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Tatarian aster
Tatarian aster
Tatarian aster
Tatarian aster
Tatarian aster
Tatarian aster
Tatarian aster
Aster tataricus
Also known as : Tartarian Aster, Tartarianow's aster
In hanakotoba, the language of flowers in Japan, tatarian aster (Aster tataricus) symbolizes 'I will not forget you.' In Korea, this edible tatarian aster is called 'gaemi-chwi' and is commonly used in traditional Korean cuisine.
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
3 to 7
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care guide

Care Guide for Tatarian aster

Watering Care
Watering Care
Average water needs,watering when the top 3 cm of soil has dried out.
Details on Watering Care Watering Care
Fertilizing Care
Fertilizing Care
Fertilization once in spring.
Details on Fertilizing Care Fertilizing Care
Pruning
Pruning
Trim the diseased, withered leaves once a month.
Details on Pruning Pruning
Soil Care
Soil Care
Sand, Loam, Neutral
Details on Soil Care Soil Care
Repotting
Repotting
Needs excellent drainage in pots.
Details on Repotting Repotting
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Tatarian aster
Water
Water
Every week
Sunlight
Sunlight
Full sun
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
3 to 7
question

Questions About Tatarian aster

Watering Watering Watering
Pruning Pruning Pruning
Sunlight Sunlight Sunlight
Temperature Temperature Temperature
Fertilizing Fertilizing Fertilizing
What is the best way to water my Tatarian aster?
When watering the Tatarian aster, you should aim to use filtered water that is at room temperature. Filtered water is better for this plant, as tap water can contain particles that are harmful to its health. The reason that the water should be at room temperature or slightly warmer is that the Tatarian aster comes from a warm environment, and cold water can be somewhat of a shock to its system. Also, you should avoid overhead watering for this plant, as it can cause foliage complications. Instead, simply apply your filtered room temperature water to the soil until the soil is entirely soaked. Soaking the soil can be very beneficial for this plant as it moistens the roots and helps them continue to spread through the soil and collect the nutrients they need.
Read More more
What should I do if I water my Tatarian aster too much or too little?
Both overwatering and underwatering will be detrimental to the health of your Tatarian aster, but overwatering is a far more common issue. When this species receives too much water, its stems and leaves may begin to wilt and turn from green to yellow. Overwatering over a prolonged period may also lead to diseases such as root rot, mold, and mildew, all of which can kill your plant. Underwatering is far less common for the Tatarian aster, as this plant has decent drought tolerance. However, underwatering remains a possibility, and when it occurs, you can expect to find that the leaves of your Tatarian aster have become brittle and brown.
It is crucial that you notice the signs of overwatering as soon as possible when caring for your Tatarian aster. Some of the diseases that arise from overwatering, such as root rot, may not be correctable if you wait too long. If you see early signs of overwatering, you should reduce your watering schedule immediately. You may also want to assess the quality of soil in which your Tatarian aster grows. If you find that the soil drains very poorly, you should replace it immediately with a loose, well-draining potting mix. On the other hand, if you find signs that your Tatarian aster is receiving too little water, all you need to do is water more regularly until those signs have subsided.
Read More more
How often should I water my Tatarian aster?
If your plant is in a pot. The most precise way to decide whether your Tatarian aster needs water is to plunge your finger into the soil. If you notice that the first two to three inches of soil have become dry, it is time to add some water.
If you grow your Tatarian aster outdoors in the ground, you can use a similar method to test the soil. Again, when you find that the first few inches of soil have dried out, it is time to add water. During the spring and early fall, this method will often lead you to water this plant about once every week. When extremely hot weather arrives, you may need to increase your watering frequency to about twice or more per week. With that said, mature, well-established the Tatarian aster can show an admirable ability to withstand drought.
Read More more
How much water does my Tatarian aster need?
When it comes time to water your Tatarian aster, you should not be shy about how much water you give. With the first two to three inches of soil dry, this plant will appreciate a long and thorough watering. Supply enough water to soak the soil entirely. The amount of water you add should be enough to cause excess water to flow through the drainage holes at the bottom of your pot. If you don’t see excess water draining from the pot, you have likely underwatered your plant. But do not let the water accumulate inside the soil, which will be very dangerous to the plant as well. Alternatively, a lack of water draining through the pot could indicate poorly draining soils, which is detrimental to the health of this plant and should be avoided. If the plant is outside, 1 inch of rain per week will be sufficient.
Read More more
How should I water my Tatarian aster at different growth stages?
The water needs of the Tatarian aster can change depending on growth stages as well. For example, when your Tatarian aster is in the first few years of its life, or if you have just transplanted it to a new growing location, you will need to give more water than usual. During both of those stages, your Tatarian aster will put a lot of energy towards sprouting new roots that will then support future growth. For those roots to perform their best, they need a bit more moisture than they would at a more mature phase. After a few seasons, your Tatarian aster will need much less water. Another growth stage in which this plant may need more water is during the bloom period. Flower development can make use of a significant amount of moisture, which is why you might need to give your Tatarian aster more water at this time.
Read More more
How should I water my Tatarian aster through the seasons?
The Tatarian aster will have its highest water needs during the hottest months of the year. During the height of summer, you may need to give this plant water more than once per week, depending on how fast the soil dries out. The opposite is true during the winter. In winter, your plant will enter a dormant phase, in which it will need far less water than usual. In fact, you may not need to water this plant at all during the winter months. However, if you do water during winter, you should not do so more than about once per month. Watering too much at this time will make it more likely that your Tatarian aster will contract a disease.
Read More more
What's the difference between watering my Tatarian aster indoors and outdoors?
It is most common to grow the Tatarian aster indoors for any gardener that does not live in temperate and tropical regions. Those gardeners should consider the fact that soil in a container can dry out a bit faster than ground soil. Also, the presence of drying elements such as air conditioning units can cause your Tatarian aster to need water on a more frequent basis as well. if you planted it outside. When that is the case, it’s likely you won’t need to water your Tatarian aster very much at all. If you receive rainfall on a regular basis, that may be enough to keep your plant alive. Alternatively, those who grow this plant inside will need to water it more often, as allowing rainwater to soak the soil will not be an option.
Read More more
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Key Facts About Tatarian aster

