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Japanese meadowsweet 'Anthony Waterer'
Japanese meadowsweet 'Anthony Waterer'
Japanese meadowsweet 'Anthony Waterer'
Spiraea japonica 'Anthony Waterer'
Also known as : Korean spiraea 'Anthony Waterer'
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
4 to 9
care guide

Care Guide for Japanese meadowsweet 'Anthony Waterer'

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Watering Care
Watering Care
Details on Watering Care Watering Care
Soil Care
Soil Care
Chalky, Acidic, Neutral, Alkaline
Details on Soil Care Soil Care
Ideal Lighting
Ideal Lighting
Full sun, Partial sun
Details on Sunlight Requirements Ideal Lighting
Ideal Temperature
Ideal Temperature
4 to 9
Details on Temperature Ideal Temperature
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Japanese meadowsweet 'Anthony Waterer'
Water
Water
Twice per week
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
4 to 9
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Key Facts About Japanese meadowsweet 'Anthony Waterer'

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Attributes of Japanese meadowsweet 'Anthony Waterer'

Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Shrub
Plant Height
1.5 m
Spread
1.5 m
Leaf Color
Green
Flower Size
20 cm
Flower Color
Purple
Pink
Leaf type
Deciduous
Ideal Temperature
5 - 35 ℃

Scientific Classification of Japanese meadowsweet 'Anthony Waterer'

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Common Pests & Diseases About Japanese meadowsweet 'Anthony Waterer'

