PictureThis
camera identify
Use App
tab list
Home Identify Application
English
English
繁體中文
日本語
Español
Français
Deutsch
Pусский
Português
Italiano
한국어
Nederlands
العربية
Svenska
Polskie
ภาษาไทย
Bahasa Melayu
Bahasa Indonesia
Get App
This page looks better in the app
about about
About
care_guide care_guide
Care Guide
pests pests
Pests & Diseases
distribution_map distribution_map
Distribution
care_scenes care_scenes
More About How-Tos
pic top
Illawarra plum
Illawarra plum
Illawarra plum
Podocarpus elatus
Also known as : Brown pine, Illawarra podocarp, Illawarra plum-pine
Illawarra plums are a group of coniferous, evergreen trees and shrubs that, while often referred to colloquially as 'pines', are not the same as true pines (genus Pinus). Illawarra plums can reach a height of up to 40 meters. Many handsome species within this genus are grown ornamentally in parks or gardens.
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
8 to 11
more
care guide

Care Guide for Illawarra plum

Ideal Lighting
Ideal Lighting
Full sun, Partial sun
Details on Sunlight Requirements Ideal Lighting
Ideal Temperature
Ideal Temperature
8 to 11
Details on Temperature Ideal Temperature
care guide bg
Know the light your plants really get.
Find the best spots for them to optimize their health, simply using your phone.
Download the App
Picture This
A Botanist in Your Pocket
qrcode
Scan QR code to download
label
cover
Illawarra plum
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
8 to 11
pests