Attributes of Tatarian aster

Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Herb
Planting Time
Spring
Bloom Time
Fall
Plant Height
40 cm to 50 cm
Spread
1.2 m
Flower Size
2.5 cm to 4.5 cm
Flower Color
Yellow
Pink
Purple
Leaf type
Deciduous

Symbolism

Memory and true love

Usages

Garden Use
Tatarian aster is an herbaceous perennial commonly found in fall gardens. It is prized for its showy star-shaped flowers and late-season blooming. Its tall stature and clumping nature makes it suitable for the back of beds and borders. Tatarian aster is appropriate for pollinator or wildflower gardens and works well with cornflowers or goldenrods for color contrast.

Trivia and Interesting Facts

Legend has it that the tatarian aster is used as an image of a deceased person and given to comfort their loved one. In autumn, you will find this purple flower around graves. The loved one looks at the little flower, and it is as if they are looking at their missed loved one, and they are flooded with beautiful memories and thoughts.

Scientific Classification of Tatarian aster

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pests

Common Pests & Diseases About Tatarian aster

Common issues for Tatarian aster based on 10 million real cases
Flower withering
Flower withering Flower withering
Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Solutions: If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible. For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface. In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well. If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles are a class of colored insects 1 to 2 cm in size. They gnaw on leaves and petals resulting in small, round holes scattered over the surface.
Solutions: For less serious cases: Remove beetles, nymphs, and eggs. Remove all life stages of the beetles and kill them by placing them in a bucket of warm, soapy water. This can be done more easily by placing the bucket under affected leaves and shaking the plant. This method is most effective in the afternoon when leaf beetles are more active. Always dispose of insects in a sealed bag or container to avoid escape and spread. To treat more serious infestations: Apply organic insecticides. Use naturally-derived insecticides before moving on to synthetic insecticides. Neem oil and pyrethrum are naturally-derived insecticides that should be applied following label instructions. Apply synthetic insecticides. Examples of insecticides effective for leaf beetles include carbaryl, permethrin, and bifenthrin. Apply insecticides according to label instructions.
Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Solutions: If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
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Flower withering
plant poor
Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Overview
Overview
Flower withering occurs when flowers become weak, droopy, wilted, or faded until they can’t be revived. During withering, they begin to wrinkle and shrink until the flower becomes completely dry or dead.
Any flowers, regardless of the plant type or the climate they are grown in, are susceptible to withering. It is a worldwide problem across houseplants, herbs, flowering ornamentals, trees, shrubs, garden vegetables, and food crops.
Unlike wilting—which withering is often confused with—withering can be caused by different things and is often due to more than a lack of water. Withering can be fatal in severe cases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Flower withering progresses from very mild cases to severe occurrences that kill the flower. The severity of the symptoms is related to the cause and how long the condition is allowed to progress before action is taken.
  • Wilted, droopy flowers
  • Petals and leaves begin to wrinkle
  • Brown papery streaks or spots appear on the petals and leaf tips
  • Flowerhead shrink in size
  • Petal color fades
  • Yellowing leaves
  • Complete death of the flower
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The main causes of flower withering include natural age progress, lack of water, nutritional deficiencies, and bacterial or fungal diseases. It’s critical to determine the underlying cause when flower withering is noticed. This will guide the best course of action, if treatment is possible.
Check the soil for moisture and then closely examine the entire plant for signs of nutrient deficiencies. If neither of those appears to be the cause then cut open the stem below a flower. If a cross-section reveals brown or rust-colored stains it is safe to assume that this is a bacterial or fungal infection.
If the flower is nearing the end of its normal lifespan, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence, or cell aging and death. Cell division stops and the plant begins breaking down resources within the flower to use in other parts of the plant.
In all other cases, flower withering happens when the plant seals off the stem as a defense mechanism, stopping transport within the vascular system. This prevents further water loss through the flowers but also stops bacteria and fungi from moving to healthy parts of the plant. Once water and nutrient transport stops, the flower begins to wither and ultimately die.
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Leaf beetles
plant poor
Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles are a class of colored insects 1 to 2 cm in size. They gnaw on leaves and petals resulting in small, round holes scattered over the surface.
Overview
Overview
