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Emory's barrel cactus
Emory's barrel cactus
Emory's barrel cactus
Emory's barrel cactus
Emory's barrel cactus
Ferocactus emoryi
Also known as : Emory’s barrel cactus
Emory's barrel cactus lives in a symbiotic relationship with ants; the ants feed on the cactus' nectar and protect the plant from other insects in return. In the past, the Seris Indians used some parts of this cactus as medicine and food. Today, emory's barrel cactus is cultivated for its ornamental purposes; it can be propagated only by seeds.
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
10 to 13
care guide

Care Guide for Emory's barrel cactus

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Watering Care
Watering Care
Drought-tolerant. Allow the soil to dry completely between watering.
Details on Watering Care Watering Care
Fertilizing Care
Fertilizing Care
Fertilization once every 2-3 months during the growing season.
Details on Fertilizing Care Fertilizing Care
Ideal Lighting
Ideal Lighting
Full sun, Partial sun
Details on Sunlight Requirements Ideal Lighting
Ideal Temperature
Ideal Temperature
10 to 13
Details on Temperature Ideal Temperature
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Emory's barrel cactus
Water
Water
Every 2-3 weeks
Sunlight
Sunlight
Full sun
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Questions About Emory's barrel cactus

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Watering Watering Watering
Pruning Pruning Pruning
Sunlight Sunlight Sunlight
What is the best way to water my Emory's barrel cactus?
Your Emory's barrel cactus will not be too picky about how you choose to water it. As such, you can use just about any common watering tool to moisten this plant’s soil. Watering cans, hoses, and even cups will work just fine when it is time to water your Emory's barrel cactus. Regardless of which watering tool you use, you should typically apply the water directly to the soil. In doing so, you should ensure that you moisten all soil areas equally to give all parts of the root system the water it needs. It can help to use filtered water, as tap water can contain particles that are harmful to plants. It is also beneficial to use water that is at or slightly above room temperature, as colder or hotter water can be somewhat shocking to the Emory's barrel cactus. However, the Emory's barrel cactus usually responds well to any kind of water you give it.
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What should I do if I water my Emory's barrel cactus too much or too little?
For outdoor plants, especially newly planted plants or plant seedlings, they can be prone to lack of watering. Remember that you need to keep watering enough for a few months when the tree is small or just planted. This is because once the roots are established, Emory's barrel cactus can rely on rain most of the time.
When your Emory's barrel cactus is planted in pots, overwatering is often more likely to.When you accidentally overwater your Emory's barrel cactus, you should be prepared to remedy the situation immediately. First, you should stop watering your plant right away to minimize the effect of your overwatering. After, you should consider removing your Emory's barrel cactus from its pot to inspect its roots. If you find that none of the roots have developed root rot, it may be permissible to return your plant to its container. If you do discover signs of root rot, then you should trim away any roots that have been affected. You may also want to apply a fungicide to prevent further damage. Lastly, you should repot your Emory's barrel cactus in soil that is well-draining. In the case of an underwatered Emory's barrel cactus, simply water this plant more frequently.
Underwatering is often an easy fix. If you underwater, the plant's leaves will tend to droop and dry out and fall off, and the leaves will quickly return to fullness after sufficient watering. Please correct your watering frequency as soon as underwatering occurs.
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How often should I water my Emory's barrel cactus?
Most plants that grow naturally outdoors can be allowed to grow normally with rainfall. If your area lacks rainfall, consider giving your plants adequate watering every 2 weeks during the spring and fall. More frequent watering is needed in summer. In winter, when growth becomes slower and plants need less water, water more sparingly. Throughout the winter, you may not give it additional watering at all. If your Emory's barrel cactus is young or newly planted, then you should water more frequently to help it establish, and mature and grow up to have more adaptable and drought tolerant plants.
For potted plants, there are two main ways that you can determine how often to water your Emory's barrel cactus. The first way is to set a predetermined watering schedule. If you choose this route, you should plan to water this plant about once every week or once every other week. However, this approach may not always work as it does not consider the unique conditions of the growing environment for your Emory's barrel cactus .
Your watering frequency can also change depending on the season. For instance, a predetermined watering schedule will likely not suffice during summer when this plant's water needs are highest. An alternative route is to set your watering frequency based on soil moisture. Typically, it is best to wait until the first two to four inches of soil, usually ⅓ to ½ depth of the pots, have dried out entirely before you give more water.
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How much water does my Emory's barrel cactus need?
When it comes time to water your Emory's barrel cactus, you may be surprised to find that this plant does not always need a high volume of water. Instead, if only a few inches of soil have dried since your last watering, you can support healthy growth in the Emory's barrel cactus by giving it about five to ten ounces of water every time you water. You can also decide your water volume based on soil moisture. As mentioned above, you should note how many inches of soil have dried out between waterings. A surefire way to make sure your Emory's barrel cactus gets the moisture it needs is to supply enough water to moisten all the soil layers that became dry since the last time you watered. If more than half of the soil has become dry, you should consider giving more water than usual. In those cases, continue adding water until you see excess water draining from your pot’s drainage holes.
If your Emory's barrel cactus is planted in an area that gets plenty of rain outdoors, it may not need additional watering. When the Emory's barrel cactus is young or just getting established, make sure it gets 1-2 inches of rain per week. As it continues to grow and establish, it can survive entirely on rainwater and only when the weather is hot and there is no rainfall at all for 2-3 weeks, then consider giving your Emory's barrel cactus a full watering to prevent them from suffering stress.
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How can I tell if i'm watering my Emory's barrel cactus enough?
Overwatering is a far more common problem for the Emory's barrel cactus, and there are several signs you should look for when this occurs. Generally, an overwatered Emory's barrel cactus will have yellowing leaves and may even drop some leaves. Also, overwatering can cause the overall structure of your plant to shrivel and may also promote root rot. On the other hand, an underwatered Emory's barrel cactus will also begin to wilt. It may also display leaves that are brown or brittle to the touch. Whether you see signs of overwatering or underwatering, you should be prepared to intervene and restore the health of your Emory's barrel cactus.
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How can I water my Emory's barrel cactus at different growth stages?
When the Emory's barrel cactus is very young, such as when it is in a seedling stage, you will need to give it more water than you would if it were at a mature age. During the early stages of this plant’s life, it is important to keep the soil consistently moist to encourage root development. The same is true for any Emory's barrel cactus that you have transplanted to a new growing location. Also, the Emory's barrel cactus can develop showy flowers and fruits when you give them the correct care. If your Emory's barrel cactus is in a flowering or fruiting phase, you will likely need to give a bit more water than you usually would to support these plant structures.
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How can I water my Emory's barrel cactus through the seasons?
The seasonal changes will affect how often you water your Emory's barrel cactus. Mainly, during the hottest summer months, you will likely need to increase how much you water this plant, especially if it grows in an area that receives ample sunlight. Strong summer sunlight can cause soil to dry out much faster than usual, meaning that you’ll need to water more frequently. By contrast, your Emory's barrel cactus will need much less water during the winter, as it will not be in an active growing phase. During winter, you can get by with watering once every 2 to 3 weeks or sometimes not at all. For those growing this plant indoors, you should be somewhat wary of appliances such as air conditioners, which can cause your plant to dry out more quickly, which also calls for more frequent watering.
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What's the difference between watering my Emory's barrel cactus indoors vs outdoors?
In some cases, your Emory's barrel cactus may not need any supplemental watering when it grows outside and will survive on rainwater alone. However, if you live in an area of little to no rain, you should water this plant about every two weeks. If you belong to the group of people who live out of this plant's natural hardiness zone, you should grow it indoors. In an indoor setting, you should monitor your plant's soil as it can dry out more quickly when it is in a container or when it is exposed to HVAC units such as air conditioners. Those drying factors will lead you to water this plant a bit more often than if you grew it outdoors.
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plant_info

