find many herbicides meant for yard use by simply searching the term online. Once you have purchased the herbicide you will want to make sure to follow the label posted on the container. If you follow the instructions precisely, then everything should run smoothly for you.

If you don’t plan on using herbicides, there are a few organic methods you can use to try to get rid of toxic plants. You can manually pull the plants out of the ground. This is probably one of the most difficult methods because there is no assurance that you will get the whole plant out this way.

You can also try pouring boiling hot water or spraying white vinegar on the target plants. This may take more time than using a synthetic herbicide, but you can feel a little better about using these products.

You can also try to use wood chips to cover a certain area where you do not want anything to grow. This will not stop all the weeds, but the few that make it through can be easily picked by hand.
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Who Is Most at Risk of Plant Poisoning?
Everyone should keep the following in mind to prevent being poisoned:
1
Do not eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
2
If you need to kill it, wear long-sleeved shirts, pants and gloves with sharp tools to dig it out completely;
3
Clean the tools with rubbing alcohol or soap and water but do not do that with bare hands;
4
Clean your hands and skin once exposed to plants with soap and water;
5
Consider using barrier creams that contain bentoquatam to prevent poison oak, ivy and sumac rashes;
6
Dump it in special trash cans in sealed garbage packages;
7
Wear properly when you hiking or working in the wilderness. Long pants, long sleeves, gloves, hiking shoes, etc., that protect you from being hurt by any plants;
8
Once you or your family aren’t feeling well after eating, touching or inhaling anything from toxic plants, please call your doctor for help ASAP!
Outdoor Workers
Outdoor Workers and Recreationalists
Those who enjoy the outdoors either as a hobby or as part of their work will rarely see a plant and decide to munch on it (although the scenario is not unheard of). However, they do tend to deal with moving through and brushing aside plants. These people are more at risk of being poisoned by touching toxic plants than by ingesting them.
Outdoor Workers
Foragers
Foragers
Foraging for food and medicinal plants is a desirable skill among people who want to feel at one with the land. This hobby can be very useful and enjoyable, but if done wrong , it can lead to disastrous effects. People who forage are picking and grabbing plants with the full intention of using those plants, most of the time to ingest them.
Foragers
Children
Children
While outdoor workers are more likely to touch poison and foragers are more likely to ingest poison, children can easily do both. These bundles of joy just love to run around and explore the world. They enjoy touching things and occasionally shoving random stuff in their mouth; this is a terrible combination with toxic plants in the mix.
If you let your children run about, it is important to know what are the local toxic plants that they could accidentally get into. Try to educate the children and steer them away from where the toxic plants are located.
Children
Common Toxic Houseplants
Common Toxic Houseplants
When it comes to decorating a house, there is nothing more refreshing than adding some beautiful houseplants. Some common house plants can also be toxic.

Aloe

aloe
Aloe is famous for its sunburn-soothing properties and its gorgeous desert design. However, many people do not realize that the latex the aloe vera plant produces can be mildly toxic to pets and children.

The latex contains a chemical compound known as saponin. Which when ingested, can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and low blood sugar. This, if left unchecked, can lead to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. The proper response is to contact poison control or a veterinarian to know what to do in your particular circumstance if either your child or pet consumes aloe.

The latex of the plant is similar to the sap of the tree. It is inside the leaf, but sticks mainly toward the edges. If aloe gel is prepared properly it should be safe for use, but be sure to apply it only topically when treating burns.

Philodendron

Philodendron
Philodendron, also known as sweetheart vine, has become a resident at many houses and even businesses. They are glossy green and the leaves elegantly split, displaying interesting designs. Behind this beauty there is a needle-like toxin called calcium oxalate crystals.

These crystals are held within the plant and only affect you, your pets, or your loved ones if the plant tissue is broken. If ingested, the crystals can cause severe swelling, difficulty breathing, stomach pain, burning and pain. If they are accidentally caught on the skin, they can cause skin irritation.

