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Tongue aloe
Tongue aloe
Tongue aloe
Tongue aloe
Tongue aloe
Tongue aloe
Tongue aloe
Gasteria carinata var. verrucosa
Also known as : Ox tongue, Wart gasteria, Sago plant
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
9 to 11
care guide

Care Guide for Tongue aloe

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Watering Care
Watering Care
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Deadhead (or remove) withered flowers after flowering.
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Tongue aloe
Water
Water
Every 3 weeks
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
9 to 11
Planting Time
Planting Time
Winter, Spring
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Questions About Tongue aloe

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Fertilizing Fertilizing Fertilizing
What should I do if I water my Tongue aloe too much or too little?
Underwatered Tongue aloe Tongue aloe and other succulents can endure long periods without water, so it’s unusual to find one of these suffering from underwatering. But, if you somehow forgot about your plant and neglected to water it for a month or more, you’ll probably find your Tongue aloe looking thirsty or with some damage from lack of watering. It is very easy to identify an underwatered Tongue aloe. Plant look lacklustre and wrinkled. Some may have dried up completely, turned brown and crispy, or dropped off the plant. And of course, the soil will be completely dried out. If your Tongue aloe is thirsty and underwatered, give it plenty of water as soon as possible. Submerging the pot entirely in water for about 5-10 minutes is a good way to make sure the soil and plant are rehydrated properly. When you feel a sense of moisture on the surface of the soil with your finger, it means the watering is done properly. Overwatered Tongue aloe Overwatering is dangerous to Tongue aloe and can be fatal to your plant if you don’t remedy the situation. Too much moisture over time leads to root rot, which prevents the roots from being able to absorb nutrients and water from the soil. Root rot occurs when wet conditions allow fungi and bacteria to flourish in the soil and feed on roots. When you find that it's overwatered, you'd better change the growing conditions, place it somewhere with more air ventilation and adjust water frequency, for example. The symptoms of overwatering are yellow, swollen, and translucent organs that may even burst open from being over-full with water. If the problem continues without being treated, plant might turn brown or black, and fall off the plant at the slightest touch. Be sure to check the soil to determine if overwatering is the culprit, as some other issues can cause similar symptoms. It’s a bit difficult (but not impossible) to save an overwatered plant. The key is catching it early before a lot of damage has occurred. If the roots become rotten, it is likely to kill the entire plant. If you suspect you have overwatered your Tongue aloe, the first step is to remove it from its pot and check the roots and soil. After removing the plant from its pot, gently remove wet soil from around the roots and then rinse them clean in room-temperature water. This helps with removing fungus that might be lurking in the soil and allows you to get a better sense of how healthy the roots are. If your plant has already developed root rot, you will see roots that are dark brown or black, soft, mushy, or slimy. If the majority of the roots are already affected by root rot, it may not be possible to save the plant. In this case, it is best to remove any healthy stem and try to use these to propagate a new Tongue aloe. If, on the other hand, only a portion of the roots have succumbed to rot and other healthy roots still remain, there is a chance it can be saved. Use a sterilized cutting tool to remove any unhealthy-looking roots. Once you're left with only the firm, pale roots, it’s a good idea to dip them in a fungicide to kill off any remaining spores. After that you can repot your Tongue aloe in fresh, free-draining potting soil. While this does not always work to save a succulent with root rot, in most cases this plant will be able to make a full recovery and will put out new growth starting in the next growing season.
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How often should I water my Tongue aloe?