Common Pests & Diseases About Illawarra plum

Common issues for Illawarra plum based on 10 million real cases
Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Solutions: If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Sooty mold
Sooty mold Sooty mold
Sooty mold
Sooty mildew causes black mold on the leaves that can be wiped away.
Solutions: The first step in treating the plant is to eradicate the insects that secrete the honeydew substance. Visually inspect the plant for insects, making sure to look on the underside of leaves and in the crotch of branches. Insects that may be present are as follows: Aphids are minuscule pear-shaped bugs. Most are green in color. Whiteflies are pale in color, almost translucent, and are covered with a powdery whitish wax. They may look like tiny white moths. Scale appears as small brown bumps attached to the leaves and branches, with either a soft or armored coating. Mealybugs are small white insects that look like cotton wool. To treat insect infestation, follow these steps: Handpick insects off if the infestation is minor. Wipe plant leaves gently with a clean, damp cloth or spray with a jet of water from the hose to dislodge them. Treat with insecticidal soap or neem oil for serious infestations. The fatty acids in insecticidal soaps suffocate small-bodied insects. Neem oil is a common botanical pesticide that blocks the hormones that transition insects from larva to pupa to adult, halting the insect’s life cycle. Once the insect infestation has been treated, remove as much mold from the leaves as possible. The remaining mold will dry out due to the lack of honeydew and will fall off the plant. Wash with insecticidal or very dilute dishwashing soap. Apply a couple of hours before rain is predicted, if possible. The soap will help soften the soot, making it easier to rinse it away. Spray plants with a steady stream of water.
Branch blight
Branch blight Branch blight
Branch blight
Branch blight can cause lignified branches to dry up entirely and die.
Solutions: Inspect trees frequently, and remove any infected branches as soon as possible. Branch blight cannot be cured, so the only treatment is to prune the tree and monitor it carefully for signs of the disease. All affected parts of the tree should be removed, since blight can survive over the winter inside the plant’s tissues. Blight can become systemic in the tree, in which case the entire plant should be removed so it does not remain a host for the pathogen and allow it to spread.
Plant dried up
Plant dried up Plant dried up
Plant dried up
The entire plant may dry out due to dieback or normal seasonal dormancy.
Solutions: The solution for a dried out plant depends on the cause, so determine the cause before selecting a treatment method. Adjust your watering: Stick your finger in the soil near the roots. If it feels bone dry or overly saturated, you need to adjust your watering frequency accordingly. Prune back dead foliage: Snip off any brown stems and leaves on the plant to make space for new growth. This encourages the roots to send up fresh stems. Move to a proper environment. This may involve decreasing or increasing sun exposure, depending on the species. Decrease fertilizer applications. If you have applied too much fertilizer, you can repot plants with fresh potting soil. Wait. If your plant has dried out as daylight is decreasing, it is entering dormancy. Decrease watering and wait until the plant resumes growth.
icon
Treat and prevent plant diseases.
AI-powered plant doctor helps you diagnose plant problems in seconds.
close
Aged yellow and dry
plant poor
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Overview
Overview
Regardless of the type of plant or where it is grown, at some point, it will begin to aged yellow and dry. This is a natural, unavoidable process that happens when the plant has completed all of the steps in its life.
Annual plants go through this process at the end of a single growing season. Perennial plants live for multiple years, if not tens or hundreds of years, but will still ultimately exhibit these symptoms.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
When plants have progressed through their natural developmental stages and are nearing the end of their lifecycle, they begin showing signs of decline. Leaves will start to yellow and droop, and over time they turn papery brown and dry.
Once completely dry, the leaves begin to fall from the plant until the entire plant has dried out.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
At the end of its life, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence or natural aging and death. Cell division stops, and the plant begins catabolizing resources to use in other parts of the plant.
As this happens, the tissues begin yellow and drying until the entire plant is desiccated and perishes.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
qrcode
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
Sooty mold
plant poor
Sooty mold
Sooty mildew causes black mold on the leaves that can be wiped away.
Overview
Overview
Sooty mold is a common disease of many plant varieties, especially those that are likely to be attacked by aphids and scale insects. While this disease can be unsightly and will reduce the plant's ability to photosynthesize, it generally won't kill an affected plant. It is treatable by fixing the underlying cause.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Plants are covered with a black soot-like substance. Sooty mold can cover leaves, stems, flower buds, and other parts of the plant.
Sometimes, there are also signs of small white casts on the mold, which are the result of the insects shedding.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Sooty mold is a secondary disease that is a result of a pest problem. Sap-sucking insects such as aphids, mealybugs, whiteflies, and scale insects excrete a honeydew-like substance that sticks to the surface of the plant. When various parts of the plant are covered in this honeydew, the sooty mold fungal spores land on the plant and start to reproduce. This causes the black mold that can be seen on the plant. It's somewhat similar to the black mold that infects damp areas in the house.