Leaf beetles range in size from 1.5 mm to 2 cm. Both adult beetles and their larvae eat the leaves of many different types of plants. There are over 35,000 different species of leaf beetles, in a variety of colors including gold, green, yellow-striped, and red striped. Some of these have been mistaken for ladybirds because of their shape and coloring. They can be oval, round, or elongated in shape. These insect pests are most active in spring and summer.
If not controlled, leaf beetles can do a lot of damage to vegetable crops and ornamental plants. They feed on the leaves, flowers, stems, roots, and fruits of different plants. They can fly, which means it's easy for them to move from one plant to another. Some species of leaf beetles only target one specific crop, while others will target many different types of plants. Although a lot of the damage that they cause is cosmetic, an infestation can weaken a plant and leave it prone to other more problematic diseases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The first signs of a leaf beetles infestation are small visible holes in leaves. Leaves then become discolored and dark beetle droppings can be seen. As the leaves turn yellow and brown, they will drop off the plant onto the ground. Some leaves will appear skeletonized with only the veins still remaining.
Infestation begins in spring, when the adult beetles emerge from the soil and lay their eggs on the leaves of plants. When these eggs hatch, the young nymphs start munching on the leaves as they grow up. Once leaf beetles are large and mature, they'll fall to the ground and pupate in the soil over winter before starting the cycle all over again.
Leaf beetles also eat holes in fruits and vegetables. These can be seen as small round holes that sometimes have a larger brown area surrounding them.
Solutions
Solutions
For less serious cases:
  1. Remove beetles, nymphs, and eggs. Remove all life stages of the beetles and kill them by placing them in a bucket of warm, soapy water. This can be done more easily by placing the bucket under affected leaves and shaking the plant. This method is most effective in the afternoon when leaf beetles are more active. Always dispose of insects in a sealed bag or container to avoid escape and spread.
To treat more serious infestations:
  1. Apply organic insecticides. Use naturally-derived insecticides before moving on to synthetic insecticides. Neem oil and pyrethrum are naturally-derived insecticides that should be applied following label instructions.
  2. Apply synthetic insecticides. Examples of insecticides effective for leaf beetles include carbaryl, permethrin, and bifenthrin. Apply insecticides according to label instructions.
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Aged yellow and dry
plant poor
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Overview
Overview
Regardless of the type of plant or where it is grown, at some point, it will begin to aged yellow and dry. This is a natural, unavoidable process that happens when the plant has completed all of the steps in its life.
Annual plants go through this process at the end of a single growing season. Perennial plants live for multiple years, if not tens or hundreds of years, but will still ultimately exhibit these symptoms.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
When plants have progressed through their natural developmental stages and are nearing the end of their lifecycle, they begin showing signs of decline. Leaves will start to yellow and droop, and over time they turn papery brown and dry.
Once completely dry, the leaves begin to fall from the plant until the entire plant has dried out.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
At the end of its life, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence or natural aging and death. Cell division stops, and the plant begins catabolizing resources to use in other parts of the plant.
As this happens, the tissues begin yellow and drying until the entire plant is desiccated and perishes.
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distribution

Distribution of Tatarian aster

Habitat of Tatarian aster

Marshy
Northern Hemisphere
South Hemisphere

Distribution Map of Tatarian aster

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
habit
care_scenes

More Info on Tatarian Aster Growth and Care

Basic Care Guide
Explore More
Lighting
Full sun
The tatarian aster thrives best when exposed to plentiful amount of sunlight, supporting its vibrant growth. Despite its preference for sunlight-rich environments, it can also survive under partially sunny conditions. Excess or lack of sun, however, can impact its health and vibrancy.
Best Sunlight Practices
Temperature
-30 35 ℃
Tatarian aster is indigenous to habitats with moderate temperature regimes, thriving best in the range of 32 to 90 °F (0 to 32 ℃). Care should be taken to maintain this temperature range throughout the seasons for optimal growth.
Temp for Healthy Growth
Transplant
2-3 feet
The perfect time to transplant tatarian aster would be during what we call the 'Golden Window', falling between late summer and early autumn (S2-S3). This allows the plant to establish roots before winter. Tatarian aster thrives best in sunny spots with well-drained soil. Be careful not to cover the crown during transplantation; it could lead to rot. Remember, patience and attention to detail is essential for a successful transplant.
Transplant Techniques
Feng shui direction
North
The tatarian aster is a vigorous plant, exuding a lively Qi that is attuned to the dynamic properties of the North. Its upright resilience mirrors the immovable determination of the Water Element, which governs the North direction in Feng Shui. A word of caution, the intensity of the energy harnessed can bring both harmony and discord, depending on individual residence energy patterns.
Fengshui Details
other_plant

