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Care Guide
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Pests & Diseases
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Common pear 'Conference'
Pyrus communis 'Conference'
Also known as : Wild pear 'Conference'
Pyrus pyraster is a deciduous plant reaching 3–4 metres in height as medium-sized shrub and 15–20 metres as a tree. Unlike the cultivated form the branches have thorns. The leaves are ovate with serrated margins. The flowers have white petals. The stamens are equal to the length of styles. The flowering period in spring.
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Fall
care guide

Care Guide for Common pear 'Conference'

Watering Care
Watering Care
Drought-tolerant. Allow the soil to dry completely between watering.
Details on Watering Care Watering Care
Fertilizing Care
Fertilizing Care
Fertilization once every 2-3 months during the growing season.
Details on Fertilizing Care Fertilizing Care
Pruning
Pruning
Shape the plant every 2 months during the growing season.
Details on Pruning Pruning
Soil Care
Soil Care
Clay, Loam, Neutral
Details on Soil Care Soil Care
Ideal Lighting
Ideal Lighting
Full sun, Partial sun
Details on Sunlight Requirements Ideal Lighting
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Common pear 'Conference'
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
6 to 9
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Fall
plant_info

Key Facts About Common pear 'Conference'

Attributes of Common pear 'Conference'

Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Tree
Plant Height
2.5 m
Spread
2.5 m
Leaf Color
Green
Flower Size
2.5 cm to 5 cm
Flower Color
White
Leaf type
Deciduous

Trivia and Interesting Facts

Legend has it that a beautiful woman led a whole village to plant pears all over a mountain to make a living. A god saw the beauty of the woman and wanted to seduce her. But the woman did not comply. The god created a drought and the pears gradually withered. The woman could only choose to kill herself under the pear trees. Surprisingly, the pears bloomed in the wind at the moment of her death.

Scientific Classification of Common pear 'Conference'

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pests

Common Pests & Diseases About Common pear 'Conference'