There’s not a hard-and-fast rule for how often to water Tongue aloe. The best way to determine this is to check the soil and only water when it’s bone dry. You can either stick your finger in the pot or use a moisture meter to check the soil below the surface. When you plant it in a deep pot, you can do this with a stick or chopstick. If it feels even a little bit moist, wait a few days and check it again. Most people will need to water Tongue aloe about every two weeks in summer and once a month in winter, but there are several factors that can change the frequency. The section below lists some considerations that can help you to determine how often to water.
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What should I consider when watering my Tongue aloe?
There are several environmental conditions that will affect how your Tongue aloe needs to be watered, including the container size, soil type, temperature, and humidity. First off, the container and soil you use will determine how often to water and how much water to use each time. Be sure you use a container with plenty of drainage holes in the bottom so extra water can escape the pot. A small container has less room for soil, meaning it won’t hold as much moisture, while a larger pot will stay wet longer and need to be watered less often. It’s important not to keep your Tongue aloe in an oversized pot as this can easily lead to overwatering. When repotting, move to just one size larger than the current container. A shallow container works better than a deep one, since Tongue aloe has shallow root systems. Tongue aloe will need to be watered less often in winter and more often in the active growing season in spring and autumn. During the winter, growth slows down considerably and the plant isn’t using much energy or water. There is less water lost to evaporation in cooler winter air, meaning that soil stays wet for much longer than it would in the summer. This also applies to the general climate around your home. If you live in a humid location with a lot of rain, you will need to water less often than if you live in a dry, arid climate. Remember that conditions at the same geographic location can vary significantly with the season and the use of indoor heating and air conditioning. Outdoor Planting If Tongue aloe is planted in the ground, after establishing a root system, it shouldn’t need supplemental water beyond what it receives through precipitation and dew. But if there is a long dry period, you may want to water occasionally. In other areas where Tongue aloe can only be grown in a container, this plant can be moved outside in the spring and summer when the temperature is proper and then brought back inside when temperatures start to drop. A potted Tongue aloe kept outside usually needs more water than the same plant kept indoors, because there is a lot more sun exposure even on a shaded porch.
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How to water Tongue aloe?
The best way to water Tongue aloe is to soak it thoroughly and then allow it to dry out before it gets watered again. Since this plant is somewhat drought tolerant, you can let it get quite dry before watering again. It is always better to give this type of plant too little water over too much. When you water, make sure the soil gets thoroughly soaked throughout the whole pot. Don’t pour the water in just one spot, but rather try to go around the whole rim of the planter to be sure that it has a chance to get wet on all sides of the plant. The correct amount of water will depend on the size of your container and how much water your soil absorbs. Give your Tongue aloe enough water that it drains out from the drainage holes and then (ideally) leave the drained water in the saucer for about 20-30 minutes to absorb into dry pockets of soil. After that, discard any excess water that’s still in the saucer to avoid the soil getting waterlogged. Bottom-watering is also an excellent method for Tongue aloe, as you can be sure that the soil gets thoroughly moistened. This process involves placing the pot into a saucer of water and allowing the soil to absorb moisture through the drainage holes. You will know that the soil has absorbed enough water when the top layer is moist. This takes a bit more time than top-watering, but is almost foolproof in getting an even distribution of water throughout the pot. The original habitat of Tongue aloe is relatively dry with little rain, but when it rains, the soil will be thoroughly moistened. So you can mimic this situation by bottom-watering your plant when the soil is totally dry. Deep soil bathing is better than frequent light watering for Tongue aloe.
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Key Facts About Tongue aloe

