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Prickly-ivy
Prickly-ivy
Prickly-ivy
Prickly-ivy
Prickly-ivy (Smilax)
Prickly-ivy comprise of a large and diverse group of woody, climbing shrubs and vines. They are damage tolerant, easily regrowing after being cut or burned by fire. Several species are made into important culinary ingredients used in sodas, soups, and stews and even have edible berries and roots. Prickly-ivy are ecologically important as well - their leaves and berries provide food for insects, birds, and mammals, while their prickly vegetation provides cover for small animals hiding from predators. This genus is named after the woodland nymph Smilax of Greek mythology, who turned into a brambly vine.
Lifespan
Lifespan
Perennial
info

Key Facts About Prickly-ivy

Attributes of Prickly-ivy

Leaf type
Deciduous

Scientific Classification of Prickly-ivy

distribution

Distribution of Prickly-ivy

Distribution Map of Prickly-ivy

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
habit
species

Exploring the Prickly-ivy Plants

8 most common species:
Smilax aspera
Rough bindweed
Rough bindweed (Smilax aspera) is a climbing evergreen vine that is native to the Mediterranean, parts of Asia, and central Africa. Its yellowish-green flowers mature into red berries, which then darken until they become nearly black. The berries are an important food source for wild birds.
Smilax bona-nox
Saw greenbrier
Saw greenbrier (Smilax bona-nox) is a woody vine that wraps its tendrils around trees, shrubbery, and along the ground. The vine is native to North America and grows throughout the world. Saw greenbrier attracts wild turkeys, squirrels, and songbirds. This species can be differentiated from other similar plants by its leathery, triangular leaves.
Smilax rotundifolia
Roundleaf greenbrier
Roundleaf greenbrier (Smilax rotundifolia) is a common and visually noticeable vine that grows throughout woodlands and forests in the eastern United States and Canada. Roundleaf greenbrier is edible and cooked similarly to asparagus and spinach, when cooked. The vine grows berries which are eaten by deer, birds, and rabbits.
Smilax glauca
Cat greenbrier
Cat greenbrier (Smilax glauca) is a woodland vine plant native to the central and eastern United States. It is resistant to fire because of the properties of its root structure.
Smilax tamnoides
Bristly greenbrier
Bristly greenbrier (Smilax tamnoides) is a deciduous climbing vine that grows in low woods thickets and coastal plains. Bristly greenbrier grows best in full sunlight and semi-shade. It blooms in clusters of greenish-brown flowers from spring to summer. The roots of this plant are edible when cooked dried or ground into powder.
Smilax china
China root
China root (Smilax china) is a tropical climbing plant. It gets both its scientific name and the common name "China root" from the largest country in which it grows wild. It can be best identified growing in its preferred streamside, thicket, and grassy slope habitats when its bright red fruit, which grows in peculiar almost spherical clusters, appears in late fall and early winter.
Smilax auriculata
Earleaf Greenbrier
Earleaf Greenbrier (Smilax auriculata) is an evergreen climbing vine that produces fragrant green flowers from spring to summer followed by clusters of grape-like berries. It grows in full sun or partial shade in moist well-drained soil. Earleaf Greenbrier is a very aggressive grower and can tangle its way into ornamental plantings with roots that are almost impossible to fully extricate from the ground.
Smilax herbacea
Smooth Carrionflower
Smooth Carrionflower (Smilax herbacea) is a herbaceous perennial vine that can grow to be 2.5 m long. Smooth Carrionflower blooms in late spring and early summer. It produces clusters of fragrant, greenish-yellow flowers. The blossoms have a carrion-like scent. This species attracts pollinators and birds and small animals feed on its berries.