Plants Related to Tatarian aster

Jewel orchid
Jewel orchid
Commonly known as the jewel orchid, Ludisia discolor is native to Southern China, Thailand, India, Malaysia, Indonesia, Burma, and Vietnam. Prized for its unusual foliage, it is often used as a houseplant. It is considered easier to care for than other orchids, provided it is kept moist.
Jellybeans
Jellybeans
Jellybeans (Sedum pachyphyllum) is a succulent plant native to Mexico and popularized as a houseplant. Jellybeans is an easy plant to care for and good for beginners in houseplants and gardening. It can survive in both moist and dry soil and survives without watering for longer periods of time than most plants.
Japanese tree lilac
Japanese tree lilac
The japanese tree lilac is a fragrant flowering tree native to northern China that is perfect for the garden or street. With full sun and moderate water, its masses of small blooms will appear in early summer and emit a pleasant scent. Though the japanese tree lilac is relatively hardy on the whole, the flowers are susceptible to late frosts.
Japanese anemone
Japanese anemone
Japanese anemone (Eriocapitella tomentosa) is a plant species native to temperate zones around the world, but without a known specific point of origin. This species blooms from midsummer to autumn.
Green Gold
Green Gold
Green Gold (Bupleurum rotundifolium) is a herbaceous hardy annual plant that will grow to 41 cm tall. The blue-green foliage has a round shape and along with its flower cluster looks great in cut flower arrangements. It blooms in summer with clusters of yellow blossoms. It grows best in full sun and well-drained soils. It is easy to germinate and grow from seed.
French lavender
French lavender
French lavender (Lavandula dentata), also referred to as fringed lavender, is a tall, flowering, and fragrant plant. French lavender is native to the Mediterranean. The distinctive purple flowers of this species emit a strong, recognizable fragrance. It is often grown as an ornamental plant and is used in the production of essential oils, beauty products, candles, and household cleaning products.
Cape jasmine
Cape jasmine
Gardenia jasminoides is an evergreen shrub with unique, glossy evergreen leaves and stunning flowers. The sophisticated, matte white flowers are often used in bouquets. The exceptional beauty of this ornamental plant has made it a popular and highly appreciated plant amongst gardeners and horticulturalists.
Golden pothos
Golden pothos
The golden pothos (Epipremnum aureum) is a popular houseplant that is commonly seen in Australia, Asia, and the West Indies. It goes by many nicknames, including "devil's ivy", because it is so hard to kill and can even grow in low light conditions. Golden pothos has poisonous sap, so it should be kept away from pets and children.
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About
Care Guide
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Pests & Diseases
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More About How-Tos
Related Plants
Tatarian aster
Tatarian aster
Tatarian aster
Tatarian aster
Tatarian aster
Tatarian aster
Tatarian aster
Aster tataricus
Also known as: Tartarian Aster, Tartarianow's aster
In hanakotoba, the language of flowers in Japan, tatarian aster (Aster tataricus) symbolizes 'I will not forget you.' In Korea, this edible tatarian aster is called 'gaemi-chwi' and is commonly used in traditional Korean cuisine.
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
3 to 7
more
question

Questions About Tatarian aster

Watering Watering Watering
Pruning Pruning Pruning
Sunlight Sunlight Sunlight
Temperature Temperature Temperature
Fertilizing Fertilizing Fertilizing
What is the best way to water my Tatarian aster?
more
What should I do if I water my Tatarian aster too much or too little?
more
How often should I water my Tatarian aster?
more
How much water does my Tatarian aster need?
more
How should I water my Tatarian aster at different growth stages?
more
How should I water my Tatarian aster through the seasons?
more
What's the difference between watering my Tatarian aster indoors and outdoors?
more
icon
Get tips and tricks for your plants.
Keep your plants happy and healthy with our guide to watering, lighting, feeding and more.
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close
plant_info

Key Facts About Tatarian aster

Attributes of Tatarian aster

Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Herb
Planting Time
Spring
Bloom Time
Fall
Plant Height
40 cm to 50 cm
Spread
1.2 m
Flower Size
2.5 cm to 4.5 cm
Flower Color
Yellow
Pink
Purple
Leaf type
Deciduous
icon
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Symbolism

Memory and true love

Usages

Garden Use
Tatarian aster is an herbaceous perennial commonly found in fall gardens. It is prized for its showy star-shaped flowers and late-season blooming. Its tall stature and clumping nature makes it suitable for the back of beds and borders. Tatarian aster is appropriate for pollinator or wildflower gardens and works well with cornflowers or goldenrods for color contrast.

Trivia and Interesting Facts

Legend has it that the tatarian aster is used as an image of a deceased person and given to comfort their loved one. In autumn, you will find this purple flower around graves. The loved one looks at the little flower, and it is as if they are looking at their missed loved one, and they are flooded with beautiful memories and thoughts.

