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Tea rose
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Tea rose
Tea rose
Tea rose
Tea rose
Add to My Garden
Tea rose
Rosa hybrida
The first tea rose was created in 1867 by Jean-Baptiste Andred Guillot, who operated his father's nursery in Lyon from the age of 14. The tea rose did not become popular until the Soleil d'Or was cultivated at the beginning of the 1900s in France.
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care guide

Care Guide for Tea rose

Deep water your Tea rose bushes whenever the top three inches of soil around them dries out. Do not let water splash on the leaves if possible, and water early enough that any wet leaves can dry in the sun.
Fertilization
Fertilization
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Tea rose bushes need a lot of nourishment to produce abundant blooms, so feed them weekly during the growing period, starting in early spring. Use a well-balanced or rose-specific fertilizer. Stop fertilizing a month and a half before the first frost.
Trim the diseased, withered leaves once a month.
Sand, Clay, Acidic, Neutral, Alkaline
Potting Suggestions
Potting Suggestions
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Needs excellent drainage in pots.
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Tea rose
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Questions About Tea rose

Watering Watering Watering
Pruning Pruning Pruning
Temperature Temperature Temperature
Seasonal Care Seasonal Care Seasonal Care
How Much Water Do I Need to Water My Tea rose?
The Tea rose generally needs about a gallon of water each schedule,With the potted plants, you might want to water them deeply until you see that the water is dripping at the bottom of the pot. Then, wait for the soil to dry before watering them again. You can use a water calculator or a moisture meter to determine the amount you've given to your plant in a week. Provide plenty of water, especially in the flowering period, but let the moisture evaporate afterwards to prevent root rot.

If Tea rose is planted outdoor with adequate rainfall, it may not need additional watering. When Tea rose is young or newly planted, make sure it gets 1-2 inches of rain per week. As Tea rose continues to grow, it can survive entirely on rainfall. Only when the weather is too hot, or when there is no rainfall at all for 2-3 weeks, then consider giving Tea rose a full watering during the cooler moment of the day to prevent the plant from suffering from high heat damage. Additional watering will be required during persistent dry spells.
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How Often Should I Water My Tea rose?
The Tea rose likes deep and infrequent watering. You would want to soak them in a gallon of water each time, especially when they are planted in pots. The water storage of flower pots is limited and the soil will dry out faster. Watering is required every 3 to 5 days when living in a cold region. Water it early in the morning when the soil is dry, outdoors or indoors. You can also determine if watering is needed by checking the soil inside. When the top 2-3 inches of soil is dry, it is time to give the plant a full watering. During hot days, you may need to check the moisture daily, as the heat can quickly dry out the soil in the pot.
Irrigation of the soil is also required if you have a garden. When you live in a hot climate, you might want to water once a week. Only water when you notice that about 2 to 3 inches of soil become too dry outdoors or indoors. Consider the amount of rainwater on the plant and ensure not to add to it to prevent root rot.You may not need additional watering of the plants if there is a lot of rainfall.Tea rose generally grows during spring and fall. When they are outdoors, you need to add mulch about 3 to 4 inches deep to conserve more water.

You need to water the plants more frequently in sandy soil because this type tends to drain faster. However, with the clay one, you need to water this less frequently where you could go for 2-3 days to dry the plant and not develop any root rot. You could mark the date on the calendar whenever you water and when you notice that the leaves are starting to droop. This can mean that you might be a day late.
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Should I Adjust the Watering Frequency for My Tea rose According to Different Seasons or Climates?
The Tea rose needs outdoors come from rain, with only persistent dry weather requiring watering. Throughout the spring and fall growing seasons, the soil needs to be kept moist but not soggy, and alternating dry and moist soil conditions will allow the Tea rose to grow well. Throughout the summer, hot weather can cause water to evaporate too quickly, and if there is a lack of rainfall, you will need to water more frequently and extra to keep it moist.

Usually, the Tea rose will need less water during the winter. Since the Tea rose will drop their leaves and go dormant, you can put them into a well-draining but moisture-retentive soil mixture like the terracotta to help the water evaporate quicker. Once your Tea rose growing outdoors begins to leaf out and go dormant, you can skip watering altogether and in most cases Tea rose can rely on the fall and winter rains to survive the entire dormant period.

After the spring, you can cultivate your Tea rose and encourage it to grow and bloom when the temperature becomes warmer.This plant is not generally a fan of ponding or drought when flowering. You must ensure that the drainage is good at all times, especially during the winter.

When the plant is in a pot, the plant has limited root growth. Keep them well-watered, especially if they are planted in pots during summer. They don't like cold and wet roots, so provide adequate drainage, especially if they are still growing.

It's always best to water your Tea rose’s diligently. Get the entire root system into a deep soak at least once or twice a week, depending on the weather. It's best to avoid shallow sprinkles that reach the leaves since they generally encourage the growth of fungi and don't reach deep into the roots. Don't allow the Tea rose’s to dry out completely in the fall or winter, even if they are already dormancy.

Don't drown the plants because they generally don't like sitting in water for too long. They can die during winter if the soil does not drain well. Also, apply mulch whenever possible to reduce stress, conserve water, and encourage healthy blooms.
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What Should I Be Careful with When I Water Tea rose in Different Seasons, Climates, or During Different Growing Periods of It?
If planting in the ground, Tea rose mostly relies on rain. However, if there is no rainfall for 2-3 weeks, you may need to give proper consideration to giving the plants a deep watering. If watering Tea rose in summer, you should try to do it in the morning. A large temperature difference between the water temperature and the root system can stress the roots. You need to avoid watering the bushes when it's too hot outside. Start mulching them during the spring when the ground is not too cold.

