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Velvet tree-pear
Velvet tree-pear
Velvet tree-pear
Velvet tree-pear
Velvet tree-pear
Velvet tree-pear
Velvet tree-pear
Opuntia tomentosa
The scientific name of the Opuntia tomentosa comes from the Latin word "tomento," which means "extremely fine hairs," since instead of spines like most cacti, velvet tree-pear has green segments that feel velvety due to the very fine hairs that cover it. This plant is grown in Central America to collect the insect cochineal, which is used to make carmine dye.
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
9 to 11
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care guide

Care Guide for Velvet tree-pear

Watering Care
Watering Care
Drought-tolerant. Allow the soil to dry completely between watering.
Details on Watering Care Watering Care
Fertilizing Care
Fertilizing Care
Fertilization once every 2-3 months during the growing season.
Details on Fertilizing Care Fertilizing Care
Soil Care
Soil Care
Sand, Neutral, Slightly alkaline
Details on Soil Care Soil Care
What Are the Lighting Requirements for Velvet tree-pear?
What Are the Lighting Requirements for Velvet tree-pear?
Full sun
Details on Sunlight Requirements What Are the Lighting Requirements for Velvet tree-pear?
What is the Ideal Temperature Range for Velvet tree-pear?
What is the Ideal Temperature Range for Velvet tree-pear?
9 to 11
Details on Temperature What is the Ideal Temperature Range for Velvet tree-pear?
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Velvet tree-pear
Sunlight
Sunlight
Full sun
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
9 to 11
question