Key Facts About Emory's barrel cactus

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Attributes of Emory's barrel cactus

Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Shrub
Plant Height
91 cm to 1.8 m
Spread
80 cm
Leaf type
Evergreen
Ideal Temperature
20 - 41 ℃

Scientific Classification of Emory's barrel cactus

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pests

Common Pests & Diseases About Emory's barrel cactus

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Common issues for Emory's barrel cactus based on 10 million real cases
Flower withering
Flower withering Flower withering
Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Solutions: If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible. For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface. In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well. If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Scars
Scars Scars
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Solutions: Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Plant dried up
Plant dried up Plant dried up
Plant dried up
The entire plant may dry out due to dieback or normal seasonal dormancy.
Solutions: The solution for a dried out plant depends on the cause, so determine the cause before selecting a treatment method. Adjust your watering: Stick your finger in the soil near the roots. If it feels bone dry or overly saturated, you need to adjust your watering frequency accordingly. Prune back dead foliage: Snip off any brown stems and leaves on the plant to make space for new growth. This encourages the roots to send up fresh stems. Move to a proper environment. This may involve decreasing or increasing sun exposure, depending on the species. Decrease fertilizer applications. If you have applied too much fertilizer, you can repot plants with fresh potting soil. Wait. If your plant has dried out as daylight is decreasing, it is entering dormancy. Decrease watering and wait until the plant resumes growth.
Fire ants
Fire ants Fire ants
Fire ants
Fire ants gnaw on the roots of plants and are aggressive toward people.
Solutions: Caution: fire ants are venomous and cause painful bites which can be fatal in the case of a rare but significant allergy. Fire ants can be a painful pest to have around for you and your plants. Keeping them under control will ensure comfortable gardening for all. For less severe cases: Physically remove mounds. Dig out and remove entire mounds (remember, they go deeper than they seem). Use citrus oil. Pour citrus oil, which is toxic to fire ants, down their holes. For severe cases: Use ant bait. For a chemical solution, broadcast insecticide bait formulated for fire ants in the area around a mound. Apply the bait during a dry evening so the ants can forage for it at night. Look for products that contain Indoxacarb. Release phorid flies. Introduce or promote beneficial phorid flies to gardens. These parasitic flies attack invasive fire ants. Hire a professional. Some ant baits are only available to professional exterminators. For serious cases of fire ants, consider hiring a professional.
Stem rot
Stem rot Stem rot
Stem rot
Bacterial infection can cause the stems to become soft and rotten.
Solutions: If the plant is only infected a little, it can sometimes be saved. This mainly applies to houseplants that are grown in pots. Here's what to do. Remove the plant from the pot and gently shake off as much soil as possible. Using pruning tools that have been disinfected, remove any diseased foliage and roots. Be sure the new pot has good drainage holes and wash it with one part bleach and nine parts water to ensure that it is completely clean and sanitized. Dip the plant's roots in fungicide to kill off any remaining fungal spores before potting into the clean growing medium. Only water the plant when the top inch of the soil is dry and never let the plant sit in water. For plants that are grown in the ground, it's best just to remove the infected plants and destroy them. Do not plant in the same spot until the soil has been allowed to dry out and has been treated with a fungicide.
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Flower withering
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Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Overview
Overview
Flower withering occurs when flowers become weak, droopy, wilted, or faded until they can’t be revived. During withering, they begin to wrinkle and shrink until the flower becomes completely dry or dead.
Any flowers, regardless of the plant type or the climate they are grown in, are susceptible to withering. It is a worldwide problem across houseplants, herbs, flowering ornamentals, trees, shrubs, garden vegetables, and food crops.
Unlike wilting—which withering is often confused with—withering can be caused by different things and is often due to more than a lack of water. Withering can be fatal in severe cases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Flower withering progresses from very mild cases to severe occurrences that kill the flower. The severity of the symptoms is related to the cause and how long the condition is allowed to progress before action is taken.
  • Wilted, droopy flowers
  • Petals and leaves begin to wrinkle
  • Brown papery streaks or spots appear on the petals and leaf tips
  • Flowerhead shrink in size
  • Petal color fades
  • Yellowing leaves
  • Complete death of the flower
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The main causes of flower withering include natural age progress, lack of water, nutritional deficiencies, and bacterial or fungal diseases. It’s critical to determine the underlying cause when flower withering is noticed. This will guide the best course of action, if treatment is possible.
