Home City Plants Application
English
English
繁體中文
日本語
Español
Français
Deutsch
Pусский
Português
Italiano
한국어
Nederlands
العربية
Svenska
Polskie
ภาษาไทย
Bahasa Melayu
Bahasa Indonesia
email
Your free 7-day Premium hasn’t been claimed yet. Click to claim.
more icon close icon
about about
About
care_guide care_guide
Care Guide
topic topic
Care FAQ
pests pests
Pests & Diseases
distribution_map distribution_map
Distribution
plant_info plant_info
More Info
more_plants more_plants
Related Plants
articles articles
Related Articles
pic top
Red Fescue
Red Fescue
Red Fescue
Red Fescue
Red Fescue
Red Fescue
Add to My Garden
Red Fescue
Festuca rubra
Red Fescue (Festuca rubra) is a perennial grass that makes an excellent ground cover and is often planted for erosion control. It thrives in full sun to shade, and is often planted for its shade tolerance. Can be manicured like turf grass or left longer. Its thin, needle-like leaves dance in the wind to add movement to the garden.
Water
Every week
Water
care guide

Care Guide for Red Fescue

Water
Water
Moisture-loving, keep the soil moist but do not let water accumulate.
Fertilization
Fertilization
Fertilization once in spring.
Pruning
Pruning
Trim the diseased, withered leaves once a month.
Soil
Soil
Sand, Loam, Acidic, Neutral, Alkaline
Potting Suggestions
Potting Suggestions
Needs excellent drainage in pots.
care guide bg
Tips, advice, and instructions for over 13,000 species that you will find nowhere else
Picture This
A Botanist in Your Pocket
qrcode
Scan QR code to download
label
cover
Red Fescue
Water
Water
Every week
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
4a - 10b
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Winter
bg
tip
Download and print this plant care card and attach it to your plants
download btn
Download
close
label label
cover
Red Fescue
Water
Water
Every week
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
4a - 10b
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Winter
download btn
Download
label label
cover
Red Fescue
Water
Water
Every week
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
4a - 10b
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Winter
download btn
Download
question

Questions About Red Fescue

Watering Watering Watering
How Much to Water Red Fescue?
Understanding how much you should water your Red Fescue is a quite simple endeavor. Whether you live more towards the north where the weather is cooler, or you live in the south where the weather is warmer, you should give your Red Fescue about one inch of water each time you water it. The exception to that rule occurs during the height of summer when this grass enters a short dormancy period. At that time, it is best to give your Red Fescue light but appropriate waterings to curb the harmful effects of the hot sun. Of course, the overall volume of water you supply depends on how large of an area your Red Fescue covers. For example, providing an inch of water for a large area of Red Fescue requires much more water than if you are caring for a small lawn made of Red Fescue.
Read More more
Free
How Often to Water Red Fescue?
The frequency with which you water your Red Fescue will depend heavily on the region in which you live, the climate conditions that are present in that region, and the specific season you are in. For example, those who grow Red Fescue in more northern regions, where the weather is somewhat cooler, should water about once every 1-2 weeks. By contrast, those at more southern latitudes will often need to water their Red Fescue a bit more often, usually about once per week. However, in both regions, when rainfall is relatively regular, you can reduce your watering schedule accordingly. Still, rainfall alone is rarely enough to keep this lawn alive. The seasonal factor may be most important as this cool season grass will typically enter a dormancy period during summer. During that period, your Red Fescue may still need water to avoid drying out, but it will not need water for the sake of producing new growth.
Read More more
Free
How to Know If You Are Watering Red Fescue Enough?
If you give your Red Fescue too much or too little water, there will be several visual cues that indicate that is the case. When overwatering occurs, the blades of Red Fescue that comprise your lawn may become softer than usual. Additionally, you may notice a buildup of thatch. If you underwater your lawn you can expect to find brown patches. Along with that, your Red Fescue may experience heat stress which can lead to accumulations of fungus and yellowing of the grass blades. Underwatered lawns also tend to preserve footprints longer than lawns that have received a correct amount of water.
Read More more
Free
Watering Red Fescue at Different Growth Stages?
You should change your watering schedule significantly if you are trying to establish a new lawn. New lawns, whether grown from seed or from sod, should receive water on a frequent basis. Often, it takes multiple waterings per week to ensure that the soil remains moist enough to allow the roots to take hold of the soil. After the initial phase in which your lawn is establishing itself, you should water based on this plant's natural growth cycle. During the spring and fall, Red Fescue is the most active in creating new growth and will need about an inch of water per week. During summer, your grass will become somewhat dormant, but need more frequent but light waterings. During winter, your grass should be entirely dormant and need no water at all.
Read More more
lock
Watering Red Fescue Through the Seasons?
If you want your Red Fescue to be as healthy as can be, you should pay close attention to seasonal changes. In spring, you should follow the rule of watering this grass with about an inch of water per week. You should water your Red Fescue more frequently than usual during the summer, sometimes multiple times per week. However, your Red Fescue will enter its summer dormancy period and those waterings can be relatively light. On the other end of the spectrum, during winter, your Red Fescue will not need any water at all. During any other time of year, you should follow the typical watering frequency of about once per week depending on how hot your region is. During any part of the growing season, you should anticipate heat waves and rainfall to adjust your watering accordingly.
Read More more
lock
What Is the Best Way to Water the Red Fescue?
In nearly all cases, people grow Red Fescue as a lawn, which means there are specific ways that you should go about watering this grass. One way to water a lawn of Red Fescue is to use a hose with a spray nozzle attachment. However, the best way to water is to set up a sprinkler system. It can be even better to set up a sprinkler system that runs on a timer, to guarantee you give your Red Fescue the right amount of water at the right time. When watering, you should use cool or room temperature water. It is also a good idea to water in the morning, as this allows the water to saturate the soil while also allowing the daily sunlight to evaporate any excess moisture.
Read More more
lock
What to Do If Your Water Red Fescue Too Much or Too Little?
If you happen to overwater your Red Fescue, there are a few steps you can take to return your lawn to full health. One of the best ways to deal with this issue is to aerate your lawn, which will repair any compacted soils that may prevent excess water from draining. In that situation, you should also consider dethatching your Red Fescue. When you underwater your Red Fescue, your remedy should be entirely different. In those cases, you should allow your lawn to grow a bit longer before mowing it. As is somewhat obvious, you should also supply your Red Fescue with a bit more water than you were previously given.
Read More more
lock
right
buy vip bg
You’ve got questions. We’ve got answers.
Let us help take all the guesswork out of your gardening.
pests

