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Perennial ryegrass
Perennial ryegrass
Perennial ryegrass
Perennial ryegrass
Perennial ryegrass
Perennial ryegrass
Add to My Garden
Perennial ryegrass
Lolium perenne
Also known as: English ryegrass, Ray grass
Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) is a plant species native to Eurasia. Perennial ryegrass is used in mixtures of lawn seed to feed cattle and to control erosion. Perennial ryegrass is also used to create turf for golf courses because of its hardiness. In countries where it's imported, this plant is often considered an invasive species.
Water
Twice per week
Water
Sunlight
Full sun
Sunlight
care guide

Care Guide for Perennial ryegrass

Water
Water
Perennial ryegrass needs plenty of moisture, especially during the summer growing season. Water whenever the soil is starting to look dry, as often as two or three times a week.
Fertilization
Fertilization
Perennial ryegrass does well when regularly fertilized during its growing season, in spring and fall. This will help the plant resist diseases. Use a fertilizer rich in nitrogen and phosphorus for best results.
Pruning
Pruning
Trim the diseased, withered leaves once a month.
Soil
Soil
Sand, Loam, Acidic, Neutral, Alkaline
Sunlight
Sunlight
Full sun, Partial sun
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Questions About Perennial ryegrass

Watering Watering Watering
Seasonal Care Seasonal Care Seasonal Care
How Much to Water Perennial ryegrass?
Understanding how much you should water your Perennial ryegrass is a quite simple endeavor. Whether you live more towards the north where the weather is cooler, or you live in the south where the weather is warmer, you should give your Perennial ryegrass about one inch of water each time you water it. The exception to that rule occurs during the height of summer when this grass enters a short dormancy period. At that time, it is best to give your Perennial ryegrass light but appropriate waterings to curb the harmful effects of the hot sun. Of course, the overall volume of water you supply depends on how large of an area your Perennial ryegrass covers. For example, providing an inch of water for a large area of Perennial ryegrass requires much more water than if you are caring for a small lawn made of Perennial ryegrass.
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How Often to Water Perennial ryegrass?
The frequency with which you water your Perennial ryegrass will depend heavily on the region in which you live, the climate conditions that are present in that region, and the specific season you are in. For example, those who grow Perennial ryegrass in more northern regions, where the weather is somewhat cooler, should water about once every 1-2 weeks. By contrast, those at more southern latitudes will often need to water their Perennial ryegrass a bit more often, usually about once per week. However, in both regions, when rainfall is relatively regular, you can reduce your watering schedule accordingly. Still, rainfall alone is rarely enough to keep this lawn alive. The seasonal factor may be most important as this cool season grass will typically enter a dormancy period during summer. During that period, your Perennial ryegrass may still need water to avoid drying out, but it will not need water for the sake of producing new growth.
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How to Know If You Are Watering Perennial ryegrass Enough?
If you give your Perennial ryegrass too much or too little water, there will be several visual cues that indicate that is the case. When overwatering occurs, the blades of Perennial ryegrass that comprise your lawn may become softer than usual. Additionally, you may notice a buildup of thatch. If you underwater your lawn you can expect to find brown patches. Along with that, your Perennial ryegrass may experience heat stress which can lead to accumulations of fungus and yellowing of the grass blades. Underwatered lawns also tend to preserve footprints longer than lawns that have received a correct amount of water.
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Watering Perennial ryegrass at Different Growth Stages?
You should change your watering schedule significantly if you are trying to establish a new lawn. New lawns, whether grown from seed or from sod, should receive water on a frequent basis. Often, it takes multiple waterings per week to ensure that the soil remains moist enough to allow the roots to take hold of the soil. After the initial phase in which your lawn is establishing itself, you should water based on this plant's natural growth cycle. During the spring and fall, Perennial ryegrass is the most active in creating new growth and will need about an inch of water per week. During summer, your grass will become somewhat dormant, but need more frequent but light waterings. During winter, your grass should be entirely dormant and need no water at all.
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Watering Perennial ryegrass Through the Seasons?
If you want your Perennial ryegrass to be as healthy as can be, you should pay close attention to seasonal changes. In spring, you should follow the rule of watering this grass with about an inch of water per week. You should water your Perennial ryegrass more frequently than usual during the summer, sometimes multiple times per week. However, your Perennial ryegrass will enter its summer dormancy period and those waterings can be relatively light. On the other end of the spectrum, during winter, your Perennial ryegrass will not need any water at all. During any other time of year, you should follow the typical watering frequency of about once per week depending on how hot your region is. During any part of the growing season, you should anticipate heat waves and rainfall to adjust your watering accordingly.
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What Is the Best Way to Water the Perennial ryegrass?
In nearly all cases, people grow Perennial ryegrass as a lawn, which means there are specific ways that you should go about watering this grass. One way to water a lawn of Perennial ryegrass is to use a hose with a spray nozzle attachment. However, the best way to water is to set up a sprinkler system. It can be even better to set up a sprinkler system that runs on a timer, to guarantee you give your Perennial ryegrass the right amount of water at the right time. When watering, you should use cool or room temperature water. It is also a good idea to water in the morning, as this allows the water to saturate the soil while also allowing the daily sunlight to evaporate any excess moisture.
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What to Do If Your Water Perennial ryegrass Too Much or Too Little?
If you happen to overwater your Perennial ryegrass, there are a few steps you can take to return your lawn to full health. One of the best ways to deal with this issue is to aerate your lawn, which will repair any compacted soils that may prevent excess water from draining. In that situation, you should also consider dethatching your Perennial ryegrass. When you underwater your Perennial ryegrass, your remedy should be entirely different. In those cases, you should allow your lawn to grow a bit longer before mowing it. As is somewhat obvious, you should also supply your Perennial ryegrass with a bit more water than you were previously given.
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pests