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Attributes of Tongue aloe

Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Succulent
Bloom Time
Summer
Flower Color
Green
Red
Orange
Leaf type
Evergreen
Ideal Temperature
20 - 38 ℃

Trivia and Interesting Facts

Scientific Classification of Tongue aloe

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Common Pests & Diseases About Tongue aloe

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Scars
Scars Scars
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Solutions: Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Low light
Low light Low light
Low light
A lack of sunlight will cause the stems and leaves to elongate and appear lighter in color.
Solutions: Low light can only be addressed by increasing light availability, and these measures will only stop further etoliation; current distortion cannot be reversed. Move plant to a position where it receives more light. Check the requirements for specific species, as too much sunlight can cause a plant to burn. Introduce appropriate artificial lighting. Some people choose to prune the longest stems so the plant can concentrate on healthy new growth under the improved lighting.
Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Solutions: If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Soft rot
Soft rot Soft rot
Soft rot
Soft rot causes the entire plant to turn black and rot from the inside out.
Solutions: Once soft rot appears, it is difficult to control. For minor issues of soft rot where only a small area is affected: Reduce watering. Only water when the soil is completely dry. Prune away affected tissue. Remove all dead and/or rotting roots and leaves. Use sterile tools. Repot using new soil. If potted, repot the plant with new soil. Be sure to use a pot with proper drainage holes. For severe cases when a large amount of tissue is infected or black: Dispose of plant. Severely infected plants will not recover. Dispose of the plant so that other nearby plants are not infected. Do not compost the infected plant.
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Scars
plant poor
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Scars form when the plant repairs wounds. They can be the result of people or pets passing by and scraping the plant. Once the underlying issue is resolved, the plant will heal but a scar may remain.
Pests and pathogens can also cause scarring. Insects may attack the plant for a meal, resulting in extensive scarring when a few invaders turn into an infestation. Diseases such as fungus and bacteria can weaken the plant, causing brown spots, mushy areas, or blisters that lead to scars.
Scars occur on stems when a leaf or bud has been lost and the plant has healed. The harder tissue is like a scab that protects a wound.
On other occasions, scars can signal problems from environmental conditions, such as overexposure to sunlight or heat. It might surprise you to know that plants can suffer from sunburn, even desert dwellers like cactus!
Solutions
Solutions
Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover.
  1. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes.
  2. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray.
  3. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs.
  4. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Prevention
Prevention
Preventing some sources of scarring is easier than others, but all start with careful attention to your plants once you decide to bring them home.
  1. Review specific guidelines for your plant, including soil drainage, watering, and fertilizer requirements.
  2. Inspect plants before planting and use sterile pots and fresh potting soil or media to limit transfer of fungi or bacteria.
  3. Once established, check your plants regularly for signs of scarring or the presence of pests, as it is better to catch problems as early as possible.
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Low light
plant poor
Low light
A lack of sunlight will cause the stems and leaves to elongate and appear lighter in color.
Overview
Overview
All plants require light, and if they do not receive it in the quantities that they require this distorts their growth in a process known as etiolation. In essence, etiolated plants are diverting all of their energy to growing taller in a desperate attempt to reach a position where they can meet their light requirements. Many other growth factors are harmed by this, and so light-deprived plants can become weak and distorted until they are almost unrecognizable. Low light symptoms are most commonly seen in houseplants, but outdoor specimens can also be affected.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Although symptoms will vary in different plants, the general symptoms of low light are easy to spot.
  1. Plant stems grow tall and lanky.
  2. There are less leaves, and both leaves and stems tend to be pale and insipid looking. This is due to a shortage of chlorophyll.
  3. All plant parts become weakened and may droop, as energy is diverted toward too-fast growth as the plant stretches itself toward any source of light.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Plants need sunlight in varying amounts for photosynthesis – a process that produces energy for growth and fruit and flower production. Low light causes a plant to divert all energy to upward (apical) growth in order to find better light. Plant hormones called auxins are transported from the actively-growing tip of the plant downwards, to suppress lateral growth. A drop in cellular pH triggers expansins, nonenzymatic cell wall proteins, to loosen cell walls and allow them to elongate. This elongation results in the abnormal lengthening of stems, especially internodes, or plant "legginess" which is observed in etoliated plants.
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Aged yellow and dry
plant poor
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Overview
Overview
Regardless of the type of plant or where it is grown, at some point, it will begin to aged yellow and dry. This is a natural, unavoidable process that happens when the plant has completed all of the steps in its life.
Annual plants go through this process at the end of a single growing season. Perennial plants live for multiple years, if not tens or hundreds of years, but will still ultimately exhibit these symptoms.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
When plants have progressed through their natural developmental stages and are nearing the end of their lifecycle, they begin showing signs of decline. Leaves will start to yellow and droop, and over time they turn papery brown and dry.
Once completely dry, the leaves begin to fall from the plant until the entire plant has dried out.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
At the end of its life, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence or natural aging and death. Cell division stops, and the plant begins catabolizing resources to use in other parts of the plant.
As this happens, the tissues begin yellow and drying until the entire plant is desiccated and perishes.
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Soft rot
plant poor
Soft rot
Soft rot causes the entire plant to turn black and rot from the inside out.
Overview
Overview
Soft rot is a common disease affecting mostly fruits and vegetables. It can occur while plants are growing but is more common once the produce has been harvested. The most susceptible plants are fleshy vegetables like tomatoes, lettuce, sweet potato, capsicum, bananas, eggplants, squash, cucumber, avocados, and potatoes.
Many succulents are also susceptible to soft rot. This is especially the case when the plant has received some damage, as bacteria enters the succulent through the open wound.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Initially, the disease is spotted in the form of soft, wet, cream-to-tan necrotic spots. These may appear on fruits and vegetables, including tubers, or succulent leaves and stems. The spots are surrounded by a dark brown to black ring.
As the disease progresses, the plant part becomes infected with a soft and slimy rot that has a foul odor. A dark discoloration can be seen internally. Potatoes, sweet potatoes and other tubers will have evidence of this rot under the skin. Fruits like avocados exhibit a dark metallic sheen on the outside and the flesh is grey to black. The flesh also has a putrid odor.
Succulents with soft rot will have watery-looking scabs on the stems or leaves. As the disease progresses, the spots will turn brown to black and they may have a foul-smelling discharge. For succulents with shorter stems, it may be more difficult to notice the earliest symptoms, and soft rot may not be noticed until the plant has already begun rotting from the center.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Soft rot is caused by the bacteria Erwinia cartovorum. This bacteria secretes enzymes that decompose the cell wall structure of the plant. This destroys the plant tissue and causes the plant or its fruit to rot.
The bacteria lives in crop debris as well as soil and water, including the ocean. It infects plants through open wounds, including those caused by overwatering in succulents. It is normally spread by splashing water, insects, and wind. Infection is worse in hot and humid weather.
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distribution

