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Tricolor stromanthe play
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Tricolor stromanthe
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Stromanthe thalia
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
10 to 12
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Care Guide for Tricolor stromanthe

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Watering Care
Watering Care
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Pruning
Pruning
Trim the diseased, withered leaves once a month.
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Soil Care
Soil Care
Slightly acidic
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Repotting
Repotting
Needs excellent drainage in pots.
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Tricolor stromanthe
Water
Water
Every week
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
10 to 12
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Summer, Fall
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Questions About Tricolor stromanthe

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Watering Watering Watering
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Sunlight Sunlight Sunlight
Temperature Temperature Temperature
Fertilizing Fertilizing Fertilizing
What should I do if I over or underwater my Tricolor stromanthe?
Careful observation of the plant will tell you if you have watering issues. If you overwater your plant you’ll notice: a. The leaves of the plant can appear yellow and are prone to yellow-brown patches at the tips of the leaves. b. If the situation is serious, severe drooping and curling of the leaves may be observed. This is due to the fact that overwatering can cause root rot and the plant is already having a hard time absorbing more water. If your Tricolor stromanthe is planted indoor, overwatering is all too easy to do with the plant as it cannot tolerate any standing water. The earlier you notice the overwatering the better. If you see standing water or some leaf change, stop watering! Allow the soil to air out over the course of 3-5 days. If you’re noticing signs of root rot, you’ll need to act fast. You’ll have to remove the plant from the pot or ground and then wash off the roots. Remove any dead or decaying roots while trying to keep as much intact as possible. Throw out all the old soil and clean out the pot then add in new soil. If you’re planting in your garden, remove the old soil and replant it in a new location. While overwatering is an issue, so is underwatering. The Tricolor stromanthe is very sensitive to drought conditions and will quickly decline if they don’t receive consistent watering. Signs of underwatering include: -Curled, pendulous, lifeless leaves; -Some leaves will gradually turn yellow from the bottom; -The edges of the leaves will turn brown. Underwatering tends to be easier to fix than overwatering. Simply increase how often you water the plant. If your plant is drying out quickly, the air might be too dry. Consider increasing the humidity so the soil stays moist for longer. You might also think about moving the plant to a different location if you notice it is getting too much sunlight or the spot is too hot in order to prevent extra evaporation.
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How often should I water my Tricolor stromanthe?
Generally speaking, you should water the plant around once per week during spring. However, compared to spring you should increase the watering frequency during the summer but decrease that in winter. However, the timing might change based on a variety of factors such as humidity, temperature, soil type, and so on. To further determine the appropriate watering frequency for your Tricolor stromanthe, you should use your finger or Soil Moisture Meter more often to check the soil condition, remember to keep the soil moist but not soggy. Water after the top 1.5-2 inches or so of soil has dried out and build the watering schedule for your Tricolor stromanthe by continually testing. Potted plants are more prone to being overwatered than their outdoor counterparts since it's easier for the water to become contained. Make sure you use a pot with proper drainage holes and well-draining soil. Make sure there’s no excess water in the plant tray before watering. If your Tricolor stromanthe is planted in the ground, rain will allow it to grow better. The Tricolor stromanthe usually needs about 1 inch of rain per week to maintain growth. If rainfall is low, you may need to do additional watering once a week to ensure proper plant growth. Humidity also plays a role in keeping the plants properly watered. Plant can grow in normal room humidity, but it prefers higher humidity if possible - generally around 40 to 60 percent. More humidity means the soil will stay wetter for longer. With indoor plants, you can increase the humidity by placing a small humidifier next to the plant. For outdoor plants, you can mist the plant throughout the day.
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How can I water my Tricolor stromanthe properly?
There are plenty of viable ways to supply your Tricolor stromanthe with water. If you grow your plant in an indoor pot, for the Tricolor stromanthe in small pots, you can bring your potted plant to your kitchen sink. Then, use the faucet to add water to the container. By holding the pot in your hands, you should easily notice when the water begins to run through the pot’s drainage holes, at which point you can stop watering. The cold temperature will hurt the plants' root system, so please don't do this during winter or in cold climates. Most of the time, watering via your faucet is permissible for the Tricolor stromanthe. However, if the local tap water contains a high proportion of fluorine, chlorine or salts, you should consider using rainwater or lake water. Also, since the Tricolor stromanthe can respond well to overhead watering and watering directly into the soil, you can use a watering can, hose, or just about any tool you’d like to water it. For Tricolor stromantheed in the ground, when there is not enough rain, aim the hose at the root system and open the spout for more than 10 minutes to fully water. Tips: The Tricolor stromanthe is quite sensitive to the water you use. They are used to soft, acidic water found naturally. If you live in an area with hard water you can use an at-home water filter to remove any minerals and salts. To get rid of chemicals, you can let your tap water sit out for around 24 hours so that they dissipate. You can also purchase filtered water for your plants. Tricolor stromanthe likes water with 6.5 pH the best. Rainwater is a better choice than tap water, so you can store some rainwater when it's raining for your Tricolor stromanthe.
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When should I water my Tricolor stromanthe?
Tricolor stromanthe needs the humid conditions tend to keep the plants moist. They do not dry out completely between waterings. However, if soggy is retained, it will tend to make its root system rotten. So people will always water after the top 1.5-2 inches or so of soil has dried out. The depth of testing is often related to the depth of the soil. When the soil depth is around 5 inches, it is recommended to test about 1.5 inches or so (about one-third of the soil depth), and more for larger pots. If you have a Soil Moisture Meter, then watering becomes easy by inserting the same position and when the soil meter is found to be around 3, then watering can be done. If it is still greater than 3 then you will need to wait a little longer until it dries out. Keeping it this way will allow you to avoid overwatering your plants.
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Key Facts About Tricolor stromanthe