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Red Fescue based on 10 million real cases
Underwatering
Underwatering Underwatering
Underwatering
Leaves may wilt for a variety of reasons.
Solutions: The easiest (and most obvious) way to address underwatering is to fully hydrate the plant. However, this must be done carefully. A common mistake that many gardeners make is to douse their underwatered plants with water. This can overwhelm the roots of the plant and shock its system, something that can be even more damaging than the lack of water to begin with. Instead, water thoroughly and slowly, taking breaks to let the water slowly saturate through the soil to get to the roots. Use room temperature water, as cold water might be too much of a shock. In the future, shorten the time between waterings. A good rule of thumb is to check the soil around each plant daily. If it’s dry to at least two inches down, it’s time to water. If a container plant is repeatedly drying out very quickly, repotting into a slower-draining container might be a good idea, too.
Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Solutions: If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Plant dried up
Plant dried up Plant dried up
Plant dried up
The entire plant may dry out due to dieback or normal seasonal dormancy.
Solutions: The solution for a dried out plant depends on the cause, so determine the cause before selecting a treatment method. Adjust your watering: Stick your finger in the soil near the roots. If it feels bone dry or overly saturated, you need to adjust your watering frequency accordingly. Prune back dead foliage: Snip off any brown stems and leaves on the plant to make space for new growth. This encourages the roots to send up fresh stems. Move to a proper environment. This may involve decreasing or increasing sun exposure, depending on the species. Decrease fertilizer applications. If you have applied too much fertilizer, you can repot plants with fresh potting soil. Wait. If your plant has dried out as daylight is decreasing, it is entering dormancy. Decrease watering and wait until the plant resumes growth.
Lace bugs
Lace bugs Lace bugs
Lace bugs
Lace bugs are 3 - 5 mm translucent flying insects that suck sap from the plant.
Solutions: Lace bugs can be controlled in various ways. For severe cases: Introduce beneficial insects that eat lace bugs, such as parasitoid wasps, assassin bugs, and lady beetles. Avoid spraying unnecessary pesticides so as not to reduce the populations of these helpful predators. Spray plants with insecticidal soap or neem oil under all leaves of the affected and surrounding plants. Make sure the soap hits the insects. Spray in the morning, evening, or on a cloudy day to avoid damaging plant tissue. Trim and burn heavily infected plant limbs. As a last resort use an insecticide containing pyrethroids to kill the lace bugs. Remember that these products will also likely kill beneficial insects such as bees. For less severe cases: Rub off lace bugs from under the leaves using a damp cloth. Use the strong stream of a hose to spray these pests off plants. This washes the nymphs off and onto the ground where they cannot return to the leaves of the plant. Large trees generally do not need to be treated for lace bugs, since they don't damage their overall health.
buy vip bg
Keep your leafy friends healthy and happy.
Diagnose your plant, and learn how to prevent and treat plant diseases.
close
Underwatering
plant poor
Underwatering
Leaves may wilt for a variety of reasons.
Overview
Overview
Underwatering plants is one of the quickest ways to kill them. This is something that most gardeners are well aware of. Unfortunately, knowing exactly how much water a plant needs can be tricky, especially considering that underwatering and overwatering present similar symptoms in plants.
Therefore, it’s important to be vigilant and attentive to each plants’ individual needs.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
As mentioned earlier, overwatering and underwatering present similar symptoms in plants. These symptoms include poor growth, wilted leaves, defoliation, and brown leaf tips or margins. Ultimately, both underwatering and overwatering can lead to the death of a plant.
The easiest way to determine whether a plant has too much water or too little is to look at the leaves. If underwatering is the culprit, the leaves will look brown and crunchy, while if it’s overwatering, they will appear yellow or a pale green in color.
When this issue first begins, there may be no noticeable symptoms at all, particularly in hardy or drought-tolerant plants. However, they will begin to wilt once they start suffering from a lack of water. The edges of the plant’s leaves will become brown or curled. Soil pulling away from the edges of the planter is a telltale sign, or a crispy, brittle stem.
Prolonged underwatering can cause a plant’s growth to become stunted. The leaves might drop and the plant can be more susceptible to pest infestations, too.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Underwatering is caused by, quite simply, not watering plants often or deeply enough. There is a heightened risk of underwatering if any of these situations apply:
  • Extreme heat and dry weather (when growing outdoors)
  • Grow lights or indoor lighting that is too bright or intense for the type of plant
  • Using fast-draining growing media such as sand
Solutions
Solutions
The easiest (and most obvious) way to address underwatering is to fully hydrate the plant. However, this must be done carefully. A common mistake that many gardeners make is to douse their underwatered plants with water. This can overwhelm the roots of the plant and shock its system, something that can be even more damaging than the lack of water to begin with.
Instead, water thoroughly and slowly, taking breaks to let the water slowly saturate through the soil to get to the roots. Use room temperature water, as cold water might be too much of a shock.
In the future, shorten the time between waterings. A good rule of thumb is to check the soil around each plant daily. If it’s dry to at least two inches down, it’s time to water. If a container plant is repeatedly drying out very quickly, repotting into a slower-draining container might be a good idea, too.
Prevention
Prevention
Always check the soil before watering. If the top inch of soil feels moist, though not wet, the watering is perfect. If it’s dry, water it immediately. If it feels soggy, you avoid watering until it dries out a bit more.
Also, make sure the lighting is sufficient for the species. Plants grow faster and need more water when there is intense light or lots of heat. Being aware of these conditions and modifying them, if possible, is a good way to prevent underwatering. Many container plants are potted in soil mixtures mean to be well-draining. Adding materials that retain moisture, like compost or peat moss, can also prevent these symptoms.
Other tips to prevent underwatering include:
  • Choose pots with adequately-sized drainage holes
  • Avoid warm temperatures
  • Use large pots with additional soil (these take longer to dry out)
  • Avoid terracotta pots, which lose water quickly
Show More
more
Become a premium member and read all about it!
Learn how to prevent and treat plant diseases.
Aged yellow and dry
plant poor
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Overview
Overview
Regardless of the type of plant or where it is grown, at some point, it will begin to aged yellow and dry. This is a natural, unavoidable process that happens when the plant has completed all of the steps in its life.
Annual plants go through this process at the end of a single growing season. Perennial plants live for multiple years, if not tens or hundreds of years, but will still ultimately exhibit these symptoms.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