Sooty mold does not feed on the plants themselves but rather on the honeydew secreted by insect pests.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
qrcode
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
Branch blight
plant poor
Branch blight
Branch blight can cause lignified branches to dry up entirely and die.
Overview
Overview
"Blight" is an umbrella term used to describe a category of tree diseases caused by fungus or bacteria. Branch blight occurs when fungus attacks the branches and twigs of a tree, resulting in branches slowly dying off.
Branch blight can affect most species of trees to some degree, and it may be called by different names including twig blight or stem blight. It is caused by a variety of fungi which attack branches first, especially immature growth.
Blight usually occurs in warm, humid conditions, so is most common in the spring and summer months. Because specific environmental conditions are required, the frequency of branch blight can vary from year to year. This makes the disease hard to control, as it can spread between trees and affect multiple plants in a short period of time.
In the worst-case scenario, trees can lose significant portions of their foliage and fail to produce fruit. Young or unhealthy trees could die off completely.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The first symptoms of branch blight are that the emerging foliage turns brown or gray at the tips, especially on the smallest branches. Brown spots cover the entire surface of the leaves, eventually causing leaves and stems to shrivel and fall off. Over time, the dying tissue will spread toward the center of the plant. If left untreated, spores from the attacking fungus may appear on dying foliage within 3-4 weeks of the infection.
In some cases, lesions may form at the spot where the twig branches off from the healthy tissue. Branches may display girdling, which is a band of damaged tissue encircling the branch. An untreated tree will eventually lose all of its foliage and die.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
  • Pathogens on young twigs and foliage cause disease
  • Stressed and unhealthy trees are more susceptible - root injury due to physical or insect damage, infection, or aging can prevent adequate absorption of water and nutrients
  • Extremely wet conditions including sprinkler watering can attract fungus
  • Fungi can be transmitted between nearby trees
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
qrcode
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
Plant dried up
plant poor
Plant dried up
The entire plant may dry out due to dieback or normal seasonal dormancy.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Your plant has dried out and turned brown. It might be starting to wilt, with no noticeable green around the stems and leaves. Touch the leaves, and they may crinkle under your fingers.
Possible causes of a dried out plant include:
  1. Not enough water. A lack of water will lead to dry plant tissue.
  2. Too much water. Watering too much can lead to root rot which makes the plant struggle to take up water. Rotted, mushy roots are a sign of overeating.
  3. Entering dormancy. As perennial plants enter their resting period known as dormancy, their leaves dry out and may fall off. This happens during decreasing day length.
  4. Exposure to herbicides and other toxic substances. If a plant is hit with a large dose herbicide or other toxic chemical, the plant will turn brown.
  5. Too much fertility. An excess of fertilizer can prevent plants from taking up water, leading to drying.
  6. Improper sun exposure. Just like humans, plants can get sunburn by intense, direct light. Plants can also dry out if they don’t receive enough light.
To determine whether the plant is still alive and can be saved, you can:
  1. Bend a stem. If the stem is pliable, the plant is still alive. If the stem breaks, the plant is dead.
  2. Gently scratch the stem with your fingernail for signs of green inside. If your plant is dead, the stem will be brittle and brown throughout.
  3. Cut the stems back a little bit a time for visible green growth. If none of the stems have visible green growth, the plant is dead.
Solutions
Solutions
The solution for a dried out plant depends on the cause, so determine the cause before selecting a treatment method.
  1. Adjust your watering: Stick your finger in the soil near the roots. If it feels bone dry or overly saturated, you need to adjust your watering frequency accordingly.
  2. Prune back dead foliage: Snip off any brown stems and leaves on the plant to make space for new growth. This encourages the roots to send up fresh stems.
  3. Move to a proper environment. This may involve decreasing or increasing sun exposure, depending on the species.
  4. Decrease fertilizer applications. If you have applied too much fertilizer, you can repot plants with fresh potting soil.
  5. Wait. If your plant has dried out as daylight is decreasing, it is entering dormancy. Decrease watering and wait until the plant resumes growth.
Prevention
Prevention
Prevention involves providing your plant with the proper environment.
  1. Provide the proper amount of water. The amount of water depends on a plant’s size, species, and environment. A general rule is to allow soil to dry out between waterings.
  2. Place plants in the proper environment. Provide the proper hours of sun and temperature for your individual plant.
  3. Provide proper fertility. Most plants only need to be fertilized once or twice a year; don’t overapply.
  4. Keep plants free from toxic substances. Keep herbicides and toxic household chemicals away from your plants.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
qrcode
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
distribution