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Attributes of Tricolor stromanthe

Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Herb
Planting Time
Spring, Summer, Fall
Bloom Time
Spring, Summer
Plant Height
61 cm to 91 cm
Spread
30 cm to 60 cm
Leaf Color
Green
Red
Flower Size
2.5 cm
Flower Color
White
Pink
Red
Orange
Dormancy
Non-dormant
Leaf type
Evergreen
Ideal Temperature
20 - 38 ℃

Usages

Garden Use

Trivia and Interesting Facts

Scientific Classification of Tricolor stromanthe

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Common Pests & Diseases About Tricolor stromanthe

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Common issues for Tricolor stromanthe based on 10 million real cases
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Brown blotch
Brown blotch Brown blotch
Brown blotch
Brown spot is a fungal disease that significantly affects Tricolor stromanthe, causing brown spots on leaves. The disease also diminishes plant vigor and aesthetic appeal. If left unattended, it can be lethal.
Low humidity
Low humidity Low humidity
Low humidity
Low air humidity can cause the edges of the leaves to curl.
Solutions: To help with low humidity, you must apply more moisture to the air. This can be done in the following ways. Mist: Use a spray bottle to mist the plant and surrounding air with water daily. Water your plant regularly. Humidifier: Utilize a humidifier to add moisture to the air. Humidity dome: Place a clear plastic or glass dome above your plant to trap moisture.
Leaf tips withering
Leaf tips withering Leaf tips withering
Leaf tips withering
Low air humidity can cause the edges of the leaves to dry out.
Solutions: If your plant has only a few dried tips, complete the following: Increase humidity. Increase the humidity around your plant by misting it with a spray bottle daily. Alternatively, you can use a humidifier. Water plant. If your soil is dry, water until the soil is moist but not damp. Water again when soil dries out. If a large portion of the leaves is suffering from dry tips, complete the following: Prune away affected tissue. Using sharp and clean pruning shears, remove the dried out tips using clean cuts to avoid harming healthy tissue. Plant tissue will heal on its own, but you can apply a pruning seal for extra protection.
Leaf rot
Leaf rot Leaf rot
Leaf rot
This pathogen can cause the leaves to rot.
Solutions: Bacterial infections need to be treated quickly to prevent the spread to neighboring, healthy plants, potentially wiping out large sections of your indoor or outdoor garden. In mild cases: Use sterilized (10% bleach solution) pruning shears or scissors to remove any infected plant parts, making sure to dispose of them off site. Use a copper-based bactericide to treat the unaffected foliage, as well as the soil, and neighboring plants. Follow the manufacturer’s rate and timing directions found on the product label. In severe cases, where more than half the leaves are affected: Remove all of the infected plants from the garden, disposing of them off site. Treat the soil and neighboring plants using a copper-based bactericide. Follow the manufacturer’s rate and timing directions found on the product label.
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Brown blotch
Overview
Symptom
Causes
Treatment
Prevention
Active Period
What is Brown blotch Disease on Tricolor stromanthe?
What is Brown blotch Disease on Tricolor stromanthe?
Brown spot is a fungal disease that significantly affects Tricolor stromanthe, causing brown spots on leaves. The disease also diminishes plant vigor and aesthetic appeal. If left unattended, it can be lethal.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Tricolor stromanthe experiences various symptoms like brown spots on the leaves often surrounded by a yellowish halos. Over time, the spots may enlarge and the plant's vigor diminishes, showing signs of wilting.
What Causes Brown blotch Disease on Tricolor stromanthe?
What Causes Brown blotch Disease on Tricolor stromanthe?
1
Fungus
The primary cause for the disease is a fungus called Bipolaris oryzae.
2
Humidity
High levels of atmospheric humidity and moist climates facilitate the spreading of the disease.
3
Nutrient Deficiency
Lack of essential nutrients often makes the plant more susceptible.
How to Treat Brown blotch Disease on Tricolor stromanthe?
How to Treat Brown blotch Disease on Tricolor stromanthe?
1
Non pesticide
Leaf Removal: Remove and destroy infected leaves to reduce disease spread.

Air Circulation: Space out the plants to improve air circulation and decrease humidity levels.

Nutrition: Ensure the Tricolor stromanthe has a balanced nutrient regime to boost its immunity.
2
Pesticide
Fungicides: Application of fungicides containing propiconazole or pyraclostrobin can control the disease effectively.