Check the soil for moisture and then closely examine the entire plant for signs of nutrient deficiencies. If neither of those appears to be the cause then cut open the stem below a flower. If a cross-section reveals brown or rust-colored stains it is safe to assume that this is a bacterial or fungal infection.
If the flower is nearing the end of its normal lifespan, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence, or cell aging and death. Cell division stops and the plant begins breaking down resources within the flower to use in other parts of the plant.
In all other cases, flower withering happens when the plant seals off the stem as a defense mechanism, stopping transport within the vascular system. This prevents further water loss through the flowers but also stops bacteria and fungi from moving to healthy parts of the plant. Once water and nutrient transport stops, the flower begins to wither and ultimately die.
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Scars
plant poor
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Scars form when the plant repairs wounds. They can be the result of people or pets passing by and scraping the plant. Once the underlying issue is resolved, the plant will heal but a scar may remain.
Pests and pathogens can also cause scarring. Insects may attack the plant for a meal, resulting in extensive scarring when a few invaders turn into an infestation. Diseases such as fungus and bacteria can weaken the plant, causing brown spots, mushy areas, or blisters that lead to scars.
Scars occur on stems when a leaf or bud has been lost and the plant has healed. The harder tissue is like a scab that protects a wound.
On other occasions, scars can signal problems from environmental conditions, such as overexposure to sunlight or heat. It might surprise you to know that plants can suffer from sunburn, even desert dwellers like cactus!
Solutions
Solutions
Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover.
  1. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes.
  2. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray.
  3. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs.
  4. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Prevention
Prevention
Preventing some sources of scarring is easier than others, but all start with careful attention to your plants once you decide to bring them home.
  1. Review specific guidelines for your plant, including soil drainage, watering, and fertilizer requirements.
  2. Inspect plants before planting and use sterile pots and fresh potting soil or media to limit transfer of fungi or bacteria.
  3. Once established, check your plants regularly for signs of scarring or the presence of pests, as it is better to catch problems as early as possible.
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Plant dried up
plant poor
Plant dried up
The entire plant may dry out due to dieback or normal seasonal dormancy.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Your plant has dried out and turned brown. It might be starting to wilt, with no noticeable green around the stems and leaves. Touch the leaves, and they may crinkle under your fingers.
Possible causes of a dried out plant include:
  1. Not enough water. A lack of water will lead to dry plant tissue.
  2. Too much water. Watering too much can lead to root rot which makes the plant struggle to take up water. Rotted, mushy roots are a sign of overeating.
  3. Entering dormancy. As perennial plants enter their resting period known as dormancy, their leaves dry out and may fall off. This happens during decreasing day length.
  4. Exposure to herbicides and other toxic substances. If a plant is hit with a large dose herbicide or other toxic chemical, the plant will turn brown.
  5. Too much fertility. An excess of fertilizer can prevent plants from taking up water, leading to drying.
  6. Improper sun exposure. Just like humans, plants can get sunburn by intense, direct light. Plants can also dry out if they don’t receive enough light.
To determine whether the plant is still alive and can be saved, you can:
  1. Bend a stem. If the stem is pliable, the plant is still alive. If the stem breaks, the plant is dead.
  2. Gently scratch the stem with your fingernail for signs of green inside. If your plant is dead, the stem will be brittle and brown throughout.
  3. Cut the stems back a little bit a time for visible green growth. If none of the stems have visible green growth, the plant is dead.
Solutions
Solutions
The solution for a dried out plant depends on the cause, so determine the cause before selecting a treatment method.
  1. Adjust your watering: Stick your finger in the soil near the roots. If it feels bone dry or overly saturated, you need to adjust your watering frequency accordingly.
  2. Prune back dead foliage: Snip off any brown stems and leaves on the plant to make space for new growth. This encourages the roots to send up fresh stems.
  3. Move to a proper environment. This may involve decreasing or increasing sun exposure, depending on the species.
  4. Decrease fertilizer applications. If you have applied too much fertilizer, you can repot plants with fresh potting soil.
  5. Wait. If your plant has dried out as daylight is decreasing, it is entering dormancy. Decrease watering and wait until the plant resumes growth.
Prevention
Prevention
Prevention involves providing your plant with the proper environment.
  1. Provide the proper amount of water. The amount of water depends on a plant’s size, species, and environment. A general rule is to allow soil to dry out between waterings.
  2. Place plants in the proper environment. Provide the proper hours of sun and temperature for your individual plant.