Distribution of Illawarra plum

Distribution Map of Illawarra plum

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
habit
care_scenes

More Info on Illawarra Plum Growth and Care

Basic Care Guide
Lighting
Full sun
Temperature
-5 43 ℃
close
product icon
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
Your Ultimate Guide to Plants
Identify grow and nurture the better way!
product icon
17,000 local species +400,000 global species studied
product icon
Nearly 5 years of research
product icon
80+ scholars in botany and gardening
ad
ad
Botanist in your pocket
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
About
Care Guide
Pests & Diseases
Distribution
More About How-Tos
Illawarra plum
Illawarra plum
Illawarra plum
Podocarpus elatus
Also known as: Brown pine, Illawarra podocarp, Illawarra plum-pine
Illawarra plums are a group of coniferous, evergreen trees and shrubs that, while often referred to colloquially as 'pines', are not the same as true pines (genus Pinus). Illawarra plums can reach a height of up to 40 meters. Many handsome species within this genus are grown ornamentally in parks or gardens.
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
8 to 11
more
care guide

Care Guide for Illawarra plum

icon
Know the light your plants really get.
Find the best spots for them to optimize their health, simply using your phone.
Download the App
close
bg bg
download btn
Download
pests

Common Pests & Diseases About Illawarra plum

Common issues for Illawarra plum based on 10 million real cases
Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry Aged yellow and dry Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Solutions: If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Learn More About the Aged yellow and dry more
Sooty mold
Sooty mold Sooty mold Sooty mold
Sooty mildew causes black mold on the leaves that can be wiped away.
Solutions: The first step in treating the plant is to eradicate the insects that secrete the honeydew substance. Visually inspect the plant for insects, making sure to look on the underside of leaves and in the crotch of branches. Insects that may be present are as follows: Aphids are minuscule pear-shaped bugs. Most are green in color. Whiteflies are pale in color, almost translucent, and are covered with a powdery whitish wax. They may look like tiny white moths. Scale appears as small brown bumps attached to the leaves and branches, with either a soft or armored coating. Mealybugs are small white insects that look like cotton wool. To treat insect infestation, follow these steps: Handpick insects off if the infestation is minor. Wipe plant leaves gently with a clean, damp cloth or spray with a jet of water from the hose to dislodge them. Treat with insecticidal soap or neem oil for serious infestations. The fatty acids in insecticidal soaps suffocate small-bodied insects. Neem oil is a common botanical pesticide that blocks the hormones that transition insects from larva to pupa to adult, halting the insect’s life cycle. Once the insect infestation has been treated, remove as much mold from the leaves as possible. The remaining mold will dry out due to the lack of honeydew and will fall off the plant. Wash with insecticidal or very dilute dishwashing soap. Apply a couple of hours before rain is predicted, if possible. The soap will help soften the soot, making it easier to rinse it away. Spray plants with a steady stream of water.
Learn More About the Sooty mold more
Branch blight
Branch blight Branch blight Branch blight
Branch blight can cause lignified branches to dry up entirely and die.
Solutions: Inspect trees frequently, and remove any infected branches as soon as possible. Branch blight cannot be cured, so the only treatment is to prune the tree and monitor it carefully for signs of the disease. All affected parts of the tree should be removed, since blight can survive over the winter inside the plant’s tissues. Blight can become systemic in the tree, in which case the entire plant should be removed so it does not remain a host for the pathogen and allow it to spread.
Learn More About the Branch blight more
Plant dried up
Plant dried up Plant dried up Plant dried up
The entire plant may dry out due to dieback or normal seasonal dormancy.
Solutions: The solution for a dried out plant depends on the cause, so determine the cause before selecting a treatment method. Adjust your watering: Stick your finger in the soil near the roots. If it feels bone dry or overly saturated, you need to adjust your watering frequency accordingly. Prune back dead foliage: Snip off any brown stems and leaves on the plant to make space for new growth. This encourages the roots to send up fresh stems. Move to a proper environment. This may involve decreasing or increasing sun exposure, depending on the species. Decrease fertilizer applications. If you have applied too much fertilizer, you can repot plants with fresh potting soil. Wait. If your plant has dried out as daylight is decreasing, it is entering dormancy. Decrease watering and wait until the plant resumes growth.
Learn More About the Plant dried up more
icon
Treat and prevent plant diseases.
AI-powered plant doctor helps you diagnose plant problems in seconds.
Download the App
close
Aged yellow and dry
plant poor
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Overview
Overview
Regardless of the type of plant or where it is grown, at some point, it will begin to aged yellow and dry. This is a natural, unavoidable process that happens when the plant has completed all of the steps in its life.
Annual plants go through this process at the end of a single growing season. Perennial plants live for multiple years, if not tens or hundreds of years, but will still ultimately exhibit these symptoms.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