If anyone accidentally ingests philodendron and they find it difficult to breathe or their tongue starts to swell up, it is important to seek medical attention immediately to avoid suffocation. If you have very young children or pets who have a tendency to tear at plants, keep them away from any philodendrons.

Peace Lily

Peace Lily
Peace lilies produce stunningly white flowers that bring to mind peace and serenity. This is one reason they are invited into our homes and given a place to stay. However, similar to philodendrons, the peace lily contains oxalate crystals known as raphides.

The raphides, once ingested, will cause swelling and burning sensations and can also cause skin irritation. Both pets and humans can get these symptoms so it is important to keep these plants from anyone who is likely to tear or chew it. Symptoms can become dire if the raphides cause the tongue and throat to swell to a point where the person or pet is having difficulty breathing. Seek proper medical attention if this is the case.

Snake Plant

Snake Plant
The snake plant is an interesting and popular house plant. Its stark architecture and wavy coloring has made it a fan favorite. This plant too, however, is toxic when ingested or if the sap touches your skin.

Snake plant sap will cause rashes if it comes into contact with your skin. In addition, it will cause diarrhea and vomiting when ingested. Again these symptoms are very serious and would be best avoided by keeping snake plants out of reach or by choosing a different houseplant.
Common Toxic Garden Plants
Common Toxic Garden Plants

Daffodil

Daffodil
Daffodils are a strikingly colorful flower. This can sometimes bring them much attention not from just onlooking adults but children as well. Since kids are more drawn to colorful objects, they may have a higher chance of just grabbing the flower and eating it. Adults have also been known to accidentally grab daffodil bulbs instead of onions.

Why are these mistakes so dangerous? Daffodils contain lycorine, which can induce nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It also contains oxalates which can cause swelling and pain. The symptoms can be worse in animals, because if your pets eat daffodils they may experience drowsiness, low blood pressure or even liver damage.

Make sure to call poison control when these symptoms set in. The vomiting and diarrhea have been known to go away after 3 hours, but it is better to be safe than sorry. Ingesting liquids to keep hydration up can be important. If the patient is having difficulty breathing, seek medical attention immediately.

Hydrangea

Hydrangea
Hydrangeas are unique, with their soft blue and pink flowers. They are a great addition to any garden, but should not be snacked on—not that you would want to. Hydrangeas can be especially nasty because they contain compounds known as glycosides. These will release hydrogen cyanide into the bloodstream when consumed. This will block your body’s ability to uptake oxygen to the cells in your body.

The way to combat this kind of poisoning is through getting IVs from the vet or doctor. It is important to contact your medical professional immediately since the symptoms can be fatal within minutes or hours.

Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons
Rhododendron, the state flower of Washington, is also toxic. The multitudinous, pink flowers can be quite dangerous. All parts of this plant are toxic, the leaves and seeds more so than the flowers. However, even the nectar of the flower is toxic and in the Mediterranean, where rhododendrons grow in more dense quantities, the honey from bees who gather rhododendron nectar can be poisonous.

Normally kids and pets do not eat enough to experience the full poisoning effect. However, just eating two leaves is enough to be considered dangerous. The grayanotoxin glycosides within the rhododendron can cause vomiting, diarrhea and irregular heartbeats. Things can get very serious when too much rhododendron is consumed and can lead to necessary medical intervention.

Start by calling poison control first if you suspect anyone has been munching on rhododendrons. The experts there will be able to help guide you through the necessary processes to cure your loved one.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb
Yummy rhubarb has a nasty side to it. While the stems are used in many recipes, including for rhubarb strawberry pie, the leaves are toxic. They contain oxalic acid which is known to blister the mouth, cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and kidney stones. The leaves are known to be more toxic to pets than humans, but in either case, it is important to contact poison control immediately to figure out necessary steps to cure the patient.
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard

Bittersweet Nightshade

Bittersweet Nightshade
Nightshade is an invasive, noxious weed that is extremely poisonous. It has been found along the East and West Coast of the U.S. It makes its home in areas with disturbed soil. This could be near your garden or areas that have recently had bushes/trees put in.