Questions About Velvet tree-pear

Watering Watering Watering
Pruning Pruning Pruning
Sunlight Sunlight Sunlight
Fertilizing Fertilizing Fertilizing
What is the best way to water my Velvet tree-pear?
Your Velvet tree-pear will not be too picky about how you choose to water it. As such, you can use just about any common watering tool to moisten this plant’s soil. Watering cans, hoses, and even cups will work just fine when it is time to water your Velvet tree-pear. Regardless of which watering tool you use, you should typically apply the water directly to the soil. In doing so, you should ensure that you moisten all soil areas equally to give all parts of the root system the water it needs. It can help to use filtered water, as tap water can contain particles that are harmful to plants. It is also beneficial to use water that is at or slightly above room temperature, as colder or hotter water can be somewhat shocking to the Velvet tree-pear. However, the Velvet tree-pear usually responds well to any kind of water you give it.
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What should I do if I water my Velvet tree-pear too much or too little?
For outdoor plants, especially newly planted plants or plant seedlings, they can be prone to lack of watering. Remember that you need to keep watering enough for a few months when the tree is small or just planted. This is because once the roots are established, Velvet tree-pear can rely on rain most of the time.
When your Velvet tree-pear is planted in pots, overwatering is often more likely to.When you accidentally overwater your Velvet tree-pear, you should be prepared to remedy the situation immediately. First, you should stop watering your plant right away to minimize the effect of your overwatering. After, you should consider removing your Velvet tree-pear from its pot to inspect its roots. If you find that none of the roots have developed root rot, it may be permissible to return your plant to its container. If you do discover signs of root rot, then you should trim away any roots that have been affected. You may also want to apply a fungicide to prevent further damage. Lastly, you should repot your Velvet tree-pear in soil that is well-draining. In the case of an underwatered Velvet tree-pear, simply water this plant more frequently.
Underwatering is often an easy fix. If you underwater, the plant's leaves will tend to droop and dry out and fall off, and the leaves will quickly return to fullness after sufficient watering. Please correct your watering frequency as soon as underwatering occurs.
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How often should I water my Velvet tree-pear?
Most plants that grow naturally outdoors can be allowed to grow normally with rainfall. If your area lacks rainfall, consider giving your plants adequate watering every 2 weeks during the spring and fall. More frequent watering is needed in summer. In winter, when growth becomes slower and plants need less water, water more sparingly. Throughout the winter, you may not give it additional watering at all. If your Velvet tree-pear is young or newly planted, then you should water more frequently to help it establish, and mature and grow up to have more adaptable and drought tolerant plants.
For potted plants, there are two main ways that you can determine how often to water your Velvet tree-pear. The first way is to set a predetermined watering schedule. If you choose this route, you should plan to water this plant about once every week or once every other week. However, this approach may not always work as it does not consider the unique conditions of the growing environment for your Velvet tree-pear .
Your watering frequency can also change depending on the season. For instance, a predetermined watering schedule will likely not suffice during summer when this plant's water needs are highest. An alternative route is to set your watering frequency based on soil moisture. Typically, it is best to wait until the first two to four inches of soil, usually ⅓ to ½ depth of the pots, have dried out entirely before you give more water.
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How much water does my Velvet tree-pear need?
When it comes time to water your Velvet tree-pear, you may be surprised to find that this plant does not always need a high volume of water. Instead, if only a few inches of soil have dried since your last watering, you can support healthy growth in the Velvet tree-pear by giving it about five to ten ounces of water every time you water. You can also decide your water volume based on soil moisture. As mentioned above, you should note how many inches of soil have dried out between waterings. A surefire way to make sure your Velvet tree-pear gets the moisture it needs is to supply enough water to moisten all the soil layers that became dry since the last time you watered. If more than half of the soil has become dry, you should consider giving more water than usual. In those cases, continue adding water until you see excess water draining from your pot’s drainage holes.
If your Velvet tree-pear is planted in an area that gets plenty of rain outdoors, it may not need additional watering. When the Velvet tree-pear is young or just getting established, make sure it gets 1-2 inches of rain per week. As it continues to grow and establish, it can survive entirely on rainwater and only when the weather is hot and there is no rainfall at all for 2-3 weeks, then consider giving your Velvet tree-pear a full watering to prevent them from suffering stress.
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How can I tell if i'm watering my Velvet tree-pear enough?
Overwatering is a far more common problem for the Velvet tree-pear, and there are several signs you should look for when this occurs. Generally, an overwatered Velvet tree-pear will have yellowing leaves and may even drop some leaves. Also, overwatering can cause the overall structure of your plant to shrivel and may also promote root rot. On the other hand, an underwatered Velvet tree-pear will also begin to wilt. It may also display leaves that are brown or brittle to the touch. Whether you see signs of overwatering or underwatering, you should be prepared to intervene and restore the health of your Velvet tree-pear.
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How can I water my Velvet tree-pear at different growth stages?
When the Velvet tree-pear is very young, such as when it is in a seedling stage, you will need to give it more water than you would if it were at a mature age. During the early stages of this plant’s life, it is important to keep the soil consistently moist to encourage root development. The same is true for any Velvet tree-pear that you have transplanted to a new growing location. Also, the Velvet tree-pear can develop showy flowers and fruits when you give them the correct care. If your Velvet tree-pear is in a flowering or fruiting phase, you will likely need to give a bit more water than you usually would to support these plant structures.
Read More more
How can I water my Velvet tree-pear through the seasons?
The seasonal changes will affect how often you water your Velvet tree-pear. Mainly, during the hottest summer months, you will likely need to increase how much you water this plant, especially if it grows in an area that receives ample sunlight. Strong summer sunlight can cause soil to dry out much faster than usual, meaning that you’ll need to water more frequently. By contrast, your Velvet tree-pear will need much less water during the winter, as it will not be in an active growing phase. During winter, you can get by with watering once every 2 to 3 weeks or sometimes not at all. For those growing this plant indoors, you should be somewhat wary of appliances such as air conditioners, which can cause your plant to dry out more quickly, which also calls for more frequent watering.
Read More more
What's the difference between watering my Velvet tree-pear indoors vs outdoors?
In some cases, your Velvet tree-pear may not need any supplemental watering when it grows outside and will survive on rainwater alone. However, if you live in an area of little to no rain, you should water this plant about every two weeks. If you belong to the group of people who live out of this plant's natural hardiness zone, you should grow it indoors. In an indoor setting, you should monitor your plant's soil as it can dry out more quickly when it is in a container or when it is exposed to HVAC units such as air conditioners. Those drying factors will lead you to water this plant a bit more often than if you grew it outdoors.
Read More more
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Key Facts About Velvet tree-pear