When plants have progressed through their natural developmental stages and are nearing the end of their lifecycle, they begin showing signs of decline. Leaves will start to yellow and droop, and over time they turn papery brown and dry.
Once completely dry, the leaves begin to fall from the plant until the entire plant has dried out.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
At the end of its life, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence or natural aging and death. Cell division stops, and the plant begins catabolizing resources to use in other parts of the plant.
As this happens, the tissues begin yellow and drying until the entire plant is desiccated and perishes.
Solutions
Solutions
If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Prevention
Prevention
Unfortunately, there is no way to prevent plants from dying of “old age.” To help prolong their life, and put off symptoms of aged yellow and dry for as long as possible, take care of them by giving them enough water, fertilizing them appropriately, and making sure they get enough sunlight.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
close
Sooty mold
plant poor
Sooty mold
Sooty mildew causes black mold on the leaves that can be wiped away.
Overview
Overview
Sooty mold is a common disease of many plant varieties, especially those that are likely to be attacked by aphids and scale insects. While this disease can be unsightly and will reduce the plant's ability to photosynthesize, it generally won't kill an affected plant. It is treatable by fixing the underlying cause.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Plants are covered with a black soot-like substance. Sooty mold can cover leaves, stems, flower buds, and other parts of the plant.
Sometimes, there are also signs of small white casts on the mold, which are the result of the insects shedding.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Sooty mold is a secondary disease that is a result of a pest problem. Sap-sucking insects such as aphids, mealybugs, whiteflies, and scale insects excrete a honeydew-like substance that sticks to the surface of the plant. When various parts of the plant are covered in this honeydew, the sooty mold fungal spores land on the plant and start to reproduce. This causes the black mold that can be seen on the plant. It's somewhat similar to the black mold that infects damp areas in the house.
Sooty mold does not feed on the plants themselves but rather on the honeydew secreted by insect pests.
Solutions
Solutions
The first step in treating the plant is to eradicate the insects that secrete the honeydew substance. Visually inspect the plant for insects, making sure to look on the underside of leaves and in the crotch of branches. Insects that may be present are as follows:
  • Aphids are minuscule pear-shaped bugs. Most are green in color.
  • Whiteflies are pale in color, almost translucent, and are covered with a powdery whitish wax. They may look like tiny white moths.
  • Scale appears as small brown bumps attached to the leaves and branches, with either a soft or armored coating.
  • Mealybugs are small white insects that look like cotton wool.
To treat insect infestation, follow these steps:
  1. Handpick insects off if the infestation is minor. Wipe plant leaves gently with a clean, damp cloth or spray with a jet of water from the hose to dislodge them.
  2. Treat with insecticidal soap or neem oil for serious infestations. The fatty acids in insecticidal soaps suffocate small-bodied insects. Neem oil is a common botanical pesticide that blocks the hormones that transition insects from larva to pupa to adult, halting the insect’s life cycle.
Once the insect infestation has been treated, remove as much mold from the leaves as possible. The remaining mold will dry out due to the lack of honeydew and will fall off the plant.
  1. Wash with insecticidal or very dilute dishwashing soap. Apply a couple of hours before rain is predicted, if possible. The soap will help soften the soot, making it easier to rinse it away.
  2. Spray plants with a steady stream of water.
Prevention
Prevention
  1. Keep plants properly watered. Drought stress will increase susceptibility to insect problems.
  2. Fertilize plants per the recommended schedule on the product label to strengthen natural plant defenses.
  3. Control insects that produce honeydew. Grow plants that attract beneficial insects or grow plants that naturally deter sap-suckers.
  4. Control ants on tree stems with sticky tape. Ants like honeydew and will protect honeydew-producing insects from predators like ladybugs.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
close
Branch blight
plant poor
Branch blight
Branch blight can cause lignified branches to dry up entirely and die.
Overview
Overview
"Blight" is an umbrella term used to describe a category of tree diseases caused by fungus or bacteria. Branch blight occurs when fungus attacks the branches and twigs of a tree, resulting in branches slowly dying off.
Branch blight can affect most species of trees to some degree, and it may be called by different names including twig blight or stem blight. It is caused by a variety of fungi which attack branches first, especially immature growth.
Blight usually occurs in warm, humid conditions, so is most common in the spring and summer months. Because specific environmental conditions are required, the frequency of branch blight can vary from year to year. This makes the disease hard to control, as it can spread between trees and affect multiple plants in a short period of time.