Common issues for Common pear 'Conference' based on 10 million real cases
Rust disease
Rust disease Rust disease
Rust disease
Rust fungus appears as reddish-brown mold deposits on the leaves, stems, and fruits of plants. In certain plants, it also causes reddish-brown spots and galls.
Solutions: Rust disease rarely kills plants, but it can weaken them and leave them vulnerable to other diseases. It's important to treat rust disease as soon as it is spotted. Remove infected leaves: eliminate fungal spores by picking off infected leaves and throwing them in the garbage. Do not compost them since this can spread the fungus to other plants. Use fungicide: A copper spray, sulfur powder, or broad-spectrum fungicide can help control a rust outbreak. Be sure to read all usage instructions carefully before applying. Water smarter: Keep plant leaves dry by watering in the morning so that the midday sun will dry them. It's also smart to use a soaker hose or drip irrigation to water only at the soil level.
Black spot
Black spot Black spot
Black spot
Infection by the black spot pathogen causes black spots or patches to appear on leaves.
Solutions: Some steps to take to address black spot include: Prune away any infected leaves, cleaning the pruners between plants with a 10% bleach solution so that the fungus does not spread to healthy leaves. Don't compost pruned plant parts as the spores can linger in the soil for a long period of time - instead, dispose of them in the trash. Use an approved fungicide such as Trifloxystrobin, Chlorothalonil, Maneb, or Myclobutanil. Use a spreader in the fungicide spray to ensure better coverage.
Yellow spot
Yellow spot Yellow spot
Yellow spot
Leaf spot can show up as yellow or white spots on the leaves.
Solutions: Diseases Fungicides can prevent the transmission of spores, but they may not treat the established infection. The first step is removing and disposing of all infected plant parts. Then apply recommended chemicals. For bacterial infections, apply a spray containing copper or streptomycin. For fungal infections, consult the local cooperative extension for recommendations on which fungicides will work best. Nutrient deficiency Apply a liquid fertilizer via foliar application to fix the deficiency quickly. Follow label directions regarding dosing instructions and application notes, such as not using before the rain or when temperatures are out of the recommended range. Incorrect watering Determine the water requirements for your specific plant, and follow accordingly. Some plants like consistently moist soil, and others like the soil to dry out slightly before being watered. Pests Thoroughly apply an insecticidal soap, an organic product like neem oil, or an appropriate chemical insecticide to the plant.
Underwatering
Underwatering Underwatering
Underwatering
Leaves may wilt for a variety of reasons.
Solutions: The easiest (and most obvious) way to address underwatering is to fully hydrate the plant. However, this must be done carefully. A common mistake that many gardeners make is to douse their underwatered plants with water. This can overwhelm the roots of the plant and shock its system, something that can be even more damaging than the lack of water to begin with. Instead, water thoroughly and slowly, taking breaks to let the water slowly saturate through the soil to get to the roots. Use room temperature water, as cold water might be too much of a shock. In the future, shorten the time between waterings. A good rule of thumb is to check the soil around each plant daily. If it’s dry to at least two inches down, it’s time to water. If a container plant is repeatedly drying out very quickly, repotting into a slower-draining container might be a good idea, too.
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Rust disease
plant poor
Rust disease
Rust fungus appears as reddish-brown mold deposits on the leaves, stems, and fruits of plants. In certain plants, it also causes reddish-brown spots and galls.
Overview
Overview
Rust disease is a fungus that is most common on the lower leaves of mature plants. If a plant is badly affected, the leaves will deform and eventually drop off the plant. The disease causes blemishes on the leaves that resemble rust spots. It is more common after periods of extended rainfall, as this results in the germination of the fungal spores and the dispersal of the spores onto the plant.
Although rust disease is not fatal for most plants, it can weaken the overall health of the tree and make it more vulnerable to other pests and diseases. Therefore, it's best to remove the affected material and follow good cultural practices to prevent further infection.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Here are the typical symptoms of rust disease:
  • Slightly raised, white spots on the undersides of the leaves and stems.
  • These spots then turn a reddish-orange color, which indicates the presence of fungal spores.
  • Reddish-orange spots appear on the upper sides of the leaves as well.
  • Eventually, the rust spots form pustules or raised lumps that can turn yellow-green and finally black.
  • Highly infected leaves will become yellow and drop off the plant.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Rust disease is caused by the fungus Phragmidium spp. The fungal spores overwinter inside the stems of the plant and are spread by water and wind. They can be identified by dark, cork-like blotches.
Like most fungal diseases, infection occurs during warm, humid weather, especially when the leaves remain damp for an extended period of time.
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Black spot
plant poor
Black spot
Infection by the black spot pathogen causes black spots or patches to appear on leaves.
Overview
Overview
Black spot is a fungus that largely attacks leaves on a variety of ornamental plants, leaving them covered in dark spots ringed with yellow, and eventually killing them. The fungus is often simply unsightly, but if it infects the whole plant it can interfere with photosynthesis by killing too many leaves. Because of this, it is important to be aware of the best methods for preventing and treating this diseases should it occur in the garden.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Here are a few of the most common symptoms of black spot:
