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Common chickweed
Common chickweed
Common chickweed
Common chickweed
Common chickweed
Common chickweed
Add to My Garden
Common chickweed
Stellaria media
Also known as: Winterweed, Craches
The common chickweed gets its name due to the fact that chickens love to eat it, though they're not alone in that respect. Though it's often considered a nuisance weed, most parts of this plant can be consumed raw or cooked and used similar to spinach. The saponins in common chickweed are slightly toxic but will only have an effect if ingested in huge quantities.
Weeds
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Plant Type
Plant Type
Herb
Flower Color
Flower Color
White
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green

Name story

Common chickweed||Chickenwort
As a common weed, it might disrupt the invaded areas. However, there are many places to make good use of it. It is called chickweed because chickens like to eat it. It is also the most common plant, so it is also called common chickweed. Sometimes, it's also called chickenwort.

Symbolism

a meeting or rendezvous

Usages

Garden Use
Common chickweed makes a wonderful ground cover in sunny vegetable or butterfly gardens, as long as cool weather persists. It's a hardy, abundant plant that requires low maintenance in gardens. Some find its presence weedy and annoying, while others admire its greenery, showy flowers, and ability to attract birds, bees, and butterflies to gardens.
weed

Weed Control

Weeds
Common chickweed is a native herb of Europe and is now considered invasive across several states in the mainland US and Hawaii. Common chickweed can produce vast quantities of seeds when in its ideally cool and shaded environments. These seeds germinate extremely fast, and even when they don't, they can remain viable in the soil for up to 60 years. Sprouts create dense shoots that outgrow native species and can quickly take over ecosystems. Common chickweed also can become a host of pests, such as spider mites, and is known to contain poisonous glycosides and saponins, which are particularly dangerous to pregnant or breastfeeding mothers.
How to Control it
The best time to remove weeds is before their flowering and fructification, otherwise controlling them can be very difficult. After they have flowered and fructified, their seeds can spread very fast, and hence, the weeds should be removed more often and precautions should be taken in advance in the following year. Mulching: During the seed stage, covering the soil with sawdust, straw or black mulches can effectively inhibit seed germination and the growth of seedlings. In the winter or spring, this method is often used to inhibit the seeds in the soil from germinating. If the weeds have already flowered and fructified, then the method can also be used to prevent more seeds from falling into the soil. Pulling out: Wear gloves or use tools to remove weeds before their fructification. If the soil is too dry, then water the soil thoroughly to make it softer, which can help to remove the root systems of the weeds. After that, deep tillage can be adopted to remove bits of weed roots left in the ground. This method works particularly well for weeds that are low-growing or in their seedling stages. Mowing: Mowing weeds before their fructification can effectively control their spread. Especially for annual weeds, frequent mowing can inhibit their growth and fructification, and thus can remove them effectively within the year. Ploughing: Be sure to plough and pull out all roots of perennial weeds before planting. The roots should be discarded, exposed to the sun for a long time, or buried deep. You can also use the roots to make organic fertilizer and compost the weeds. The weed can be effectively controlled by burning. High density planting of crops and application of nitrogenous fertilizer can inhibit the growth of weeds. It can be effectively removed with herbicide. When you plant it in a flowerpot: When seeds are mature, move the flowerpot away from other plants, and dispose of its scattered seeds timely to prevent it from spreading. The soil where it has grown cannot be discarded directly. Instead, the soil needs to be buried 0. 5-1 feet deep. Clean the flowerpot thoroughly before it is used for other plants so as to prevent the remaining seeds from re-germinating. Note: When removing weeds, especially those which are toxic, thorny and have allergenic sap, be sure to wear gloves and avoid direct contact with them. When removing weeds during their bloom time, be sure to wear special masks to prevent pollen allergy.
weed
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distribution

Distribution Map

Habitat

A variety of soil types
distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
habit
question