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Perennial ryegrass based on 10 million real cases
Leaf tips withering
Leaf tips withering Leaf tips withering
Leaf tips withering
Low air humidity can cause the edges of the leaves to dry out.
Solutions: If your plant has only a few dried tips, complete the following: Increase humidity. Increase the humidity around your plant by misting it with a spray bottle daily. Alternatively, you can use a humidifier. Water plant. If your soil is dry, water until the soil is moist but not damp. Water again when soil dries out. If a large portion of the leaves is suffering from dry tips, complete the following: Prune away affected tissue. Using sharp and clean pruning shears, remove the dried out tips using clean cuts to avoid harming healthy tissue. Plant tissue will heal on its own, but you can apply a pruning seal for extra protection.
Scars
Scars Scars
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Solutions: Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Flower withering
Flower withering Flower withering
Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Solutions: If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible. For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface. In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well. If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Fire ants
Fire ants Fire ants
Fire ants
Fire ants gnaw on the roots of plants and are aggressive toward people.
Solutions: Caution: fire ants are venomous and cause painful bites which can be fatal in the case of a rare but significant allergy. Fire ants can be a painful pest to have around for you and your plants. Keeping them under control will ensure comfortable gardening for all. For less severe cases: Physically remove mounds. Dig out and remove entire mounds (remember, they go deeper than they seem). Use citrus oil. Pour citrus oil, which is toxic to fire ants, down their holes. For severe cases: Use ant bait. For a chemical solution, broadcast insecticide bait formulated for fire ants in the area around a mound. Apply the bait during a dry evening so the ants can forage for it at night. Look for products that contain Indoxacarb. Release phorid flies. Introduce or promote beneficial phorid flies to gardens. These parasitic flies attack invasive fire ants. Hire a professional. Some ant baits are only available to professional exterminators. For serious cases of fire ants, consider hiring a professional.
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Leaf tips withering
plant poor
Leaf tips withering
Low air humidity can cause the edges of the leaves to dry out.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The tips and the edges of the plants’ leaves are dried out and brown. They may be crunchy when touched. This is caused by low humidity and/or a lack of water.
Solutions
Solutions
If your plant has only a few dried tips, complete the following:
  1. Increase humidity. Increase the humidity around your plant by misting it with a spray bottle daily. Alternatively, you can use a humidifier.
  2. Water plant. If your soil is dry, water until the soil is moist but not damp. Water again when soil dries out.
If a large portion of the leaves is suffering from dry tips, complete the following:
  1. Prune away affected tissue. Using sharp and clean pruning shears, remove the dried out tips using clean cuts to avoid harming healthy tissue. Plant tissue will heal on its own, but you can apply a pruning seal for extra protection.
Prevention
Prevention
Many houseplants come from moist tropical areas with high humidity.
To prevent dry and brown tips, you should complete the following:
  1. Water regularly. Water when soil is dry.
  2. Keep humidity high. Keep moisture high by regularly misting the air or using a humidifier.
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Scars
plant poor
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Scars form when the plant repairs wounds. They can be the result of people or pets passing by and scraping the plant. Once the underlying issue is resolved, the plant will heal but a scar may remain.
Pests and pathogens can also cause scarring. Insects may attack the plant for a meal, resulting in extensive scarring when a few invaders turn into an infestation. Diseases such as fungus and bacteria can weaken the plant, causing brown spots, mushy areas, or blisters that lead to scars.
Scars occur on stems when a leaf or bud has been lost and the plant has healed. The harder tissue is like a scab that protects a wound.
On other occasions, scars can signal problems from environmental conditions, such as overexposure to sunlight or heat. It might surprise you to know that plants can suffer from sunburn, even desert dwellers like cactus!
Solutions
Solutions
Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover.
  1. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes.
  2. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray.
  3. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs.
  4. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Prevention
Prevention
Preventing some sources of scarring is easier than others, but all start with careful attention to your plants once you decide to bring them home.
  1. Review specific guidelines for your plant, including soil drainage, watering, and fertilizer requirements.
  2. Inspect plants before planting and use sterile pots and fresh potting soil or media to limit transfer of fungi or bacteria.
  3. Once established, check your plants regularly for signs of scarring or the presence of pests, as it is better to catch problems as early as possible.
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Flower withering
plant poor
Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Overview
Overview
Flower withering occurs when flowers become weak, droopy, wilted, or faded until they can’t be revived. During withering, they begin to wrinkle and shrink until the flower becomes completely dry or dead.
Any flowers, regardless of the plant type or the climate they are grown in, are susceptible to withering. It is a worldwide problem across houseplants, herbs, flowering ornamentals, trees, shrubs, garden vegetables, and food crops.