  • The plant has developed small black spots along the leaves.
  • These spots be small, circular, and clustered together, or they may have a splotchy appearance and take up large portions of the leaves.
  • The fungus may also affect plant canes, where lesions start purple and then turn black.
  • The plant may suffer premature leaf drop.
Though most forms of black spot fungus pose little risk to a plant's overall health, many gardeners find them unsightly. Severe cases can also weaken a plant, so it becomes more susceptible to other pathogens and diseases.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Black spot is spread by various types of fungi, which differ slightly depending on whether they are in their sexual or asexual stages.
The fungal spores linger over the winter in fallen leaves and lesions on canes. In the spring, the spores are splashed up onto the leaves, causing infection within seven hours of moisture and when temperatures range between 24 to 29 ℃ with a high relative humidity.
In just two weeks, thousands of additional spores are produced, making it easy for the disease to infect nearby healthy plants as well.
There are several factors that could make a plant more likely to suffer a black spot infection. Here are some of the most common:
  • Exposure to infected plants or mulch (the fungus overwinters on dead leaves)
  • Weakening from physical damage, pest infestation or other infections.
  • Increased periods of wet, humid, warm weather – or exposure to overhead watering
  • Plants growing too close together
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Yellow spot
plant poor
Yellow spot
Leaf spot can show up as yellow or white spots on the leaves.
Overview
Overview
Yellow spot is a common condition that affects all types of plants -- flowering ornamentals, trees, shrubs, herbs, and vegetable plants -- worldwide. Yellow spots may appear because of dozens of potential causes and occur in various environmental and climatic conditions, but fortunately, most are easy to address. The most common causes of yellow spots include diseases, nutrient deficiency, watering problems, and pests.
In most cases, yellow spots can be treated without permanent damage to the plant. However, in some fungal disease cases, nothing can be done to treat the disease after infection, and the plant will ultimately perish from the disease.
Due to this, the most critical aspect of addressing yellow spots on plants is correctly determining the cause.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Symptoms occur on varying parts of the plant, depending upon the cause. Smaller spots tend to be indicative of younger infections or newly developing problems.
  • Small yellow spots appear on leaves
  • Spots can occur on the lower or upper leaf surfaces, or both
  • Raised, rounded, or sunken spots with fringed or smooth edges
  • Spots may grow together, causing leaves to become totally discolored
  • Stunted growth
  • Premature leaf drop
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The vast majority of yellow spot diseases are caused by fungal pathogens. However, there are some situations in which bacteria, environmental conditions, or other issues may be blamed.
Diseases are typically host-specific, so they may only affect plants within the same family. That said, just about every single species of plant is vulnerable to at least one disease that causes yellow spot. The most common problems are leaf blight, leaf septoria, powdery mildew, and downy mildew, to name a few.
All plants need specific nutrients from the soil to survive. When these nutrients become depleted or unavailable for plant uptake due to particular conditions, deficiencies occur, and yellow spots are seen.
  • Nitrogen is an integral component of chlorophyll.
  • Iron is needed in the enzymes that make chlorophyll.
Yellow spots may also appear because of incorrect watering, mainly underwatering, or infestations of sap-sucking pests such as aphids.
  • Too little water inhibits photosynthesis. Too much water pushes oxygen out of the soil and the roots cannot take in nutrients or even water from the soil.
  • Insect problems can cause yellow spots directly by damaging leaf tissue when feeding, or they may introduce pathogens.
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Underwatering
plant poor
Underwatering
Leaves may wilt for a variety of reasons.
Overview
Overview
Underwatering plants is one of the quickest ways to kill them. This is something that most gardeners are well aware of. Unfortunately, knowing exactly how much water a plant needs can be tricky, especially considering that underwatering and overwatering present similar symptoms in plants.
Therefore, it’s important to be vigilant and attentive to each plants’ individual needs.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
As mentioned earlier, overwatering and underwatering present similar symptoms in plants. These symptoms include poor growth, wilted leaves, defoliation, and brown leaf tips or margins. Ultimately, both underwatering and overwatering can lead to the death of a plant.
The easiest way to determine whether a plant has too much water or too little is to look at the leaves. If underwatering is the culprit, the leaves will look brown and crunchy, while if it’s overwatering, they will appear yellow or a pale green in color.
When this issue first begins, there may be no noticeable symptoms at all, particularly in hardy or drought-tolerant plants. However, they will begin to wilt once they start suffering from a lack of water. The edges of the plant’s leaves will become brown or curled. Soil pulling away from the edges of the planter is a telltale sign, or a crispy, brittle stem.
Prolonged underwatering can cause a plant’s growth to become stunted. The leaves might drop and the plant can be more susceptible to pest infestations, too.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Underwatering is caused by, quite simply, not watering plants often or deeply enough. There is a heightened risk of underwatering if any of these situations apply:
  • Extreme heat and dry weather (when growing outdoors)
  • Grow lights or indoor lighting that is too bright or intense for the type of plant
  • Using fast-draining growing media such as sand
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care_scenes