Bactericides: Spray bactericides, if bacterial infection is suspected, particularly in persistent cases.
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Low humidity
plant poor
Low humidity
Low air humidity can cause the edges of the leaves to curl.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Your plants’ leaves are curled either upward or downward. Only the edges of the leaves or whole leaves may be curled. You may also notice brown tips on your plants’ leaves.
Both curling edges and entirely curled leaves indicate low humidity or a lack of enough moisture in the air. Plant leaves curl to reduce transpiration and slow water loss.
Solutions
Solutions
To help with low humidity, you must apply more moisture to the air. This can be done in the following ways.
  1. Mist: Use a spray bottle to mist the plant and surrounding air with water daily.
  2. Water your plant regularly.
  3. Humidifier: Utilize a humidifier to add moisture to the air.
  4. Humidity dome: Place a clear plastic or glass dome above your plant to trap moisture.
Prevention
Prevention
Many houseplants naturally grow in humid tropical forests, so try to recreate their natural conditions. To prevent low humidity, don’t allow the air to dry out. You can use a humidity meter to measure the humidity around your plant and adjust if it gets too low.
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Leaf tips withering
plant poor
Leaf tips withering
Low air humidity can cause the edges of the leaves to dry out.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The tips and the edges of the plants’ leaves are dried out and brown. They may be crunchy when touched. This is caused by low humidity and/or a lack of water.
Solutions
Solutions
If your plant has only a few dried tips, complete the following:
  1. Increase humidity. Increase the humidity around your plant by misting it with a spray bottle daily. Alternatively, you can use a humidifier.
  2. Water plant. If your soil is dry, water until the soil is moist but not damp. Water again when soil dries out.
If a large portion of the leaves is suffering from dry tips, complete the following:
  1. Prune away affected tissue. Using sharp and clean pruning shears, remove the dried out tips using clean cuts to avoid harming healthy tissue. Plant tissue will heal on its own, but you can apply a pruning seal for extra protection.
Prevention
Prevention
Many houseplants come from moist tropical areas with high humidity.
To prevent dry and brown tips, you should complete the following:
  1. Water regularly. Water when soil is dry.
  2. Keep humidity high. Keep moisture high by regularly misting the air or using a humidifier.
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Leaf rot
plant poor
Leaf rot
This pathogen can cause the leaves to rot.
Overview
Overview
Leaf rot is very common among both house plants and garden plants. It affects foliage and occurs mainly when the leaves become wet due to rain or misting by the gardener. The cause is fungal disease and this is facilitated by the fungal spores adhering to wet leaves then penetrating the leaf and expanding rapidly. Damp conditions and poor air circulation will increase chances of infection taking place. Another factor are leaves that are damaged or have been penetrated by sap sucking insects that facilitate plant penetration.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
  1. Spores are able to cling to a damp leaf and penetrate, often through an existing wound.
  2. A small dark brown mark appears which expands rapidly as sporulation starts to take place.
  3. Quite quickly these bull's eye like circles can link together and the whole leaf turns dark and loses texture.
  4. Leaf drop occurs.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
These symptoms are caused by a bacterial infection invading the plant. Bacteria from many sources in the environment (air, water, soil, diseased plants) enter a plant through wounds, or in some cases the stomata when they are open. Once inside the leaf tissue, the bacteria feed and reproduce quickly, breaking down healthy leaves.
Bacterial infections threaten most plant species, and are more prominent in wet weather that more easily transfers the bacteria from plant to plant, or from soil to plant.
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distribution

Distribution of Tricolor stromanthe

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Habitat of Tricolor stromanthe

Shaded patio and flower gardens
Northern Hemisphere
South Hemisphere

Distribution Map of Tricolor stromanthe

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Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
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More Info on Tricolor Stromanthe Growth and Care