Scientific Classification of Tatarian aster

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pests

Common Pests & Diseases About Tatarian aster

Common issues for Tatarian aster based on 10 million real cases
Flower withering
Flower withering Flower withering Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Solutions: If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible. For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface. In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well. If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Learn More About the Flower withering more
Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles Leaf beetles Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles are a class of colored insects 1 to 2 cm in size. They gnaw on leaves and petals resulting in small, round holes scattered over the surface.
Solutions: For less serious cases: Remove beetles, nymphs, and eggs. Remove all life stages of the beetles and kill them by placing them in a bucket of warm, soapy water. This can be done more easily by placing the bucket under affected leaves and shaking the plant. This method is most effective in the afternoon when leaf beetles are more active. Always dispose of insects in a sealed bag or container to avoid escape and spread. To treat more serious infestations: Apply organic insecticides. Use naturally-derived insecticides before moving on to synthetic insecticides. Neem oil and pyrethrum are naturally-derived insecticides that should be applied following label instructions. Apply synthetic insecticides. Examples of insecticides effective for leaf beetles include carbaryl, permethrin, and bifenthrin. Apply insecticides according to label instructions.
Learn More About the Leaf beetles more
Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry Aged yellow and dry Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Solutions: If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Learn More About the Aged yellow and dry more
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Flower withering
plant poor
Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Overview
Overview
Flower withering occurs when flowers become weak, droopy, wilted, or faded until they can’t be revived. During withering, they begin to wrinkle and shrink until the flower becomes completely dry or dead.
Any flowers, regardless of the plant type or the climate they are grown in, are susceptible to withering. It is a worldwide problem across houseplants, herbs, flowering ornamentals, trees, shrubs, garden vegetables, and food crops.
Unlike wilting—which withering is often confused with—withering can be caused by different things and is often due to more than a lack of water. Withering can be fatal in severe cases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Flower withering progresses from very mild cases to severe occurrences that kill the flower. The severity of the symptoms is related to the cause and how long the condition is allowed to progress before action is taken.
  • Wilted, droopy flowers
  • Petals and leaves begin to wrinkle
  • Brown papery streaks or spots appear on the petals and leaf tips
  • Flowerhead shrink in size
  • Petal color fades
  • Yellowing leaves
  • Complete death of the flower
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The main causes of flower withering include natural age progress, lack of water, nutritional deficiencies, and bacterial or fungal diseases. It’s critical to determine the underlying cause when flower withering is noticed. This will guide the best course of action, if treatment is possible.
Check the soil for moisture and then closely examine the entire plant for signs of nutrient deficiencies. If neither of those appears to be the cause then cut open the stem below a flower. If a cross-section reveals brown or rust-colored stains it is safe to assume that this is a bacterial or fungal infection.
If the flower is nearing the end of its normal lifespan, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence, or cell aging and death. Cell division stops and the plant begins breaking down resources within the flower to use in other parts of the plant.
In all other cases, flower withering happens when the plant seals off the stem as a defense mechanism, stopping transport within the vascular system. This prevents further water loss through the flowers but also stops bacteria and fungi from moving to healthy parts of the plant. Once water and nutrient transport stops, the flower begins to wither and ultimately die.
Solutions
Solutions
If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface.
In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well.
If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Prevention
Prevention
This is definitely one of those instances where prevention is more effective than cure. Here are some preventative measures for avoiding premature flower withering.
  • Water plants according to their needs -- either keep the soil slightly moist or allow the top inch or two to dry out before watering again.
  • Fertilize lightly on a consistent basis, depending upon the plant’s growth. Quick-growing plants and those that flower or develop fruit will need more frequent fertilizing than slow-growing plants.
  • Purchase plants that are certified disease- or pathogen-free.
  • Look for disease-resistant cultivars.
  • Isolate plants showing disease symptoms to prevent the spread to neighboring plants.
  • Practice good plant hygiene by removing any fallen plant material as soon as possible.