Unlike wilting—which withering is often confused with—withering can be caused by different things and is often due to more than a lack of water. Withering can be fatal in severe cases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Flower withering progresses from very mild cases to severe occurrences that kill the flower. The severity of the symptoms is related to the cause and how long the condition is allowed to progress before action is taken.
  • Wilted, droopy flowers
  • Petals and leaves begin to wrinkle
  • Brown papery streaks or spots appear on the petals and leaf tips
  • Flowerhead shrink in size
  • Petal color fades
  • Yellowing leaves
  • Complete death of the flower
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The main causes of flower withering include natural age progress, lack of water, nutritional deficiencies, and bacterial or fungal diseases. It’s critical to determine the underlying cause when flower withering is noticed. This will guide the best course of action, if treatment is possible.
Check the soil for moisture and then closely examine the entire plant for signs of nutrient deficiencies. If neither of those appears to be the cause then cut open the stem below a flower. If a cross-section reveals brown or rust-colored stains it is safe to assume that this is a bacterial or fungal infection.
If the flower is nearing the end of its normal lifespan, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence, or cell aging and death. Cell division stops and the plant begins breaking down resources within the flower to use in other parts of the plant.
In all other cases, flower withering happens when the plant seals off the stem as a defense mechanism, stopping transport within the vascular system. This prevents further water loss through the flowers but also stops bacteria and fungi from moving to healthy parts of the plant. Once water and nutrient transport stops, the flower begins to wither and ultimately die.
Solutions
Solutions
If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface.
In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well.
If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Prevention
Prevention
This is definitely one of those instances where prevention is more effective than cure. Here are some preventative measures for avoiding premature flower withering.
  • Water plants according to their needs -- either keep the soil slightly moist or allow the top inch or two to dry out before watering again.
  • Fertilize lightly on a consistent basis, depending upon the plant’s growth. Quick-growing plants and those that flower or develop fruit will need more frequent fertilizing than slow-growing plants.
  • Purchase plants that are certified disease- or pathogen-free.
  • Look for disease-resistant cultivars.
  • Isolate plants showing disease symptoms to prevent the spread to neighboring plants.
  • Practice good plant hygiene by removing any fallen plant material as soon as possible.
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Fire ants
plant poor
Fire ants
Fire ants gnaw on the roots of plants and are aggressive toward people.
Overview
Overview
Fire ants are a group of ants that are known for their aggressive behavior and painful stings. Some fire ants are native and others are invasive from other countries. Once they reach plants, they climb them and chew away at leaves and flower buds.
Fire ants also kill and eat beneficial insects such as caterpillars, ladybugs, mantis, and native ants. They can be a problem any time temperatures are above freezing, but new infestations are most likely to appear when brought in via contaminated material such as potting soil or mulch, or when insecticides have harmed populations of beneficial insects that would otherwise control populations of fire ants.
They can be difficult to control, especially once populations become large. Plant damage is typically minor, but fire ants can destroy seedlings.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The number one symptom of fire ants is seeing the ants themselves which are red or black in color. Ant mounds in the ground are also signs. Fire ant mounds rarely exceed 46 cm in diameter. If a fire ant mound is disturbed, many fast-moving, aggressive ants will emerge. These ants will bite and then painfully sting.
Even if no ants are visible, their damage might be apparent. Chewed leaf and flower edges might indicate fire ants. Fully eaten seedlings are another sign.
Solutions
Solutions
Caution: fire ants are venomous and cause painful bites which can be fatal in the case of a rare but significant allergy.
Fire ants can be a painful pest to have around for you and your plants. Keeping them under control will ensure comfortable gardening for all.
For less severe cases:
  • Physically remove mounds. Dig out and remove entire mounds (remember, they go deeper than they seem).
  • Use citrus oil. Pour citrus oil, which is toxic to fire ants, down their holes.
For severe cases:
  • Use ant bait. For a chemical solution, broadcast insecticide bait formulated for fire ants in the area around a mound. Apply the bait during a dry evening so the ants can forage for it at night. Look for products that contain Indoxacarb.
  • Release phorid flies. Introduce or promote beneficial phorid flies to gardens. These parasitic flies attack invasive fire ants.
  • Hire a professional. Some ant baits are only available to professional exterminators. For serious cases of fire ants, consider hiring a professional.
Prevention
Prevention
Fire ants become more difficult to control as they establish themselves, so try to prevent them or treat them early.
  • Monitor new material. Do not bring in any soil or plants from known infested areas, unless if they are "Quarantine Approved." Make sure to check new material for fire ants.
  • Apply insecticide. Some warm and humid areas have high fire ants populations. In these areas, spread a granular fire ants insecticide such as Varsity in the spring near gardens to prevent these unwelcome visitors.
  • Treat early. Spot treat at the first sight of any fire ants mound, as larger mounds are more difficult to treat.
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weed