In the worst-case scenario, trees can lose significant portions of their foliage and fail to produce fruit. Young or unhealthy trees could die off completely.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The first symptoms of branch blight are that the emerging foliage turns brown or gray at the tips, especially on the smallest branches. Brown spots cover the entire surface of the leaves, eventually causing leaves and stems to shrivel and fall off. Over time, the dying tissue will spread toward the center of the plant. If left untreated, spores from the attacking fungus may appear on dying foliage within 3-4 weeks of the infection.
In some cases, lesions may form at the spot where the twig branches off from the healthy tissue. Branches may display girdling, which is a band of damaged tissue encircling the branch. An untreated tree will eventually lose all of its foliage and die.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
  • Pathogens on young twigs and foliage cause disease
  • Stressed and unhealthy trees are more susceptible - root injury due to physical or insect damage, infection, or aging can prevent adequate absorption of water and nutrients
  • Extremely wet conditions including sprinkler watering can attract fungus
  • Fungi can be transmitted between nearby trees
Solutions
Solutions
  • Inspect trees frequently, and remove any infected branches as soon as possible. Branch blight cannot be cured, so the only treatment is to prune the tree and monitor it carefully for signs of the disease.
  • All affected parts of the tree should be removed, since blight can survive over the winter inside the plant’s tissues.
  • Blight can become systemic in the tree, in which case the entire plant should be removed so it does not remain a host for the pathogen and allow it to spread.
Prevention
Prevention
  • Avoid purchasing trees with dead or dying growth.
  • Sterilize cutting tools frequently when pruning to avoid spreading fungus between plants.
  • Keep trees mulched and watered, especially during dry periods, to prevent stress.
  • Avoid splashing water on the leaves when watering, as wet foliage is attractive to fungi and bacteria.
  • When planting, allow enough room between trees that there will be sufficient air circulation for them to dry out. Crowding trees too close together can increase humidity and allow the fungi to transfer.
  • When conditions are wet and humid, a fungicide can be used on new growth.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
close
Plant dried up
plant poor
Plant dried up
The entire plant may dry out due to dieback or normal seasonal dormancy.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Your plant has dried out and turned brown. It might be starting to wilt, with no noticeable green around the stems and leaves. Touch the leaves, and they may crinkle under your fingers.
Possible causes of a dried out plant include:
  1. Not enough water. A lack of water will lead to dry plant tissue.
  2. Too much water. Watering too much can lead to root rot which makes the plant struggle to take up water. Rotted, mushy roots are a sign of overeating.
  3. Entering dormancy. As perennial plants enter their resting period known as dormancy, their leaves dry out and may fall off. This happens during decreasing day length.
  4. Exposure to herbicides and other toxic substances. If a plant is hit with a large dose herbicide or other toxic chemical, the plant will turn brown.
  5. Too much fertility. An excess of fertilizer can prevent plants from taking up water, leading to drying.
  6. Improper sun exposure. Just like humans, plants can get sunburn by intense, direct light. Plants can also dry out if they don’t receive enough light.
To determine whether the plant is still alive and can be saved, you can:
  1. Bend a stem. If the stem is pliable, the plant is still alive. If the stem breaks, the plant is dead.
  2. Gently scratch the stem with your fingernail for signs of green inside. If your plant is dead, the stem will be brittle and brown throughout.
  3. Cut the stems back a little bit a time for visible green growth. If none of the stems have visible green growth, the plant is dead.
Solutions
Solutions
The solution for a dried out plant depends on the cause, so determine the cause before selecting a treatment method.
  1. Adjust your watering: Stick your finger in the soil near the roots. If it feels bone dry or overly saturated, you need to adjust your watering frequency accordingly.
  2. Prune back dead foliage: Snip off any brown stems and leaves on the plant to make space for new growth. This encourages the roots to send up fresh stems.
  3. Move to a proper environment. This may involve decreasing or increasing sun exposure, depending on the species.
  4. Decrease fertilizer applications. If you have applied too much fertilizer, you can repot plants with fresh potting soil.
  5. Wait. If your plant has dried out as daylight is decreasing, it is entering dormancy. Decrease watering and wait until the plant resumes growth.
Prevention
Prevention
Prevention involves providing your plant with the proper environment.
  1. Provide the proper amount of water. The amount of water depends on a plant’s size, species, and environment. A general rule is to allow soil to dry out between waterings.
  2. Place plants in the proper environment. Provide the proper hours of sun and temperature for your individual plant.
  3. Provide proper fertility. Most plants only need to be fertilized once or twice a year; don’t overapply.
  4. Keep plants free from toxic substances. Keep herbicides and toxic household chemicals away from your plants.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
distribution