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Leaf beetles
plant poor
Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles are a class of colored insects 1 to 2 cm in size. They gnaw on leaves and petals resulting in small, round holes scattered over the surface.
Overview
Overview
Leaf beetles range in size from 1.5 mm to 2 cm. Both adult beetles and their larvae eat the leaves of many different types of plants. There are over 35,000 different species of leaf beetles, in a variety of colors including gold, green, yellow-striped, and red striped. Some of these have been mistaken for ladybirds because of their shape and coloring. They can be oval, round, or elongated in shape. These insect pests are most active in spring and summer.
If not controlled, leaf beetles can do a lot of damage to vegetable crops and ornamental plants. They feed on the leaves, flowers, stems, roots, and fruits of different plants. They can fly, which means it's easy for them to move from one plant to another. Some species of leaf beetles only target one specific crop, while others will target many different types of plants. Although a lot of the damage that they cause is cosmetic, an infestation can weaken a plant and leave it prone to other more problematic diseases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The first signs of a leaf beetles infestation are small visible holes in leaves. Leaves then become discolored and dark beetle droppings can be seen. As the leaves turn yellow and brown, they will drop off the plant onto the ground. Some leaves will appear skeletonized with only the veins still remaining.
Infestation begins in spring, when the adult beetles emerge from the soil and lay their eggs on the leaves of plants. When these eggs hatch, the young nymphs start munching on the leaves as they grow up. Once leaf beetles are large and mature, they'll fall to the ground and pupate in the soil over winter before starting the cycle all over again.
Leaf beetles also eat holes in fruits and vegetables. These can be seen as small round holes that sometimes have a larger brown area surrounding them.
Solutions
Solutions
For less serious cases:
  1. Remove beetles, nymphs, and eggs. Remove all life stages of the beetles and kill them by placing them in a bucket of warm, soapy water. This can be done more easily by placing the bucket under affected leaves and shaking the plant. This method is most effective in the afternoon when leaf beetles are more active. Always dispose of insects in a sealed bag or container to avoid escape and spread.
To treat more serious infestations:
  1. Apply organic insecticides. Use naturally-derived insecticides before moving on to synthetic insecticides. Neem oil and pyrethrum are naturally-derived insecticides that should be applied following label instructions.
  2. Apply synthetic insecticides. Examples of insecticides effective for leaf beetles include carbaryl, permethrin, and bifenthrin. Apply insecticides according to label instructions.
Prevention
Prevention
To prevent infestations of leaf beetles, follow these practices.
  1. Regularly check for beetles. To prevent large pest infestations, be proactive about frequently checking plants for pests and removing them quickly.
  2. Clear debris. Clear weeds and debris to remove areas where these beetles may overwinter and hide.
  3. Attract natural predators. Birds and other insects, such as wasps and ladybugs, are effective natural predators of leaf beetles. Encourage them to visit by including a diverse array of plants to provide habitat and food. Also, avoid applying broad-spectrum herbicides that can harm and kill beneficial insects.
  4. Plant aromatic herbs like mint, garlic, or rosemary, as these can repel leaf beetles.
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Aged yellow and dry
plant poor
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Overview
Overview
Regardless of the type of plant or where it is grown, at some point, it will begin to aged yellow and dry. This is a natural, unavoidable process that happens when the plant has completed all of the steps in its life.
Annual plants go through this process at the end of a single growing season. Perennial plants live for multiple years, if not tens or hundreds of years, but will still ultimately exhibit these symptoms.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
When plants have progressed through their natural developmental stages and are nearing the end of their lifecycle, they begin showing signs of decline. Leaves will start to yellow and droop, and over time they turn papery brown and dry.
Once completely dry, the leaves begin to fall from the plant until the entire plant has dried out.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
At the end of its life, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence or natural aging and death. Cell division stops, and the plant begins catabolizing resources to use in other parts of the plant.
As this happens, the tissues begin yellow and drying until the entire plant is desiccated and perishes.
Solutions
Solutions
If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Prevention
Prevention
Unfortunately, there is no way to prevent plants from dying of “old age.” To help prolong their life, and put off symptoms of aged yellow and dry for as long as possible, take care of them by giving them enough water, fertilizing them appropriately, and making sure they get enough sunlight.
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distribution