These plants are dark green with purple flowers that develop into bright red berries. The whole plant is toxic and should be avoided by pets and children alike. If ingested it can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The colorful berries are especially enticing to young children. If you see any plants that look similar to tomato or pepper plants that you did not plant in your yard, it is best to just pull them immediately.

Call poison control immediately if you think someone has fallen victim to nightshade.

Buttercups

Buttercups
Buttercups are found throughout the United States, especially in wet areas. The shiny, yellow flowers will pop up in the springtime, accompanying their dandelion friends. However, unlike dandelions, buttercups are not edible.

Buttercups will release a compound called protoanemonin. This toxin is known to cause vomiting, diarrhea, bloody stool, hypersalivation, depression, blisters, and more. These symptoms will affect both humans and animals. The sap may also cause irritation when it comes into contact with skin. These yellow flowers are dangerous and children should be observed cautiously when around them.

Foxgloves

Foxgloves
Foxgloves are beautiful plants that build towers out of vivid purple bell-shaped blossoms. They are very pretty to look at, but they contain a compound known as digoxin. This chemical is used in certain medicines to help people with certain heart conditions. However, the medicine is made by specialists, whereas someone eating foxgloves will receive unregulated amounts of the chemical.

This toxin can make you vomit and lower your heartbeat. This often causes dizziness and faintness. It is extremely important to call poison control immediately to know what to do in the case of foxglove poisoning. Some people have confused the young leaves of foxglove with borage, making adult foragers at risk as well as kids and pets.
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
Now that you know where to start with toxic plant identification, let us discuss how to either tend to the poisonous plants you decide to keep or get rid of them that plague your yard.

How to Tend to Poisonous Plants

Many plants that are toxic when ingested are also skin irritants. The philodendron is a good example of this. When the sap comes into contact with skin, it can cause a rash to form. To help protect yourself when tending to toxic plants, it is important to wear some sort of gloves.
Tend
Latex gloves may be the best solution due to their disposability. Regular gloves could potentially keep the poisonous sap on their surface. If the gloves aren’t cleaned then you could accidentally touch the irritant or pass it to someone else.

In addition you will want to plan where to keep your deadly beauties. If you have a toxic indoor plant try to keep it up high or out of reach of children and pets. This will keep accidents few and far between. Another idea is keeping your plants in areas that are usually inaccessible to children or pets. Areas such as an office, study room, or guest bedroom could be good locations. If applicable, you could also set up a terrarium for your little plant baby, making it more difficult for curious hands or paws to access.
tend2
If you plan to have outdoor plants, location will be key. You will want to put plants in an area that will be inaccessible to children, pets and even wild animals. You will probably want to avoid planting the plants in the front of your house if kids walk by on a regular basis, just to be cautious. Having the plants behind a fence will be best, but use your discretion when choosing a spot.

How to Get Rid of Poisonous Plants

plants
The easiest but possibly most controversial way to get rid of poisonous plants is by using herbicides. This can be especially easy if you own a grass lawn and use an herbicide that targets broadleaf (non-grass) species. You can find many herbicides meant for yard use by simply searching the term online. Once you have purchased the herbicide you will want to make sure to follow the label posted on the container. If you follow the instructions precisely, then everything should run smoothly for you.

If you don’t plan on using herbicides, there are a few organic methods you can use to try to get rid of toxic plants. You can manually pull the plants out of the ground. This is probably one of the most difficult methods because there is no assurance that you will get the whole plant out this way.

You can also try pouring boiling hot water or spraying white vinegar on the target plants. This may take more time than using a synthetic herbicide, but you can feel a little better about using these products.