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Common issues for Japanese meadowsweet 'Anthony Waterer' based on 10 million real cases
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Flower withering
Flower withering Flower withering
Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Solutions: If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible. For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface. In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well. If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Nutrient deficiencies
Nutrient deficiencies Nutrient deficiencies
Nutrient deficiencies
A lack of nutrients will cause a widespread yellowing of the leaves. The yellowing may begin at the base or top of the plant.
Solutions: There are several easy ways to remedy the nutrient deficiencies in soils. Use a water-soluble fertilizer. Fertilizers will include most or all of the macro and micro-nutrients the plants need to thrive. Adding some fertilizer to the soil will make those nutrients available and can combat deficiencies. Regularly apply organic fertilizer pellets. Organic fertilizers such as animal manures and bonemeal can supply plants with all the nutrients that they need to grow strong and healthy. Apply compost. Though not as finely tuned as artificial fertilizer, compost can nevertheless be rich in important nutrients and should be applied to the soil regularly. Apply nutrients via foliar application. In addition to supplementing the soil with nutrients, foliar fertilizer can be applied directly to the plant's leaves. Nutrients offered via foliar application are often taken up even quicker than those put in the soil, so the foliar application can be great for swiftly addressing specific deficiencies.
Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Solutions: If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Branch blight
Branch blight Branch blight
Branch blight
Branch blight can cause lignified branches to dry up entirely and die.
Solutions: Inspect trees frequently, and remove any infected branches as soon as possible. Branch blight cannot be cured, so the only treatment is to prune the tree and monitor it carefully for signs of the disease. All affected parts of the tree should be removed, since blight can survive over the winter inside the plant’s tissues. Blight can become systemic in the tree, in which case the entire plant should be removed so it does not remain a host for the pathogen and allow it to spread.
close
Flower withering
plant poor
Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Overview
Overview
Flower withering occurs when flowers become weak, droopy, wilted, or faded until they can’t be revived. During withering, they begin to wrinkle and shrink until the flower becomes completely dry or dead.
Any flowers, regardless of the plant type or the climate they are grown in, are susceptible to withering. It is a worldwide problem across houseplants, herbs, flowering ornamentals, trees, shrubs, garden vegetables, and food crops.
Unlike wilting—which withering is often confused with—withering can be caused by different things and is often due to more than a lack of water. Withering can be fatal in severe cases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Flower withering progresses from very mild cases to severe occurrences that kill the flower. The severity of the symptoms is related to the cause and how long the condition is allowed to progress before action is taken.
  • Wilted, droopy flowers
  • Petals and leaves begin to wrinkle
  • Brown papery streaks or spots appear on the petals and leaf tips
  • Flowerhead shrink in size
  • Petal color fades
  • Yellowing leaves
  • Complete death of the flower
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The main causes of flower withering include natural age progress, lack of water, nutritional deficiencies, and bacterial or fungal diseases. It’s critical to determine the underlying cause when flower withering is noticed. This will guide the best course of action, if treatment is possible.
Check the soil for moisture and then closely examine the entire plant for signs of nutrient deficiencies. If neither of those appears to be the cause then cut open the stem below a flower. If a cross-section reveals brown or rust-colored stains it is safe to assume that this is a bacterial or fungal infection.
If the flower is nearing the end of its normal lifespan, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence, or cell aging and death. Cell division stops and the plant begins breaking down resources within the flower to use in other parts of the plant.
In all other cases, flower withering happens when the plant seals off the stem as a defense mechanism, stopping transport within the vascular system. This prevents further water loss through the flowers but also stops bacteria and fungi from moving to healthy parts of the plant. Once water and nutrient transport stops, the flower begins to wither and ultimately die.
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Nutrient deficiencies
plant poor
Nutrient deficiencies
A lack of nutrients will cause a widespread yellowing of the leaves. The yellowing may begin at the base or top of the plant.
Overview
Overview
Nutrient deficiencies can be seen in many different ways on plants. Basically, the lack of nutrients will inhibit plant growth, produce weak stems and leaves, and leave plants open to infection from pests and diseases. Plants use the nutrients from the soil to help them with photosynthesis. This, in turn, produces healthy plant growth. Plants that lack adequate amounts of nutrients will look lackluster and unhealthy. Eventually, if this is not addressed, it will cause the plants to die. The most important nutrients that plants need are nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and sulfur. Additionally, plants require small amounts of micronutrients such as iron, boron, manganese, zinc, copper, and molybdenum.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