  3. Provide proper fertility. Most plants only need to be fertilized once or twice a year; don’t overapply.
  4. Keep plants free from toxic substances. Keep herbicides and toxic household chemicals away from your plants.
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Fire ants
plant poor
Fire ants
Fire ants gnaw on the roots of plants and are aggressive toward people.
Overview
Overview
Fire ants are a group of ants that are known for their aggressive behavior and painful stings. Some fire ants are native and others are invasive from other countries. Once they reach plants, they climb them and chew away at leaves and flower buds.
Fire ants also kill and eat beneficial insects such as caterpillars, ladybugs, mantis, and native ants. They can be a problem any time temperatures are above freezing, but new infestations are most likely to appear when brought in via contaminated material such as potting soil or mulch, or when insecticides have harmed populations of beneficial insects that would otherwise control populations of fire ants.
They can be difficult to control, especially once populations become large. Plant damage is typically minor, but fire ants can destroy seedlings.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The number one symptom of fire ants is seeing the ants themselves which are red or black in color. Ant mounds in the ground are also signs. Fire ant mounds rarely exceed 46 cm in diameter. If a fire ant mound is disturbed, many fast-moving, aggressive ants will emerge. These ants will bite and then painfully sting.
Even if no ants are visible, their damage might be apparent. Chewed leaf and flower edges might indicate fire ants. Fully eaten seedlings are another sign.
Solutions
Solutions
Caution: fire ants are venomous and cause painful bites which can be fatal in the case of a rare but significant allergy.
Fire ants can be a painful pest to have around for you and your plants. Keeping them under control will ensure comfortable gardening for all.
For less severe cases:
  • Physically remove mounds. Dig out and remove entire mounds (remember, they go deeper than they seem).
  • Use citrus oil. Pour citrus oil, which is toxic to fire ants, down their holes.
For severe cases:
  • Use ant bait. For a chemical solution, broadcast insecticide bait formulated for fire ants in the area around a mound. Apply the bait during a dry evening so the ants can forage for it at night. Look for products that contain Indoxacarb.
  • Release phorid flies. Introduce or promote beneficial phorid flies to gardens. These parasitic flies attack invasive fire ants.
  • Hire a professional. Some ant baits are only available to professional exterminators. For serious cases of fire ants, consider hiring a professional.
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Stem rot
plant poor
Stem rot
Bacterial infection can cause the stems to become soft and rotten.
Overview
Overview
Stem rot is a serious disease and can affect many different types of plants. it can be particularly prevalent when the temperature of the soil is over 16 ℃ and there's a lot of moisture in the soil. This could be from unusually heavy rainfalls or too much irrigation. Once stem rot sets in, it's very difficult to get rid of the disease and most affected plants will have to be discarded. This is especially the case for vegetables, herbs, and other herbaceous plants that have soft stems. This is why it's important to ensure that the soil used for growing these plants is well-drained and that overwatering is avoided. Using good cultural practices also help in curbing these types of fungal diseases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Plants that have been affected by stem rot will first display a yellowing of the lower leaves. This is followed by obvious wilting and stunted growth.
If the stem of the affected plant is examined closely, there will be some dark discolorations starting near the base and moving upward. If the roots of affected plants are examined, they will appear dark and mushy instead of white and healthy-looking. Eventually, the entire plant will wilt and die.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Stem rot is caused by a variety of soil-borne fungus pathogens. The type of fungus depends on the species of plant that is affected. Two fungi responsible for stem rot are Rhizoctonia and Fusarium. These fungal pathogens live in soil and migrate to the plant when conditions are optimum. This includes warm, humid weather and excessive soil moisture. Commonly, vegetable seedlings are affected by these fungi.
Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is another fungus that causes stem rot in plants. This fungus has a host range of over 350 different species of plants. Plants most susceptible to this fungus include many vegetable varieties such as cucumbers, beans, cilantro, carrots, cabbage, melons, lettuce, peas, onions, tomatoes, pumpkins, and squash. This fungus can produce different symptoms in different species. In some cases, the fungus causes irregular spots on stems and other plant material that appear water-soaked. On other plant species, the fungus appears as dry lesions that grow and girdle the stem of the plant.
The third type of fungus that causes stem rot is Phytophthora capsici. Plants that belong to the cucumber family are most susceptible to this fungal infection. This fungus manifests as water-soaked lesions on the stems that then turn brown and girdle the stem.
All of these fungal pathogens are transmitted to the plant by water splashing from the soil up onto the plant. That's because the fungal spores live in the soil where they wait for the right conditions to infect the plants.
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distribution