You can also try to use wood chips to cover a certain area where you do not want anything to grow. This will not stop all the weeds, but the few that make it through can be easily picked by hand.
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distribution

Distribution of Azaleas

Distribution Map of Azaleas

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
care detail

How to Grow and Care for Azaleas

The azaleas genus, known for its vibrant flowers, command specific care needs. Basic care includes moderate sunlight, regular watering, cool temperatures, and acid-rich well-drained soil. Gardeners often face challenges with pests like Vine Weevil and diseases like Honey Fungus, along with a sensitivity to high alkaline soil. Seasonal considerations involve more watering in summer, protection from cold winds in winter, prompt dead-heading in spring, and applying mulch in autumn for nutrient replenishment.
More Info About Caring for Azaleas
species

Exploring the Azaleas Plants

8 most common species:
Rhododendron indicum
Evergreen azalea
Evergreen azalea is a bushy, sprawling Japanese native semi-evergreen shrub. It features magnificent cerise pink flowers with everlasting foliage. Because it has low tolerance to wet soils, drought, and immoderate fertilizer, this plant prefers well-drained soils in partial shade. The overall components of the plant are ideal for decoration, but it is toxic and should not be used for consumption.
Rhododendron ferrugineum
Alpen rose
Alpen rose is a small evergreen shrub native to high mountain ranges of Europe, where it grows on acidic soil above the tree line. It is renowned for its bell-shaped, pink, summer flowers. It is moderately toxic and should not be ingested.
Rhododendron ponticum
Pontic rhododendron
Pontic rhododendron (Rhododendron ponticum) is a dense shrub species that is one of the most extensively cultivated Rhododendron species in western Europe. Pontic rhododendron is native to southern Europe and southwest Asia. This species is widely cultivated for ornamental purposes, and considered invasive in western Europe. Honey produced from the pollen of this species is poisonous.
Rhododendron mucronatum
White azalea
White azalea (Rhododendron mucronatum) is a multi-stemmed evergreen shrub that will grow to 1.5 m tall and 1.5 m wide. It blooms in spring with clusters of snow-white flowers accented with light-gray spots. These trumpet-shaped blossoms are lightly scented and make a beautiful hedge or background plant in the garden. Prefers full sun to partial shade in moist well-drained soil.
Show More Species

All Species of Azaleas

Evergreen azalea
Alpen rose
Pontic rhododendron
White azalea
Maries' rhododendron
Korean rhododendron
Pacific rhododendron
Dahurian rhododendron
Western azalea
Royal azalea
Chinese azalea
Swamp Azalea
Sweet azalea
Labrador tea
Early azalea
Alpine rose
Western labrador tea
Huading rhododendron
Rhododendron hippophaeoides
Lobed rhododendron
Rhododendron argyrophyllum subsp. omeiense
Japanese azalea
Piedmont rhododendron
Azaleas 'Koster's Brilliant Red'
Rhododendron mariae
Honey-bell rhododendron 'Harvest Moon'
Rhododendron fortunei 'Lodauric Iceberg'
Rhododendron sargentianum 'Sarled'
Azaleas 'Golden Lights'
Rhododendron cinnabarinum 'Conroy'
Azaleas 'Teal'
Azaleas 'Winsome'
Azaleas 'Else Frye'
Azaleas 'Blue Jay'
Azaleas 'Royal Lodge'
Azaleas 'Bric'
Azaleas 'Fragrantissimum'
Azaleas 'Temple Belle'
Azaleas 'Choremia'
Azaleas 'Lem's Monarch'
Azaleas 'Susan'
Azaleas 'Mrs T.H. Lowinsky'
Azaleas 'Christmas Cheer'
Azaleas 'Fastuosum Flore Pleno'
Azaleas 'Cosmopolitan'
Azaleas 'Crest'
Azaleas 'Curlew'
Azaleas 'Nancy Evans'
Azaleas 'Norma'
Azaleas 'Goldflimmer'
Azaleas 'Razorbill'
Azaleas 'Lady Eleanor Cathcart'
Azaleas 'Germania'
Azaleas 'Dora Amateis'
Azaleas 'Gomer Waterer'
Azaleas 'Gibraltar'
Azaleas 'Shamrock'
Catawba rosebay 'Nova Zembla'
Catawba rosebay 'English Roseum'
Western azalea 'Irene Koster'
White azalea 'Narcissiflorum'
Rhododendron spiciferum
Rhododendron hyperythrum
Rhododendron formosanum
Azaleas 'Nancy Waterer'
Azaleas 'Directeur Moerlands'
Azaleas 'Nestucca'
Azaleas 'Earl of Donoughmore'
Azaleas 'Ken Janeck'
Azaleas 'Saint Tudy'
Azaleas 'Lem's Cameo'
Azaleas 'Mrs Charles E. Pearson'
Azaleas 'Champagne'
Azaleas 'Coccineum Speciosum'
Azaleas 'Golden Oriole'
Rhododendron racemosum 'Rock Rose'
Azaleas 'Pink Cherub'
Yellow azalea 'Whitethroat'
Rhododendron dauricum 'Mid'
Hiryu azalea 'Hatsugiri'
Rhododendron sinogrande 'Faggetter's Favourite'
Catawba rosebay 'Cunningham's White'
Yellow azalea 'Satan'
Swamp azalea 'Fragrant Star'
Pontic rhododendron 'GRAZIELLA'
Catawba rosebay 'Purple Splendour'
popular genus