A common sign that plants are experiencing nutrient deficiencies is the yellowing of leaves. This may be an overall yellowing or leaves that are yellow but still have green veins. These leaves will eventually brown off and die.
Another sign is the loss of plant vigor. The plants may not be growing as well as they should or their growth may be stunted.
Below are some common symptoms that appear when plants are lacking in nutrients.
Nitrogen (N): Inner, older leaves yellow first. If the deficiency is severe, yellowing progresses outward to newer growth.
Potassium (K): Leaf edges may turn brown and crinkly, with a yellowing layer forming just inside of the edge. Older leaves tend to be impacted first.
Phosphorus (P): Lack of vigorous growth. Plants will appear stunted.
Zinc (Zn): Yellowing tends to occur first at the base of the leaf.
Copper (Cu): Newer leaves begin to yellow first, with older leaves yellowing only if the deficiency becomes severe.
Boron (B): Newer leaves are impacted first. Foliage may also become particularly brittle in cases of boron deficiency.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
There are several factors that can lead to nutrient deficiencies, a situation where plants are not receiving the nutrients that they need. This could be because they are planted in nutrient-deficient soils, or that the soil's pH is too high or low. Incorrect soil pH can lock up certain nutrients, thus making them unavailable to plants. Lack of soil moisture can also be a problem, because plants need water to be able to absorb the nutrients from the soil.
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Aged yellow and dry
plant poor
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Overview
Overview
Regardless of the type of plant or where it is grown, at some point, it will begin to aged yellow and dry. This is a natural, unavoidable process that happens when the plant has completed all of the steps in its life.
Annual plants go through this process at the end of a single growing season. Perennial plants live for multiple years, if not tens or hundreds of years, but will still ultimately exhibit these symptoms.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
When plants have progressed through their natural developmental stages and are nearing the end of their lifecycle, they begin showing signs of decline. Leaves will start to yellow and droop, and over time they turn papery brown and dry.
Once completely dry, the leaves begin to fall from the plant until the entire plant has dried out.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
At the end of its life, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence or natural aging and death. Cell division stops, and the plant begins catabolizing resources to use in other parts of the plant.
As this happens, the tissues begin yellow and drying until the entire plant is desiccated and perishes.
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qrcode
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
Branch blight
plant poor
Branch blight
Branch blight can cause lignified branches to dry up entirely and die.
Overview
Overview
"Blight" is an umbrella term used to describe a category of tree diseases caused by fungus or bacteria. Branch blight occurs when fungus attacks the branches and twigs of a tree, resulting in branches slowly dying off.
Branch blight can affect most species of trees to some degree, and it may be called by different names including twig blight or stem blight. It is caused by a variety of fungi which attack branches first, especially immature growth.
Blight usually occurs in warm, humid conditions, so is most common in the spring and summer months. Because specific environmental conditions are required, the frequency of branch blight can vary from year to year. This makes the disease hard to control, as it can spread between trees and affect multiple plants in a short period of time.
In the worst-case scenario, trees can lose significant portions of their foliage and fail to produce fruit. Young or unhealthy trees could die off completely.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The first symptoms of branch blight are that the emerging foliage turns brown or gray at the tips, especially on the smallest branches. Brown spots cover the entire surface of the leaves, eventually causing leaves and stems to shrivel and fall off. Over time, the dying tissue will spread toward the center of the plant. If left untreated, spores from the attacking fungus may appear on dying foliage within 3-4 weeks of the infection.
In some cases, lesions may form at the spot where the twig branches off from the healthy tissue. Branches may display girdling, which is a band of damaged tissue encircling the branch. An untreated tree will eventually lose all of its foliage and die.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
  • Pathogens on young twigs and foliage cause disease
  • Stressed and unhealthy trees are more susceptible - root injury due to physical or insect damage, infection, or aging can prevent adequate absorption of water and nutrients
  • Extremely wet conditions including sprinkler watering can attract fungus
  • Fungi can be transmitted between nearby trees
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Pests & Diseases
Japanese meadowsweet 'Anthony Waterer'
Japanese meadowsweet 'Anthony Waterer'
Japanese meadowsweet 'Anthony Waterer'
Spiraea japonica 'Anthony Waterer'
Also known as: Korean spiraea 'Anthony Waterer'
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
4 to 9
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Care Guide for Japanese meadowsweet 'Anthony Waterer'