When plants have progressed through their natural developmental stages and are nearing the end of their lifecycle, they begin showing signs of decline. Leaves will start to yellow and droop, and over time they turn papery brown and dry.
Once completely dry, the leaves begin to fall from the plant until the entire plant has dried out.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
At the end of its life, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence or natural aging and death. Cell division stops, and the plant begins catabolizing resources to use in other parts of the plant.
As this happens, the tissues begin yellow and drying until the entire plant is desiccated and perishes.
Solutions
Solutions
If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Prevention
Prevention
Unfortunately, there is no way to prevent plants from dying of “old age.” To help prolong their life, and put off symptoms of aged yellow and dry for as long as possible, take care of them by giving them enough water, fertilizing them appropriately, and making sure they get enough sunlight.
Show More
more
Become a premium member and read all about it!
Learn how to prevent and treat plant diseases.
Plant dried up
plant poor
Plant dried up
The entire plant may dry out due to dieback or normal seasonal dormancy.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Your plant has dried out and turned brown. It might be starting to wilt, with no noticeable green around the stems and leaves. Touch the leaves, and they may crinkle under your fingers.
Possible causes of a dried out plant include:
  1. Not enough water. A lack of water will lead to dry plant tissue.
  2. Too much water. Watering too much can lead to root rot which makes the plant struggle to take up water. Rotted, mushy roots are a sign of overeating.
  3. Entering dormancy. As perennial plants enter their resting period known as dormancy, their leaves dry out and may fall off. This happens during decreasing day length.
  4. Exposure to herbicides and other toxic substances. If a plant is hit with a large dose herbicide or other toxic chemical, the plant will turn brown.
  5. Too much fertility. An excess of fertilizer can prevent plants from taking up water, leading to drying.
  6. Improper sun exposure. Just like humans, plants can get sunburn by intense, direct light. Plants can also dry out if they don’t receive enough light.
To determine whether the plant is still alive and can be saved, you can:
  1. Bend a stem. If the stem is pliable, the plant is still alive. If the stem breaks, the plant is dead.
  2. Gently scratch the stem with your fingernail for signs of green inside. If your plant is dead, the stem will be brittle and brown throughout.
  3. Cut the stems back a little bit a time for visible green growth. If none of the stems have visible green growth, the plant is dead.
Solutions
Solutions
The solution for a dried out plant depends on the cause, so determine the cause before selecting a treatment method.
  1. Adjust your watering: Stick your finger in the soil near the roots. If it feels bone dry or overly saturated, you need to adjust your watering frequency accordingly.
  2. Prune back dead foliage: Snip off any brown stems and leaves on the plant to make space for new growth. This encourages the roots to send up fresh stems.
  3. Move to a proper environment. This may involve decreasing or increasing sun exposure, depending on the species.
  4. Decrease fertilizer applications. If you have applied too much fertilizer, you can repot plants with fresh potting soil.
  5. Wait. If your plant has dried out as daylight is decreasing, it is entering dormancy. Decrease watering and wait until the plant resumes growth.
Prevention
Prevention
Prevention involves providing your plant with the proper environment.
  1. Provide the proper amount of water. The amount of water depends on a plant’s size, species, and environment. A general rule is to allow soil to dry out between waterings.
  2. Place plants in the proper environment. Provide the proper hours of sun and temperature for your individual plant.
  3. Provide proper fertility. Most plants only need to be fertilized once or twice a year; don’t overapply.
  4. Keep plants free from toxic substances. Keep herbicides and toxic household chemicals away from your plants.
Show More
more
Become a premium member and read all about it!
Learn how to prevent and treat plant diseases.
Lace bugs
plant poor
Lace bugs
Lace bugs are 3 - 5 mm translucent flying insects that suck sap from the plant.
Overview
Overview
Lace bugs are tiny winged insect pests that feed on the sap of the plant that they infest. There are a number of different types, which each attack certain species of plants. A severe infestation can cause leaf drop, and a reduction of fruit yield also occurs on infested fruit trees. They are most active in late summer and fall.
Lace bugs can be difficult to detect, so damage may be seen before the insect pests are detected. While adult lace bugs are brown to black with lacy wings that lay flat against their body, the nymphs are clear when they first hatch and then gradually turn black. They have small spines around their bodies. These nymphs will mature into adults within 3 or 4 weeks.
Although the damage caused by lace bugs is somewhat unsightly, it does not seriously harm the plant. The most susceptible species of plants include azaleas, rhododendrons, olive and macadamia trees, and plane trees.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
When lace bugs infest a plant's leaves, yellow spots can be seen on the upper surface. The underside of the leaves is usually fouled with black bug droppings that are tar-like.
Lace bugs spend their entire lifecycle on the leaves of the plant they have infested, from egg to adult. They are tiny sap-sucking insects that are around 3 mm long. The adults lay their eggs on the undersides of the leaves. When the eggs hatch, the nymphs start to feed on the sap of the leaves.
When an entire leaf is infested, it takes on a bronze appearance. Eventually, severely affected leaves will drop off the plant.
Some lace bugs also feed on flower buds. This causes the tips of the flowers to blacken. Eventually, the entire flower will turn black and drop off.
Solutions
Solutions
Lace bugs can be controlled in various ways.
For severe cases:
  1. Introduce beneficial insects that eat lace bugs, such as parasitoid wasps, assassin bugs, and lady beetles. Avoid spraying unnecessary pesticides so as not to reduce the populations of these helpful predators.
  2. Spray plants with insecticidal soap or neem oil under all leaves of the affected and surrounding plants. Make sure the soap hits the insects. Spray in the morning, evening, or on a cloudy day to avoid damaging plant tissue.
  3. Trim and burn heavily infected plant limbs.
  4. As a last resort use an insecticide containing pyrethroids to kill the lace bugs. Remember that these products will also likely kill beneficial insects such as bees.
For less severe cases:
  1. Rub off lace bugs from under the leaves using a damp cloth.
  2. Use the strong stream of a hose to spray these pests off plants. This washes the nymphs off and onto the ground where they cannot return to the leaves of the plant.
  3. Large trees generally do not need to be treated for lace bugs, since they don't damage their overall health.
Prevention
Prevention
Simple steps for preventing lace bugs:
  1. Avoid buying or transplanting plants with an infestation, by examining the leaves closely.
  2. Keep plants in top health with regular watering, compost, and fertilizer applications.
  3. Move heat-stressed plants in high sun locations to partial shade.
  4. Clear debris around plants to remove overwintering insects.
  5. Check plants for lace bugs in the late spring before their population peaks in the summer. Treat before populations increase.
Show More
more
Become a premium member and read all about it!
Learn how to prevent and treat plant diseases.
distribution