More Info on Common Pear 'conference' Growth and Care

Basic Care Guide
Lighting
Full sun
Temperature
-15 38 ℃
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Pests & Diseases
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Common pear 'Conference'
Pyrus communis 'Conference'
Also known as: Wild pear 'Conference'
Pyrus pyraster is a deciduous plant reaching 3–4 metres in height as medium-sized shrub and 15–20 metres as a tree. Unlike the cultivated form the branches have thorns. The leaves are ovate with serrated margins. The flowers have white petals. The stamens are equal to the length of styles. The flowering period in spring.
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Fall
plant_info

Key Facts About Common pear 'Conference'

Attributes of Common pear 'Conference'

Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Tree
Plant Height
2.5 m
Spread
2.5 m
Leaf Color
Green
Flower Size
2.5 cm to 5 cm
Flower Color
White
Leaf type
Deciduous
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Trivia and Interesting Facts

Legend has it that a beautiful woman led a whole village to plant pears all over a mountain to make a living. A god saw the beauty of the woman and wanted to seduce her. But the woman did not comply. The god created a drought and the pears gradually withered. The woman could only choose to kill herself under the pear trees. Surprisingly, the pears bloomed in the wind at the moment of her death.

Scientific Classification of Common pear 'Conference'

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pests

Common Pests & Diseases About Common pear 'Conference'