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Key Facts About Japanese meadowsweet 'Anthony Waterer'

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Attributes of Japanese meadowsweet 'Anthony Waterer'

Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Shrub
Plant Height
1.5 m
Spread
1.5 m
Leaf Color
Green
Flower Size
20 cm
Flower Color
Purple
Pink
Leaf type
Deciduous
Ideal Temperature
5 - 35 ℃
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Scientific Classification of Japanese meadowsweet 'Anthony Waterer'

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Common Pests & Diseases About Japanese meadowsweet 'Anthony Waterer'

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Common issues for Japanese meadowsweet 'Anthony Waterer' based on 10 million real cases
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AI-powered plant doctor helps you diagnose plant problems in seconds.
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Flower withering
Flower withering Flower withering Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Solutions: If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible. For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface. In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well. If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Learn More About the Flower withering more
Nutrient deficiencies
Nutrient deficiencies Nutrient deficiencies Nutrient deficiencies
A lack of nutrients will cause a widespread yellowing of the leaves. The yellowing may begin at the base or top of the plant.
Solutions: There are several easy ways to remedy the nutrient deficiencies in soils. Use a water-soluble fertilizer. Fertilizers will include most or all of the macro and micro-nutrients the plants need to thrive. Adding some fertilizer to the soil will make those nutrients available and can combat deficiencies. Regularly apply organic fertilizer pellets. Organic fertilizers such as animal manures and bonemeal can supply plants with all the nutrients that they need to grow strong and healthy. Apply compost. Though not as finely tuned as artificial fertilizer, compost can nevertheless be rich in important nutrients and should be applied to the soil regularly. Apply nutrients via foliar application. In addition to supplementing the soil with nutrients, foliar fertilizer can be applied directly to the plant's leaves. Nutrients offered via foliar application are often taken up even quicker than those put in the soil, so the foliar application can be great for swiftly addressing specific deficiencies.
Learn More About the Nutrient deficiencies more
Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry Aged yellow and dry Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Solutions: If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Learn More About the Aged yellow and dry more
Branch blight
Branch blight Branch blight Branch blight
Branch blight can cause lignified branches to dry up entirely and die.
Solutions: Inspect trees frequently, and remove any infected branches as soon as possible. Branch blight cannot be cured, so the only treatment is to prune the tree and monitor it carefully for signs of the disease. All affected parts of the tree should be removed, since blight can survive over the winter inside the plant’s tissues. Blight can become systemic in the tree, in which case the entire plant should be removed so it does not remain a host for the pathogen and allow it to spread.
Learn More About the Branch blight more
close
Flower withering
plant poor
Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Overview
Overview
Flower withering occurs when flowers become weak, droopy, wilted, or faded until they can’t be revived. During withering, they begin to wrinkle and shrink until the flower becomes completely dry or dead.
Any flowers, regardless of the plant type or the climate they are grown in, are susceptible to withering. It is a worldwide problem across houseplants, herbs, flowering ornamentals, trees, shrubs, garden vegetables, and food crops.
Unlike wilting—which withering is often confused with—withering can be caused by different things and is often due to more than a lack of water. Withering can be fatal in severe cases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Flower withering progresses from very mild cases to severe occurrences that kill the flower. The severity of the symptoms is related to the cause and how long the condition is allowed to progress before action is taken.
  • Wilted, droopy flowers
  • Petals and leaves begin to wrinkle
  • Brown papery streaks or spots appear on the petals and leaf tips
  • Flowerhead shrink in size
  • Petal color fades
  • Yellowing leaves
  • Complete death of the flower
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The main causes of flower withering include natural age progress, lack of water, nutritional deficiencies, and bacterial or fungal diseases. It’s critical to determine the underlying cause when flower withering is noticed. This will guide the best course of action, if treatment is possible.
Check the soil for moisture and then closely examine the entire plant for signs of nutrient deficiencies. If neither of those appears to be the cause then cut open the stem below a flower. If a cross-section reveals brown or rust-colored stains it is safe to assume that this is a bacterial or fungal infection.
If the flower is nearing the end of its normal lifespan, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence, or cell aging and death. Cell division stops and the plant begins breaking down resources within the flower to use in other parts of the plant.
In all other cases, flower withering happens when the plant seals off the stem as a defense mechanism, stopping transport within the vascular system. This prevents further water loss through the flowers but also stops bacteria and fungi from moving to healthy parts of the plant. Once water and nutrient transport stops, the flower begins to wither and ultimately die.
Solutions
Solutions
If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface.
In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well.
If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Prevention
Prevention
This is definitely one of those instances where prevention is more effective than cure. Here are some preventative measures for avoiding premature flower withering.
  • Water plants according to their needs -- either keep the soil slightly moist or allow the top inch or two to dry out before watering again.
  • Fertilize lightly on a consistent basis, depending upon the plant’s growth. Quick-growing plants and those that flower or develop fruit will need more frequent fertilizing than slow-growing plants.
  • Purchase plants that are certified disease- or pathogen-free.
  • Look for disease-resistant cultivars.
  • Isolate plants showing disease symptoms to prevent the spread to neighboring plants.
  • Practice good plant hygiene by removing any fallen plant material as soon as possible.
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Nutrient deficiencies
plant poor
Nutrient deficiencies
A lack of nutrients will cause a widespread yellowing of the leaves. The yellowing may begin at the base or top of the plant.
Overview
Overview
Nutrient deficiencies can be seen in many different ways on plants. Basically, the lack of nutrients will inhibit plant growth, produce weak stems and leaves, and leave plants open to infection from pests and diseases. Plants use the nutrients from the soil to help them with photosynthesis. This, in turn, produces healthy plant growth. Plants that lack adequate amounts of nutrients will look lackluster and unhealthy. Eventually, if this is not addressed, it will cause the plants to die. The most important nutrients that plants need are nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and sulfur. Additionally, plants require small amounts of micronutrients such as iron, boron, manganese, zinc, copper, and molybdenum.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
A common sign that plants are experiencing nutrient deficiencies is the yellowing of leaves. This may be an overall yellowing or leaves that are yellow but still have green veins. These leaves will eventually brown off and die.