Weed Control

Weeds
Perennial ryegrass was originally planted as a turf grass in lawns, but its spread is becoming problematic. It is found in agricultural land, wetlands, and disturbed soil areas. In Australia and New Zealand, it is viewed as invasive environmental weed, and it is included on the state invasive species list in both California and Alaska. It can be toxic to both humans and grazing animals. These grasses generate large amounts of seed which are easily spread. The grass outcompetes local plants and leads to a reduction in wildflowers. In a garden setting, perennial ryegrass can be controlled by hand pulling or digging, but otherwise herbicides are needed for larger areas.
How to Control it
Once the weeds start to flower and fructify, it will be difficult to control them effectively. In fact, the best time to remove weeds is before flowering and fructification because the seeds will spread rapidly after that. So, it is necessary to remove weeds more often and to take precautions in advance next year. Mulching: During the seed stage, covering with sawdust, straws or black mulches to effectively inhibit seed germination and the growth of the seedling. Generally, this method is used in winter or spring to inhibit the germination of weed in the soil. If the weeds have already flowered and fructified, this method can be used to isolate the seeds and the soil to prevent the seeds from falling into the soil. Pulling out: Before the weeds fructify, wear gloves or use tools to pull them out. If it is difficult to pull out weed due to dry soil, adding water to the soil helps to make it easy to remove the roots thoroughly. After pulling out the weed, deep tillage can be adopted to remove the residual roots. This method is especially effective for weeds that are in the seedling stage or low growing size. Pruning: Pruning weeds before they fructify can effectively control the propagation of weeds. It is suggested to prune this weed repeatedly, twice a week straight for two weeks during the growth phase. Plowing: Before cultivation, plow the soil, collect and discard the roots of perennial weeds, then expose them to the sun or bury them deeply. It can also be used for retting organic fertilizer and composting. Chemical control: Using appropriate herbicides can effectively remove the weed from the area. Note: When removing weeds, it is necessary to wear gloves to avoid direct contact with the weeds, especially for the ones that are poisonous, thorny and allergenic. When removing weeds at the flowering stage, special masks should be worn to prevent allergic reactions caused by the inhalation of pollen.
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Distribution Map