The age of the plants matter. Lack of water is one of the most common reasons the newly planted ones fail to grow. After they are established, you need to ease off the watering schedule.

Reduce watering them during the fall and winter, especially if they have a water-retaining material in the soil. The dry winds in winter can dry them out, and the newly planted ones can be at risk of drought during windy winter, summer, and fall. Windy seasons mean that there's more watering required. The ones planted in the pot tend to dry out faster, so they need more watering. Once you see that they bloom less, the leaves begin to dry up.

Potted plants are relatively complex to water and fluctuate in frequency. Always be careful that the pot-planted plant don't sit in the water. Avoid putting them in containers with saucers, bowls, and trays. Too much watering in the fall can make the foliage look mottled or yellowish. It's always a good idea to prevent overwatering them regardless of the current climate or season that you might have. During the months when Tea rose begins to flower, you might want to increase the watering frequency but give it a rest once they are fully grown.

Give them an adequate amount of water once every 3 to 5 days but don't give them regular schedules. Make sure the soil is dry by sticking your finger in the pot, or use a moisture meter if you're unsure if it's the right time. Too much root rot can cause them to die, so be careful not to overwater or underwater regardless of the climate or season you have in your area.
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What Should I Do If I Water Tea rose Too Much/Too Little?
An overwatered Tea rose can start to have leaves that turn yellow, drop off and wilt. The plant can also look dull and unhealthy, with signs of mushy stems. When they are beginning to show these signs, it's best to adjust your schedule whenever possible.
The wilting can also be a sign of under watering as well. You might see that the leaves begin to turn crispy and dry while the overwatered ones will have soft wilted leaves. Check the soil when it is dry and watering is not enough, give it a full watering in time. Enough water will make the Tea rose recover again, but the plant will still appear dry and yellow leaves after a few days due to the damaged root system. Once it return to normal, the leave yellowing will stop .

Always check the moisture levels at the pot when you have the Tea rose indoors. Avoid overwatering indoors and see if there are signs of black spots. If these are present, let the soil dry in the pot by giving it a few days of rest from watering.

Overwatering can lead to root rot being present in your plant. If this is the case, you might want to transfer them into a different pot, especially if you see discolored and slimy roots. Always prevent root rot as much as possible, and don't let the soil become too soggy.

You should dig a little deeper when you plant your Tea rose outdoors. When you check with your fingers and notice that the soil is too dry, it could mean underwatering. Adequate watering is required to help the plant recover.
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What'S the Best Method to Water the Tea rose?
You might want to put a garden hose at the plant base to ensure that you're promoting excellent root development. Avoid directly spraying the leaves, and know that the leaves will require more watering if they are outdoors and facing direct sunlight. You can also use bubblers that you can put on to each plant to moisten the roots. Also, use soaker hoses that can cover the entire garden or bed when adding or removing plants to push the roots deeply. Drain any excess water and wait for the soil to dry before watering. Water at ground level to prevent diseases. On a sunny day, you might want to spray the entire bush with water. Whether potted or in-ground, please remember Tea rose prefers deep watering over light sprinkling.
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Why Should I Water the Tea rose?
Watering the Tea rose helps transport the needed nutrients from the soil to the rest of the plant. The moisture will keep this species healthy if you know how much water to give. The watering requirements will depend on the weather in your area and the plant's soil.

The Tea rose thrives on moist soil, but they can't generally tolerate waterlogging. Ensure to provide enough mulch when planted on the ground and never fall into the trap of watering too little. They enjoy a full can of watering where the water should be moist at the base when they are planted in a pot to get the best blooms.

If they are grown as foliage, you need to water them up to a depth of 10 to 20 inches so they will continue to grow. If it's raining, refrain from watering and let them get the nutrients they need from the rainwater.
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pests