Distribution Map

Habitat

Prairie/Meadow/Field
distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
habit
plant_info

More Info

Plant Type
Plant Type
Grass
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Summer, Fall
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green
Blue
Gray
Silver

Usages

Garden Use
A good-looking species of grass common to temperate lawns, red Fescue is often chosen for its fast growth, density, and use in a variety of soils and locations. It is most commonly used in medium-traffic areas and shady or partly shady areas, as well as being used to repair patchy areas in your lawn.

Scientific Classification

other_plant

Related Plants

Giant ragweed
Giant ragweed
Giant ragweed, a native plant to North America, is an allergy sufferer's nightmare. It causes dramatic allergic reactions in more than 23 million Americans annually. In spite of this, the wildflower is edible, and evidence suggests that Native Americans actually planted it as a crop and harvested the seeds for their oil. Giant ragweed can be invasive, however, and out-competes many native species. Modern horticulture practices recommend against planting it.
Ram's Horn
Ram's Horn
Ram's Horn (Proboscidea louisianica) is an annual shrub that can grow to be 30 - 61 cm tall. Ram's Horn leaves grow to be 30 cm long and 13 cm wide and are covered with nectar. This species produces yellow, tube-shaped flowers that have purple spots. It blooms in summer and produces a nut with a curved beak similar to a horn. This is how the plant gets its common name. This species grows best in full sun and sandy soil.
True cinnamon tree
True cinnamon tree
True cinnamon tree (Cinnamomum verum) is an evergreen tree that will grow from 9 - 15 m tall. This species produces a superior quality of cinnamon that is highly prized by gourmet chefs and culinarians. Native to Asia, it produces a fruit that is eaten by birds, spreading the seed from one area to another. Blooms from spring to summer, followed by the production of single-seeded fruit. It has become invasive in some areas.
Governor's plum
Governor's plum
Governor's plum (Flacourtia indica) is a shrub or tree that is native to Africa and Asia. The fruit is small, red to purple on the outside, with yellow or white flesh. It is eaten raw, cooked into preserves, or fermented into a wine. Flacourtia indica is sometimes planted as an ornamental living fence.
Chinese parasol tree
Chinese parasol tree
Commonly known as the chinese parasol tree, the Firmiana simplex is an ornamental plant native to Asia. But in the warmer parts of North America, it grows aggressively and is considered invasive. Its robust sonic properties have led to its use in the soundboards of many Eastern instruments. And their fruits are used to extract oil.
Tossa jute
Tossa jute
Tossa jute (Corchorus olitorius) is a leafy vegetable that has been cultivated in Africa for human consumption for many centuries. When cooked alone it forms a sticky paste, much like Okra. Tossa jute pulp is also used to make paper and cardboard and as a packaging fiber.
View More Plants more
close
product icon
product icon
17,000 local species +400,000 global species studied
product icon
Nearly 5 years of research
product icon
80+ scholars in botany and gardening
product icon
Premium membership for No 1 mobile plant app 'PictureThis'
Continue reading all contents with a PictureThis membership
No need to pay if you cancel the subscription at least a day before the 7-day free trial ends
Sorry, the website is being upgraded and does not support purchases at the moment.
About
Care Guide
Care FAQ
Pests & Diseases
Distribution
More Info
Related Plants
Related Articles
Red Fescue
Red Fescue
Red Fescue
Red Fescue
Red Fescue
Red Fescue
Add to My Garden
Red Fescue
Festuca rubra
Water
Every week
Water
care guide

Care Guide for Red Fescue

Water
Water
Moisture-loving, keep the soil moist but do not let water accumulate.
Fertilization
Fertilization
Fertilization once in spring.
Pruning
Pruning
Trim the diseased, withered leaves once a month.
Soil
Soil
Sand, Loam, Acidic, Neutral, Alkaline
Potting Suggestions
Potting Suggestions
Needs excellent drainage in pots.
buy vip bg
Tips, advice, and instructions for over 13,000 species that you will find nowhere else
cover
Red Fescue
Festuca rubra
Water
Water
Every week
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
4a - 10b
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Winter
close
bg bg
download btn
Download
question

Questions About Red Fescue

Watering Watering Watering
How Much to Water Red Fescue?
more
Free
How Often to Water Red Fescue?
more
Free
How to Know If You Are Watering Red Fescue Enough?
more
Free
Watering Red Fescue at Different Growth Stages?
more
lock
Watering Red Fescue Through the Seasons?
more
lock
Show More more
buy vip bg
You’ve got questions. We’ve got answers.
Let us help take all the guesswork out of your gardening.
pests