Habitat

Meadows, weedy places
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Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
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No species reported
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Plant Type
Plant Type
Herb
Flower Color
Flower Color
Green
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green

Name story

Perennial ryegrass
This plant is commonly used in the southwest United States to overseed winter lawns and it is also used as an indicator of nonspecies-rich grassland. Since it is also a perennial plant, it is called perennial ryegrass.

Symbolism

Vice and changeable disposition

Usages

Garden Use
Perennial ryegrass is one of the most frequently used grasses for turf and lawn grass mixes due to its consistent lushness, high tolerance of foot traffic, and quick establishment. This grass is used in a huge range of areas, from home lawns and parks to golf and baseball turfs.
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Hairy willowherb
Hairy willowherb
Hairy willowherb (Epilobium hirsutum) is a species of weed that is difficult to eradicate. It is not known to be toxic, but the sale of this plant or its seeds has been banned in some areas. This is because its dense, aggressive growth habits can crowd out and destroy other native beneficial plants.
Dragon fruit
Dragon fruit
Dragon fruit berries are edible and have bright red skins and white pulp. A delicious tropical fruit, they also have a high nutritional value. Dragon fruit is a climbing plant with aerial roots and often climbs on tree trunks, abandoned walls, or boulders. It requires plenty of light but is easy to care for and can be planted in a yard.
Cherokee rose
Cherokee rose
The Rosa laevigata is a fragrant rose that's indigenous to parts of Asia. It's considered invasive in the United States. The flower is commonly known as cherokee rose in the United States, and its white petals are said to stand for the tears of Native American Cherokee women being forcibly removed from their homes as part of the infamous Trail of Tears.
Greater periwinkle
Greater periwinkle
Greater periwinkle (Vinca major) is an evergreen shrub native to the Western Mediterranean. It features lavender-colored flowers, and thick, lustrous deep green foliage. To avoid garden invasion and also for ornamental purposes, it's best to grow this plant in hanging pots or in window containers.
Chinese mugwort
Chinese mugwort
Chinese mugwort, a member of the daisy family, closely resembles its relative, the Common mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris). However, chinese mugwort has a more intense aroma, which is how the two are distinguished.It can be toxic to highly toxic if consumed, and even handling can cause skin irritation or allergy reactions.
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Perennial ryegrass
Perennial ryegrass
Perennial ryegrass
Perennial ryegrass
Perennial ryegrass
Perennial ryegrass
Add to My Garden
Perennial ryegrass
Lolium perenne
Also known as: English ryegrass, Ray grass
Water
Twice per week
Water
Sunlight
Full sun
Sunlight
care guide

Care Guide for Perennial ryegrass

Water
Water
Perennial ryegrass needs plenty of moisture, especially during the summer growing season. Water whenever the soil is starting to look dry, as often as two or three times a week.
Fertilization
Fertilization
Perennial ryegrass does well when regularly fertilized during its growing season, in spring and fall. This will help the plant resist diseases. Use a fertilizer rich in nitrogen and phosphorus for best results.
Pruning
Pruning
Trim the diseased, withered leaves once a month.
Soil
Soil
Sand, Loam, Acidic, Neutral, Alkaline
Sunlight
Sunlight
Full sun, Partial sun
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Perennial ryegrass
Lolium perenne
Water
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Twice per week
Sunlight
Sunlight
Full sun
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Fall
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Questions About Perennial ryegrass