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Tea rose based on 10 million real cases
Flower withering
Flower withering Flower withering
Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Solutions: If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible. For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface. In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well. If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Wilting after blooming
Wilting after blooming Wilting after blooming
Wilting after blooming
Flowers may wither for a variety of reasons.
Solutions: Check the soil or potting medium. Coarse textures can allow water to drain too rapidly, preventing the plant from taking up enough. If the soil and roots seem very dry, add sphagnum moss or other mediums that hold water. Water according to recommendations for each plant's species. Low humidity can be corrected by misting the plant regularly or placing it near a humidifier. Keeping it near other plants helps, too. Keep the environment consistent in terms of temperature, humidity, and lighting. Keep it away from vents, heaters, and air conditioners, and avoid moving it to locations where it will experience a temperature shock. Hot, dry heat, and cold drafts are problematic for many plants. Especially if the plant is outside, it could be experiencing heat or light stress. Try moving it to a shadier location.
Black spot
Black spot Black spot
Black spot
Infection by the black spot pathogen causes black spots or patches to appear on leaves.
Solutions: Some steps to take to address black spot include: Prune away any infected leaves, cleaning the pruners between plants with a 10% bleach solution so that the fungus does not spread to healthy leaves. Don't compost pruned plant parts as the spores can linger in the soil for a long period of time - instead, dispose of them in the trash. Use an approved fungicide such as Trifloxystrobin, Chlorothalonil, Maneb, or Myclobutanil. Use a spreader in the fungicide spray to ensure better coverage.
Nutrient deficiencies
Nutrient deficiencies Nutrient deficiencies
Nutrient deficiencies
A lack of nutrients will cause a widespread yellowing of the leaves. The yellowing may begin at the base or top of the plant.
Solutions: There are several easy ways to remedy the nutrient deficiencies in soils. Use a water-soluble fertilizer. Fertilizers will include most or all of the macro and micro-nutrients the plants need to thrive. Adding some fertilizer to the soil will make those nutrients available and can combat deficiencies. Regularly apply organic fertilizer pellets. Organic fertilizers such as animal manures and bonemeal can supply plants with all the nutrients that they need to grow strong and healthy. Apply compost. Though not as finely tuned as artificial fertilizer, compost can nevertheless be rich in important nutrients and should be applied to the soil regularly. Apply nutrients via foliar application. In addition to supplementing the soil with nutrients, foliar fertilizer can be applied directly to the plant's leaves. Nutrients offered via foliar application are often taken up even quicker than those put in the soil, so the foliar application can be great for swiftly addressing specific deficiencies.
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Flower withering
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Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Overview
Overview
Flower withering occurs when flowers become weak, droopy, wilted, or faded until they can’t be revived. During withering, they begin to wrinkle and shrink until the flower becomes completely dry or dead.
Any flowers, regardless of the plant type or the climate they are grown in, are susceptible to withering. It is a worldwide problem across houseplants, herbs, flowering ornamentals, trees, shrubs, garden vegetables, and food crops.
Unlike wilting—which withering is often confused with—withering can be caused by different things and is often due to more than a lack of water. Withering can be fatal in severe cases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Flower withering progresses from very mild cases to severe occurrences that kill the flower. The severity of the symptoms is related to the cause and how long the condition is allowed to progress before action is taken.
  • Wilted, droopy flowers
  • Petals and leaves begin to wrinkle
  • Brown papery streaks or spots appear on the petals and leaf tips
  • Flowerhead shrink in size
  • Petal color fades
  • Yellowing leaves
  • Complete death of the flower
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The main causes of flower withering include natural age progress, lack of water, nutritional deficiencies, and bacterial or fungal diseases. It’s critical to determine the underlying cause when flower withering is noticed. This will guide the best course of action, if treatment is possible.
Check the soil for moisture and then closely examine the entire plant for signs of nutrient deficiencies. If neither of those appears to be the cause then cut open the stem below a flower. If a cross-section reveals brown or rust-colored stains it is safe to assume that this is a bacterial or fungal infection.
If the flower is nearing the end of its normal lifespan, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence, or cell aging and death. Cell division stops and the plant begins breaking down resources within the flower to use in other parts of the plant.
In all other cases, flower withering happens when the plant seals off the stem as a defense mechanism, stopping transport within the vascular system. This prevents further water loss through the flowers but also stops bacteria and fungi from moving to healthy parts of the plant. Once water and nutrient transport stops, the flower begins to wither and ultimately die.
Solutions
Solutions
If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface.
In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well.
If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Prevention
Prevention
This is definitely one of those instances where prevention is more effective than cure. Here are some preventative measures for avoiding premature flower withering.
  • Water plants according to their needs -- either keep the soil slightly moist or allow the top inch or two to dry out before watering again.
  • Fertilize lightly on a consistent basis, depending upon the plant’s growth. Quick-growing plants and those that flower or develop fruit will need more frequent fertilizing than slow-growing plants.
  • Purchase plants that are certified disease- or pathogen-free.
  • Look for disease-resistant cultivars.
  • Isolate plants showing disease symptoms to prevent the spread to neighboring plants.
  • Practice good plant hygiene by removing any fallen plant material as soon as possible.
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Wilting after blooming
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Wilting after blooming
Flowers may wither for a variety of reasons.
Overview
Overview
Wilting after blooming is sometimes a natural aging process of the flower, while other times it may indicate a problem. Orchids, for example, can bloom for anywhere from two weeks to three months, so wilting after a few days signals a problem for most varieties. This can happen to virtually any ornamental flowering plant, but those with shallow roots and limited tolerance for drought, full sun, and low humidity are more susceptible.
This is a common problem, and often has an easy fix. Sometimes, however, it is the result of more serious causes such as pests or disease of the root system.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
  • At first, flowers may look a little limp.
  • Petals may start to appear dried out and turn brown.
  • Eventually they may drop off the plant all together.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Wilting blooms can be a sign of an unhealthy root system. Any condition that prevents the plant from absorbing enough water and nutrition can result in wilting blooms and sometimes other symptoms. If the plant doesn’t have enough water, it cannot maintain appropriate pressure within stems, leaves, and blooms, causing them to wilt.
This can result from physical damage – for example from root breakage during re-potting or attack by insects like cutworms. If you recently re-potted your plant, physical damage to the roots is a likely cause. If you see insects, they may be eating leaves, roots, or flowers. Fungal infections can also cause root rot and damage, preventing water and nutrient uptake.
Finally, wilting blooms can result simply from age. If no other symptoms are visible, it may simply signal the natural end of the flower’s lifespan. If it seems premature, this may be caused by environmental factors: water, humidity, light, or stress. Under-watering is a common cause. Similarly, plants adapted to high humidity dry out easily when humidity is low, like during winter or in dry climates. Too much light can also stress plants that need shade, causing blooms to wilt.
Solutions
Solutions
  • Check the soil or potting medium. Coarse textures can allow water to drain too rapidly, preventing the plant from taking up enough. If the soil and roots seem very dry, add sphagnum moss or other mediums that hold water.
  • Water according to recommendations for each plant's species.