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Basic Care Guide
Common Pests & Diseases
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Lighting
Partial sun
Tricolor stromanthe favors a moderate quantity of sunlight, much the same as the forest understory environments where it naturally proliferates. While it can endure less well-lit conditions, its growth might be stunted. Lunarity or overexposure to solar rays might result in its leaf color fading or becoming scorched.
Best Sunlight Practices
Transplant
8-12 inches
For the best results when transplanting tricolor stromanthe, aim for warm months like early to late summer. This vibrant perennial thrives in partial to full shade conditions. To ensure a successful transplant, choose a location with rich, well-draining soil. Happy planting!
Transplant Techniques
Temperature
5 - 43 ℃
The native growth environment of tricolor stromanthe is tropical, with temperatures that range from 20 to 38 ℃ (68 to 100 ℉). The plant prefers to be in temperatures between 20 and 24℃ (68 to 75 ℉), and does not tolerate temperatures below 15℃ (59℉). During winter, it is recommended to keep the plant away from drafty windows and doors and maintain a constant indoor temperature of 18-21℃ (64 to 70℉) to avoid damaging the foliage.
Temp for Healthy Growth
Pruning
Early spring, Late winter
Recognized for its vibrant leaves with green, pink, and cream shades, tricolor stromanthe thrives with proper maintenance. Prune for size and shape in early spring or late winter, removing dead or yellowing leaves at the base. Utilize sharp, sterilized shears to minimize stress. Pruning encourages healthy growth, enhances aesthetic appeal, and can promote a bushier foliage. Timely pruning also allows tricolor stromanthe to redirect energy to flourishing leaves, contributing to its overall vigor and longevity.
Pruning techniques
Propagation
Spring, Autumn
The ideal propagation season for tricolor stromanthe is during the Spring and Autumn through the preferred method of division. Propagation tends to be moderate in difficulty, with successful signs including vigorous new growth. Keep the divided plants well-watered and avoid direct sunlight initially.
Propagation Techniques
Overwinter
5 - 43 ℃
Tricolor stromanthe originates from Brazil's tropical rainforests, naturally adapted to warm and humid conditions. In winter, tricolor stromanthe goes into dormancy, reducing its growth, but cannot tolerate frost or direct cold winds. To over-winter, it needs regulated indoor conditions with maintained humidity and temperature. Minimized waterings and a pause in fertilizing help avoid stress on tricolor stromanthe during its resting phase.
Winter Techniques
Best Time to Buy
Mid spring, Late spring
Ideal to purchase in mid to late spring, tricolor stromanthe is an eye-catching plant with a moderate growth rate and moderate maintenance needs. Often purchased for the tri-color leafing, it will add a unique flair to any collection. When shopping, seek out tricolor stromanthe with vibrant, multicolored leaves as a sign of good health.
How to Choose Tricolor stromanthe
Brown blotch
Brown spot is a fungal disease that significantly affects Tricolor stromanthe, causing brown spots on leaves. The disease also diminishes plant vigor and aesthetic appeal. If left unattended, it can be lethal.
Read More
Leaf rot
Leaf rot is a devastating plant disease that significantly affects the health and appearance of Tricolor stromanthe. It causes its vibrant leaves to brown, wilt, and eventually, die off. If unmanaged, the disease might lead to a complete plant demise. This guide provides essential details about the disease's causes, symptoms, cure, prevention, and FAQs.
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Scars
Scars on Tricolor stromanthe typically refer to physical damage rather than a disease, causing aesthetic and structural harm. Avoiding injury and proper care is vital for plant health.
Read More
Soil fungus
Soil fungus is a pathogenic condition affecting Tricolor stromanthe, leading to stunted growth, discoloration, and root rot. It is critical to manage for optimal plant health.
Read More
Whole leaf withering
Whole leaf withering is a condition that affects Tricolor stromanthe, leading to leaf desiccation, color loss, and diminished plant health. This disease can be caused by environmental stressors or pathogens, impacting the plant's ornamental value and vigor.
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Yellow edges
Yellow edges is a plant disease typical for Tricolor stromanthe, resulting in the edges of the leaves turning yellow. It significantly hampers plant growth and often results from poor watering practices, low humidity or a deficiency of essential nutrients.
Read More
Leaf blotch
Leaf blotch is a fungal disease affecting Tricolor stromanthe, causing irregular brown or black patches on leaves, potentially leading to diminished plant vigor and aesthetic value.
Read More
Mushrooms
Mushroom disease in Tricolor stromanthe is a condition typically caused by fungal growth affecting the plant's health, leading to disfiguration and potential mortality.
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Spots
Spots is a plant disease that can affect Tricolor stromanthe, causing aesthetic and physiological damage. It is triggered by specific pathogens and environmental factors, presenting as discolored leaf spots. However, the disease is manageable with careful cultural practices and appropriate treatment measures.
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Leaf yellowing
Leaf yellowing is a common plant disease affecting various plants, including Tricolor stromanthe. It may result in the loss of the plant's vibrant tricolor aesthetic appeal, wilting, and eventual death if not timely treated. Identification and management are, therefore, vital.
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Leaf tip withering
Leaf tip withering is a disease that markedly affects the appearance and overall health of the Tricolor stromanthe. Caused by several factors such as unsuitable living conditions and pests, it manifests as drying, browning, and withering of the leaf tips of the Tricolor stromanthe.
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Leaf blight
Leaf blight is a fungal disease that can severely affect Tricolor stromanthe. It can cause drying, wilting, and yellowing of the leaves, thereby inhibiting the plant's growth and aesthetic. The disease thrives in moist, humid conditions and can have detrimental effects if left untreated.
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Plant dried up
Plant dried up is a disease that critically affects Tricolor stromanthe health resulting in wilted, dry-looking leaves, and may lead to complete desiccation in prolonged cases. Often caused by environmental stressors, once infected, the plant may become non-revivable. Accurate diagnosis of the cause and timely treatment are essential to save the plant.
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Dark blotch
Dark blotch is a fungal disease characterized by the appearance of large, brownish-black spots on the leaves of Tricolor stromanthe. It leads to discoloration, shriveling of surfaces, and significant health degradation of the plant.
Read More
Leaf wilting
Leaf wilting in Tricolor stromanthe typically indicates a state of distress, potentially due to inadequate watering, pests, disease, or environmental stress, often resulting in drooping or yellowing of leaves and reduced plant vigor.
Read More
Notch
Notch disease is a common plant disorder that can significantly affect the overall health and appearance of Tricolor stromanthe. It usually results in notable notches or lesions on the plant's edges, disrupting the plant's growth and aesthetic appeal.
Read More
Dark spots
Dark spots on Tricolor stromanthe are a common issue causing aesthetic and potential health problems for the plant. These spots can indicate underlying diseases or environmental stress, affecting photosynthesis and growth.
Read More
Underwatering dry
Underwatering is a common disorder in plants, including Tricolor stromanthe, caused by insufficient water intake. It leads to dehydration and wilting, significantly affecting Tricolor stromanthe's growth and vitality. While not classified as an infectious disease, repeated episodes can be lethal to the plant.
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Leaf curling
Leaf curling is a common plant disease that severely impacts the health of Tricolor stromanthe, causing noticeable deformities in the leaves and stunting its growth. It's caused by various factors including pests, nutrient imbalances, and environmental stressors, demanding appropriate treatment and preventative measures.
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Wilting
Wilting is a common plant disease that affects Tricolor stromanthe. It causes the leaves and stems to droop due to dehydration, impeding the plant's growth and vitality. Understanding the causal factors, recognising symptoms, and implementing appropriate control measures is essential.
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Mealybug
Mealybug disease, caused by the Pseudococcidae family, poses threats to Tricolor stromanthe by stunting growth and discoloring leaves. It impacts the plant’s aesthetics and health, leading to severe issues without management.
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Scale insect
Scale insects cause a severe disease impacting the health of Tricolor stromanthe, causing discolored foliage and potentially plant death. The disease spreads easily, affecting both aesthetics and health of the plants.
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Feng shui direction
South
The tricolor stromanthe is subtly synchronized with Feng Shui principles, carrying certain intriguing connotations. Being a tropical plant, it exhibits a lovely harmony when faced South, the direction associated with the element of Fire. As tricolor stromanthe fosters vibrant growth in warm, well-lit settings, it potentially resonates with the South's high energy and warmth, creating a dynamic balance.
Fengshui Details
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Blue orchid
A remarkable orchid species that is found high on the rough barks of small-leafed trees, the blue orchid can be found in Northeast India. It has enormous, flat, intense blue, long-lasting flowers. Orchid growers use the blue orchid to grow deep blue and purple hybrids.
Blue iris
Blue iris
The blue iris (Iris spuria) is among the tallest irises, reaching heights of 91 to 183 cm. It is a common victim of several insects including the iris borer, but it attracts butterflies. The blue iris is also called beardless because it lacks the fuzzy, beardlike tuft at the center of "bearded" irises.
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Blue ginger
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Bacopa
Bacopa
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Wild Oats
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Golden pothos
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Tricolor stromanthe play
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Stromanthe thalia
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
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Watering Watering Watering
Pruning Pruning Pruning
Sunlight Sunlight Sunlight
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Key Facts About Tricolor stromanthe