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How Much to Water Perennial ryegrass?
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pests

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Perennial ryegrass based on 10 million real cases
Leaf tips withering
Leaf tips withering  Leaf tips withering  Leaf tips withering
Low air humidity can cause the edges of the leaves to dry out.
Solutions: If your plant has only a few dried tips, complete the following: Increase humidity. Increase the humidity around your plant by misting it with a spray bottle daily. Alternatively, you can use a humidifier. Water plant. If your soil is dry, water until the soil is moist but not damp. Water again when soil dries out. If a large portion of the leaves is suffering from dry tips, complete the following: Prune away affected tissue. Using sharp and clean pruning shears, remove the dried out tips using clean cuts to avoid harming healthy tissue. Plant tissue will heal on its own, but you can apply a pruning seal for extra protection.
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Scars
Scars  Scars  Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Solutions: Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
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Flower withering
Flower withering  Flower withering  Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Solutions: If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible. For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface. In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well. If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
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Fire ants
Fire ants  Fire ants  Fire ants
Fire ants gnaw on the roots of plants and are aggressive toward people.
Solutions: Caution: fire ants are venomous and cause painful bites which can be fatal in the case of a rare but significant allergy. Fire ants can be a painful pest to have around for you and your plants. Keeping them under control will ensure comfortable gardening for all. For less severe cases: Physically remove mounds. Dig out and remove entire mounds (remember, they go deeper than they seem). Use citrus oil. Pour citrus oil, which is toxic to fire ants, down their holes. For severe cases: Use ant bait. For a chemical solution, broadcast insecticide bait formulated for fire ants in the area around a mound. Apply the bait during a dry evening so the ants can forage for it at night. Look for products that contain Indoxacarb. Release phorid flies. Introduce or promote beneficial phorid flies to gardens. These parasitic flies attack invasive fire ants. Hire a professional. Some ant baits are only available to professional exterminators. For serious cases of fire ants, consider hiring a professional.
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Leaf tips withering
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Leaf tips withering
Low air humidity can cause the edges of the leaves to dry out.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The tips and the edges of the plants’ leaves are dried out and brown. They may be crunchy when touched. This is caused by low humidity and/or a lack of water.
Solutions
Solutions
If your plant has only a few dried tips, complete the following:
  1. Increase humidity. Increase the humidity around your plant by misting it with a spray bottle daily. Alternatively, you can use a humidifier.
  2. Water plant. If your soil is dry, water until the soil is moist but not damp. Water again when soil dries out.
If a large portion of the leaves is suffering from dry tips, complete the following:
  1. Prune away affected tissue. Using sharp and clean pruning shears, remove the dried out tips using clean cuts to avoid harming healthy tissue. Plant tissue will heal on its own, but you can apply a pruning seal for extra protection.
Prevention
Prevention
Many houseplants come from moist tropical areas with high humidity.
To prevent dry and brown tips, you should complete the following:
  1. Water regularly. Water when soil is dry.
  2. Keep humidity high. Keep moisture high by regularly misting the air or using a humidifier.
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Scars
plant poor
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Scars form when the plant repairs wounds. They can be the result of people or pets passing by and scraping the plant. Once the underlying issue is resolved, the plant will heal but a scar may remain.
Pests and pathogens can also cause scarring. Insects may attack the plant for a meal, resulting in extensive scarring when a few invaders turn into an infestation. Diseases such as fungus and bacteria can weaken the plant, causing brown spots, mushy areas, or blisters that lead to scars.
Scars occur on stems when a leaf or bud has been lost and the plant has healed. The harder tissue is like a scab that protects a wound.
On other occasions, scars can signal problems from environmental conditions, such as overexposure to sunlight or heat. It might surprise you to know that plants can suffer from sunburn, even desert dwellers like cactus!
Solutions
Solutions
Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover.
  1. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes.
  2. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray.
  3. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs.
  4. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Prevention
Prevention
Preventing some sources of scarring is easier than others, but all start with careful attention to your plants once you decide to bring them home.
  1. Review specific guidelines for your plant, including soil drainage, watering, and fertilizer requirements.
  2. Inspect plants before planting and use sterile pots and fresh potting soil or media to limit transfer of fungi or bacteria.
  3. Once established, check your plants regularly for signs of scarring or the presence of pests, as it is better to catch problems as early as possible.
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Flower withering
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Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Overview
Overview
Flower withering occurs when flowers become weak, droopy, wilted, or faded until they can’t be revived. During withering, they begin to wrinkle and shrink until the flower becomes completely dry or dead.