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Red Fescue based on 10 million real cases
Underwatering
Underwatering  Underwatering  Underwatering
Leaves may wilt for a variety of reasons.
Solutions: The easiest (and most obvious) way to address underwatering is to fully hydrate the plant. However, this must be done carefully. A common mistake that many gardeners make is to douse their underwatered plants with water. This can overwhelm the roots of the plant and shock its system, something that can be even more damaging than the lack of water to begin with. Instead, water thoroughly and slowly, taking breaks to let the water slowly saturate through the soil to get to the roots. Use room temperature water, as cold water might be too much of a shock. In the future, shorten the time between waterings. A good rule of thumb is to check the soil around each plant daily. If it’s dry to at least two inches down, it’s time to water. If a container plant is repeatedly drying out very quickly, repotting into a slower-draining container might be a good idea, too.
Learn More more
Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry  Aged yellow and dry  Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Solutions: If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Learn More more
Plant dried up
Plant dried up  Plant dried up  Plant dried up
The entire plant may dry out due to dieback or normal seasonal dormancy.
Solutions: The solution for a dried out plant depends on the cause, so determine the cause before selecting a treatment method. Adjust your watering: Stick your finger in the soil near the roots. If it feels bone dry or overly saturated, you need to adjust your watering frequency accordingly. Prune back dead foliage: Snip off any brown stems and leaves on the plant to make space for new growth. This encourages the roots to send up fresh stems. Move to a proper environment. This may involve decreasing or increasing sun exposure, depending on the species. Decrease fertilizer applications. If you have applied too much fertilizer, you can repot plants with fresh potting soil. Wait. If your plant has dried out as daylight is decreasing, it is entering dormancy. Decrease watering and wait until the plant resumes growth.
Learn More more
Lace bugs
Lace bugs  Lace bugs  Lace bugs
Lace bugs are 3 - 5 mm translucent flying insects that suck sap from the plant.
Solutions: Lace bugs can be controlled in various ways. For severe cases: Introduce beneficial insects that eat lace bugs, such as parasitoid wasps, assassin bugs, and lady beetles. Avoid spraying unnecessary pesticides so as not to reduce the populations of these helpful predators. Spray plants with insecticidal soap or neem oil under all leaves of the affected and surrounding plants. Make sure the soap hits the insects. Spray in the morning, evening, or on a cloudy day to avoid damaging plant tissue. Trim and burn heavily infected plant limbs. As a last resort use an insecticide containing pyrethroids to kill the lace bugs. Remember that these products will also likely kill beneficial insects such as bees. For less severe cases: Rub off lace bugs from under the leaves using a damp cloth. Use the strong stream of a hose to spray these pests off plants. This washes the nymphs off and onto the ground where they cannot return to the leaves of the plant. Large trees generally do not need to be treated for lace bugs, since they don't damage their overall health.
Learn More more
buy vip bg
Keep your leafy friends healthy and happy.
Diagnose your plant, and learn how to prevent and treat plant diseases.
close
Underwatering
plant poor
Underwatering
Leaves may wilt for a variety of reasons.
Overview
Overview
Underwatering plants is one of the quickest ways to kill them. This is something that most gardeners are well aware of. Unfortunately, knowing exactly how much water a plant needs can be tricky, especially considering that underwatering and overwatering present similar symptoms in plants.
Therefore, it’s important to be vigilant and attentive to each plants’ individual needs.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
As mentioned earlier, overwatering and underwatering present similar symptoms in plants. These symptoms include poor growth, wilted leaves, defoliation, and brown leaf tips or margins. Ultimately, both underwatering and overwatering can lead to the death of a plant.
The easiest way to determine whether a plant has too much water or too little is to look at the leaves. If underwatering is the culprit, the leaves will look brown and crunchy, while if it’s overwatering, they will appear yellow or a pale green in color.
When this issue first begins, there may be no noticeable symptoms at all, particularly in hardy or drought-tolerant plants. However, they will begin to wilt once they start suffering from a lack of water. The edges of the plant’s leaves will become brown or curled. Soil pulling away from the edges of the planter is a telltale sign, or a crispy, brittle stem.
Prolonged underwatering can cause a plant’s growth to become stunted. The leaves might drop and the plant can be more susceptible to pest infestations, too.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Underwatering is caused by, quite simply, not watering plants often or deeply enough. There is a heightened risk of underwatering if any of these situations apply:
  • Extreme heat and dry weather (when growing outdoors)
  • Grow lights or indoor lighting that is too bright or intense for the type of plant
  • Using fast-draining growing media such as sand
Solutions
Solutions
The easiest (and most obvious) way to address underwatering is to fully hydrate the plant. However, this must be done carefully. A common mistake that many gardeners make is to douse their underwatered plants with water. This can overwhelm the roots of the plant and shock its system, something that can be even more damaging than the lack of water to begin with.
Instead, water thoroughly and slowly, taking breaks to let the water slowly saturate through the soil to get to the roots. Use room temperature water, as cold water might be too much of a shock.
In the future, shorten the time between waterings. A good rule of thumb is to check the soil around each plant daily. If it’s dry to at least two inches down, it’s time to water. If a container plant is repeatedly drying out very quickly, repotting into a slower-draining container might be a good idea, too.
Prevention
Prevention
Always check the soil before watering. If the top inch of soil feels moist, though not wet, the watering is perfect. If it’s dry, water it immediately. If it feels soggy, you avoid watering until it dries out a bit more.
Also, make sure the lighting is sufficient for the species. Plants grow faster and need more water when there is intense light or lots of heat. Being aware of these conditions and modifying them, if possible, is a good way to prevent underwatering. Many container plants are potted in soil mixtures mean to be well-draining. Adding materials that retain moisture, like compost or peat moss, can also prevent these symptoms.
Other tips to prevent underwatering include:
  • Choose pots with adequately-sized drainage holes
  • Avoid warm temperatures
  • Use large pots with additional soil (these take longer to dry out)
  • Avoid terracotta pots, which lose water quickly
Show More
more
Become a premium member and read all about it!
Learn how to prevent and treat plant diseases.
close
Aged yellow and dry
plant poor
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Overview
Overview
Regardless of the type of plant or where it is grown, at some point, it will begin to aged yellow and dry. This is a natural, unavoidable process that happens when the plant has completed all of the steps in its life.
Annual plants go through this process at the end of a single growing season. Perennial plants live for multiple years, if not tens or hundreds of years, but will still ultimately exhibit these symptoms.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
When plants have progressed through their natural developmental stages and are nearing the end of their lifecycle, they begin showing signs of decline. Leaves will start to yellow and droop, and over time they turn papery brown and dry.
Once completely dry, the leaves begin to fall from the plant until the entire plant has dried out.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
At the end of its life, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence or natural aging and death. Cell division stops, and the plant begins catabolizing resources to use in other parts of the plant.
As this happens, the tissues begin yellow and drying until the entire plant is desiccated and perishes.
Solutions
Solutions
If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Prevention
Prevention
Unfortunately, there is no way to prevent plants from dying of “old age.” To help prolong their life, and put off symptoms of aged yellow and dry for as long as possible, take care of them by giving them enough water, fertilizing them appropriately, and making sure they get enough sunlight.
Show More
more
Become a premium member and read all about it!
Learn how to prevent and treat plant diseases.
close
Plant dried up
plant poor
Plant dried up
The entire plant may dry out due to dieback or normal seasonal dormancy.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Your plant has dried out and turned brown. It might be starting to wilt, with no noticeable green around the stems and leaves. Touch the leaves, and they may crinkle under your fingers.
Possible causes of a dried out plant include:
  1. Not enough water. A lack of water will lead to dry plant tissue.
  2. Too much water. Watering too much can lead to root rot which makes the plant struggle to take up water. Rotted, mushy roots are a sign of overeating.
  3. Entering dormancy. As perennial plants enter their resting period known as dormancy, their leaves dry out and may fall off. This happens during decreasing day length.
  4. Exposure to herbicides and other toxic substances. If a plant is hit with a large dose herbicide or other toxic chemical, the plant will turn brown.
  5. Too much fertility. An excess of fertilizer can prevent plants from taking up water, leading to drying.
  6. Improper sun exposure. Just like humans, plants can get sunburn by intense, direct light. Plants can also dry out if they don’t receive enough light.
To determine whether the plant is still alive and can be saved, you can:
  1. Bend a stem. If the stem is pliable, the plant is still alive. If the stem breaks, the plant is dead.
  2. Gently scratch the stem with your fingernail for signs of green inside. If your plant is dead, the stem will be brittle and brown throughout.