Questions About Common chickweed

Watering Watering Watering
Pruning Pruning Pruning
How Often to Water Common chickweed?
Common chickweed needs water regularly throughout the growing season. Beginning in spring, you should plan to water this plant about once per week. As the season presses on and grows warmer, you may need to increase your watering rate to about two to three times per week. Exceeding at this rate can be detrimental to your Common chickweed. With that said, you should also ensure that the soil in which your Common chickweed grows remains relatively moist but not wet, regardless of how often you must water to make that the case. Watering Common chickweed that lives in a pot is a bit different. Generally, you'll need to increase your watering frequency, as the soil in a pot can heat up and dry out a bit faster than ground soil. As such, you should plan to water a container-grown Common chickweed a few times per week in most cases, versus just once per week for an in-ground plant.
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How Much to Water Common chickweed?
There are a few different ways you can go about determining how much water to give to your Common chickweed. Some gardeners choose to pick their water volume based on feeling the soil for moisture. That method suggests that you should water until you feel that the first six inches of soil have become moist. Alternatively, you can use a set measurement to determine how much to water your Common chickweed. Typically, you should give your Common chickweed about two gallons of water per week, depending on how hot it is and how quickly the soil becomes dry. However, following strict guidelines like that can lead to overwatering if your plant requires less than two gallons per week for whatever reason. When growing Common chickweed in a container, you will need to use a different method to determine how much water to supply. Typically, you should give enough water to moisten all of the layers of soil that have become dry. To test if that is the case, you can simply stick your finger in the soil to feel for moisture. You can also water the soil until you notice a slight trickle of excess water exiting the drainage holes of your pot.
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What Is the Best Way to Water the Common chickweed?
To water Common chickweed, you can use a garden hose with a spray nozzle, a watering can, or just about any other common watering tool. Generally, Common chickweed is not too picky about how they receive their water, as they can live off of rainwater, tap water, or filtered water. Often, you should try not to water this plant from overhead, as doing so can damage the leaves and flowers and may lead to disease as well. At times, the best method for watering this plant is to set up a drip irrigation system. These systems work well for Common chickweed as they apply water evenly and directly to the soil. For one Common chickweed that grows in a container, you can use a similar watering approach while changing the tools you use. To water a container-grown Common chickweed, use a cup, watering can, or your tap to apply water directly to the soil.
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How to Know If You Are Watering Common chickweed Enough?
It can be somewhat difficult to avoid overwatering your Common chickweed. On the one hand, these plants have relatively deep roots that require you to moisten the soil weekly. On the other hand, Common chickweed are plants that are incredibly susceptible to root rot. Along with root rot, your Common chickweed may also experience browning as a result of overwatering. Underwatering is far less likely for your Common chickweed as these plants can survive for a while in the absence of supplemental watering. However, if you go too long without giving this plant water, it will likely begin to wilt. You may also notice dry leaves.
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What to Do If Your Water Common chickweed Too Much or Too Little?
The remedy for underwatering Common chickweed is somewhat obvious. When you notice that your plant lacks moisture, simply begin watering it on a more regular basis. The issue of overwatering can be a much more dire situation, especially if you fail to notice it early. When your Common chickweed is overwatered, it may contract diseases that lead to its decline and death. The best way to prevent this outcome is to choose a proper growing location, one that receives plenty of sunlight to help dry the soil and has good enough drainage to allow excess water to drain rather than pooling and causing waterlogged soils. If you overwater your Common chickweed that lives in a pot, you may need to consider changing it to a new pot. Your previous container may not have contained soil with good drainage or may not have had sufficient drainage holes. As you repot your overwatered Common chickweed, make sure to add loose soils and to use a pot that drains efficiently.
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How to Water Common chickweed Through the Seasons?
You can expect your Common chickweed’s water needs to increase as the season moves on. During spring, you should water about once per week. Then, as the summer heat arrives, you will likely need to give a bit more water to your Common chickweed, at times increasing to about three times per week. This is especially true of Common chickweed that grow in containers, as the soil in a container is far more likely to dry out faster than ground soil when the weather is warm. In autumn, while your Common chickweed is still in bloom, it may need a bit less water as the temperature has likely declined, and the sun is no longer as strong as it was in summer.
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How to Water Common chickweed at Different Growth Stages?
Common chickweed will move through several different growth stages throughout the year, some of which may require more water than others. For example, you will probably start your Common chickweed as a seed. While the seed germinates, you should plant to give more water than your Common chickweed will need later in life, watering often enough to maintain consistent soil moisture. After a few weeks, your Common chickweed will grow above the soil and may need slightly less water than at the seedling phase. Then, once this plant is mature, you can begin to use the regular watering frequency of about once per week. As flower development takes place, you may need to give slightly more water to aid the process.
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What'S the Difference between Watering Common chickweed Indoors and Outdoors?
There are several reasons why most Common chickweed grow outdoors rather than indoors. The first is that these plants typically grow to tall. The second reason is that Common chickweed needs more daily sunlight than most indoor growing locations can provide. If you are able to provide a suitable indoor growing location, you may find that you need to give your Common chickweed water a bit more often than you would in an outdoor growing location. Part of the reason for this is that indoor growing locations tend to be a lot drier than outdoor ones due to HVAC units. The other reason for this is that soil in containers can dry out relatively quickly as well compared to soil in the ground.
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About
More Info
Weed Control
Distribution
Care FAQ
Related Plants
Related Articles
Common chickweed
Common chickweed
Common chickweed
Common chickweed
Common chickweed
Common chickweed
Add to My Garden
Common chickweed
Stellaria media
Also known as: Winterweed, Craches
Weeds
plant_info

More Info

Plant Type
Plant Type
Herb
Flower Color
Flower Color
White
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green

Name story

Common chickweed||Chickenwort
As a common weed, it might disrupt the invaded areas. However, there are many places to make good use of it. It is called chickweed because chickens like to eat it. It is also the most common plant, so it is also called common chickweed. Sometimes, it's also called chickenwort.