Distribution of Emory's barrel cactus

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Habitat of Emory's barrel cactus

Desert flats, scrubland and hillsides, to 4,000 feet elevation
Northern Hemisphere
South Hemisphere

Distribution Map of Emory's barrel cactus

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Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
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Distribution
Emory's barrel cactus
Emory's barrel cactus
Emory's barrel cactus
Emory's barrel cactus
Emory's barrel cactus
Ferocactus emoryi
Also known as: Emory’s barrel cactus
Emory's barrel cactus lives in a symbiotic relationship with ants; the ants feed on the cactus' nectar and protect the plant from other insects in return. In the past, the Seris Indians used some parts of this cactus as medicine and food. Today, emory's barrel cactus is cultivated for its ornamental purposes; it can be propagated only by seeds.
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
10 to 13
care guide

Care Guide for Emory's barrel cactus

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Questions About Emory's barrel cactus

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Watering Watering Watering
Pruning Pruning Pruning
Sunlight Sunlight Sunlight
What is the best way to water my Emory's barrel cactus?
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What should I do if I water my Emory's barrel cactus too much or too little?
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How often should I water my Emory's barrel cactus?
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How much water does my Emory's barrel cactus need?
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How can I tell if i'm watering my Emory's barrel cactus enough?
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How can I water my Emory's barrel cactus at different growth stages?
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How can I water my Emory's barrel cactus through the seasons?
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What's the difference between watering my Emory's barrel cactus indoors vs outdoors?
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Key Facts About Emory's barrel cactus

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Attributes of Emory's barrel cactus

Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Shrub
Plant Height
91 cm to 1.8 m
Spread
80 cm
Leaf type
Evergreen
Ideal Temperature
20 - 41 ℃
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Scientific Classification of Emory's barrel cactus