  3. Cut the stems back a little bit a time for visible green growth. If none of the stems have visible green growth, the plant is dead.
Solutions
Solutions
The solution for a dried out plant depends on the cause, so determine the cause before selecting a treatment method.
  1. Adjust your watering: Stick your finger in the soil near the roots. If it feels bone dry or overly saturated, you need to adjust your watering frequency accordingly.
  2. Prune back dead foliage: Snip off any brown stems and leaves on the plant to make space for new growth. This encourages the roots to send up fresh stems.
  3. Move to a proper environment. This may involve decreasing or increasing sun exposure, depending on the species.
  4. Decrease fertilizer applications. If you have applied too much fertilizer, you can repot plants with fresh potting soil.
  5. Wait. If your plant has dried out as daylight is decreasing, it is entering dormancy. Decrease watering and wait until the plant resumes growth.
Prevention
Prevention
Prevention involves providing your plant with the proper environment.
  1. Provide the proper amount of water. The amount of water depends on a plant’s size, species, and environment. A general rule is to allow soil to dry out between waterings.
  2. Place plants in the proper environment. Provide the proper hours of sun and temperature for your individual plant.
  3. Provide proper fertility. Most plants only need to be fertilized once or twice a year; don’t overapply.
  4. Keep plants free from toxic substances. Keep herbicides and toxic household chemicals away from your plants.
Show More
more
Become a premium member and read all about it!
Learn how to prevent and treat plant diseases.
close
Lace bugs
plant poor
Lace bugs
Lace bugs are 3 - 5 mm translucent flying insects that suck sap from the plant.
Overview
Overview
Lace bugs are tiny winged insect pests that feed on the sap of the plant that they infest. There are a number of different types, which each attack certain species of plants. A severe infestation can cause leaf drop, and a reduction of fruit yield also occurs on infested fruit trees. They are most active in late summer and fall.
Lace bugs can be difficult to detect, so damage may be seen before the insect pests are detected. While adult lace bugs are brown to black with lacy wings that lay flat against their body, the nymphs are clear when they first hatch and then gradually turn black. They have small spines around their bodies. These nymphs will mature into adults within 3 or 4 weeks.
Although the damage caused by lace bugs is somewhat unsightly, it does not seriously harm the plant. The most susceptible species of plants include azaleas, rhododendrons, olive and macadamia trees, and plane trees.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
When lace bugs infest a plant's leaves, yellow spots can be seen on the upper surface. The underside of the leaves is usually fouled with black bug droppings that are tar-like.
Lace bugs spend their entire lifecycle on the leaves of the plant they have infested, from egg to adult. They are tiny sap-sucking insects that are around 3 mm long. The adults lay their eggs on the undersides of the leaves. When the eggs hatch, the nymphs start to feed on the sap of the leaves.
When an entire leaf is infested, it takes on a bronze appearance. Eventually, severely affected leaves will drop off the plant.
Some lace bugs also feed on flower buds. This causes the tips of the flowers to blacken. Eventually, the entire flower will turn black and drop off.
Solutions
Solutions
Lace bugs can be controlled in various ways.
For severe cases:
  1. Introduce beneficial insects that eat lace bugs, such as parasitoid wasps, assassin bugs, and lady beetles. Avoid spraying unnecessary pesticides so as not to reduce the populations of these helpful predators.
  2. Spray plants with insecticidal soap or neem oil under all leaves of the affected and surrounding plants. Make sure the soap hits the insects. Spray in the morning, evening, or on a cloudy day to avoid damaging plant tissue.
  3. Trim and burn heavily infected plant limbs.
  4. As a last resort use an insecticide containing pyrethroids to kill the lace bugs. Remember that these products will also likely kill beneficial insects such as bees.
For less severe cases:
  1. Rub off lace bugs from under the leaves using a damp cloth.
  2. Use the strong stream of a hose to spray these pests off plants. This washes the nymphs off and onto the ground where they cannot return to the leaves of the plant.
  3. Large trees generally do not need to be treated for lace bugs, since they don't damage their overall health.
Prevention
Prevention
Simple steps for preventing lace bugs:
  1. Avoid buying or transplanting plants with an infestation, by examining the leaves closely.
  2. Keep plants in top health with regular watering, compost, and fertilizer applications.
  3. Move heat-stressed plants in high sun locations to partial shade.
  4. Clear debris around plants to remove overwintering insects.
  5. Check plants for lace bugs in the late spring before their population peaks in the summer. Treat before populations increase.
Show More
more
Become a premium member and read all about it!
Learn how to prevent and treat plant diseases.
distribution