  • Low humidity can be corrected by misting the plant regularly or placing it near a humidifier. Keeping it near other plants helps, too.
  • Keep the environment consistent in terms of temperature, humidity, and lighting. Keep it away from vents, heaters, and air conditioners, and avoid moving it to locations where it will experience a temperature shock. Hot, dry heat, and cold drafts are problematic for many plants.
  • Especially if the plant is outside, it could be experiencing heat or light stress. Try moving it to a shadier location.
Prevention
Prevention
  • Read up on moisture, light, and soil type preferences for each plant to avoid underwatering, incorrect light levels, or other conditions that can cause wilting blooms.
  • Avoid re-potting during the flowering period. This causes additional stress on the plants because they need to repair root damage and adapt to the new micro-environment, all of which can result in wilting.
  • One other potential cause is ethylene gas, a plant hormone related to ripening. Some fruits and vegetables emit ethylene, especially bananas. Apples, grapes, melons, avocados, and potatoes can also give it off, so keep flowering plants away from fresh produce.
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Black spot
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Black spot
Infection by the black spot pathogen causes black spots or patches to appear on leaves.
Overview
Overview
Black spot is a fungus that largely attacks leaves on a variety of ornamental plants, leaving them covered in dark spots ringed with yellow, and eventually killing them. The fungus is often simply unsightly, but if it infects the whole plant it can interfere with photosynthesis by killing too many leaves. Because of this, it is important to be aware of the best methods for preventing and treating this diseases should it occur in the garden.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Here are a few of the most common symptoms of black spot:
  • The plant has developed small black spots along the leaves.
  • These spots be small, circular, and clustered together, or they may have a splotchy appearance and take up large portions of the leaves.
  • The fungus may also affect plant canes, where lesions start purple and then turn black.
  • The plant may suffer premature leaf drop.
Though most forms of black spot fungus pose little risk to a plant's overall health, many gardeners find them unsightly. Severe cases can also weaken a plant, so it becomes more susceptible to other pathogens and diseases.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Black spot is spread by various types of fungi, which differ slightly depending on whether they are in their sexual or asexual stages.
The fungal spores linger over the winter in fallen leaves and lesions on canes. In the spring, the spores are splashed up onto the leaves, causing infection within seven hours of moisture and when temperatures range between 24 - 29 ℃ with a high relative humidity.
In just two weeks, thousands of additional spores are produced, making it easy for the disease to infect nearby healthy plants as well.
There are several factors that could make a plant more likely to suffer a black spot infection. Here are some of the most common:
  • Exposure to infected plants or mulch (the fungus overwinters on dead leaves)
  • Weakening from physical damage, pest infestation or other infections.
  • Increased periods of wet, humid, warm weather – or exposure to overhead watering
  • Plants growing too close together
Solutions
Solutions
Some steps to take to address black spot include:
  • Prune away any infected leaves, cleaning the pruners between plants with a 10% bleach solution so that the fungus does not spread to healthy leaves.
  • Don't compost pruned plant parts as the spores can linger in the soil for a long period of time - instead, dispose of them in the trash.
  • Use an approved fungicide such as Trifloxystrobin, Chlorothalonil, Maneb, or Myclobutanil.
  • Use a spreader in the fungicide spray to ensure better coverage.
Prevention
Prevention
Here are a few tips to prevent black spot outbreaks.
  • Purchase resistant varieties: Invest in fungus-resistant plant varieties to reduce the chances for black spot diseases.
  • Remove infected plant debris: Fungi can overwinter in contaminated plant debris, so remove all fallen leaves from infected plants as soon as possible.
  • Rake and discard fallen leaves in the fall.
  • Prune regularly.
  • Water carefully: Fungal diseases spread when plants stay in moist conditions and when water droplets splash contaminated soil on plant leaves. Control these factors by only watering infected plants when the top few inches of soil are dry, and by watering at soil level to reduce splashback. Adding a layer of mulch to the soil will also reduce splashing.
  • Grow plants in an open, sunny locations so the foliage dries quickly.
  • Follow spacing guidelines when planting and avoid natural windbreaks for good air circulation.
  • Use chemical control: Regular doses of a fungicide, especially in the spring, can stop an outbreak before it begins.
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Nutrient deficiencies
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Nutrient deficiencies
A lack of nutrients will cause a widespread yellowing of the leaves. The yellowing may begin at the base or top of the plant.
Overview
Overview
Nutrient deficiencies can be seen in many different ways on plants. Basically, the lack of nutrients will inhibit plant growth, produce weak stems and leaves, and leave plants open to infection from pests and diseases. Plants use the nutrients from the soil to help them with photosynthesis. This, in turn, produces healthy plant growth. Plants that lack adequate amounts of nutrients will look lackluster and unhealthy. Eventually, if this is not addressed, it will cause the plants to die. The most important nutrients that plants need are nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and sulfur. Additionally, plants require small amounts of micronutrients such as iron, boron, manganese, zinc, copper, and molybdenum.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
A common sign that plants are experiencing nutrient deficiencies is the yellowing of leaves. This may be an overall yellowing or leaves that are yellow but still have green veins. These leaves will eventually brown off and die.
Another sign is the loss of plant vigor. The plants may not be growing as well as they should or their growth may be stunted.
Below are some common symptoms that appear when plants are lacking in nutrients.
Nitrogen (N): Inner, older leaves yellow first. If the deficiency is severe, yellowing progresses outward to newer growth.
Potassium (K): Leaf edges may turn brown and crinkly, with a yellowing layer forming just inside of the edge. Older leaves tend to be impacted first.
Phosphorus (P): Lack of vigorous growth. Plants will appear stunted.
Zinc (Zn): Yellowing tends to occur first at the base of the leaf.
Copper (Cu): Newer leaves begin to yellow first, with older leaves yellowing only if the deficiency becomes severe.
Boron (B): Newer leaves are impacted first. Foliage may also become particularly brittle in cases of boron deficiency.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
There are several factors that can lead to nutrient deficiencies, a situation where plants are not receiving the nutrients that they need. This could be because they are planted in nutrient-deficient soils, or that the soil's pH is too high or low. Incorrect soil pH can lock up certain nutrients, thus making them unavailable to plants. Lack of soil moisture can also be a problem, because plants need water to be able to absorb the nutrients from the soil.
Solutions
Solutions
There are several easy ways to remedy the nutrient deficiencies in soils.
  1. Use a water-soluble fertilizer. Fertilizers will include most or all of the macro and micro-nutrients the plants need to thrive. Adding some fertilizer to the soil will make those nutrients available and can combat deficiencies.
  2. Regularly apply organic fertilizer pellets. Organic fertilizers such as animal manures and bonemeal can supply plants with all the nutrients that they need to grow strong and healthy.
  3. Apply compost. Though not as finely tuned as artificial fertilizer, compost can nevertheless be rich in important nutrients and should be applied to the soil regularly.
  4. Apply nutrients via foliar application. In addition to supplementing the soil with nutrients, foliar fertilizer can be applied directly to the plant's leaves. Nutrients offered via foliar application are often taken up even quicker than those put in the soil, so the foliar application can be great for swiftly addressing specific deficiencies.
Prevention
Prevention
There are several easy ways to prevent nutrient deficiencies in plants.
  1. Regular fertilizing. Regular addition of fertilizer to the soil is one of the simplest and most effective ways to prevent deficiencies.
  2. Proper watering. Both over and under watering can adversely impact a plant's roots, which in turn makes it harder for them to properly take up nutrients.
  3. Testing the soil's pH. A soil's acidity or alkalinity will impact the degree to which certain nutrients are available to be taken up by plants. Knowing the soil's pH means it can be amended to suit the needs of the individual plants.
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plant_info