All Species of Prickly-ivy

Rough bindweed
Smilax aspera
Rough bindweed
Rough bindweed (Smilax aspera) is a climbing evergreen vine that is native to the Mediterranean, parts of Asia, and central Africa. Its yellowish-green flowers mature into red berries, which then darken until they become nearly black. The berries are an important food source for wild birds.
Saw greenbrier
Smilax bona-nox
Saw greenbrier
Saw greenbrier (Smilax bona-nox) is a woody vine that wraps its tendrils around trees, shrubbery, and along the ground. The vine is native to North America and grows throughout the world. Saw greenbrier attracts wild turkeys, squirrels, and songbirds. This species can be differentiated from other similar plants by its leathery, triangular leaves.
Roundleaf greenbrier
Smilax rotundifolia
Roundleaf greenbrier
Roundleaf greenbrier (Smilax rotundifolia) is a common and visually noticeable vine that grows throughout woodlands and forests in the eastern United States and Canada. Roundleaf greenbrier is edible and cooked similarly to asparagus and spinach, when cooked. The vine grows berries which are eaten by deer, birds, and rabbits.
Cat greenbrier
Smilax glauca
Cat greenbrier
Cat greenbrier (Smilax glauca) is a woodland vine plant native to the central and eastern United States. It is resistant to fire because of the properties of its root structure.
Bristly greenbrier
Smilax tamnoides
Bristly greenbrier
Bristly greenbrier (Smilax tamnoides) is a deciduous climbing vine that grows in low woods thickets and coastal plains. Bristly greenbrier grows best in full sunlight and semi-shade. It blooms in clusters of greenish-brown flowers from spring to summer. The roots of this plant are edible when cooked dried or ground into powder.
China root
Smilax china
China root
China root (Smilax china) is a tropical climbing plant. It gets both its scientific name and the common name "China root" from the largest country in which it grows wild. It can be best identified growing in its preferred streamside, thicket, and grassy slope habitats when its bright red fruit, which grows in peculiar almost spherical clusters, appears in late fall and early winter.
Earleaf Greenbrier
Smilax auriculata
Earleaf Greenbrier
Earleaf Greenbrier (Smilax auriculata) is an evergreen climbing vine that produces fragrant green flowers from spring to summer followed by clusters of grape-like berries. It grows in full sun or partial shade in moist well-drained soil. Earleaf Greenbrier is a very aggressive grower and can tangle its way into ornamental plantings with roots that are almost impossible to fully extricate from the ground.
Smooth Carrionflower
Smilax herbacea
Smooth Carrionflower
Smooth Carrionflower (Smilax herbacea) is a herbaceous perennial vine that can grow to be 2.5 m long. Smooth Carrionflower blooms in late spring and early summer. It produces clusters of fragrant, greenish-yellow flowers. The blossoms have a carrion-like scent. This species attracts pollinators and birds and small animals feed on its berries.
Laurel Greenbrier
Smilax laurifolia
Laurel Greenbrier
Laurel Greenbrier (Smilax laurifolia) is an evergreen herbaceous vine with leathery leaves and thorny, twining stems that grows in dense thickets. It produces a blackish-blue fruit that has been used to dye fabrics and leather. It grows in partial shade or partial sun in moist soil. Laurel Greenbrier is considered a weed in much of the Southeastern United States.
Blue Ridge Carrionflower
Smilax lasioneura
Blue Ridge Carrionflower
Blue Ridge Carrionflower gets its name because it emits a scent that smells like carrion. This stinky smell attracts the flies that will pollinate its flowers. It is a perennial vine with small flowers and nearly black berries.
Sarsparilla vine
Smilax pumila
Sarsparilla vine
The sarsparilla vine (Smilax pumila) is native to the southeastern states of the USA. It trails along the ground and is useful as a ground cover in less fertile soils. In wooded areas, it clambers up trees. It bears yellowish-green flowers in the fall, followed by red fruit in the winter, which is eaten by birds and mammals.
Horsetail greenbrier
Smilax riparia
Horsetail greenbrier
Often harvested in the wild as a food source by indigenous people, horsetail greenbrier is a climber that is found in thickets, forests, and grassy slopes. Horsetail greenbrier is frequently used in traditional Chinese medicine.
Smilax bockii
Smilax bockii
Smilax bockii
Smilax bockii comprise of a large and diverse group of woody, climbing shrubs and vines. They are damage tolerant, easily regrowing after being cut or burned by fire. Several species are made into important culinary ingredients used in sodas, soups, and stews and even have edible berries and roots. Smilax bockii are ecologically important as well - their leaves and berries provide food for insects, birds, and mammals, while their prickly vegetation provides cover for small animals hiding from predators. This genus is named after the woodland nymph Smilax of Greek mythology, who turned into a brambly vine.
Upright carrionflower
Smilax ecirrhata
Upright carrionflower
Upright carrionflower is a small vine that produces flowers with a very unpleasant smell. These flowers bloom in spring, attracting various insects with their odor. This smell is described as similar to rotten flesh, so it's no mystery how the plant got its Smilax ecirrhata.
Smilax trinervula
Smilax trinervula
Smilax trinervula
Known locally as smilax trinervula, this plant has thorns and can grow up to 10 feet tall. It is used by some Native American tribes for medicinal purposes. Its vines can be used for crafts like basket weaving.
Bearded smilax
Smilax bracteata
Bearded smilax
Also known as bearded smilax, this plant features unique foliage covered in fine hair-like structures, giving it a distinctive appearance.
Warty greenbrier
Smilax aspericaulis
Warty greenbrier
Warty greenbrier comprise of a large and diverse group of woody, climbing shrubs and vines. They are damage tolerant, easily regrowing after being cut or burned by fire. Several species are made into important culinary ingredients used in sodas, soups, and stews and even have edible berries and roots. Warty greenbrier are ecologically important as well - their leaves and berries provide food for insects, birds, and mammals, while their prickly vegetation provides cover for small animals hiding from predators. This genus is named after the woodland nymph Smilax of Greek mythology, who turned into a brambly vine.
Smilax scobinicaulis
Smilax scobinicaulis
Smilax scobinicaulis
Smilax scobinicaulis comprise of a large and diverse group of woody, climbing shrubs and vines. They are damage tolerant, easily regrowing after being cut or burned by fire. Several species are made into important culinary ingredients used in sodas, soups, and stews and even have edible berries and roots. Smilax scobinicaulis are ecologically important as well - their leaves and berries provide food for insects, birds, and mammals, while their prickly vegetation provides cover for small animals hiding from predators. This genus is named after the woodland nymph Smilax of Greek mythology, who turned into a brambly vine.
Taiwan greenbrier
Smilax lanceifolia
Taiwan greenbrier
Taiwan greenbrier comprise of a large and diverse group of woody, climbing shrubs and vines. They are damage tolerant, easily regrowing after being cut or burned by fire. Several species are made into important culinary ingredients used in sodas, soups, and stews and even have edible berries and roots. Taiwan greenbrier are ecologically important as well - their leaves and berries provide food for insects, birds, and mammals, while their prickly vegetation provides cover for small animals hiding from predators. This genus is named after the woodland nymph Smilax of Greek mythology, who turned into a brambly vine.
Rough bindweed
Smilax glabra
Rough bindweed
Rough bindweed comprise of a large and diverse group of woody, climbing shrubs and vines. They are damage tolerant, easily regrowing after being cut or burned by fire. Several species are made into important culinary ingredients used in sodas, soups, and stews and even have edible berries and roots. Rough bindweed are ecologically important as well - their leaves and berries provide food for insects, birds, and mammals, while their prickly vegetation provides cover for small animals hiding from predators. This genus is named after the woodland nymph Smilax of Greek mythology, who turned into a brambly vine.
Smilax vaginata
Smilax vaginata
Smilax vaginata
Smilax vaginata comprise of a large and diverse group of woody, climbing shrubs and vines. They are damage tolerant, easily regrowing after being cut or burned by fire. Several species are made into important culinary ingredients used in sodas, soups, and stews and even have edible berries and roots. Smilax vaginata are ecologically important as well - their leaves and berries provide food for insects, birds, and mammals, while their prickly vegetation provides cover for small animals hiding from predators. This genus is named after the woodland nymph Smilax of Greek mythology, who turned into a brambly vine.
popular genus