Distribution of Tongue aloe

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Distribution Map of Tongue aloe

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Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
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More Info on Tongue Aloe Growth and Care

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Basic Care Guide
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Lighting
Full sun
Tongue aloe has a preference for generous amounts of sunlight, which promotes its healthy growth. However, this plant is moderately tolerant to locations with less sun exposure. Its origin of growth is in places abundant in sunlight. Excessive or insufficient sunlight can harm the plant, disturbing its normal growth cycle.
Best Sunlight Practices
Transplant
1-2 feet
Optimal times to transplant tongue aloe include the warmth of mid to late spring, promoting robust growth. Choose a location offering bright, indirect light and ensure well-draining soil. A gently persuasive touch is key when moving tongue aloe.
Transplant Techniques
Propagation
Spring,Autumn
Tongue aloe flourishes in cultivation when propagated correctly. Primarily, this plant thrives through cuttings, involving a segment of healthy leaf placed in suitable soil resulting in effective rooting. Ideal conditions include a well-draining medium and partial shade, fostering optimal growth without the risk of moisture-related diseases. Patience is vital, as tongue aloe may take several weeks to establish new roots.
Propagation Techniques
Feng shui direction
South
In the discipline of Feng Shui, tongue aloe might be seen favorably when oriented towards the South. This direction, governed by the element of Fire, could harmonize with this plant's fleshy leaves and its resilience, symbolizing energy and rebirth. However, interpretations may vary, revealing the rich, subjective shades of Feng Shui.
Fengshui Details
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Plants Related to Tongue aloe