More Info

Flower Color
Flower Color
Pink
White
Yellow
Purple
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Late spring, Summer, Early fall
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green
Gold

Name story

Tea rose
When you read this name, you will probably start questioning whether is it used for tea or does it look like a rose? It is called tea rose because its flowers give off a scent that is similar to the fragrant of a newly-opened bag of tea. Imagine when the hills are filled with flowered Rosa hybrida, the fresh tea fragrance must be enjoyable and intoxicating.

Symbolism

Happiness, Glory and Beauty

Usages

Garden Use
Tea rose is a classic choice for small, formal gardens. They come in so many colors that gardeners can combine different variants for striking effect. They are also a common addition to cutting gardens and loved for their perfect flowers. Alyssum is a great companion plant, as it can serve to cover the bare canes of taller rose bushes.

Scientific Classification

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Beggar's lice
Beggar's lice
Beggar's lice has small white flowers that bloom in mid-summer. The common name comes from the seeds of this plant, which are burrs and are very sticky. These burrs are extremely small and are very difficult to remove from clothing and pet fur. This method of seed dispersal is very effective for this plant, and if caught on clothing often times the entire seed stem, or even the whole plant will come out of the ground.
Bloom Time
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Beach spider lily
Beach spider lily
Beach spider lily (Hymenocallis littoralis) is a bulbous perennial plant native to the south and eastern United States, Mexico, Central America, and South America. Beach spider lily has a distinctive appearance and is often cultivated for ornamental eye-catching displays.
Bloom Time
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Moreton bay fig
Moreton bay fig
Moreton bay fig (Ficus macrophylla) Is an evergreen tree and one of the largest cultivated fig trees that will grow from 23 - 55 m tall and 21 - 40 m wide. Known to live for more than 150 years, this tree grows an average of 91 cm per year. Blooms in summer, but flowers are inconspicuous. Produces edible figs that turn purple as they ripen in fall. Thrives in full sun and requires ample growing space.
Bloom Time
Spring, Summer, Autumn
Garden Usage
Plants of genus Ficus are often used in arbors and shrubs, as it usually grows large. If it is planted in a garden, choose a wide plot to give it enough space. It can also be planted in a flowerpot and maintained indoors at early stages, and transplanted to a garden later on. Its attractive green leaves require a warm, humid environment; we consider it a medium level difficulty plant to care.
Red maple
Red maple
The red maple is a common North American tree with distinctive red leaves and flower buds. Its sap can be made into maple syrup and the wood is good for furniture. Though non-toxic to humans, the leaves are very toxic to horses. According to the U.S. Forest Service, red maple is the most common tree in eastern North America.
Bloom Time
Spring
Garden Usage
The Maple is a plant of the genus Acer. The red maple is mainly used as a landscape tree because of its beautiful leaf color changes and elegant shape. The leaf color can change dramatically; colors include yellow, green, red, orange, pink, and purple. The red maple is often used as a garden shrub or as a potted plant.
Cotton fruit
Cotton fruit
Cotton fruit is a fast-growing fruit tree. It is commonly cultivated and the popular fruits are widely seasonally available in both local and international markets. There are two varieties that produce either yellow or red fruits. These varieties were once thought to be two distinct species. The fruit has various uses in Asian cuisine, however, care should be taken not to swallow the whole seeds for the risk of intestinal obstruction and perforation.
Bloom Time
Mid winter, Late winter, Early spring
Princess flower
Princess flower
The princess flower is native to Brazil and grows best in sunny areas. It has a wide reach when growing, and can be trained to "climb" up trellises or other upright structures. Its leaves are hairy to the touch.
Bloom Time
Summer, autumn
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Tea rose
Tea rose
Tea rose
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Rosa hybrida
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Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Tea rose based on 10 million real cases
Flower withering
Flower withering  Flower withering  Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Solutions: If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible. For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface. In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well. If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
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Wilting after blooming
Wilting after blooming  Wilting after blooming  Wilting after blooming
Flowers may wither for a variety of reasons.
Solutions: Check the soil or potting medium. Coarse textures can allow water to drain too rapidly, preventing the plant from taking up enough. If the soil and roots seem very dry, add sphagnum moss or other mediums that hold water. Water according to recommendations for each plant's species. Low humidity can be corrected by misting the plant regularly or placing it near a humidifier. Keeping it near other plants helps, too. Keep the environment consistent in terms of temperature, humidity, and lighting. Keep it away from vents, heaters, and air conditioners, and avoid moving it to locations where it will experience a temperature shock. Hot, dry heat, and cold drafts are problematic for many plants. Especially if the plant is outside, it could be experiencing heat or light stress. Try moving it to a shadier location.
Learn More more
Black spot
Black spot  Black spot  Black spot
Infection by the black spot pathogen causes black spots or patches to appear on leaves.
Solutions: Some steps to take to address black spot include: Prune away any infected leaves, cleaning the pruners between plants with a 10% bleach solution so that the fungus does not spread to healthy leaves. Don't compost pruned plant parts as the spores can linger in the soil for a long period of time - instead, dispose of them in the trash. Use an approved fungicide such as Trifloxystrobin, Chlorothalonil, Maneb, or Myclobutanil. Use a spreader in the fungicide spray to ensure better coverage.
Learn More more
Nutrient deficiencies
Nutrient deficiencies  Nutrient deficiencies  Nutrient deficiencies
A lack of nutrients will cause a widespread yellowing of the leaves. The yellowing may begin at the base or top of the plant.
Solutions: There are several easy ways to remedy the nutrient deficiencies in soils. Use a water-soluble fertilizer. Fertilizers will include most or all of the macro and micro-nutrients the plants need to thrive. Adding some fertilizer to the soil will make those nutrients available and can combat deficiencies. Regularly apply organic fertilizer pellets. Organic fertilizers such as animal manures and bonemeal can supply plants with all the nutrients that they need to grow strong and healthy. Apply compost. Though not as finely tuned as artificial fertilizer, compost can nevertheless be rich in important nutrients and should be applied to the soil regularly. Apply nutrients via foliar application. In addition to supplementing the soil with nutrients, foliar fertilizer can be applied directly to the plant's leaves. Nutrients offered via foliar application are often taken up even quicker than those put in the soil, so the foliar application can be great for swiftly addressing specific deficiencies.