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Attributes of Tricolor stromanthe

Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Herb
Planting Time
Spring, Summer, Fall
Bloom Time
Spring, Summer
Plant Height
61 cm to 91 cm
Spread
30 cm to 60 cm
Leaf Color
Green
Red
Flower Size
2.5 cm
Flower Color
White
Pink
Red
Orange
Dormancy
Non-dormant
Leaf type
Evergreen
Ideal Temperature
20 - 38 ℃
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Usages

Garden Use

Trivia and Interesting Facts

Scientific Classification of Tricolor stromanthe

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pests

Common Pests & Diseases About Tricolor stromanthe

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Common issues for Tricolor stromanthe based on 10 million real cases
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Brown blotch
Brown blotch Brown blotch Brown blotch
Brown spot is a fungal disease that significantly affects Tricolor stromanthe, causing brown spots on leaves. The disease also diminishes plant vigor and aesthetic appeal. If left unattended, it can be lethal.
Learn More About the Brown blotch more
Low humidity
Low humidity Low humidity Low humidity
Low air humidity can cause the edges of the leaves to curl.
Solutions: To help with low humidity, you must apply more moisture to the air. This can be done in the following ways. Mist: Use a spray bottle to mist the plant and surrounding air with water daily. Water your plant regularly. Humidifier: Utilize a humidifier to add moisture to the air. Humidity dome: Place a clear plastic or glass dome above your plant to trap moisture.
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Leaf tips withering
Leaf tips withering Leaf tips withering Leaf tips withering
Low air humidity can cause the edges of the leaves to dry out.
Solutions: If your plant has only a few dried tips, complete the following: Increase humidity. Increase the humidity around your plant by misting it with a spray bottle daily. Alternatively, you can use a humidifier. Water plant. If your soil is dry, water until the soil is moist but not damp. Water again when soil dries out. If a large portion of the leaves is suffering from dry tips, complete the following: Prune away affected tissue. Using sharp and clean pruning shears, remove the dried out tips using clean cuts to avoid harming healthy tissue. Plant tissue will heal on its own, but you can apply a pruning seal for extra protection.
Learn More About the Leaf tips withering more
Leaf rot
Leaf rot Leaf rot Leaf rot
This pathogen can cause the leaves to rot.
Solutions: Bacterial infections need to be treated quickly to prevent the spread to neighboring, healthy plants, potentially wiping out large sections of your indoor or outdoor garden. In mild cases: Use sterilized (10% bleach solution) pruning shears or scissors to remove any infected plant parts, making sure to dispose of them off site. Use a copper-based bactericide to treat the unaffected foliage, as well as the soil, and neighboring plants. Follow the manufacturer’s rate and timing directions found on the product label. In severe cases, where more than half the leaves are affected: Remove all of the infected plants from the garden, disposing of them off site. Treat the soil and neighboring plants using a copper-based bactericide. Follow the manufacturer’s rate and timing directions found on the product label.
Learn More About the Leaf rot more
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Brown blotch
Overview
Symptom
Causes
Treatment
Prevention
Active Period
What is Brown blotch Disease on Tricolor stromanthe?
What is Brown blotch Disease on Tricolor stromanthe?
Brown spot is a fungal disease that significantly affects Tricolor stromanthe, causing brown spots on leaves. The disease also diminishes plant vigor and aesthetic appeal. If left unattended, it can be lethal.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Tricolor stromanthe experiences various symptoms like brown spots on the leaves often surrounded by a yellowish halos. Over time, the spots may enlarge and the plant's vigor diminishes, showing signs of wilting.
What Causes Brown blotch Disease on Tricolor stromanthe?
What Causes Brown blotch Disease on Tricolor stromanthe?
1
Fungus
The primary cause for the disease is a fungus called Bipolaris oryzae.
2
Humidity
High levels of atmospheric humidity and moist climates facilitate the spreading of the disease.
3
Nutrient Deficiency
Lack of essential nutrients often makes the plant more susceptible.
How to Treat Brown blotch Disease on Tricolor stromanthe?
How to Treat Brown blotch Disease on Tricolor stromanthe?
1
Non pesticide
Leaf Removal: Remove and destroy infected leaves to reduce disease spread.

Air Circulation: Space out the plants to improve air circulation and decrease humidity levels.

Nutrition: Ensure the Tricolor stromanthe has a balanced nutrient regime to boost its immunity.
2
Pesticide
Fungicides: Application of fungicides containing propiconazole or pyraclostrobin can control the disease effectively.