Distribution of Illawarra plum

Distribution Map of Illawarra plum

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
care_scenes

More Info on Illawarra Plum Growth and Care

Basic Care Guide
product icon close
Your Ultimate Guide to Plants
Identify grow and nurture the better way!
product icon
17,000 local species +400,000 global species studied
product icon
Nearly 5 years of research
product icon
80+ scholars in botany and gardening
ad
product icon close
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
Lighting
close
Indoor
Indoor
Outdoor
Choose a site here for personalized care tips.
Requirements
Full sun
Ideal
Above 6 hours sunlight
Partial sun
Tolerance
About 3-6 hours sunlight
Watch how sunlight gracefully moves through your garden, and choose spots that provide the perfect balance of light and shade for your plants, ensuring their happiness.
Discover information about plant diseases, toxicity, weed control and more.
Temperature
close
Indoor
Indoor
Outdoor
Choose a site here for personalized care tips.
Requirements
Ideal
Tolerable
Unsuitable
Just like people, each plant has its own preferences. Learn about your plants' temperature needs and create a comforting environment for them to flourish. As you care for your plants, your bond with them will deepen. Trust your intuition as you learn about their temperature needs, celebrating the journey you share. Lovingly monitor the temperature around your plants and adjust their environment as needed. A thermometer can be your ally in this heartfelt endeavor. Be patient and gentle with yourself as you explore your plants' temperature needs. Cherish your successes, learn from challenges, and nurture your garden with love, creating a haven that reflects the warmth of your care.
Discover information about plant diseases, toxicity, weed control and more.
Cookie Management Tool
In addition to managing cookies through your browser or device, you can change your cookie settings below.
Necessary Cookies
Necessary cookies enable core functionality. The website cannot function properly without these cookies, and can only be disabled by changing your browser preferences.
Analytical Cookies
Analytical cookies help us to improve our application/website by collecting and reporting information on its usage.
Cookie Name Source Purpose Lifespan
_ga Google Analytics These cookies are set because of our use of Google Analytics. They are used to collect information about your use of our application/website. The cookies collect specific information, such as your IP address, data related to your device and other information about your use of the application/website. Please note that the data processing is essentially carried out by Google LLC and Google may use your data collected by the cookies for own purposes, e.g. profiling and will combine it with other data such as your Google Account. For more information about how Google processes your data and Google’s approach to privacy as well as implemented safeguards for your data, please see here. 1 Year
_pta PictureThis Analytics We use these cookies to collect information about how you use our site, monitor site performance, and improve our site performance, our services, and your experience. 1 Year
Cookie Name
_ga
Source
Google Analytics
Purpose
These cookies are set because of our use of Google Analytics. They are used to collect information about your use of our application/website. The cookies collect specific information, such as your IP address, data related to your device and other information about your use of the application/website. Please note that the data processing is essentially carried out by Google LLC and Google may use your data collected by the cookies for own purposes, e.g. profiling and will combine it with other data such as your Google Account. For more information about how Google processes your data and Google’s approach to privacy as well as implemented safeguards for your data, please see here.
Lifespan
1 Year

Cookie Name
_pta
Source
PictureThis Analytics
Purpose
We use these cookies to collect information about how you use our site, monitor site performance, and improve our site performance, our services, and your experience.
Lifespan
1 Year
Marketing Cookies
Marketing cookies are used by advertising companies to serve ads that are relevant to your interests.
Cookie Name Source Purpose Lifespan
_fbp Facebook Pixel A conversion pixel tracking that we use for retargeting campaigns. Learn more here. 1 Year
_adj Adjust This cookie provides mobile analytics and attribution services that enable us to measure and analyze the effectiveness of marketing campaigns, certain events and actions within the Application. Learn more here. 1 Year
Cookie Name
_fbp
Source
Facebook Pixel
Purpose
A conversion pixel tracking that we use for retargeting campaigns. Learn more here.
Lifespan
1 Year

Cookie Name
_adj
Source
Adjust
Purpose
This cookie provides mobile analytics and attribution services that enable us to measure and analyze the effectiveness of marketing campaigns, certain events and actions within the Application. Learn more here.
Lifespan
1 Year
This page looks better in the app
Open