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Flower withering
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Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Overview
Overview
Flower withering occurs when flowers become weak, droopy, wilted, or faded until they can’t be revived. During withering, they begin to wrinkle and shrink until the flower becomes completely dry or dead.
Any flowers, regardless of the plant type or the climate they are grown in, are susceptible to withering. It is a worldwide problem across houseplants, herbs, flowering ornamentals, trees, shrubs, garden vegetables, and food crops.
Unlike wilting—which withering is often confused with—withering can be caused by different things and is often due to more than a lack of water. Withering can be fatal in severe cases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Flower withering progresses from very mild cases to severe occurrences that kill the flower. The severity of the symptoms is related to the cause and how long the condition is allowed to progress before action is taken.
  • Wilted, droopy flowers
  • Petals and leaves begin to wrinkle
  • Brown papery streaks or spots appear on the petals and leaf tips
  • Flowerhead shrink in size
  • Petal color fades
  • Yellowing leaves
  • Complete death of the flower
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The main causes of flower withering include natural age progress, lack of water, nutritional deficiencies, and bacterial or fungal diseases. It’s critical to determine the underlying cause when flower withering is noticed. This will guide the best course of action, if treatment is possible.
Check the soil for moisture and then closely examine the entire plant for signs of nutrient deficiencies. If neither of those appears to be the cause then cut open the stem below a flower. If a cross-section reveals brown or rust-colored stains it is safe to assume that this is a bacterial or fungal infection.
If the flower is nearing the end of its normal lifespan, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence, or cell aging and death. Cell division stops and the plant begins breaking down resources within the flower to use in other parts of the plant.
In all other cases, flower withering happens when the plant seals off the stem as a defense mechanism, stopping transport within the vascular system. This prevents further water loss through the flowers but also stops bacteria and fungi from moving to healthy parts of the plant. Once water and nutrient transport stops, the flower begins to wither and ultimately die.
Solutions
Solutions
If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface.
In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well.
If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Prevention
Prevention
This is definitely one of those instances where prevention is more effective than cure. Here are some preventative measures for avoiding premature flower withering.
  • Water plants according to their needs -- either keep the soil slightly moist or allow the top inch or two to dry out before watering again.
  • Fertilize lightly on a consistent basis, depending upon the plant’s growth. Quick-growing plants and those that flower or develop fruit will need more frequent fertilizing than slow-growing plants.
  • Purchase plants that are certified disease- or pathogen-free.
  • Look for disease-resistant cultivars.
  • Isolate plants showing disease symptoms to prevent the spread to neighboring plants.
  • Practice good plant hygiene by removing any fallen plant material as soon as possible.
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Wilting after blooming
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Wilting after blooming
Flowers may wither for a variety of reasons.
Overview
Overview
Wilting after blooming is sometimes a natural aging process of the flower, while other times it may indicate a problem. Orchids, for example, can bloom for anywhere from two weeks to three months, so wilting after a few days signals a problem for most varieties. This can happen to virtually any ornamental flowering plant, but those with shallow roots and limited tolerance for drought, full sun, and low humidity are more susceptible.
This is a common problem, and often has an easy fix. Sometimes, however, it is the result of more serious causes such as pests or disease of the root system.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
  • At first, flowers may look a little limp.
  • Petals may start to appear dried out and turn brown.
  • Eventually they may drop off the plant all together.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Wilting blooms can be a sign of an unhealthy root system. Any condition that prevents the plant from absorbing enough water and nutrition can result in wilting blooms and sometimes other symptoms. If the plant doesn’t have enough water, it cannot maintain appropriate pressure within stems, leaves, and blooms, causing them to wilt.
This can result from physical damage – for example from root breakage during re-potting or attack by insects like cutworms. If you recently re-potted your plant, physical damage to the roots is a likely cause. If you see insects, they may be eating leaves, roots, or flowers. Fungal infections can also cause root rot and damage, preventing water and nutrient uptake.
Finally, wilting blooms can result simply from age. If no other symptoms are visible, it may simply signal the natural end of the flower’s lifespan. If it seems premature, this may be caused by environmental factors: water, humidity, light, or stress. Under-watering is a common cause. Similarly, plants adapted to high humidity dry out easily when humidity is low, like during winter or in dry climates. Too much light can also stress plants that need shade, causing blooms to wilt.
Solutions
Solutions
  • Check the soil or potting medium. Coarse textures can allow water to drain too rapidly, preventing the plant from taking up enough. If the soil and roots seem very dry, add sphagnum moss or other mediums that hold water.
  • Water according to recommendations for each plant's species.
  • Low humidity can be corrected by misting the plant regularly or placing it near a humidifier. Keeping it near other plants helps, too.
  • Keep the environment consistent in terms of temperature, humidity, and lighting. Keep it away from vents, heaters, and air conditioners, and avoid moving it to locations where it will experience a temperature shock. Hot, dry heat, and cold drafts are problematic for many plants.
  • Especially if the plant is outside, it could be experiencing heat or light stress. Try moving it to a shadier location.
Prevention
Prevention
  • Read up on moisture, light, and soil type preferences for each plant to avoid underwatering, incorrect light levels, or other conditions that can cause wilting blooms.
  • Avoid re-potting during the flowering period. This causes additional stress on the plants because they need to repair root damage and adapt to the new micro-environment, all of which can result in wilting.
  • One other potential cause is ethylene gas, a plant hormone related to ripening. Some fruits and vegetables emit ethylene, especially bananas. Apples, grapes, melons, avocados, and potatoes can also give it off, so keep flowering plants away from fresh produce.
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Black spot
plant poor
Black spot
Infection by the black spot pathogen causes black spots or patches to appear on leaves.
Overview
Overview