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Coastal cholla
Coastal cholla
Coastal cholla (Cylindropuntia prolifera) is a shrub cactus species native to California. Coastal cholla grows in coastal sage scrub, chaparral, beach and bluff habitats. This species is very prominent in Santa Barbara County.
Cliff fendlerbush
Cliff fendlerbush
The fendlerbush is a deciduous shrub that grows 1 to 3 m tall. The branches are tough and wiry, grey with furrowed bark. The leaves are opposite, oblong, entire, thick and twisted, with three veins. The creamy-white flowers open at the end of short branches, either solitary or in groups of up to three. The four sepals are purplish, the four petals narrow to a claw at the base and there is a central boss with four styles and eight stamens. The fruits are capsules that remain on the plant for a long time.
Cleft phlox
Cleft phlox
Phlox bifida, commonly known as cleft phlox, is native to the midwestern United States, the cedar glades areas in Tennessee and Kentucky, and the Ozarks. It is usually found in dry areas and blooms in the spring.
Chinese violet cress
Chinese violet cress
Chinese violet cress (Orychophragmus violaceus) is a plant species native to Asia. It grows in many habitats in central China, where it is often cultivated in gardens and as a vegetable. Its flowers are edible and often added to salads. Chinese violet cress should be grown in full sunlight in well-drained soil. This species does not grow well in the shade.
Chinese plumbago
Chinese plumbago
Chinese plumbago is often used for ornamental purposes in borders and various types of gardens, including city, courtyard, rock, and Mediterranean gardens. providing late-season color. This petite deciduous shrub can grow in soils with poor nutritional values but it doesn't tolerate full shade. It received the Award of Garden Merit of the UK's Royal Horticultural Society for its excellent performance and qualitites.
Chinese plum-yew
Chinese plum-yew
Chinese plum-yews are shrubs that can grow into smaller trees. Its leaves are glossy and have a similar appearance to palm trees. Their fruits look like olives or plums with almond-shaped seeds. It is a dioecious species which means a male and a female variety of this plant can grow separately but needs both to pollinate.
Cape jasmine
Cape jasmine
Gardenia jasminoides is an evergreen shrub with unique, glossy evergreen leaves and stunning flowers. The sophisticated, matte white flowers are often used in bouquets. The exceptional beauty of this ornamental plant has made it a popular and highly appreciated plant amongst gardeners and horticulturalists.
Golden pothos
Golden pothos
The golden pothos (Epipremnum aureum) is a popular houseplant that is commonly seen in Australia, Asia, and the West Indies. It goes by many nicknames, including "devil's ivy", because it is so hard to kill and can even grow in low light conditions. Golden pothos has poisonous sap, so it should be kept away from pets and children.
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Tongue aloe
Tongue aloe
Tongue aloe
Tongue aloe
Tongue aloe
Tongue aloe
Tongue aloe
Gasteria carinata var. verrucosa
Also known as: Ox tongue, Wart gasteria, Sago plant
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
9 to 11
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Questions About Tongue aloe

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Watering Watering Watering
Sunlight Sunlight Sunlight
Temperature Temperature Temperature
Fertilizing Fertilizing Fertilizing
What should I do if I water my Tongue aloe too much or too little?
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How often should I water my Tongue aloe?
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What should I consider when watering my Tongue aloe?
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How to water Tongue aloe?
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Key Facts About Tongue aloe

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Attributes of Tongue aloe

Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Succulent
Bloom Time
Summer
Flower Color
Green
Red
Orange
Leaf type
Evergreen
Ideal Temperature
20 - 38 ℃
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Trivia and Interesting Facts

Scientific Classification of Tongue aloe

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Common Pests & Diseases About Tongue aloe