Another sign is the loss of plant vigor. The plants may not be growing as well as they should or their growth may be stunted.
Below are some common symptoms that appear when plants are lacking in nutrients.
Nitrogen (N): Inner, older leaves yellow first. If the deficiency is severe, yellowing progresses outward to newer growth.
Potassium (K): Leaf edges may turn brown and crinkly, with a yellowing layer forming just inside of the edge. Older leaves tend to be impacted first.
Phosphorus (P): Lack of vigorous growth. Plants will appear stunted.
Zinc (Zn): Yellowing tends to occur first at the base of the leaf.
Copper (Cu): Newer leaves begin to yellow first, with older leaves yellowing only if the deficiency becomes severe.
Boron (B): Newer leaves are impacted first. Foliage may also become particularly brittle in cases of boron deficiency.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
There are several factors that can lead to nutrient deficiencies, a situation where plants are not receiving the nutrients that they need. This could be because they are planted in nutrient-deficient soils, or that the soil's pH is too high or low. Incorrect soil pH can lock up certain nutrients, thus making them unavailable to plants. Lack of soil moisture can also be a problem, because plants need water to be able to absorb the nutrients from the soil.
Solutions
Solutions
There are several easy ways to remedy the nutrient deficiencies in soils.
  1. Use a water-soluble fertilizer. Fertilizers will include most or all of the macro and micro-nutrients the plants need to thrive. Adding some fertilizer to the soil will make those nutrients available and can combat deficiencies.
  2. Regularly apply organic fertilizer pellets. Organic fertilizers such as animal manures and bonemeal can supply plants with all the nutrients that they need to grow strong and healthy.
  3. Apply compost. Though not as finely tuned as artificial fertilizer, compost can nevertheless be rich in important nutrients and should be applied to the soil regularly.
  4. Apply nutrients via foliar application. In addition to supplementing the soil with nutrients, foliar fertilizer can be applied directly to the plant's leaves. Nutrients offered via foliar application are often taken up even quicker than those put in the soil, so the foliar application can be great for swiftly addressing specific deficiencies.
Prevention
Prevention
There are several easy ways to prevent nutrient deficiencies in plants.
  1. Regular fertilizing. Regular addition of fertilizer to the soil is one of the simplest and most effective ways to prevent deficiencies.
  2. Proper watering. Both over and under watering can adversely impact a plant's roots, which in turn makes it harder for them to properly take up nutrients.
  3. Testing the soil's pH. A soil's acidity or alkalinity will impact the degree to which certain nutrients are available to be taken up by plants. Knowing the soil's pH means it can be amended to suit the needs of the individual plants.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
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unlimited guides at your fingertips...
close
Aged yellow and dry
plant poor
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Overview
Overview
Regardless of the type of plant or where it is grown, at some point, it will begin to aged yellow and dry. This is a natural, unavoidable process that happens when the plant has completed all of the steps in its life.
Annual plants go through this process at the end of a single growing season. Perennial plants live for multiple years, if not tens or hundreds of years, but will still ultimately exhibit these symptoms.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
When plants have progressed through their natural developmental stages and are nearing the end of their lifecycle, they begin showing signs of decline. Leaves will start to yellow and droop, and over time they turn papery brown and dry.
Once completely dry, the leaves begin to fall from the plant until the entire plant has dried out.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
At the end of its life, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence or natural aging and death. Cell division stops, and the plant begins catabolizing resources to use in other parts of the plant.
As this happens, the tissues begin yellow and drying until the entire plant is desiccated and perishes.
Solutions
Solutions
If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Prevention
Prevention
Unfortunately, there is no way to prevent plants from dying of “old age.” To help prolong their life, and put off symptoms of aged yellow and dry for as long as possible, take care of them by giving them enough water, fertilizing them appropriately, and making sure they get enough sunlight.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
close
Branch blight
plant poor
Branch blight
Branch blight can cause lignified branches to dry up entirely and die.
Overview
Overview
"Blight" is an umbrella term used to describe a category of tree diseases caused by fungus or bacteria. Branch blight occurs when fungus attacks the branches and twigs of a tree, resulting in branches slowly dying off.
Branch blight can affect most species of trees to some degree, and it may be called by different names including twig blight or stem blight. It is caused by a variety of fungi which attack branches first, especially immature growth.
Blight usually occurs in warm, humid conditions, so is most common in the spring and summer months. Because specific environmental conditions are required, the frequency of branch blight can vary from year to year. This makes the disease hard to control, as it can spread between trees and affect multiple plants in a short period of time.
In the worst-case scenario, trees can lose significant portions of their foliage and fail to produce fruit. Young or unhealthy trees could die off completely.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The first symptoms of branch blight are that the emerging foliage turns brown or gray at the tips, especially on the smallest branches. Brown spots cover the entire surface of the leaves, eventually causing leaves and stems to shrivel and fall off. Over time, the dying tissue will spread toward the center of the plant. If left untreated, spores from the attacking fungus may appear on dying foliage within 3-4 weeks of the infection.
In some cases, lesions may form at the spot where the twig branches off from the healthy tissue. Branches may display girdling, which is a band of damaged tissue encircling the branch. An untreated tree will eventually lose all of its foliage and die.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
  • Pathogens on young twigs and foliage cause disease
  • Stressed and unhealthy trees are more susceptible - root injury due to physical or insect damage, infection, or aging can prevent adequate absorption of water and nutrients
  • Extremely wet conditions including sprinkler watering can attract fungus
  • Fungi can be transmitted between nearby trees
Solutions
Solutions
  • Inspect trees frequently, and remove any infected branches as soon as possible. Branch blight cannot be cured, so the only treatment is to prune the tree and monitor it carefully for signs of the disease.
  • All affected parts of the tree should be removed, since blight can survive over the winter inside the plant’s tissues.
  • Blight can become systemic in the tree, in which case the entire plant should be removed so it does not remain a host for the pathogen and allow it to spread.
Prevention
Prevention
  • Avoid purchasing trees with dead or dying growth.
  • Sterilize cutting tools frequently when pruning to avoid spreading fungus between plants.
  • Keep trees mulched and watered, especially during dry periods, to prevent stress.
  • Avoid splashing water on the leaves when watering, as wet foliage is attractive to fungi and bacteria.
  • When planting, allow enough room between trees that there will be sufficient air circulation for them to dry out. Crowding trees too close together can increase humidity and allow the fungi to transfer.
  • When conditions are wet and humid, a fungicide can be used on new growth.
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