Attributes of Velvet tree-pear

Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Tree, Shrub
Plant Height
3 m to 8 m
Leaf Color
Green
Blue
Flower Size
4 cm to 5 cm
Flower Color
Red
Orange
Leaf type
Evergreen

Scientific Classification of Velvet tree-pear

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pests

Common Pests & Diseases About Velvet tree-pear

Common issues for Velvet tree-pear based on 10 million real cases
Scars
Scars Scars
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Solutions: Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Fruit Spot
Fruit Spot Fruit Spot
Fruit Spot
Pathogenic infections can cause spots (typically black or brown) to appear on the fruit.
Solutions: Prune regularly - prune as a preventative measure as well as to remove any plants and plant parts affected by fruit Spot. Improve air circulation and drainage Fertilize as needed Spray applications - there are few programs that are effective at controlling fruit Spot for home growers, but the local cooperative extension may be able to provide information regarding potential chemical treatments if the disease is severe.
Dieback
Dieback Dieback
Dieback
There are several possible causes for dieback.
Solutions: There are a few things to try when dieback becomes apparent: Fertilize and water the plants - these two steps, along with judicious pruning, can help reduce the stress on the root system and encourage renewed vigor Have an arborist check to see if plant roots are girdling Test soil pH and adjust accordingly Remove and destroy infected twigs and branches
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Scars
plant poor
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Scars form when the plant repairs wounds. They can be the result of people or pets passing by and scraping the plant. Once the underlying issue is resolved, the plant will heal but a scar may remain.
Pests and pathogens can also cause scarring. Insects may attack the plant for a meal, resulting in extensive scarring when a few invaders turn into an infestation. Diseases such as fungus and bacteria can weaken the plant, causing brown spots, mushy areas, or blisters that lead to scars.
Scars occur on stems when a leaf or bud has been lost and the plant has healed. The harder tissue is like a scab that protects a wound.
On other occasions, scars can signal problems from environmental conditions, such as overexposure to sunlight or heat. It might surprise you to know that plants can suffer from sunburn, even desert dwellers like cactus!
Solutions
Solutions
Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover.
  1. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes.
  2. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray.
  3. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs.
  4. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Prevention
Prevention
Preventing some sources of scarring is easier than others, but all start with careful attention to your plants once you decide to bring them home.
  1. Review specific guidelines for your plant, including soil drainage, watering, and fertilizer requirements.
  2. Inspect plants before planting and use sterile pots and fresh potting soil or media to limit transfer of fungi or bacteria.
  3. Once established, check your plants regularly for signs of scarring or the presence of pests, as it is better to catch problems as early as possible.
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Fruit Spot
plant poor
Fruit Spot
Pathogenic infections can cause spots (typically black or brown) to appear on the fruit.
Overview
Overview
If there are brown or black spots on the unripened fruits of plants, there is a good chance that fruit Spot could be to blame. This is an informal term used to describe several types of diseases that all cause these same symptoms: unattractive spots on fruits and vegetables.
There are a few different culprits behind fruit Spot, including bacterial spot, bacterial speck, and other related diseases (like early blight). Here are some symptoms and potential solutions to consider.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The symptoms of fruit Spot vary depending on which type of plant is affected as well as by which specific pathogen is to blame. Just about every type of plant can be affected by fruit Spot, including tomatoes, pears, plums, onions, strawberries, celery, peaches, and more.
Here are some examples of potential symptoms:
Small Fruit Spot
Small spots are most commonly associated with bacterial speck.
  • Spots may appear on fruits as well as leaves and other aboveground areas of the plant
  • Small black specks appear on infected fruits (spots are less than 1/16” in diameter)