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Scars
Scars Scars Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Solutions: Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Learn More About the Scars more
Low light
Low light Low light Low light
A lack of sunlight will cause the stems and leaves to elongate and appear lighter in color.
Solutions: Low light can only be addressed by increasing light availability, and these measures will only stop further etoliation; current distortion cannot be reversed. Move plant to a position where it receives more light. Check the requirements for specific species, as too much sunlight can cause a plant to burn. Introduce appropriate artificial lighting. Some people choose to prune the longest stems so the plant can concentrate on healthy new growth under the improved lighting.
Learn More About the Low light more
Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry Aged yellow and dry Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Solutions: If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Learn More About the Aged yellow and dry more
Soft rot
Soft rot Soft rot Soft rot
Soft rot causes the entire plant to turn black and rot from the inside out.
Solutions: Once soft rot appears, it is difficult to control. For minor issues of soft rot where only a small area is affected: Reduce watering. Only water when the soil is completely dry. Prune away affected tissue. Remove all dead and/or rotting roots and leaves. Use sterile tools. Repot using new soil. If potted, repot the plant with new soil. Be sure to use a pot with proper drainage holes. For severe cases when a large amount of tissue is infected or black: Dispose of plant. Severely infected plants will not recover. Dispose of the plant so that other nearby plants are not infected. Do not compost the infected plant.
Learn More About the Soft rot more
close
Scars
plant poor
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Scars form when the plant repairs wounds. They can be the result of people or pets passing by and scraping the plant. Once the underlying issue is resolved, the plant will heal but a scar may remain.
Pests and pathogens can also cause scarring. Insects may attack the plant for a meal, resulting in extensive scarring when a few invaders turn into an infestation. Diseases such as fungus and bacteria can weaken the plant, causing brown spots, mushy areas, or blisters that lead to scars.
Scars occur on stems when a leaf or bud has been lost and the plant has healed. The harder tissue is like a scab that protects a wound.
On other occasions, scars can signal problems from environmental conditions, such as overexposure to sunlight or heat. It might surprise you to know that plants can suffer from sunburn, even desert dwellers like cactus!
Solutions
Solutions
Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover.
  1. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes.
  2. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray.
  3. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs.
  4. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Prevention
Prevention
Preventing some sources of scarring is easier than others, but all start with careful attention to your plants once you decide to bring them home.
  1. Review specific guidelines for your plant, including soil drainage, watering, and fertilizer requirements.
  2. Inspect plants before planting and use sterile pots and fresh potting soil or media to limit transfer of fungi or bacteria.
  3. Once established, check your plants regularly for signs of scarring or the presence of pests, as it is better to catch problems as early as possible.
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Low light
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Low light
A lack of sunlight will cause the stems and leaves to elongate and appear lighter in color.
Overview
Overview
All plants require light, and if they do not receive it in the quantities that they require this distorts their growth in a process known as etiolation. In essence, etiolated plants are diverting all of their energy to growing taller in a desperate attempt to reach a position where they can meet their light requirements. Many other growth factors are harmed by this, and so light-deprived plants can become weak and distorted until they are almost unrecognizable. Low light symptoms are most commonly seen in houseplants, but outdoor specimens can also be affected.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Although symptoms will vary in different plants, the general symptoms of low light are easy to spot.
  1. Plant stems grow tall and lanky.
  2. There are less leaves, and both leaves and stems tend to be pale and insipid looking. This is due to a shortage of chlorophyll.
  3. All plant parts become weakened and may droop, as energy is diverted toward too-fast growth as the plant stretches itself toward any source of light.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Plants need sunlight in varying amounts for photosynthesis – a process that produces energy for growth and fruit and flower production. Low light causes a plant to divert all energy to upward (apical) growth in order to find better light. Plant hormones called auxins are transported from the actively-growing tip of the plant downwards, to suppress lateral growth. A drop in cellular pH triggers expansins, nonenzymatic cell wall proteins, to loosen cell walls and allow them to elongate. This elongation results in the abnormal lengthening of stems, especially internodes, or plant "legginess" which is observed in etoliated plants.
Solutions
Solutions
Low light can only be addressed by increasing light availability, and these measures will only stop further etoliation; current distortion cannot be reversed.
  • Move plant to a position where it receives more light. Check the requirements for specific species, as too much sunlight can cause a plant to burn.
  • Introduce appropriate artificial lighting.
  • Some people choose to prune the longest stems so the plant can concentrate on healthy new growth under the improved lighting.
Prevention