Common issues for Common pear 'Conference' based on 10 million real cases
Rust disease
Rust disease Rust disease Rust disease
Rust fungus appears as reddish-brown mold deposits on the leaves, stems, and fruits of plants. In certain plants, it also causes reddish-brown spots and galls.
Solutions: Rust disease rarely kills plants, but it can weaken them and leave them vulnerable to other diseases. It's important to treat rust disease as soon as it is spotted. Remove infected leaves: eliminate fungal spores by picking off infected leaves and throwing them in the garbage. Do not compost them since this can spread the fungus to other plants. Use fungicide: A copper spray, sulfur powder, or broad-spectrum fungicide can help control a rust outbreak. Be sure to read all usage instructions carefully before applying. Water smarter: Keep plant leaves dry by watering in the morning so that the midday sun will dry them. It's also smart to use a soaker hose or drip irrigation to water only at the soil level.
Learn More About the Rust disease more
Black spot
Black spot Black spot Black spot
Infection by the black spot pathogen causes black spots or patches to appear on leaves.
Solutions: Some steps to take to address black spot include: Prune away any infected leaves, cleaning the pruners between plants with a 10% bleach solution so that the fungus does not spread to healthy leaves. Don't compost pruned plant parts as the spores can linger in the soil for a long period of time - instead, dispose of them in the trash. Use an approved fungicide such as Trifloxystrobin, Chlorothalonil, Maneb, or Myclobutanil. Use a spreader in the fungicide spray to ensure better coverage.
Learn More About the Black spot more
Yellow spot
Yellow spot Yellow spot Yellow spot
Leaf spot can show up as yellow or white spots on the leaves.
Solutions: Diseases Fungicides can prevent the transmission of spores, but they may not treat the established infection. The first step is removing and disposing of all infected plant parts. Then apply recommended chemicals. For bacterial infections, apply a spray containing copper or streptomycin. For fungal infections, consult the local cooperative extension for recommendations on which fungicides will work best. Nutrient deficiency Apply a liquid fertilizer via foliar application to fix the deficiency quickly. Follow label directions regarding dosing instructions and application notes, such as not using before the rain or when temperatures are out of the recommended range. Incorrect watering Determine the water requirements for your specific plant, and follow accordingly. Some plants like consistently moist soil, and others like the soil to dry out slightly before being watered. Pests Thoroughly apply an insecticidal soap, an organic product like neem oil, or an appropriate chemical insecticide to the plant.
Learn More About the Yellow spot more
Underwatering
Underwatering Underwatering Underwatering
Leaves may wilt for a variety of reasons.
Solutions: The easiest (and most obvious) way to address underwatering is to fully hydrate the plant. However, this must be done carefully. A common mistake that many gardeners make is to douse their underwatered plants with water. This can overwhelm the roots of the plant and shock its system, something that can be even more damaging than the lack of water to begin with. Instead, water thoroughly and slowly, taking breaks to let the water slowly saturate through the soil to get to the roots. Use room temperature water, as cold water might be too much of a shock. In the future, shorten the time between waterings. A good rule of thumb is to check the soil around each plant daily. If it’s dry to at least two inches down, it’s time to water. If a container plant is repeatedly drying out very quickly, repotting into a slower-draining container might be a good idea, too.
Learn More About the Underwatering more
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close
Rust disease
plant poor
Rust disease
Rust fungus appears as reddish-brown mold deposits on the leaves, stems, and fruits of plants. In certain plants, it also causes reddish-brown spots and galls.
Overview
Overview
Rust disease is a fungus that is most common on the lower leaves of mature plants. If a plant is badly affected, the leaves will deform and eventually drop off the plant. The disease causes blemishes on the leaves that resemble rust spots. It is more common after periods of extended rainfall, as this results in the germination of the fungal spores and the dispersal of the spores onto the plant.
Although rust disease is not fatal for most plants, it can weaken the overall health of the tree and make it more vulnerable to other pests and diseases. Therefore, it's best to remove the affected material and follow good cultural practices to prevent further infection.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Here are the typical symptoms of rust disease:
  • Slightly raised, white spots on the undersides of the leaves and stems.
  • These spots then turn a reddish-orange color, which indicates the presence of fungal spores.
  • Reddish-orange spots appear on the upper sides of the leaves as well.
  • Eventually, the rust spots form pustules or raised lumps that can turn yellow-green and finally black.
  • Highly infected leaves will become yellow and drop off the plant.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Rust disease is caused by the fungus Phragmidium spp. The fungal spores overwinter inside the stems of the plant and are spread by water and wind. They can be identified by dark, cork-like blotches.
Like most fungal diseases, infection occurs during warm, humid weather, especially when the leaves remain damp for an extended period of time.
Solutions
Solutions
Rust disease rarely kills plants, but it can weaken them and leave them vulnerable to other diseases. It's important to treat rust disease as soon as it is spotted.
  1. Remove infected leaves: eliminate fungal spores by picking off infected leaves and throwing them in the garbage. Do not compost them since this can spread the fungus to other plants.
  2. Use fungicide: A copper spray, sulfur powder, or broad-spectrum fungicide can help control a rust outbreak. Be sure to read all usage instructions carefully before applying.
  3. Water smarter: Keep plant leaves dry by watering in the morning so that the midday sun will dry them. It's also smart to use a soaker hose or drip irrigation to water only at the soil level.
Prevention
Prevention
The best way to prevent rust diseases is by planting resistant varieties. Most nurseries will specify which species qualify. When introducing new plants, check the plants for signs of rust before planting.
Rust disease often spreads through watering, or when working with wet plants, so take care not to touch an infected plant and accidentally spread spores to healthy ones. Keep vulnerable plants well-pruned to maximize airflow and prevent moisture build-up.