Black spot is a fungus that largely attacks leaves on a variety of ornamental plants, leaving them covered in dark spots ringed with yellow, and eventually killing them. The fungus is often simply unsightly, but if it infects the whole plant it can interfere with photosynthesis by killing too many leaves. Because of this, it is important to be aware of the best methods for preventing and treating this diseases should it occur in the garden.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Here are a few of the most common symptoms of black spot:
  • The plant has developed small black spots along the leaves.
  • These spots be small, circular, and clustered together, or they may have a splotchy appearance and take up large portions of the leaves.
  • The fungus may also affect plant canes, where lesions start purple and then turn black.
  • The plant may suffer premature leaf drop.
Though most forms of black spot fungus pose little risk to a plant's overall health, many gardeners find them unsightly. Severe cases can also weaken a plant, so it becomes more susceptible to other pathogens and diseases.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Black spot is spread by various types of fungi, which differ slightly depending on whether they are in their sexual or asexual stages.
The fungal spores linger over the winter in fallen leaves and lesions on canes. In the spring, the spores are splashed up onto the leaves, causing infection within seven hours of moisture and when temperatures range between 24 - 29 ℃ with a high relative humidity.
In just two weeks, thousands of additional spores are produced, making it easy for the disease to infect nearby healthy plants as well.
There are several factors that could make a plant more likely to suffer a black spot infection. Here are some of the most common:
  • Exposure to infected plants or mulch (the fungus overwinters on dead leaves)
  • Weakening from physical damage, pest infestation or other infections.
  • Increased periods of wet, humid, warm weather – or exposure to overhead watering
  • Plants growing too close together
Solutions
Solutions
Some steps to take to address black spot include:
  • Prune away any infected leaves, cleaning the pruners between plants with a 10% bleach solution so that the fungus does not spread to healthy leaves.
  • Don't compost pruned plant parts as the spores can linger in the soil for a long period of time - instead, dispose of them in the trash.
  • Use an approved fungicide such as Trifloxystrobin, Chlorothalonil, Maneb, or Myclobutanil.
  • Use a spreader in the fungicide spray to ensure better coverage.
Prevention
Prevention
Here are a few tips to prevent black spot outbreaks.
  • Purchase resistant varieties: Invest in fungus-resistant plant varieties to reduce the chances for black spot diseases.
  • Remove infected plant debris: Fungi can overwinter in contaminated plant debris, so remove all fallen leaves from infected plants as soon as possible.
  • Rake and discard fallen leaves in the fall.
  • Prune regularly.
  • Water carefully: Fungal diseases spread when plants stay in moist conditions and when water droplets splash contaminated soil on plant leaves. Control these factors by only watering infected plants when the top few inches of soil are dry, and by watering at soil level to reduce splashback. Adding a layer of mulch to the soil will also reduce splashing.
  • Grow plants in an open, sunny locations so the foliage dries quickly.
  • Follow spacing guidelines when planting and avoid natural windbreaks for good air circulation.
  • Use chemical control: Regular doses of a fungicide, especially in the spring, can stop an outbreak before it begins.
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Nutrient deficiencies
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Nutrient deficiencies
A lack of nutrients will cause a widespread yellowing of the leaves. The yellowing may begin at the base or top of the plant.
Overview
Overview
Nutrient deficiencies can be seen in many different ways on plants. Basically, the lack of nutrients will inhibit plant growth, produce weak stems and leaves, and leave plants open to infection from pests and diseases. Plants use the nutrients from the soil to help them with photosynthesis. This, in turn, produces healthy plant growth. Plants that lack adequate amounts of nutrients will look lackluster and unhealthy. Eventually, if this is not addressed, it will cause the plants to die. The most important nutrients that plants need are nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and sulfur. Additionally, plants require small amounts of micronutrients such as iron, boron, manganese, zinc, copper, and molybdenum.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
A common sign that plants are experiencing nutrient deficiencies is the yellowing of leaves. This may be an overall yellowing or leaves that are yellow but still have green veins. These leaves will eventually brown off and die.
Another sign is the loss of plant vigor. The plants may not be growing as well as they should or their growth may be stunted.
Below are some common symptoms that appear when plants are lacking in nutrients.
Nitrogen (N): Inner, older leaves yellow first. If the deficiency is severe, yellowing progresses outward to newer growth.
Potassium (K): Leaf edges may turn brown and crinkly, with a yellowing layer forming just inside of the edge. Older leaves tend to be impacted first.
Phosphorus (P): Lack of vigorous growth. Plants will appear stunted.
Zinc (Zn): Yellowing tends to occur first at the base of the leaf.
Copper (Cu): Newer leaves begin to yellow first, with older leaves yellowing only if the deficiency becomes severe.
Boron (B): Newer leaves are impacted first. Foliage may also become particularly brittle in cases of boron deficiency.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
There are several factors that can lead to nutrient deficiencies, a situation where plants are not receiving the nutrients that they need. This could be because they are planted in nutrient-deficient soils, or that the soil's pH is too high or low. Incorrect soil pH can lock up certain nutrients, thus making them unavailable to plants. Lack of soil moisture can also be a problem, because plants need water to be able to absorb the nutrients from the soil.
Solutions
Solutions
There are several easy ways to remedy the nutrient deficiencies in soils.
  1. Use a water-soluble fertilizer. Fertilizers will include most or all of the macro and micro-nutrients the plants need to thrive. Adding some fertilizer to the soil will make those nutrients available and can combat deficiencies.
  2. Regularly apply organic fertilizer pellets. Organic fertilizers such as animal manures and bonemeal can supply plants with all the nutrients that they need to grow strong and healthy.
  3. Apply compost. Though not as finely tuned as artificial fertilizer, compost can nevertheless be rich in important nutrients and should be applied to the soil regularly.
  4. Apply nutrients via foliar application. In addition to supplementing the soil with nutrients, foliar fertilizer can be applied directly to the plant's leaves. Nutrients offered via foliar application are often taken up even quicker than those put in the soil, so the foliar application can be great for swiftly addressing specific deficiencies.
Prevention
Prevention
There are several easy ways to prevent nutrient deficiencies in plants.
  1. Regular fertilizing. Regular addition of fertilizer to the soil is one of the simplest and most effective ways to prevent deficiencies.
  2. Proper watering. Both over and under watering can adversely impact a plant's roots, which in turn makes it harder for them to properly take up nutrients.
  3. Testing the soil's pH. A soil's acidity or alkalinity will impact the degree to which certain nutrients are available to be taken up by plants. Knowing the soil's pH means it can be amended to suit the needs of the individual plants.
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More Info