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pests

Common Pests & Diseases About Emory's barrel cactus

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Common issues for Emory's barrel cactus based on 10 million real cases
Flower withering
Flower withering Flower withering Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Solutions: If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible. For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface. In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well. If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Learn More About the Flower withering more
Scars
Scars Scars Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Solutions: Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Learn More About the Scars more
Plant dried up
Plant dried up Plant dried up Plant dried up
The entire plant may dry out due to dieback or normal seasonal dormancy.
Solutions: The solution for a dried out plant depends on the cause, so determine the cause before selecting a treatment method. Adjust your watering: Stick your finger in the soil near the roots. If it feels bone dry or overly saturated, you need to adjust your watering frequency accordingly. Prune back dead foliage: Snip off any brown stems and leaves on the plant to make space for new growth. This encourages the roots to send up fresh stems. Move to a proper environment. This may involve decreasing or increasing sun exposure, depending on the species. Decrease fertilizer applications. If you have applied too much fertilizer, you can repot plants with fresh potting soil. Wait. If your plant has dried out as daylight is decreasing, it is entering dormancy. Decrease watering and wait until the plant resumes growth.
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Fire ants
Fire ants Fire ants Fire ants
Fire ants gnaw on the roots of plants and are aggressive toward people.
Solutions: Caution: fire ants are venomous and cause painful bites which can be fatal in the case of a rare but significant allergy. Fire ants can be a painful pest to have around for you and your plants. Keeping them under control will ensure comfortable gardening for all. For less severe cases: Physically remove mounds. Dig out and remove entire mounds (remember, they go deeper than they seem). Use citrus oil. Pour citrus oil, which is toxic to fire ants, down their holes. For severe cases: Use ant bait. For a chemical solution, broadcast insecticide bait formulated for fire ants in the area around a mound. Apply the bait during a dry evening so the ants can forage for it at night. Look for products that contain Indoxacarb. Release phorid flies. Introduce or promote beneficial phorid flies to gardens. These parasitic flies attack invasive fire ants. Hire a professional. Some ant baits are only available to professional exterminators. For serious cases of fire ants, consider hiring a professional.
Learn More About the Fire ants more
Stem rot
Stem rot Stem rot Stem rot
Bacterial infection can cause the stems to become soft and rotten.
Solutions: If the plant is only infected a little, it can sometimes be saved. This mainly applies to houseplants that are grown in pots. Here's what to do. Remove the plant from the pot and gently shake off as much soil as possible. Using pruning tools that have been disinfected, remove any diseased foliage and roots. Be sure the new pot has good drainage holes and wash it with one part bleach and nine parts water to ensure that it is completely clean and sanitized. Dip the plant's roots in fungicide to kill off any remaining fungal spores before potting into the clean growing medium. Only water the plant when the top inch of the soil is dry and never let the plant sit in water. For plants that are grown in the ground, it's best just to remove the infected plants and destroy them. Do not plant in the same spot until the soil has been allowed to dry out and has been treated with a fungicide.
Learn More About the Stem rot more
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Flower withering
plant poor
Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Overview
Overview
Flower withering occurs when flowers become weak, droopy, wilted, or faded until they can’t be revived. During withering, they begin to wrinkle and shrink until the flower becomes completely dry or dead.
Any flowers, regardless of the plant type or the climate they are grown in, are susceptible to withering. It is a worldwide problem across houseplants, herbs, flowering ornamentals, trees, shrubs, garden vegetables, and food crops.
Unlike wilting—which withering is often confused with—withering can be caused by different things and is often due to more than a lack of water. Withering can be fatal in severe cases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Flower withering progresses from very mild cases to severe occurrences that kill the flower. The severity of the symptoms is related to the cause and how long the condition is allowed to progress before action is taken.
  • Wilted, droopy flowers
  • Petals and leaves begin to wrinkle
  • Brown papery streaks or spots appear on the petals and leaf tips
  • Flowerhead shrink in size
  • Petal color fades
  • Yellowing leaves
  • Complete death of the flower
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The main causes of flower withering include natural age progress, lack of water, nutritional deficiencies, and bacterial or fungal diseases. It’s critical to determine the underlying cause when flower withering is noticed. This will guide the best course of action, if treatment is possible.
Check the soil for moisture and then closely examine the entire plant for signs of nutrient deficiencies. If neither of those appears to be the cause then cut open the stem below a flower. If a cross-section reveals brown or rust-colored stains it is safe to assume that this is a bacterial or fungal infection.
If the flower is nearing the end of its normal lifespan, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence, or cell aging and death. Cell division stops and the plant begins breaking down resources within the flower to use in other parts of the plant.
In all other cases, flower withering happens when the plant seals off the stem as a defense mechanism, stopping transport within the vascular system. This prevents further water loss through the flowers but also stops bacteria and fungi from moving to healthy parts of the plant. Once water and nutrient transport stops, the flower begins to wither and ultimately die.
Solutions
Solutions
If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface.
In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well.
If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Prevention
Prevention
This is definitely one of those instances where prevention is more effective than cure. Here are some preventative measures for avoiding premature flower withering.