Symbolism

a meeting or rendezvous

Usages

Garden Use
Common chickweed makes a wonderful ground cover in sunny vegetable or butterfly gardens, as long as cool weather persists. It's a hardy, abundant plant that requires low maintenance in gardens. Some find its presence weedy and annoying, while others admire its greenery, showy flowers, and ability to attract birds, bees, and butterflies to gardens.
weed

Weed Control

weed
Weeds
Common chickweed is a native herb of Europe and is now considered invasive across several states in the mainland US and Hawaii. Common chickweed can produce vast quantities of seeds when in its ideally cool and shaded environments. These seeds germinate extremely fast, and even when they don't, they can remain viable in the soil for up to 60 years. Sprouts create dense shoots that outgrow native species and can quickly take over ecosystems. Common chickweed also can become a host of pests, such as spider mites, and is known to contain poisonous glycosides and saponins, which are particularly dangerous to pregnant or breastfeeding mothers.
How to Control it
The best time to remove weeds is before their flowering and fructification, otherwise controlling them can be very difficult. After they have flowered and fructified, their seeds can spread very fast, and hence, the weeds should be removed more often and precautions should be taken in advance in the following year. Mulching: During the seed stage, covering the soil with sawdust, straw or black mulches can effectively inhibit seed germination and the growth of seedlings. In the winter or spring, this method is often used to inhibit the seeds in the soil from germinating. If the weeds have already flowered and fructified, then the method can also be used to prevent more seeds from falling into the soil. Pulling out: Wear gloves or use tools to remove weeds before their fructification. If the soil is too dry, then water the soil thoroughly to make it softer, which can help to remove the root systems of the weeds. After that, deep tillage can be adopted to remove bits of weed roots left in the ground. This method works particularly well for weeds that are low-growing or in their seedling stages. Mowing: Mowing weeds before their fructification can effectively control their spread. Especially for annual weeds, frequent mowing can inhibit their growth and fructification, and thus can remove them effectively within the year. Ploughing: Be sure to plough and pull out all roots of perennial weeds before planting. The roots should be discarded, exposed to the sun for a long time, or buried deep. You can also use the roots to make organic fertilizer and compost the weeds. The weed can be effectively controlled by burning. High density planting of crops and application of nitrogenous fertilizer can inhibit the growth of weeds. It can be effectively removed with herbicide. When you plant it in a flowerpot: When seeds are mature, move the flowerpot away from other plants, and dispose of its scattered seeds timely to prevent it from spreading. The soil where it has grown cannot be discarded directly. Instead, the soil needs to be buried 0. 5-1 feet deep. Clean the flowerpot thoroughly before it is used for other plants so as to prevent the remaining seeds from re-germinating. Note: When removing weeds, especially those which are toxic, thorny and have allergenic sap, be sure to wear gloves and avoid direct contact with them. When removing weeds during their bloom time, be sure to wear special masks to prevent pollen allergy.
Show More more
buy vip bg
Do you have weeds in your garden?
Differentiate them from your plants by a picture, and learn how to control them.
distribution

Distribution Map

Habitat

A variety of soil types

Map

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
question

Questions About Common chickweed

Watering Watering Watering
Pruning Pruning Pruning
How Often to Water Common chickweed?
more
Free
How Much to Water Common chickweed?
more
Free
What Is the Best Way to Water the Common chickweed?
more
Free
How to Know If You Are Watering Common chickweed Enough?
more
lock
What to Do If Your Water Common chickweed Too Much or Too Little?
more
lock
Show More more
buy vip bg
You’ve got questions. We’ve got answers.
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# Useful Tips
Most Common Herb
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# Useful Tips
Most Common Herb
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17,000 local species +400,000 global species studied
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product icon
80+ scholars in botany and gardening
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Continue reading all contents with a PictureThis membership
No need to pay if you cancel the subscription at least a day before the 7-day free trial ends
Sorry, the website is being upgraded and does not support purchases at the moment.
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