Bactericides: Spray bactericides, if bacterial infection is suspected, particularly in persistent cases.
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Low humidity
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Low humidity
Low air humidity can cause the edges of the leaves to curl.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Your plants’ leaves are curled either upward or downward. Only the edges of the leaves or whole leaves may be curled. You may also notice brown tips on your plants’ leaves.
Both curling edges and entirely curled leaves indicate low humidity or a lack of enough moisture in the air. Plant leaves curl to reduce transpiration and slow water loss.
Solutions
Solutions
To help with low humidity, you must apply more moisture to the air. This can be done in the following ways.
  1. Mist: Use a spray bottle to mist the plant and surrounding air with water daily.
  2. Water your plant regularly.
  3. Humidifier: Utilize a humidifier to add moisture to the air.
  4. Humidity dome: Place a clear plastic or glass dome above your plant to trap moisture.
Prevention
Prevention
Many houseplants naturally grow in humid tropical forests, so try to recreate their natural conditions. To prevent low humidity, don’t allow the air to dry out. You can use a humidity meter to measure the humidity around your plant and adjust if it gets too low.
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Leaf tips withering
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Leaf tips withering
Low air humidity can cause the edges of the leaves to dry out.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The tips and the edges of the plants’ leaves are dried out and brown. They may be crunchy when touched. This is caused by low humidity and/or a lack of water.
Solutions
Solutions
If your plant has only a few dried tips, complete the following:
  1. Increase humidity. Increase the humidity around your plant by misting it with a spray bottle daily. Alternatively, you can use a humidifier.
  2. Water plant. If your soil is dry, water until the soil is moist but not damp. Water again when soil dries out.
If a large portion of the leaves is suffering from dry tips, complete the following:
  1. Prune away affected tissue. Using sharp and clean pruning shears, remove the dried out tips using clean cuts to avoid harming healthy tissue. Plant tissue will heal on its own, but you can apply a pruning seal for extra protection.
Prevention
Prevention
Many houseplants come from moist tropical areas with high humidity.
To prevent dry and brown tips, you should complete the following:
  1. Water regularly. Water when soil is dry.
  2. Keep humidity high. Keep moisture high by regularly misting the air or using a humidifier.
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Leaf rot
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Leaf rot
This pathogen can cause the leaves to rot.
Overview
Overview
Leaf rot is very common among both house plants and garden plants. It affects foliage and occurs mainly when the leaves become wet due to rain or misting by the gardener. The cause is fungal disease and this is facilitated by the fungal spores adhering to wet leaves then penetrating the leaf and expanding rapidly. Damp conditions and poor air circulation will increase chances of infection taking place. Another factor are leaves that are damaged or have been penetrated by sap sucking insects that facilitate plant penetration.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
  1. Spores are able to cling to a damp leaf and penetrate, often through an existing wound.
  2. A small dark brown mark appears which expands rapidly as sporulation starts to take place.
  3. Quite quickly these bull's eye like circles can link together and the whole leaf turns dark and loses texture.
  4. Leaf drop occurs.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
These symptoms are caused by a bacterial infection invading the plant. Bacteria from many sources in the environment (air, water, soil, diseased plants) enter a plant through wounds, or in some cases the stomata when they are open. Once inside the leaf tissue, the bacteria feed and reproduce quickly, breaking down healthy leaves.
Bacterial infections threaten most plant species, and are more prominent in wet weather that more easily transfers the bacteria from plant to plant, or from soil to plant.
Solutions
Solutions
Bacterial infections need to be treated quickly to prevent the spread to neighboring, healthy plants, potentially wiping out large sections of your indoor or outdoor garden.
In mild cases: Use sterilized (10% bleach solution) pruning shears or scissors to remove any infected plant parts, making sure to dispose of them off site. Use a copper-based bactericide to treat the unaffected foliage, as well as the soil, and neighboring plants. Follow the manufacturer’s rate and timing directions found on the product label.
In severe cases, where more than half the leaves are affected: Remove all of the infected plants from the garden, disposing of them off site. Treat the soil and neighboring plants using a copper-based bactericide. Follow the manufacturer’s rate and timing directions found on the product label.
Prevention
Prevention
  1. Clean up garden debris at the end of the season, especially if it contains any diseased plant tissue. Diseases can overwinter from season to season and infect new plants.
  2. Avoid overhead watering to prevent transferring pathogens from one plant to another, and to keep foliage dry.
  3. Mulch around the base of plants to prevent soil-borne bacteria from splashing up onto uninfected plants.
  4. Sterilize cutting tools using a 10% bleach solution when gardening and moving from one plant to another.
  5. Do not work in your garden when it is wet.
  6. Rotate crops to prevent the buildup of bacteria in one site due to continuous cropping.
  7. Use a copper or streptomycin-containing bactericide in early spring to prevent infection. Read label directions carefully as they are not suitable for all plants.
  8. Ensure plants are well spaced and thin leaves on densely leaved plants so that air circulation is maximised.
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distribution

Distribution of Tricolor stromanthe

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Habitat of Tricolor stromanthe

Shaded patio and flower gardens
Northern Hemisphere
South Hemisphere

Distribution Map of Tricolor stromanthe

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Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
care_scenes