If the soil is contaminated, it's also a good idea to lay down thick mulch around the base of plants. This prevents spores from splashing up to hit plant leaves while watering.
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Black spot
plant poor
Black spot
Infection by the black spot pathogen causes black spots or patches to appear on leaves.
Overview
Overview
Black spot is a fungus that largely attacks leaves on a variety of ornamental plants, leaving them covered in dark spots ringed with yellow, and eventually killing them. The fungus is often simply unsightly, but if it infects the whole plant it can interfere with photosynthesis by killing too many leaves. Because of this, it is important to be aware of the best methods for preventing and treating this diseases should it occur in the garden.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Here are a few of the most common symptoms of black spot:
  • The plant has developed small black spots along the leaves.
  • These spots be small, circular, and clustered together, or they may have a splotchy appearance and take up large portions of the leaves.
  • The fungus may also affect plant canes, where lesions start purple and then turn black.
  • The plant may suffer premature leaf drop.
Though most forms of black spot fungus pose little risk to a plant's overall health, many gardeners find them unsightly. Severe cases can also weaken a plant, so it becomes more susceptible to other pathogens and diseases.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Black spot is spread by various types of fungi, which differ slightly depending on whether they are in their sexual or asexual stages.
The fungal spores linger over the winter in fallen leaves and lesions on canes. In the spring, the spores are splashed up onto the leaves, causing infection within seven hours of moisture and when temperatures range between 24 to 29 ℃ with a high relative humidity.
In just two weeks, thousands of additional spores are produced, making it easy for the disease to infect nearby healthy plants as well.
There are several factors that could make a plant more likely to suffer a black spot infection. Here are some of the most common:
  • Exposure to infected plants or mulch (the fungus overwinters on dead leaves)
  • Weakening from physical damage, pest infestation or other infections.
  • Increased periods of wet, humid, warm weather – or exposure to overhead watering
  • Plants growing too close together
Solutions
Solutions
Some steps to take to address black spot include:
  • Prune away any infected leaves, cleaning the pruners between plants with a 10% bleach solution so that the fungus does not spread to healthy leaves.
  • Don't compost pruned plant parts as the spores can linger in the soil for a long period of time - instead, dispose of them in the trash.
  • Use an approved fungicide such as Trifloxystrobin, Chlorothalonil, Maneb, or Myclobutanil.
  • Use a spreader in the fungicide spray to ensure better coverage.
Prevention
Prevention
Here are a few tips to prevent black spot outbreaks.
  • Purchase resistant varieties: Invest in fungus-resistant plant varieties to reduce the chances for black spot diseases.
  • Remove infected plant debris: Fungi can overwinter in contaminated plant debris, so remove all fallen leaves from infected plants as soon as possible.
  • Rake and discard fallen leaves in the fall.
  • Prune regularly.
  • Water carefully: Fungal diseases spread when plants stay in moist conditions and when water droplets splash contaminated soil on plant leaves. Control these factors by only watering infected plants when the top few inches of soil are dry, and by watering at soil level to reduce splashback. Adding a layer of mulch to the soil will also reduce splashing.
  • Grow plants in an open, sunny locations so the foliage dries quickly.
  • Follow spacing guidelines when planting and avoid natural windbreaks for good air circulation.
  • Use chemical control: Regular doses of a fungicide, especially in the spring, can stop an outbreak before it begins.
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unlimited guides at your fingertips...
close
Yellow spot
plant poor
Yellow spot
Leaf spot can show up as yellow or white spots on the leaves.
Overview
Overview
Yellow spot is a common condition that affects all types of plants -- flowering ornamentals, trees, shrubs, herbs, and vegetable plants -- worldwide. Yellow spots may appear because of dozens of potential causes and occur in various environmental and climatic conditions, but fortunately, most are easy to address. The most common causes of yellow spots include diseases, nutrient deficiency, watering problems, and pests.
In most cases, yellow spots can be treated without permanent damage to the plant. However, in some fungal disease cases, nothing can be done to treat the disease after infection, and the plant will ultimately perish from the disease.
Due to this, the most critical aspect of addressing yellow spots on plants is correctly determining the cause.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Symptoms occur on varying parts of the plant, depending upon the cause. Smaller spots tend to be indicative of younger infections or newly developing problems.
  • Small yellow spots appear on leaves
  • Spots can occur on the lower or upper leaf surfaces, or both
  • Raised, rounded, or sunken spots with fringed or smooth edges
  • Spots may grow together, causing leaves to become totally discolored
  • Stunted growth
  • Premature leaf drop
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The vast majority of yellow spot diseases are caused by fungal pathogens. However, there are some situations in which bacteria, environmental conditions, or other issues may be blamed.
Diseases are typically host-specific, so they may only affect plants within the same family. That said, just about every single species of plant is vulnerable to at least one disease that causes yellow spot. The most common problems are leaf blight, leaf septoria, powdery mildew, and downy mildew, to name a few.
All plants need specific nutrients from the soil to survive. When these nutrients become depleted or unavailable for plant uptake due to particular conditions, deficiencies occur, and yellow spots are seen.
  • Nitrogen is an integral component of chlorophyll.
  • Iron is needed in the enzymes that make chlorophyll.
Yellow spots may also appear because of incorrect watering, mainly underwatering, or infestations of sap-sucking pests such as aphids.
  • Too little water inhibits photosynthesis. Too much water pushes oxygen out of the soil and the roots cannot take in nutrients or even water from the soil.
  • Insect problems can cause yellow spots directly by damaging leaf tissue when feeding, or they may introduce pathogens.