Prevention
To avoid etiolation, provide an adequate amount of light from the beginning.
  1. Choose a location that matches each plant's ideal light needs. Many indoor plants do best in or near a south-facing window, which will provide the longest hours of sunlight. Flowering plants and those with colored leaves typically need more light than purely-green plants, as photosynthesis occurs in the green portions of leaves.
  2. Select plants with light needs that match a location's conditions. Some cultivars and varieties require less light than others.
  3. Use a grow light. Darker locations may require artificial illumination. A grow light may also become more necessary during winter, when sunlit hours are at their shortest.
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Aged yellow and dry
plant poor
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Overview
Overview
Regardless of the type of plant or where it is grown, at some point, it will begin to aged yellow and dry. This is a natural, unavoidable process that happens when the plant has completed all of the steps in its life.
Annual plants go through this process at the end of a single growing season. Perennial plants live for multiple years, if not tens or hundreds of years, but will still ultimately exhibit these symptoms.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
When plants have progressed through their natural developmental stages and are nearing the end of their lifecycle, they begin showing signs of decline. Leaves will start to yellow and droop, and over time they turn papery brown and dry.
Once completely dry, the leaves begin to fall from the plant until the entire plant has dried out.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
At the end of its life, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence or natural aging and death. Cell division stops, and the plant begins catabolizing resources to use in other parts of the plant.
As this happens, the tissues begin yellow and drying until the entire plant is desiccated and perishes.
Solutions
Solutions
If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Prevention
Prevention
Unfortunately, there is no way to prevent plants from dying of “old age.” To help prolong their life, and put off symptoms of aged yellow and dry for as long as possible, take care of them by giving them enough water, fertilizing them appropriately, and making sure they get enough sunlight.
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Soft rot
plant poor
Soft rot
Soft rot causes the entire plant to turn black and rot from the inside out.
Overview
Overview
Soft rot is a common disease affecting mostly fruits and vegetables. It can occur while plants are growing but is more common once the produce has been harvested. The most susceptible plants are fleshy vegetables like tomatoes, lettuce, sweet potato, capsicum, bananas, eggplants, squash, cucumber, avocados, and potatoes.
Many succulents are also susceptible to soft rot. This is especially the case when the plant has received some damage, as bacteria enters the succulent through the open wound.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Initially, the disease is spotted in the form of soft, wet, cream-to-tan necrotic spots. These may appear on fruits and vegetables, including tubers, or succulent leaves and stems. The spots are surrounded by a dark brown to black ring.
As the disease progresses, the plant part becomes infected with a soft and slimy rot that has a foul odor. A dark discoloration can be seen internally. Potatoes, sweet potatoes and other tubers will have evidence of this rot under the skin. Fruits like avocados exhibit a dark metallic sheen on the outside and the flesh is grey to black. The flesh also has a putrid odor.
Succulents with soft rot will have watery-looking scabs on the stems or leaves. As the disease progresses, the spots will turn brown to black and they may have a foul-smelling discharge. For succulents with shorter stems, it may be more difficult to notice the earliest symptoms, and soft rot may not be noticed until the plant has already begun rotting from the center.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Soft rot is caused by the bacteria Erwinia cartovorum. This bacteria secretes enzymes that decompose the cell wall structure of the plant. This destroys the plant tissue and causes the plant or its fruit to rot.
The bacteria lives in crop debris as well as soil and water, including the ocean. It infects plants through open wounds, including those caused by overwatering in succulents. It is normally spread by splashing water, insects, and wind. Infection is worse in hot and humid weather.
Solutions
Solutions
Once soft rot appears, it is difficult to control.
For minor issues of soft rot where only a small area is affected:
  1. Reduce watering. Only water when the soil is completely dry.
  2. Prune away affected tissue. Remove all dead and/or rotting roots and leaves. Use sterile tools.
  3. Repot using new soil. If potted, repot the plant with new soil. Be sure to use a pot with proper drainage holes.
For severe cases when a large amount of tissue is infected or black:
  1. Dispose of plant. Severely infected plants will not recover. Dispose of the plant so that other nearby plants are not infected. Do not compost the infected plant.
Prevention
Prevention
To prevent soft rot, do the following:
  1. Avoid overwatering. Only water succulents when soil is almost dry. Make sure potted plants are in containers with drainage holes.
  2. Ensure proper airflow. Do not crowd plants together. Make sure there is adequate space between plants to allow for airflow.
  3. Source healthy plants. Avoid introducing plants with soft rot into your garden or home. Buy plants for a reliable source and check for signs of soft rot.
  4. Sterilize pruning tools. Soft rot bacteria enter plants where tissue is cut. Make sure to sterilize pruning tools before using.
  5. Control pests. Pests can spread soft rot bacteria when they feed on plants. Controlling pests will help stop the spread of soft rot.
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distribution