More Popular Genus

Dracaena
Dracaena
Dracaena are popular house plants that are easy to grow. They can tolerate low-light conditions and require little watering. Their leaves range from variegated to dark green. Their characteristic traits include woody stems that grow slowly but offer a striking appearance for small spaces such as apartments or offices.
Ficus
Fig trees
Fig trees have been cultivated in many regions for their fruits, particularly the common fig, F. carica. Most of the species have edible fruits, although the common fig is the only one of commercial value. Fig trees are also important food sources for wildlife in the tropics, including monkeys, bats, and insects.
Rubus
Brambles
Brambles are members of the rose family, and there are hundreds of different types to be found throughout the European countryside. They have been culturally significant for centuries; Christian folklore stories hold that when the devil was thrown from heaven, he landed on a bramble bush. Their vigorous growth habit can tangle into native plants and take over.
Acer
Maples
The popular tree family known as maples change the color of their leaves in the fall. Many cultural traditions encourage people to watch the colors change, such as momijigari in Japan. Maples popular options for bonsai art. Alternately, their sap is used to create maple syrup.
Prunus
Prunus
Prunus is a genus of flowering fruit trees that includes almonds, cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines, and apricots. These are often known as "stone fruits" because their pits are large seeds or "stones." When prunus trees are damaged, they exhibit "gummosis," a condition in which the tree's gum (similar to sap) is secreted to the bark to help heal external wounds.
Solanum
Nightshades
Nightshades is a large and diverse genus of plants, with more than 1500 different types worldwide. This genus incorporates both important staple food crops like tomato, potato, and eggplant, but also dangerous poisonous plants from the nightshade family. The name was coined by Pliny the Elder almost two thousand years ago.
Rosa
Roses
Most species of roses are shrubs or climbing plants that have showy flowers and sharp thorns. They are commonly cultivated for cut flowers or as ornamental plants in gardens due to their attractive appearance, pleasant fragrance, and cultural significance in many countries. The rose hips (fruits) can also be used in jams and teas.
Quercus
Oaks
Oaks are among the world's longest-lived trees, sometimes growing for over 1,000 years! The oldest known oak tree is in the southern United States and is over 1,500 years old. Oaks produce an exceedingly popular type of wood which is used to make different products, from furniture and flooring to wine barrels and even cosmetic creams.
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Key Facts
Distribution
All Species
More Genus
Prickly-ivy
Prickly-ivy
Prickly-ivy
Prickly-ivy
Prickly-ivy
Prickly-ivy
Prickly-ivy
Smilax
Prickly-ivy comprise of a large and diverse group of woody, climbing shrubs and vines. They are damage tolerant, easily regrowing after being cut or burned by fire. Several species are made into important culinary ingredients used in sodas, soups, and stews and even have edible berries and roots. Prickly-ivy are ecologically important as well - their leaves and berries provide food for insects, birds, and mammals, while their prickly vegetation provides cover for small animals hiding from predators. This genus is named after the woodland nymph Smilax of Greek mythology, who turned into a brambly vine.
Lifespan
Lifespan
Perennial
info