More Info on Tricolor Stromanthe Growth and Care

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Basic Care Guide
Common Pests & Diseases
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Brown blotch
Brown blotch
Brown spot is a fungal disease that significantly affects Tricolor stromanthe, causing brown spots on leaves. The disease also diminishes plant vigor and aesthetic appeal. If left unattended, it can be lethal.
 detail
Leaf rot
Leaf rot
Leaf rot is a devastating plant disease that significantly affects the health and appearance of Tricolor stromanthe. It causes its vibrant leaves to brown, wilt, and eventually, die off. If unmanaged, the disease might lead to a complete plant demise. This guide provides essential details about the disease's causes, symptoms, cure, prevention, and FAQs.
 detail
Scars
Scars on Tricolor stromanthe typically refer to physical damage rather than a disease, causing aesthetic and structural harm. Avoiding injury and proper care is vital for plant health.
 detail
Soil fungus
Soil fungus is a pathogenic condition affecting Tricolor stromanthe, leading to stunted growth, discoloration, and root rot. It is critical to manage for optimal plant health.
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Whole leaf withering
Whole leaf withering is a condition that affects Tricolor stromanthe, leading to leaf desiccation, color loss, and diminished plant health. This disease can be caused by environmental stressors or pathogens, impacting the plant's ornamental value and vigor.
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Yellow edges
Yellow edges is a plant disease typical for Tricolor stromanthe, resulting in the edges of the leaves turning yellow. It significantly hampers plant growth and often results from poor watering practices, low humidity or a deficiency of essential nutrients.
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Leaf blotch
Leaf blotch is a fungal disease affecting Tricolor stromanthe, causing irregular brown or black patches on leaves, potentially leading to diminished plant vigor and aesthetic value.
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Mushrooms
Mushroom disease in Tricolor stromanthe is a condition typically caused by fungal growth affecting the plant's health, leading to disfiguration and potential mortality.
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Spots
Spots is a plant disease that can affect Tricolor stromanthe, causing aesthetic and physiological damage. It is triggered by specific pathogens and environmental factors, presenting as discolored leaf spots. However, the disease is manageable with careful cultural practices and appropriate treatment measures.
 detail
Leaf yellowing
Leaf yellowing is a common plant disease affecting various plants, including Tricolor stromanthe. It may result in the loss of the plant's vibrant tricolor aesthetic appeal, wilting, and eventual death if not timely treated. Identification and management are, therefore, vital.
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Leaf tip withering
Leaf tip withering is a disease that markedly affects the appearance and overall health of the Tricolor stromanthe. Caused by several factors such as unsuitable living conditions and pests, it manifests as drying, browning, and withering of the leaf tips of the Tricolor stromanthe.
 detail
Leaf blight
Leaf blight is a fungal disease that can severely affect Tricolor stromanthe. It can cause drying, wilting, and yellowing of the leaves, thereby inhibiting the plant's growth and aesthetic. The disease thrives in moist, humid conditions and can have detrimental effects if left untreated.
 detail
Plant dried up
Plant dried up is a disease that critically affects Tricolor stromanthe health resulting in wilted, dry-looking leaves, and may lead to complete desiccation in prolonged cases. Often caused by environmental stressors, once infected, the plant may become non-revivable. Accurate diagnosis of the cause and timely treatment are essential to save the plant.
 detail
Dark blotch
Dark blotch is a fungal disease characterized by the appearance of large, brownish-black spots on the leaves of Tricolor stromanthe. It leads to discoloration, shriveling of surfaces, and significant health degradation of the plant.
 detail
Leaf wilting
Leaf wilting in Tricolor stromanthe typically indicates a state of distress, potentially due to inadequate watering, pests, disease, or environmental stress, often resulting in drooping or yellowing of leaves and reduced plant vigor.
 detail
Notch
Notch disease is a common plant disorder that can significantly affect the overall health and appearance of Tricolor stromanthe. It usually results in notable notches or lesions on the plant's edges, disrupting the plant's growth and aesthetic appeal.
 detail
Dark spots
Dark spots on Tricolor stromanthe are a common issue causing aesthetic and potential health problems for the plant. These spots can indicate underlying diseases or environmental stress, affecting photosynthesis and growth.
 detail
Underwatering dry
Underwatering is a common disorder in plants, including Tricolor stromanthe, caused by insufficient water intake. It leads to dehydration and wilting, significantly affecting Tricolor stromanthe's growth and vitality. While not classified as an infectious disease, repeated episodes can be lethal to the plant.
 detail
Leaf curling
Leaf curling is a common plant disease that severely impacts the health of Tricolor stromanthe, causing noticeable deformities in the leaves and stunting its growth. It's caused by various factors including pests, nutrient imbalances, and environmental stressors, demanding appropriate treatment and preventative measures.
 detail
Wilting
Wilting is a common plant disease that affects Tricolor stromanthe. It causes the leaves and stems to droop due to dehydration, impeding the plant's growth and vitality. Understanding the causal factors, recognising symptoms, and implementing appropriate control measures is essential.
 detail
Mealybug
Mealybug disease, caused by the Pseudococcidae family, poses threats to Tricolor stromanthe by stunting growth and discoloring leaves. It impacts the plant’s aesthetics and health, leading to severe issues without management.
 detail
Scale insect
Scale insects cause a severe disease impacting the health of Tricolor stromanthe, causing discolored foliage and potentially plant death. The disease spreads easily, affecting both aesthetics and health of the plants.
 detail
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Lighting
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Indoor
Indoor
Outdoor
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Requirements
Partial sun
Ideal
About 3-6 hours sunlight
Full shade
Tolerance
Less than 3 hours of sunlight
Watch how sunlight gracefully moves through your garden, and choose spots that provide the perfect balance of light and shade for your plants, ensuring their happiness.
Essentials
Tricolor stromanthe favors a moderate quantity of sunlight, much the same as the forest understory environments where it naturally proliferates. While it can endure less well-lit conditions, its growth might be stunted. Lunarity or overexposure to solar rays might result in its leaf color fading or becoming scorched.
Preferred
Tolerable
Unsuitable
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Artificial lighting