  • Spots are raised with distinct margins, developing into sunken pits as the fruit matures
  • Fruit tissue near the spot stays green longer than the rest of the fruit
  • Spots are dark brown to black in color, with nearby spots often growing together
Large Fruit Spot
Large spots are often seen on plants suffering from bacterial spot, early blight, and related diseases.
  • Spots are large, sometimes larger than 1.3 cm
  • Some spots may look like targets with a brown to greyish coloration
  • Older spots are black and raised with lobed borders
  • Spots are superficial only, not penetrating into the seed cavity
  • Spots may turn into sunken pits, turning into craters as they get older
  • The skin of the fruit can be cracked and produce a water-soaked border
  • Some spots may ooze a gelatinous substance
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
There are a few culprits behind the fruit Spot. These depend on the pathogen as well as the type of plant. Bacterial speck and bacterial spot are both common diseases that can affect tomatoes, ground cherries, and other plants.
Bacterial speck is caused by Pseudomonas syringae. First discovered in the United States in 1933, it is most common in tomatoes and nearby weeds but can affect other kinds of plants and their fruits, too. It is more prevalent in low temperatures (less than 24 ℃) and high moisture.
Bacterial spot is caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. Vesicatoria. First discovered in Texas in 1912, this disease is more common in warm weather and conditions of high moisture.
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Dieback
plant poor
Dieback
There are several possible causes for dieback.
Overview
Overview
Dealing with dieback in plants can be tricky, in part because this is both the name of a disease itself and a common symptom of many other types of diseases. Dieback can be characterized by the progressive, gradual death of shoots, twigs, roots, and branches, generally starting first at the tips.
In many cases, dieback is caused by fungi or bacteria. These pathogens can produce cankers, wilts, stem or root rots, and even anthracnose, but the most common symptom, of course, is that various plant parts (or the entire plant) will begin to die back.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The symptoms of dieback can be gradual or slightly more abrupt. Usually, however, they are slow in developing and tend to be uniform among the various parts of a plant.
Some plants may have more localized symptoms, with all twigs affected or all branches affected but not the rest of the plant. Some potential symptoms include:
  • Dead or dying branches and twigs
  • Dieback that starts in the top of a plant and progresses downward (though it can start lower, especially for conifers)
  • A delayed flush of growth in the spring
  • Leaf margins become scorched
  • Pale green or yellow leaves
  • Leaves that are small or otherwise distorted
  • Early leaf drop
  • Reduced growth of twigs and stems
  • Thinning of crown foliage
  • Production of suckers on trunk and branches
  • Premature fall coloration (in tree species like birch, sweetgum, maple, oak, ash, etc)
The symptoms of dieback can occur within just one season or become worse each and every year.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
There are several types of dieback, each of which has a different cause with which it is associated.
"dieback" as a standalone issue, including the condition known as Staghead, is caused by fungal or bacterial infections. Staghead is a slow dieback that occurs on the upper branches of a tree, named as such because the dead limbs look much like the head of a stag.
Other causes of dieback symptoms include:
  • Cankers or wilts
  • Stem or root rots
  • Nematodes
  • Stem or root boring insects
  • Pavement being placed over root systems
  • Winter injury from cold
  • Salt damage
  • Lack of moisture (or excess of moisture)
  • Lack of an essential nutrient or element
Trees and shrubs that are attacked by insects, exposed to extremely high or low temperatures, or experience severe and frequent fluctuations in soil moisture are the most likely to suffer from dieback. These stress factors alone or in combination with each other can reduce leaf and shoot growth, and progress into death of twigs and branches.
Although any of these issues can lead to dieback, the most serious consequences tend to occur when the roots of a plant are damaged. Similarly, trees and shrubs that are planted improperly or in unfavorable locations are more likely to develop this condition.
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distribution