More Popular Genus

Dracaena
Dracaena
Dracaena are popular house plants that are easy to grow. They can tolerate low-light conditions and require little watering. Their leaves range from variegated to dark green. Their characteristic traits include woody stems that grow slowly but offer a striking appearance for small spaces such as apartments or offices.
Ficus
Fig trees
Fig trees have been cultivated in many regions for their fruits, particularly the common fig, F. carica. Most of the species have edible fruits, although the common fig is the only one of commercial value. Fig trees are also important food sources for wildlife in the tropics, including monkeys, bats, and insects.
Rubus
Brambles
Brambles are members of the rose family, and there are hundreds of different types to be found throughout the European countryside. They have been culturally significant for centuries; Christian folklore stories hold that when the devil was thrown from heaven, he landed on a bramble bush. Their vigorous growth habit can tangle into native plants and take over.
Acer
Maples
The popular tree family known as maples change the color of their leaves in the fall. Many cultural traditions encourage people to watch the colors change, such as momijigari in Japan. Maples popular options for bonsai art. Alternately, their sap is used to create maple syrup.
Prunus
Prunus
Prunus is a genus of flowering fruit trees that includes almonds, cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines, and apricots. These are often known as "stone fruits" because their pits are large seeds or "stones." When prunus trees are damaged, they exhibit "gummosis," a condition in which the tree's gum (similar to sap) is secreted to the bark to help heal external wounds.
Solanum
Nightshades
Nightshades is a large and diverse genus of plants, with more than 1500 different types worldwide. This genus incorporates both important staple food crops like tomato, potato, and eggplant, but also dangerous poisonous plants from the nightshade family. The name was coined by Pliny the Elder almost two thousand years ago.
Rosa
Roses
Most species of roses are shrubs or climbing plants that have showy flowers and sharp thorns. They are commonly cultivated for cut flowers or as ornamental plants in gardens due to their attractive appearance, pleasant fragrance, and cultural significance in many countries. The rose hips (fruits) can also be used in jams and teas.
Quercus
Oaks
Oaks are among the world's longest-lived trees, sometimes growing for over 1,000 years! The oldest known oak tree is in the southern United States and is over 1,500 years old. Oaks produce an exceedingly popular type of wood which is used to make different products, from furniture and flooring to wine barrels and even cosmetic creams.
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