Distribution of Tatarian aster

Habitat of Tatarian aster

Marshy
Northern Hemisphere
South Hemisphere

Distribution Map of Tatarian aster

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
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More Info on Tatarian Aster Growth and Care

Basic Care Guide
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Plants Related to Tatarian aster

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Lighting
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Indoor
Indoor
Outdoor
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Requirements
Full sun
Ideal
Above 6 hours sunlight
Partial sun
Tolerance
About 3-6 hours sunlight
Watch how sunlight gracefully moves through your garden, and choose spots that provide the perfect balance of light and shade for your plants, ensuring their happiness.
Essentials
The tatarian aster thrives best when exposed to plentiful amount of sunlight, supporting its vibrant growth. Despite its preference for sunlight-rich environments, it can also survive under partially sunny conditions. Excess or lack of sun, however, can impact its health and vibrancy.
Preferred
Tolerable
Unsuitable
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Artificial lighting
Indoor plants require adequate lighting for optimal growth. When natural sunlight is insufficient, particularly in winter or in less sunny spaces, artificial lights offer a vital solution, promoting faster, healthier growth.
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Indoor plants require adequate lighting for optimal growth. When natural sunlight is insufficient, particularly in winter or in less sunny spaces, artificial lights offer a vital solution, promoting faster, healthier growth.
1. Choose the right type of artificial light: LED lights are a popular choice for indoor plant lighting because they can be customized to provide the specific wavelengths of light that your plants need.
Full sun plants need 30-50W/sq ft of artificial light, partial sun plants need 20-30W/sq ft, and full shade plants need 10-20W/sq ft.
2. Determine the appropriate distance: Place the light source 12-36 inches above the plant to mimic natural sunlight.
3. Determine the duration: Mimic the length of natural daylight hours for your plant species. most plants need 8-12 hours of light per day.
Important Symptoms
Insufficient light
Tatarian aster thrives in full sunlight and is commonly grown outdoors where it receives ample sunlight. When placed in rooms with inadequate lighting, symptoms of light deficiency may not be readily apparent.
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(Symptom details and solutions)
Small leaves
New leaves may grow smaller in size compared to the previous ones once they have matured.
Leggy or sparse growth
The spaces between leaves or stems of your Tatarian aster may become longer, resulting in a thin and stretched-out appearance. This can make the plant look sparse and weak, and it may easily break or lean due to its own weight.
Faster leaf drop
When plants are exposed to low light conditions, they tend to shed older leaves early to conserve resources. Within a limited time, these resources can be utilized to grow new leaves until the plant's energy reserves are depleted.
Slower or no new growth
Tatarian aster enters a survival mode when light conditions are poor, which leads to a halt in leaf production. As a result, the plant's growth becomes delayed or stops altogether.
Lighter-colored new leaves
Insufficient sunlight can cause leaves to develop irregular color patterns or appear pale. This indicates a lack of chlorophyll and essential nutrients.
Solutions
1. To ensure optimal growth, gradually move plants to a sunnier location each week, until they receive at least 6 hours of direct sunlight daily. Use a south-facing window and keep curtains open during the day for maximum sunlight exposure and nutrient accumulation.2. To provide additional light for your plant, consider using artificial light if it's large or not easily movable. Keep a desk or ceiling lamp on for at least 8 hours daily, or invest in professional plant grow lights for ample light.
Excessive light
Tatarian aster thrives in full sun exposure and can tolerate intense sunlight. With their remarkable resilience, symptoms of sunburn may not be easily visible, as they rarely suffer from it.
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(Symptom details and solutions)
Chlorosis
Chlorosis is a condition where the plant's leaves lose their green color and turn yellow. This is due to the breakdown of chlorophyll from excessive sunlight, which negatively affects the plant's ability to photosynthesize.
Sunscald
Sunscald occurs when the plant's leaves or stems are damaged by intense sunlight exposure. It appears as pale, bleached, or necrotic areas on the plant tissue and can reduce the plant's overall health.
Leaf Curling
Leaf curling is a symptom where leaves curl or twist under extreme sunlight conditions. This is a defense mechanism used by the plant to reduce its surface area exposed to sunlight, minimizing water loss and damage.
Wilting
Wilting occurs when a plant loses turgor pressure and its leaves and stems begin to droop. Overexposure to sunlight can cause wilting by increasing the plant's water loss through transpiration, making it difficult for the plant to maintain adequate hydration.
Leaf Scorching
Leaf scorching is a symptom characterized by the appearance of brown, dry, and crispy edges or patches on leaves due to excessive sunlight. This can lead to a reduction in photosynthetic capacity and overall plant health.
Solutions
1. Move your plant to the optimal position where it can receive abundant sunlight but also have some shade. An east-facing window is an ideal choice as the morning sunlight is gentler. This way, your plant can enjoy ample sunlight while reducing the risk of sunburn.2. It is recommended to trim off any completely dehydrated or withered parts of the plant.
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Temperature
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Indoor
Outdoor
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Requirements
Ideal
Tolerable
Unsuitable
Just like people, each plant has its own preferences. Learn about your plants' temperature needs and create a comforting environment for them to flourish. As you care for your plants, your bond with them will deepen. Trust your intuition as you learn about their temperature needs, celebrating the journey you share. Lovingly monitor the temperature around your plants and adjust their environment as needed. A thermometer can be your ally in this heartfelt endeavor. Be patient and gentle with yourself as you explore your plants' temperature needs. Cherish your successes, learn from challenges, and nurture your garden with love, creating a haven that reflects the warmth of your care.
Essentials
Tatarian aster is indigenous to habitats with moderate temperature regimes, thriving best in the range of 32 to 90 °F (0 to 32 ℃). Care should be taken to maintain this temperature range throughout the seasons for optimal growth.
Regional wintering strategies
Tatarian aster is highly cold-tolerant and does not require additional frost protection measures during winter. However, before the first freeze in autumn, it is recommended to water the plant generously to ensure the soil remains moist and enters a frozen state. This helps prevent drought and water scarcity for the plant during winter and early spring.
Important Symptoms
Low Temperature
Tatarian aster is extremely cold-tolerant, but the winter temperature should be maintained above {Limit_growth_temperature}. If the temperature drops below this threshold, although there may not be any noticeable changes during winter, there may be a decrease in sprouting or even no sprouting during springtime.
Solutions
In spring, remove any parts that have failed to sprout.