Any flowers, regardless of the plant type or the climate they are grown in, are susceptible to withering. It is a worldwide problem across houseplants, herbs, flowering ornamentals, trees, shrubs, garden vegetables, and food crops.
Unlike wilting—which withering is often confused with—withering can be caused by different things and is often due to more than a lack of water. Withering can be fatal in severe cases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Flower withering progresses from very mild cases to severe occurrences that kill the flower. The severity of the symptoms is related to the cause and how long the condition is allowed to progress before action is taken.
  • Wilted, droopy flowers
  • Petals and leaves begin to wrinkle
  • Brown papery streaks or spots appear on the petals and leaf tips
  • Flowerhead shrink in size
  • Petal color fades
  • Yellowing leaves
  • Complete death of the flower
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The main causes of flower withering include natural age progress, lack of water, nutritional deficiencies, and bacterial or fungal diseases. It’s critical to determine the underlying cause when flower withering is noticed. This will guide the best course of action, if treatment is possible.
Check the soil for moisture and then closely examine the entire plant for signs of nutrient deficiencies. If neither of those appears to be the cause then cut open the stem below a flower. If a cross-section reveals brown or rust-colored stains it is safe to assume that this is a bacterial or fungal infection.
If the flower is nearing the end of its normal lifespan, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence, or cell aging and death. Cell division stops and the plant begins breaking down resources within the flower to use in other parts of the plant.
In all other cases, flower withering happens when the plant seals off the stem as a defense mechanism, stopping transport within the vascular system. This prevents further water loss through the flowers but also stops bacteria and fungi from moving to healthy parts of the plant. Once water and nutrient transport stops, the flower begins to wither and ultimately die.
Solutions
Solutions
If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface.
In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well.
If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Prevention
Prevention
This is definitely one of those instances where prevention is more effective than cure. Here are some preventative measures for avoiding premature flower withering.
  • Water plants according to their needs -- either keep the soil slightly moist or allow the top inch or two to dry out before watering again.
  • Fertilize lightly on a consistent basis, depending upon the plant’s growth. Quick-growing plants and those that flower or develop fruit will need more frequent fertilizing than slow-growing plants.
  • Purchase plants that are certified disease- or pathogen-free.
  • Look for disease-resistant cultivars.
  • Isolate plants showing disease symptoms to prevent the spread to neighboring plants.
  • Practice good plant hygiene by removing any fallen plant material as soon as possible.
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Fire ants
plant poor
Fire ants
Fire ants gnaw on the roots of plants and are aggressive toward people.
Overview
Overview
Fire ants are a group of ants that are known for their aggressive behavior and painful stings. Some fire ants are native and others are invasive from other countries. Once they reach plants, they climb them and chew away at leaves and flower buds.
Fire ants also kill and eat beneficial insects such as caterpillars, ladybugs, mantis, and native ants. They can be a problem any time temperatures are above freezing, but new infestations are most likely to appear when brought in via contaminated material such as potting soil or mulch, or when insecticides have harmed populations of beneficial insects that would otherwise control populations of fire ants.
They can be difficult to control, especially once populations become large. Plant damage is typically minor, but fire ants can destroy seedlings.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The number one symptom of fire ants is seeing the ants themselves which are red or black in color. Ant mounds in the ground are also signs. Fire ant mounds rarely exceed 46 cm in diameter. If a fire ant mound is disturbed, many fast-moving, aggressive ants will emerge. These ants will bite and then painfully sting.
Even if no ants are visible, their damage might be apparent. Chewed leaf and flower edges might indicate fire ants. Fully eaten seedlings are another sign.
Solutions
Solutions
Caution: fire ants are venomous and cause painful bites which can be fatal in the case of a rare but significant allergy.
Fire ants can be a painful pest to have around for you and your plants. Keeping them under control will ensure comfortable gardening for all.
For less severe cases:
  • Physically remove mounds. Dig out and remove entire mounds (remember, they go deeper than they seem).
  • Use citrus oil. Pour citrus oil, which is toxic to fire ants, down their holes.
For severe cases:
  • Use ant bait. For a chemical solution, broadcast insecticide bait formulated for fire ants in the area around a mound. Apply the bait during a dry evening so the ants can forage for it at night. Look for products that contain Indoxacarb.
  • Release phorid flies. Introduce or promote beneficial phorid flies to gardens. These parasitic flies attack invasive fire ants.
  • Hire a professional. Some ant baits are only available to professional exterminators. For serious cases of fire ants, consider hiring a professional.
Prevention
Prevention
Fire ants become more difficult to control as they establish themselves, so try to prevent them or treat them early.
  • Monitor new material. Do not bring in any soil or plants from known infested areas, unless if they are "Quarantine Approved." Make sure to check new material for fire ants.
  • Apply insecticide. Some warm and humid areas have high fire ants populations. In these areas, spread a granular fire ants insecticide such as Varsity in the spring near gardens to prevent these unwelcome visitors.
  • Treat early. Spot treat at the first sight of any fire ants mound, as larger mounds are more difficult to treat.
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weed