Key Facts About Prickly-ivy

Attributes of Prickly-ivy

Leaf type
Deciduous

Scientific Classification of Prickly-ivy

distribution

Distribution of Prickly-ivy

Distribution Map of Prickly-ivy

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
species

Exploring the Prickly-ivy Plants

8 most common species:
Smilax aspera
Rough bindweed
Rough bindweed (Smilax aspera) is a climbing evergreen vine that is native to the Mediterranean, parts of Asia, and central Africa. Its yellowish-green flowers mature into red berries, which then darken until they become nearly black. The berries are an important food source for wild birds.
Smilax bona-nox
Saw greenbrier
Saw greenbrier (Smilax bona-nox) is a woody vine that wraps its tendrils around trees, shrubbery, and along the ground. The vine is native to North America and grows throughout the world. Saw greenbrier attracts wild turkeys, squirrels, and songbirds. This species can be differentiated from other similar plants by its leathery, triangular leaves.
Smilax rotundifolia
Roundleaf greenbrier
Roundleaf greenbrier (Smilax rotundifolia) is a common and visually noticeable vine that grows throughout woodlands and forests in the eastern United States and Canada. Roundleaf greenbrier is edible and cooked similarly to asparagus and spinach, when cooked. The vine grows berries which are eaten by deer, birds, and rabbits.
Smilax glauca
Cat greenbrier
Cat greenbrier (Smilax glauca) is a woodland vine plant native to the central and eastern United States. It is resistant to fire because of the properties of its root structure.
Show More Species

All Species of Prickly-ivy

popular genus

More Popular Genus

Dracaena
Dracaena
Dracaena are popular house plants that are easy to grow. They can tolerate low-light conditions and require little watering. Their leaves range from variegated to dark green. Their characteristic traits include woody stems that grow slowly but offer a striking appearance for small spaces such as apartments or offices.
Ficus
Fig trees
Fig trees have been cultivated in many regions for their fruits, particularly the common fig, F. carica. Most of the species have edible fruits, although the common fig is the only one of commercial value. Fig trees are also important food sources for wildlife in the tropics, including monkeys, bats, and insects.
Rubus
Brambles
Brambles are members of the rose family, and there are hundreds of different types to be found throughout the European countryside. They have been culturally significant for centuries; Christian folklore stories hold that when the devil was thrown from heaven, he landed on a bramble bush. Their vigorous growth habit can tangle into native plants and take over.
Acer
Maples
The popular tree family known as maples change the color of their leaves in the fall. Many cultural traditions encourage people to watch the colors change, such as momijigari in Japan. Maples popular options for bonsai art. Alternately, their sap is used to create maple syrup.
Prunus
Prunus
Prunus is a genus of flowering fruit trees that includes almonds, cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines, and apricots. These are often known as "stone fruits" because their pits are large seeds or "stones." When prunus trees are damaged, they exhibit "gummosis," a condition in which the tree's gum (similar to sap) is secreted to the bark to help heal external wounds.
Solanum
Nightshades
Nightshades is a large and diverse genus of plants, with more than 1500 different types worldwide. This genus incorporates both important staple food crops like tomato, potato, and eggplant, but also dangerous poisonous plants from the nightshade family. The name was coined by Pliny the Elder almost two thousand years ago.
Rosa
Roses
Most species of roses are shrubs or climbing plants that have showy flowers and sharp thorns. They are commonly cultivated for cut flowers or as ornamental plants in gardens due to their attractive appearance, pleasant fragrance, and cultural significance in many countries. The rose hips (fruits) can also be used in jams and teas.
Quercus
Oaks
Oaks are among the world's longest-lived trees, sometimes growing for over 1,000 years! The oldest known oak tree is in the southern United States and is over 1,500 years old. Oaks produce an exceedingly popular type of wood which is used to make different products, from furniture and flooring to wine barrels and even cosmetic creams.
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Your Ultimate Guide to Plants
Identify grow and nurture the better way!
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17,000 local species +400,000 global species studied
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Nearly 5 years of research
product icon
80+ scholars in botany and gardening
ad
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