  • Water plants according to their needs -- either keep the soil slightly moist or allow the top inch or two to dry out before watering again.
  • Fertilize lightly on a consistent basis, depending upon the plant’s growth. Quick-growing plants and those that flower or develop fruit will need more frequent fertilizing than slow-growing plants.
  • Purchase plants that are certified disease- or pathogen-free.
  • Look for disease-resistant cultivars.
  • Isolate plants showing disease symptoms to prevent the spread to neighboring plants.
  • Practice good plant hygiene by removing any fallen plant material as soon as possible.
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Scars
plant poor
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Scars form when the plant repairs wounds. They can be the result of people or pets passing by and scraping the plant. Once the underlying issue is resolved, the plant will heal but a scar may remain.
Pests and pathogens can also cause scarring. Insects may attack the plant for a meal, resulting in extensive scarring when a few invaders turn into an infestation. Diseases such as fungus and bacteria can weaken the plant, causing brown spots, mushy areas, or blisters that lead to scars.
Scars occur on stems when a leaf or bud has been lost and the plant has healed. The harder tissue is like a scab that protects a wound.
On other occasions, scars can signal problems from environmental conditions, such as overexposure to sunlight or heat. It might surprise you to know that plants can suffer from sunburn, even desert dwellers like cactus!
Solutions
Solutions
Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover.
  1. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes.
  2. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray.
  3. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs.
  4. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Prevention
Prevention
Preventing some sources of scarring is easier than others, but all start with careful attention to your plants once you decide to bring them home.
  1. Review specific guidelines for your plant, including soil drainage, watering, and fertilizer requirements.
  2. Inspect plants before planting and use sterile pots and fresh potting soil or media to limit transfer of fungi or bacteria.
  3. Once established, check your plants regularly for signs of scarring or the presence of pests, as it is better to catch problems as early as possible.
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Plant dried up
plant poor
Plant dried up
The entire plant may dry out due to dieback or normal seasonal dormancy.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Your plant has dried out and turned brown. It might be starting to wilt, with no noticeable green around the stems and leaves. Touch the leaves, and they may crinkle under your fingers.
Possible causes of a dried out plant include:
  1. Not enough water. A lack of water will lead to dry plant tissue.
  2. Too much water. Watering too much can lead to root rot which makes the plant struggle to take up water. Rotted, mushy roots are a sign of overeating.
  3. Entering dormancy. As perennial plants enter their resting period known as dormancy, their leaves dry out and may fall off. This happens during decreasing day length.
  4. Exposure to herbicides and other toxic substances. If a plant is hit with a large dose herbicide or other toxic chemical, the plant will turn brown.
  5. Too much fertility. An excess of fertilizer can prevent plants from taking up water, leading to drying.
  6. Improper sun exposure. Just like humans, plants can get sunburn by intense, direct light. Plants can also dry out if they don’t receive enough light.
To determine whether the plant is still alive and can be saved, you can:
  1. Bend a stem. If the stem is pliable, the plant is still alive. If the stem breaks, the plant is dead.
  2. Gently scratch the stem with your fingernail for signs of green inside. If your plant is dead, the stem will be brittle and brown throughout.
  3. Cut the stems back a little bit a time for visible green growth. If none of the stems have visible green growth, the plant is dead.
Solutions
Solutions
The solution for a dried out plant depends on the cause, so determine the cause before selecting a treatment method.
  1. Adjust your watering: Stick your finger in the soil near the roots. If it feels bone dry or overly saturated, you need to adjust your watering frequency accordingly.
  2. Prune back dead foliage: Snip off any brown stems and leaves on the plant to make space for new growth. This encourages the roots to send up fresh stems.
  3. Move to a proper environment. This may involve decreasing or increasing sun exposure, depending on the species.
  4. Decrease fertilizer applications. If you have applied too much fertilizer, you can repot plants with fresh potting soil.
  5. Wait. If your plant has dried out as daylight is decreasing, it is entering dormancy. Decrease watering and wait until the plant resumes growth.
Prevention
Prevention
Prevention involves providing your plant with the proper environment.
  1. Provide the proper amount of water. The amount of water depends on a plant’s size, species, and environment. A general rule is to allow soil to dry out between waterings.
  2. Place plants in the proper environment. Provide the proper hours of sun and temperature for your individual plant.
  3. Provide proper fertility. Most plants only need to be fertilized once or twice a year; don’t overapply.
  4. Keep plants free from toxic substances. Keep herbicides and toxic household chemicals away from your plants.
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Fire ants
plant poor
Fire ants
Fire ants gnaw on the roots of plants and are aggressive toward people.
Overview
Overview
Fire ants are a group of ants that are known for their aggressive behavior and painful stings. Some fire ants are native and others are invasive from other countries. Once they reach plants, they climb them and chew away at leaves and flower buds.
Fire ants also kill and eat beneficial insects such as caterpillars, ladybugs, mantis, and native ants. They can be a problem any time temperatures are above freezing, but new infestations are most likely to appear when brought in via contaminated material such as potting soil or mulch, or when insecticides have harmed populations of beneficial insects that would otherwise control populations of fire ants.
They can be difficult to control, especially once populations become large. Plant damage is typically minor, but fire ants can destroy seedlings.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The number one symptom of fire ants is seeing the ants themselves which are red or black in color. Ant mounds in the ground are also signs. Fire ant mounds rarely exceed 46 cm in diameter. If a fire ant mound is disturbed, many fast-moving, aggressive ants will emerge. These ants will bite and then painfully sting.