Indoor plants require adequate lighting for optimal growth. When natural sunlight is insufficient, particularly in winter or in less sunny spaces, artificial lights offer a vital solution, promoting faster, healthier growth.
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Indoor plants require adequate lighting for optimal growth. When natural sunlight is insufficient, particularly in winter or in less sunny spaces, artificial lights offer a vital solution, promoting faster, healthier growth.
1. Choose the right type of artificial light: LED lights are a popular choice for indoor plant lighting because they can be customized to provide the specific wavelengths of light that your plants need.
Full sun plants need 30-50W/sq ft of artificial light, partial sun plants need 20-30W/sq ft, and full shade plants need 10-20W/sq ft.
2. Determine the appropriate distance: Place the light source 12-36 inches above the plant to mimic natural sunlight.
3. Determine the duration: Mimic the length of natural daylight hours for your plant species. most plants need 8-12 hours of light per day.
Important Symptoms
Symptoms of Insufficient Light in %s
Tricolor stromanthe is a versatile plant that thrives in partial sunlight but can tolerate full sunlight in cooler weather. Although symptoms of light deficiency may not be easily noticeable, inadequate light conditions can affect their growth indoors.
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Slower or no new growth
Tricolor stromanthe enters a survival mode when light conditions are poor, which leads to a halt in leaf production. As a result, the plant's growth becomes delayed or stops altogether.
Lighter-colored new leaves
Insufficient sunlight can cause leaves to develop irregular color patterns or appear pale. This indicates a lack of chlorophyll and essential nutrients.
Solutions
1. To optimize plant growth, shift them to increasingly sunnier spots each week until they receive 3-6 hours of direct sunlight daily, enabling gradual adaptation to changing light conditions.2. To provide additional light for your plant, consider using artificial light if it's large or not easily movable. Keep a desk or ceiling lamp on for at least 8 hours daily, or invest in professional plant grow lights for ample light.
Symptoms of Excessive light in %s
Tricolor stromanthe thrives with partial sun exposure but is more prone to sunburn. The intense sunlight during summer can cause leaf sunburn, making it important to provide adequate shade and protection.
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Chlorosis
Chlorosis is a condition where the plant's leaves lose their green color and turn yellow. This is due to the breakdown of chlorophyll from excessive sunlight, which negatively affects the plant's ability to photosynthesize.
Sunscald
Sunscald occurs when the plant's leaves or stems are damaged by intense sunlight exposure. It appears as pale, bleached, or necrotic areas on the plant tissue and can reduce the plant's overall health.
Leaf Curling
Leaf curling is a symptom where leaves curl or twist under extreme sunlight conditions. This is a defense mechanism used by the plant to reduce its surface area exposed to sunlight, minimizing water loss and damage.
Wilting
Wilting occurs when a plant loses turgor pressure and its leaves and stems begin to droop. Overexposure to sunlight can cause wilting by increasing the plant's water loss through transpiration, making it difficult for the plant to maintain adequate hydration.
Leaf Scorching
Leaf scorching is a symptom characterized by the appearance of brown, dry, and crispy edges or patches on leaves due to excessive sunlight. This can lead to a reduction in photosynthetic capacity and overall plant health.
Solutions
1. Move your plant to the optimal position where it can receive abundant sunlight but also have some shade. An east-facing window is an ideal choice as the morning sunlight is gentler. This way, your plant can enjoy ample sunlight while reducing the risk of sunburn.2. It is recommended to trim off any completely dehydrated or withered parts of the plant.
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Temperature
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Indoor
Indoor
Outdoor
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Requirements
Ideal
Tolerable
Unsuitable
Just like people, each plant has its own preferences. Learn about your plants' temperature needs and create a comforting environment for them to flourish. As you care for your plants, your bond with them will deepen. Trust your intuition as you learn about their temperature needs, celebrating the journey you share. Lovingly monitor the temperature around your plants and adjust their environment as needed. A thermometer can be your ally in this heartfelt endeavor. Be patient and gentle with yourself as you explore your plants' temperature needs. Cherish your successes, learn from challenges, and nurture your garden with love, creating a haven that reflects the warmth of your care.
Essentials
The native growth environment of tricolor stromanthe is tropical, with temperatures that range from 20 to 38 ℃ (68 to 100 ℉). The plant prefers to be in temperatures between 20 and 24℃ (68 to 75 ℉), and does not tolerate temperatures below 15℃ (59℉). During winter, it is recommended to keep the plant away from drafty windows and doors and maintain a constant indoor temperature of 18-21℃ (64 to 70℉) to avoid damaging the foliage.
Regional wintering strategies
Tricolor stromanthe is extremely heat-loving, and any cold temperatures can cause harm to it. In the autumn, it is recommended to bring outdoor-grown Tricolor stromanthe indoors and place it near a bright window, but it should be kept at a certain distance from heaters. Maintaining temperatures above {Suitable_growth_temperature_min} during winter is beneficial for plant growth. Any temperatures approaching {Tolerable_growing_temperature_min} are detrimental to the plant.
Important Symptoms
Symptoms of Low Temperature in Tricolor stromanthe
Tricolor stromanthe prefers warm temperatures and is not tolerant of low temperatures. It thrives best when the temperature is above {Suitable_growth_temperature_min}. During winter, it should be kept above {Tolerable_growing_temperature_min}. When the temperature falls below {Limit_growth_temperature}, the leaves may lighten in color. After frost damage, the color gradually turns brown or black, and symptoms such as wilting and drooping may occur.
Solutions
Trim off the frost-damaged parts. Immediately move indoors to a warm environment for cold protection. Choose a spot near a south-facing window to place the plant, ensuring ample sunlight. Additionally, avoid placing the plant near heaters or air conditioning vents to prevent excessive dryness in the air.
Symptoms of High Temperature in Tricolor stromanthe
During summer, Tricolor stromanthe should be kept below {Suitable_growth_temperature_max}. When the temperature exceeds {Tolerable_growing_temperature_max}, the color of the leaves becomes lighter, and the plant becomes more susceptible to sunburn.
Solutions
Trim away the sunburned and dried-up parts. Move the plant to a location that provides shade from the midday and afternoon sun. Water the plant in the morning and evening to keep the soil moist.
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