Weed Control

weed
Weeds
Perennial ryegrass was originally planted as a turf grass in lawns, but its spread is becoming problematic. It is found in agricultural land, wetlands, and disturbed soil areas. In Australia and New Zealand, it is viewed as invasive environmental weed, and it is included on the state invasive species list in both California and Alaska. It can be toxic to both humans and grazing animals. These grasses generate large amounts of seed which are easily spread. The grass outcompetes local plants and leads to a reduction in wildflowers. In a garden setting, perennial ryegrass can be controlled by hand pulling or digging, but otherwise herbicides are needed for larger areas.
How to Control it
Once the weeds start to flower and fructify, it will be difficult to control them effectively. In fact, the best time to remove weeds is before flowering and fructification because the seeds will spread rapidly after that. So, it is necessary to remove weeds more often and to take precautions in advance next year. Mulching: During the seed stage, covering with sawdust, straws or black mulches to effectively inhibit seed germination and the growth of the seedling. Generally, this method is used in winter or spring to inhibit the germination of weed in the soil. If the weeds have already flowered and fructified, this method can be used to isolate the seeds and the soil to prevent the seeds from falling into the soil. Pulling out: Before the weeds fructify, wear gloves or use tools to pull them out. If it is difficult to pull out weed due to dry soil, adding water to the soil helps to make it easy to remove the roots thoroughly. After pulling out the weed, deep tillage can be adopted to remove the residual roots. This method is especially effective for weeds that are in the seedling stage or low growing size. Pruning: Pruning weeds before they fructify can effectively control the propagation of weeds. It is suggested to prune this weed repeatedly, twice a week straight for two weeks during the growth phase. Plowing: Before cultivation, plow the soil, collect and discard the roots of perennial weeds, then expose them to the sun or bury them deeply. It can also be used for retting organic fertilizer and composting. Chemical control: Using appropriate herbicides can effectively remove the weed from the area. Note: When removing weeds, it is necessary to wear gloves to avoid direct contact with the weeds, especially for the ones that are poisonous, thorny and allergenic. When removing weeds at the flowering stage, special masks should be worn to prevent allergic reactions caused by the inhalation of pollen.
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distribution

Distribution Map

Habitat

Meadows, weedy places

Map

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
plant_info

More Info

Plant Type
Plant Type
Herb
Flower Color
Flower Color
Green
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green

Name story

Perennial ryegrass
This plant is commonly used in the southwest United States to overseed winter lawns and it is also used as an indicator of nonspecies-rich grassland. Since it is also a perennial plant, it is called perennial ryegrass.

Symbolism

Vice and changeable disposition

Usages

Garden Use
Perennial ryegrass is one of the most frequently used grasses for turf and lawn grass mixes due to its consistent lushness, high tolerance of foot traffic, and quick establishment. This grass is used in a huge range of areas, from home lawns and parks to golf and baseball turfs.
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