Solutions
Solutions
Diseases
Fungicides can prevent the transmission of spores, but they may not treat the established infection. The first step is removing and disposing of all infected plant parts. Then apply recommended chemicals.
For bacterial infections, apply a spray containing copper or streptomycin.
For fungal infections, consult the local cooperative extension for recommendations on which fungicides will work best.
Nutrient deficiency
Apply a liquid fertilizer via foliar application to fix the deficiency quickly. Follow label directions regarding dosing instructions and application notes, such as not using before the rain or when temperatures are out of the recommended range.
Incorrect watering
Determine the water requirements for your specific plant, and follow accordingly. Some plants like consistently moist soil, and others like the soil to dry out slightly before being watered.
Pests
Thoroughly apply an insecticidal soap, an organic product like neem oil, or an appropriate chemical insecticide to the plant.
Prevention
Prevention
Depending on the type of plant and which specific disease is causing yellow spot, problems may be avoided by taking the following preventative steps:
  • Plant resistant varieties
  • Avoid planting susceptible varieties close together - space susceptible plants further apart from one another so it’s more difficult for the fungal spores to find new plant hosts.
  • Water wisely - water from below rather than splashing water on foliage. This can reduce the spread of both bacterial and fungal pathogens responsible for yellow spot.
  • Prune - prune as a way of getting rid of affected leaves but also to control the spread of yellow spot to new plants. Pruning can also improve air circulation to limit disease spread.
  • Rotate crops - many diseases, including downy mildew, can live in the soil over the winter and produce problems for many years. Rotate annual crops to new locations each year so that they aren’t growing anywhere in which plants in the same family were grown within the last three to four years.
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Underwatering
plant poor
Underwatering
Leaves may wilt for a variety of reasons.
Overview
Overview
Underwatering plants is one of the quickest ways to kill them. This is something that most gardeners are well aware of. Unfortunately, knowing exactly how much water a plant needs can be tricky, especially considering that underwatering and overwatering present similar symptoms in plants.
Therefore, it’s important to be vigilant and attentive to each plants’ individual needs.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
As mentioned earlier, overwatering and underwatering present similar symptoms in plants. These symptoms include poor growth, wilted leaves, defoliation, and brown leaf tips or margins. Ultimately, both underwatering and overwatering can lead to the death of a plant.
The easiest way to determine whether a plant has too much water or too little is to look at the leaves. If underwatering is the culprit, the leaves will look brown and crunchy, while if it’s overwatering, they will appear yellow or a pale green in color.
When this issue first begins, there may be no noticeable symptoms at all, particularly in hardy or drought-tolerant plants. However, they will begin to wilt once they start suffering from a lack of water. The edges of the plant’s leaves will become brown or curled. Soil pulling away from the edges of the planter is a telltale sign, or a crispy, brittle stem.
Prolonged underwatering can cause a plant’s growth to become stunted. The leaves might drop and the plant can be more susceptible to pest infestations, too.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Underwatering is caused by, quite simply, not watering plants often or deeply enough. There is a heightened risk of underwatering if any of these situations apply:
  • Extreme heat and dry weather (when growing outdoors)
  • Grow lights or indoor lighting that is too bright or intense for the type of plant
  • Using fast-draining growing media such as sand
Solutions
Solutions
The easiest (and most obvious) way to address underwatering is to fully hydrate the plant. However, this must be done carefully. A common mistake that many gardeners make is to douse their underwatered plants with water. This can overwhelm the roots of the plant and shock its system, something that can be even more damaging than the lack of water to begin with.
Instead, water thoroughly and slowly, taking breaks to let the water slowly saturate through the soil to get to the roots. Use room temperature water, as cold water might be too much of a shock.
In the future, shorten the time between waterings. A good rule of thumb is to check the soil around each plant daily. If it’s dry to at least two inches down, it’s time to water. If a container plant is repeatedly drying out very quickly, repotting into a slower-draining container might be a good idea, too.
Prevention
Prevention
Always check the soil before watering. If the top inch of soil feels moist, though not wet, the watering is perfect. If it’s dry, water it immediately. If it feels soggy, you avoid watering until it dries out a bit more.
Also, make sure the lighting is sufficient for the species. Plants grow faster and need more water when there is intense light or lots of heat. Being aware of these conditions and modifying them, if possible, is a good way to prevent underwatering. Many container plants are potted in soil mixtures mean to be well-draining. Adding materials that retain moisture, like compost or peat moss, can also prevent these symptoms.
Other tips to prevent underwatering include:
  • Choose pots with adequately-sized drainage holes
  • Avoid warm temperatures
  • Use large pots with additional soil (these take longer to dry out)
  • Avoid terracotta pots, which lose water quickly
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Above 6 hours sunlight
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About 3-6 hours sunlight
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Just like people, each plant has its own preferences. Learn about your plants' temperature needs and create a comforting environment for them to flourish. As you care for your plants, your bond with them will deepen. Trust your intuition as you learn about their temperature needs, celebrating the journey you share. Lovingly monitor the temperature around your plants and adjust their environment as needed. A thermometer can be your ally in this heartfelt endeavor. Be patient and gentle with yourself as you explore your plants' temperature needs. Cherish your successes, learn from challenges, and nurture your garden with love, creating a haven that reflects the warmth of your care.
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