High Temperature
Tatarian aster is not tolerant to high temperatures. When the temperature exceeds {Suitable_growth_temperature_max}, its growth will stop, and it becomes more susceptible to rot.
Solutions
Trim away the sunburned and dried-up parts. Move the plant to a location that provides shade from the midday and afternoon sun, or use a shade cloth to create shade. Water the plant in the morning and evening to keep the soil moist.
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Transplant
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How to Successfully Transplant Tatarian Aster?
The perfect time to transplant tatarian aster would be during what we call the 'Golden Window', falling between late summer and early autumn (S2-S3). This allows the plant to establish roots before winter. Tatarian aster thrives best in sunny spots with well-drained soil. Be careful not to cover the crown during transplantation; it could lead to rot. Remember, patience and attention to detail is essential for a successful transplant.
What Preparations are Needed Before Transplanting Tatarian Aster?
What is the Ideal Time for Transplanting Tatarian Aster?
The ideal period for transplanting tatarian aster is between late spring and early summer (S2-S3). This season provides optimal growing conditions and ample time for tatarian aster to establish its roots. Transplanting tatarian aster during this timeframe can lead to a healthier, more vibrant plant with a higher survival chance. Take advantage of this ideal planting time for a flourishing tatarian aster garden.
How Much Space Should You Leave Between Tatarian Aster Plants?
Start with spacing your tatarian aster saplings about 2-3 feet (60-90 cm) apart. This gives them ample room to spread out and grow without crowding each other. Remember, a little extra room now will contribute to healthier growth later.
What is the Best Soil Mix for Tatarian Aster Transplanting?
For your tatarian aster, opt for well-drained soil. Mix some base fertilizer into the soil before planting. This enriched soil will provide a nutrient-rich starting point for your tatarian aster to establish itself. Balanced granular or liquid fertilizers work well in this case.
Where Should You Relocate Your Tatarian Aster?
Locate a sunny spot in your garden for the tatarian aster. They flourish under full sunlight. However, they can tolerate partial shade as well. This sunlight pattern helps them produce their best color and growth.
What Equipments Should You Prepare Before Transplantation Tatarian Aster?
Gardening Gloves
To protect your hands while working with soil and plant.
Spade or Shovel
To dig around the plant for removing from its original location and for preparing the hole at the new location.
Wheelbarrow or Gardening Cart
To move the removed plant comfortably.
Garden Fork
To loosen the soil in the new location.
Watering Can or Hose
To water the plant before and after transplanting.
How Do You Remove Tatarian Aster from the Soil?
From Ground: First, water the tatarian aster plant to dampen the soil. Gently dig around the plant 6-12 inches away from the stem using a spade or shovel. This is done to preserve as many roots as possible to ensure successful transplanting. Once the plant is loose, gently lift it from the ground.
From pot: Water the tatarian aster plant adequately. Turn the pot upside down, holding the plant at its base with your fingers spread on each side. Gently tap the pot’s rim on a hard surface to loosen the root ball and carefully slide the plant out of the pot.
From seedling tray: The tatarian aster plant is usually ready for transplanting when it has at least two sets of true leaves. Moisten the soil and carefully lift the seedling out, holding them by their leaves to avoid damaging the stem or roots.
Step-by-Step Guide for Transplanting Tatarian Aster
Step1 Site Selection
Choose a location with adequate space for the tatarian aster to grow to its mature size.
Step2 Hole Preparation
Prepare a hole as deep as and twice as wide as the root ball using a spade.
Step3 Checking the Plant
Examine the roots and prune any that are broken or damaged. This will encourage fresh growth and stronger roots post-transplant.
Step4 Placing the Plant
Place the plant in the hole with the top of the root ball level with the ground surface.
Step5 Backfilling the Hole
Backfill the hole with soil, firmly pressing it around the root ball. This will eliminate any air pockets.
Step6 Watering
Water the tatarian aster plant well. Ensure that the soil is adequately moistened but not waterlogged.
How Do You Care For Tatarian Aster After Transplanting?
Mulching
Apply a 2-3 inches layer of organic mulch around (but not touching) the stem. This will help retain moisture and suppress weeds.
Protection
Protect the newly transplanted plant from intense sunlight and strong winds until it establishes itself. In case of severe weather, consider setting a protective barrier around the plant.
Monitoring
Keep an eye on the plant's post-transplant growth. If the tatarian aster shows sign of wilting, it may need more water. On other hand, yellow or brown leaves could imply overwatering.
Maintenance
Do not fertilize immediately after transplanting as the roots are too fragile. Wait for about a month before fortifying it with a slow-release fertilizer.
Troubleshooting Common Issues with Tatarian Aster Transplantation.
When is the best time to transplant tatarian aster?
The ideal period to move tatarian aster is during its second to third growing stages, which generally coincides with late spring to early summer. This gives them ample time to become established before the cold sets in.
How much space should I leave between tatarian aster plants?
For healthy growth, provide ample space of approximately 2-3 feet (60-90 cm) between each tatarian aster plant. This allows them to grow and spread without intruding on each other's space.
What kind of soil is best for transplanting tatarian aster?
Tatarian aster thrives in well-drained soil rich in organic matter. Opt for a soil that drains quickly but holds enough moisture to support the plant's growth.
How should I prepare the spot to transplant tatarian aster?
First, you should loosen the soil to a depth of about 12 inches (30 cm). Improve the site with some compost or organic matter. This will create a fertile foundation for tatarian aster.
What is the correct technique to dig up tatarian aster for transplanting?
Use a pointy spade to dig around tatarian aster, starting a few inches away from the stem. Gently lift the plant from the bottom to keep as many roots intact as possible.
How deep should I plant tatarian aster during transplantation?
Tatarian aster should be planted at the same level it was growing in its previous location. As a rule of thumb, the hole for the transplant should be twice as wide and the same depth as the root ball.
Should I fertilize tatarian aster immediately after transplanting?
Avoid using strong fertilizer right after transplanting. Instead, enrich the soil with compost or a mild organic-based feed. As tatarian aster begins to establish, you can adjust the feeding accordingly.
How much should I water tatarian aster after transplanting?
Once transplanted, water tatarian aster thoroughly. Thereafter, establish a consistent watering schedule depending on the weather. The key is to keep the soil moist, but not overly saturated.
My transplanted tatarian aster appears wilted. What should I do?
Don't panic if tatarian aster wilts a bit after transplanting. It's common while the plant adjusts to its new home. Keep it watered and it should perk up after a few days.
Why are the leaves of my transplanted tatarian aster turning yellow?
Yellowing leaves could be due to transplant shock, overwatering, or nutrient deficiency. Review your care routine. If everything seems fine, you might consider having the soil tested for nutrient content.
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