Even if no ants are visible, their damage might be apparent. Chewed leaf and flower edges might indicate fire ants. Fully eaten seedlings are another sign.
Solutions
Solutions
Caution: fire ants are venomous and cause painful bites which can be fatal in the case of a rare but significant allergy.
Fire ants can be a painful pest to have around for you and your plants. Keeping them under control will ensure comfortable gardening for all.
For less severe cases:
  • Physically remove mounds. Dig out and remove entire mounds (remember, they go deeper than they seem).
  • Use citrus oil. Pour citrus oil, which is toxic to fire ants, down their holes.
For severe cases:
  • Use ant bait. For a chemical solution, broadcast insecticide bait formulated for fire ants in the area around a mound. Apply the bait during a dry evening so the ants can forage for it at night. Look for products that contain Indoxacarb.
  • Release phorid flies. Introduce or promote beneficial phorid flies to gardens. These parasitic flies attack invasive fire ants.
  • Hire a professional. Some ant baits are only available to professional exterminators. For serious cases of fire ants, consider hiring a professional.
Prevention
Prevention
Fire ants become more difficult to control as they establish themselves, so try to prevent them or treat them early.
  • Monitor new material. Do not bring in any soil or plants from known infested areas, unless if they are "Quarantine Approved." Make sure to check new material for fire ants.
  • Apply insecticide. Some warm and humid areas have high fire ants populations. In these areas, spread a granular fire ants insecticide such as Varsity in the spring near gardens to prevent these unwelcome visitors.
  • Treat early. Spot treat at the first sight of any fire ants mound, as larger mounds are more difficult to treat.
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Stem rot
plant poor
Stem rot
Bacterial infection can cause the stems to become soft and rotten.
Overview
Overview
Stem rot is a serious disease and can affect many different types of plants. it can be particularly prevalent when the temperature of the soil is over 16 ℃ and there's a lot of moisture in the soil. This could be from unusually heavy rainfalls or too much irrigation. Once stem rot sets in, it's very difficult to get rid of the disease and most affected plants will have to be discarded. This is especially the case for vegetables, herbs, and other herbaceous plants that have soft stems. This is why it's important to ensure that the soil used for growing these plants is well-drained and that overwatering is avoided. Using good cultural practices also help in curbing these types of fungal diseases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Plants that have been affected by stem rot will first display a yellowing of the lower leaves. This is followed by obvious wilting and stunted growth.
If the stem of the affected plant is examined closely, there will be some dark discolorations starting near the base and moving upward. If the roots of affected plants are examined, they will appear dark and mushy instead of white and healthy-looking. Eventually, the entire plant will wilt and die.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Stem rot is caused by a variety of soil-borne fungus pathogens. The type of fungus depends on the species of plant that is affected. Two fungi responsible for stem rot are Rhizoctonia and Fusarium. These fungal pathogens live in soil and migrate to the plant when conditions are optimum. This includes warm, humid weather and excessive soil moisture. Commonly, vegetable seedlings are affected by these fungi.
Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is another fungus that causes stem rot in plants. This fungus has a host range of over 350 different species of plants. Plants most susceptible to this fungus include many vegetable varieties such as cucumbers, beans, cilantro, carrots, cabbage, melons, lettuce, peas, onions, tomatoes, pumpkins, and squash. This fungus can produce different symptoms in different species. In some cases, the fungus causes irregular spots on stems and other plant material that appear water-soaked. On other plant species, the fungus appears as dry lesions that grow and girdle the stem of the plant.
The third type of fungus that causes stem rot is Phytophthora capsici. Plants that belong to the cucumber family are most susceptible to this fungal infection. This fungus manifests as water-soaked lesions on the stems that then turn brown and girdle the stem.
All of these fungal pathogens are transmitted to the plant by water splashing from the soil up onto the plant. That's because the fungal spores live in the soil where they wait for the right conditions to infect the plants.
Solutions
Solutions
If the plant is only infected a little, it can sometimes be saved. This mainly applies to houseplants that are grown in pots. Here's what to do.
  1. Remove the plant from the pot and gently shake off as much soil as possible.
  2. Using pruning tools that have been disinfected, remove any diseased foliage and roots.
  3. Be sure the new pot has good drainage holes and wash it with one part bleach and nine parts water to ensure that it is completely clean and sanitized.
  4. Dip the plant's roots in fungicide to kill off any remaining fungal spores before potting into the clean growing medium.
  5. Only water the plant when the top inch of the soil is dry and never let the plant sit in water.
For plants that are grown in the ground, it's best just to remove the infected plants and destroy them. Do not plant in the same spot until the soil has been allowed to dry out and has been treated with a fungicide.
Prevention
Prevention
For outdoor gardens:
  1. Raking the garden thoroughly in the springtime will help to cut down on pathogens that may be living in the soil.
  2. Using a copper fungicide on plants in the springtime will cut down on fungal growth and prevent the spread of infection.
  3. Placing a heavy layer of mulch on top of the soil will also prevent pathogens from splashing up onto the stems of plants.
  4. Place plants at the recommended spacing to encourage better air flow between them.
  5. Water plants at the base instead of overhead to prevent excessive moisture on foliage.
For indoor plants:
  1. Avoid overwatering houseplants and ensure the roots do not sit in water.
  2. Make sure that indoor plants receive adequate air circulation and light.
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distribution

Distribution of Emory's barrel cactus

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Habitat of Emory's barrel cactus

Desert flats, scrubland and hillsides, to 4,000 feet elevation
Northern Hemisphere
South Hemisphere

Distribution Map of Emory's barrel cactus

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
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