Distribution Map

Habitat

Prairie/Meadow/Field

Map

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
plant_info

More Info

Plant Type
Plant Type
Grass
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Summer, Fall
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green
Blue
Gray
Silver

Usages

Garden Use
A good-looking species of grass common to temperate lawns, red Fescue is often chosen for its fast growth, density, and use in a variety of soils and locations. It is most commonly used in medium-traffic areas and shady or partly shady areas, as well as being used to repair patchy areas in your lawn.

Scientific Classification

article

Related Articles

Best Perennial Plant to Grow
# Useful Tips
Best Perennial Plant to Grow
Best Perennial Plant to Grow
# Useful Tips
Best Perennial Plant to Grow
Discover more articles?
Read More
close
product icon
product icon
17,000 local species +400,000 global species studied
product icon
Nearly 5 years of research
product icon
80+ scholars in botany and gardening
product icon
Premium membership for No 1 mobile plant app 'PictureThis'
Continue reading all contents with a PictureThis membership
No need to pay if you cancel the subscription at least a day before the 7-day free trial ends
Sorry, the website is being upgraded and does not support purchases at the moment.
Cookie Management Tool
In addition to managing cookies through your browser or device, you can change your cookie settings below.
Necessary Cookies
Necessary cookies enable core functionality. The website cannot function properly without these cookies, and can only be disabled by changing your browser preferences.
Analytical Cookies
Analytical cookies help us to improve our application/website by collecting and reporting information on its usage.
Cookie Name Source Purpose Lifespan
_ga Google Analytics These cookies are set because of our use of Google Analytics. They are used to collect information about your use of our application/website. The cookies collect specific information, such as your IP address, data related to your device and other information about your use of the application/website. Please note that the data processing is essentially carried out by Google LLC and Google may use your data collected by the cookies for own purposes, e.g. profiling and will combine it with other data such as your Google Account. For more information about how Google processes your data and Google’s approach to privacy as well as implemented safeguards for your data, please see here. 1 Year
_pta PictureThis Analytics We use these cookies to collect information about how you use our site, monitor site performance, and improve our site performance, our services, and your experience. 1 Year
Cookie Name
_ga
Source
Google Analytics
Purpose
These cookies are set because of our use of Google Analytics. They are used to collect information about your use of our application/website. The cookies collect specific information, such as your IP address, data related to your device and other information about your use of the application/website. Please note that the data processing is essentially carried out by Google LLC and Google may use your data collected by the cookies for own purposes, e.g. profiling and will combine it with other data such as your Google Account. For more information about how Google processes your data and Google’s approach to privacy as well as implemented safeguards for your data, please see here.
Lifespan
1 Year

Cookie Name
_pta
Source
PictureThis Analytics
Purpose
We use these cookies to collect information about how you use our site, monitor site performance, and improve our site performance, our services, and your experience.
Lifespan
1 Year
Marketing Cookies
Marketing cookies are used by advertising companies to serve ads that are relevant to your interests.
Cookie Name Source Purpose Lifespan
_fbp Facebook Pixel A conversion pixel tracking that we use for retargeting campaigns. Learn more here. 1 Year
_adj Adjust This cookie provides mobile analytics and attribution services that enable us to measure and analyze the effectiveness of marketing campaigns, certain events and actions within the Application. Learn more here. 1 Year
Cookie Name
_fbp
Source
Facebook Pixel
Purpose
A conversion pixel tracking that we use for retargeting campaigns. Learn more here.
Lifespan
1 Year

Cookie Name
_adj
Source
Adjust
Purpose
This cookie provides mobile analytics and attribution services that enable us to measure and analyze the effectiveness of marketing campaigns, certain events and actions within the Application. Learn more here.
Lifespan
1 Year
Download