Flower Color
Flower Color
Pink
White
Yellow
Purple
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Late spring, Summer, Early fall
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green
Gold

Name story

Tea rose
When you read this name, you will probably start questioning whether is it used for tea or does it look like a rose? It is called tea rose because its flowers give off a scent that is similar to the fragrant of a newly-opened bag of tea. Imagine when the hills are filled with flowered Rosa hybrida, the fresh tea fragrance must be enjoyable and intoxicating.

Symbolism

Happiness, Glory and Beauty

Usages

Garden Use
Tea rose is a classic choice for small, formal gardens. They come in so many colors that gardeners can combine different variants for striking effect. They are also a common addition to cutting gardens and loved for their perfect flowers. Alyssum is a great companion plant, as it can serve to cover the bare canes of taller rose bushes.

Scientific Classification

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These cookies are set because of our use of Google Analytics. They are used to collect information about your use of our application/website. The cookies collect specific information, such as your IP address, data related to your device and other information about your use of the application/website. Please note that the data processing is essentially carried out by Google LLC and Google may use your data collected by the cookies for own purposes, e.g. profiling and will combine it with other data such as your Google Account. For more information about how Google processes your data and Google’s approach to privacy as well as implemented safeguards for your data, please see here.
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We use these cookies to collect information about how you use our site, monitor site performance, and improve our site performance, our services, and your experience.
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Facebook Pixel
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This cookie provides mobile analytics and attribution services that enable us to measure and analyze the effectiveness of marketing campaigns, certain events and actions within the Application. Learn more here.
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