Distribution of Tongue aloe

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Distribution Map of Tongue aloe

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Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
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More Info on Tongue Aloe Growth and Care

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Basic Care Guide
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Plants Related to Tongue aloe

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Lighting
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Indoor
Indoor
Outdoor
Choose a site here for personalized care tips.
Requirements
Full sun
Ideal
Above 6 hours sunlight
Partial sun
Tolerance
About 3-6 hours sunlight
Watch how sunlight gracefully moves through your garden, and choose spots that provide the perfect balance of light and shade for your plants, ensuring their happiness.
Essentials
Tongue aloe has a preference for generous amounts of sunlight, which promotes its healthy growth. However, this plant is moderately tolerant to locations with less sun exposure. Its origin of growth is in places abundant in sunlight. Excessive or insufficient sunlight can harm the plant, disturbing its normal growth cycle.
Preferred
Tolerable
Unsuitable
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Artificial lighting
Indoor plants require adequate lighting for optimal growth. When natural sunlight is insufficient, particularly in winter or in less sunny spaces, artificial lights offer a vital solution, promoting faster, healthier growth.
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Indoor plants require adequate lighting for optimal growth. When natural sunlight is insufficient, particularly in winter or in less sunny spaces, artificial lights offer a vital solution, promoting faster, healthier growth.
1. Choose the right type of artificial light: LED lights are a popular choice for indoor plant lighting because they can be customized to provide the specific wavelengths of light that your plants need.
Full sun plants need 30-50W/sq ft of artificial light, partial sun plants need 20-30W/sq ft, and full shade plants need 10-20W/sq ft.
2. Determine the appropriate distance: Place the light source 12-36 inches above the plant to mimic natural sunlight.
3. Determine the duration: Mimic the length of natural daylight hours for your plant species. most plants need 8-12 hours of light per day.
Important Symptoms
Symptoms of Insufficient Light in %s
Tongue aloe is a beloved choice for indoor gardening, and they require strong light to thrive. However, when placed in rooms with suboptimal lighting, they may develop symptoms of light deficiency.
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(Symptom details and solutions)
Small leaves
New leaves may grow smaller in size compared to the previous ones once they have matured.
Leggy or sparse growth
The spaces between leaves or stems of your Tongue aloe may become longer, resulting in a thin and stretched-out appearance. This can make the plant look sparse and weak, and it may easily break or lean due to its own weight.
Faster leaf drop
When plants are exposed to low light conditions, they tend to shed older leaves early to conserve resources. Within a limited time, these resources can be utilized to grow new leaves until the plant's energy reserves are depleted.
Slower or no new growth
Tongue aloe enters a survival mode when light conditions are poor, which leads to a halt in leaf production. As a result, the plant's growth becomes delayed or stops altogether.
Lighter-colored new leaves
Insufficient sunlight can cause leaves to develop irregular color patterns or appear pale. This indicates a lack of chlorophyll and essential nutrients.
Solutions
1. To ensure optimal growth, gradually move plants to a sunnier location each week, until they receive at least 6 hours of direct sunlight daily. Use a south-facing window and keep curtains open during the day for maximum sunlight exposure and nutrient accumulation.2. To provide additional light for your plant, consider using artificial light if it's large or not easily movable. Keep a desk or ceiling lamp on for at least 8 hours daily, or invest in professional plant grow lights for ample light.
Symptoms of Excessive light in %s
Tongue aloe require strong light to thrive, and some are remarkably resilient to sun exposure, rarely suffering from sunburn.
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(Symptom details and solutions)
Chlorosis
Chlorosis is a condition where the plant's leaves lose their green color and turn yellow. This is due to the breakdown of chlorophyll from excessive sunlight, which negatively affects the plant's ability to photosynthesize.
Sunscald
Sunscald occurs when the plant's leaves or stems are damaged by intense sunlight exposure. It appears as pale, bleached, or necrotic areas on the plant tissue and can reduce the plant's overall health.
Leaf Curling
Leaf curling is a symptom where leaves curl or twist under extreme sunlight conditions. This is a defense mechanism used by the plant to reduce its surface area exposed to sunlight, minimizing water loss and damage.
Wilting
Wilting occurs when a plant loses turgor pressure and its leaves and stems begin to droop. Overexposure to sunlight can cause wilting by increasing the plant's water loss through transpiration, making it difficult for the plant to maintain adequate hydration.
Leaf Scorching
Leaf scorching is a symptom characterized by the appearance of brown, dry, and crispy edges or patches on leaves due to excessive sunlight. This can lead to a reduction in photosynthetic capacity and overall plant health.
Solutions
1. Move your plant to the optimal position where it can receive abundant sunlight but also have some shade. An east-facing window is an ideal choice as the morning sunlight is gentler. This way, your plant can enjoy ample sunlight while reducing the risk of sunburn.2. It is recommended to trim off any completely dehydrated or withered parts of the plant.
Discover information about plant diseases, toxicity, weed control and more.
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