Distribution of Velvet tree-pear

Distribution Map of Velvet tree-pear

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
habit
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More Info on Velvet Tree-pear Growth and Care

Basic Care Guide
Explore More
Lighting
Full sun
The velvet tree-pear thrives under a sun-drenched environment, soaking up generous amounts of light. This characteristic is rooted in its original habitat, which is exposed to ample sunlight. While it is resilient, prolonged periods of insufficient light may hinder its growth. Similarly, overexposure can also lead to possible harm, although this plant tolerates such conditions better than most.
Best Sunlight Practices
Temperature
0 43 ℃
Transplant
3-4 feet
The prime time to transfer velvet tree-pear is during the second and third seasons. This is due to its high survival rate during mild weather. Velvet tree-pear thrives in full sun or partial shade. Remind to water moderately after relocating, avoid excess, to promote healthy root development.
Transplant Techniques
Feng shui direction
Southeast
The velvet tree-pear exhibits a propensity for harmonious balance when positioned in a Southeast-facing direction. This orientation enhances its growth, implying an amplification of prosperity and wealth energies, as per Feng Shui principles. However, this observation should be tailored to incorporate individual contextual factors, in line with the nuanced nature of Feng Shui interpretation.
Fengshui Details
other_plant

Plants Related to Velvet tree-pear

Toothed-wing knotweed
Toothed-wing knotweed
The toothed-wing knotweed form a small genus in the buckwheat family containing temperate and sub-tropical shrubs. A few species within the genus, most notably Japanese Knotweed (F. japonica) are famous for being pesky invasives. In their native ranges, however, toothed-wing knotweed do tend to provide food to insects and birds.
Tidal-marsh flatsedge
Tidal-marsh flatsedge
Tidal-marsh flatsedge (Cyperus serotinus) has a descriptive common name since it is native to swampy meadows and tidal marshes. The common name flatsedge comes from its unusual flattened seed pods. This plant is attacked by the rice water weevil Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus. Tidal-marsh flatsedge is extinct in Switzerland and is classed as threatened in Croatia.
Thyme-leaf pinweed
Thyme-leaf pinweed
Most of thyme-leaf pinweed are low-growing herbs with narrow leaves and may small flowers that resemble pinheads. The genus thyme-leaf pinweed is based primarily in eastern North America and contains about 18 species.
Thin-fruit sedge
Thin-fruit sedge
Thin-fruit sedge are a vast genus containing over 2000 grasses often growing in tufted mounds found in a variety of temperate climates. These plants are cultivated ornamentally for their variegated foliage and attractiveness. Sedge seeds provide forage while the foliage provides shelter and nesting sites for animals.
Tennis ball bush
Tennis ball bush
Tennis ball bush (Gomphocarpus fruticosus) is an evergreen, herbaceous perennial that will grow to 1.8 m tall. It blooms in spring with pendulous clusters of small white flowers. When the flower or plant is cut, it releases a milky, latex substance that can irritate the skin. The seed pod is brown, with a papery texture and is covered with bristly hairs. The seed pod is inflated and contains dark seeds that are attached with silky cotton-like fibers that help them to disperse.
Tall blacktip ragwort
Tall blacktip ragwort
Tall blacktip ragwort is a large genus with many members that are succulent plants and very popular as garden perennials. These plants prefer sandy soil and thrive in full sunlight. Tall blacktip ragwort usually flower for a month or less and the thick, succulent leaves are their most recognizable feature, making them popular rock garden and pot plants.
Poison ivy
Poison ivy
In pop culture, poison ivy is a symbol of an obnoxious weed because, despite its unthreatening looks, it gives a highly unpleasant contact rash to the unfortunate person who touches it. Still, it is commonly eaten by many animals, and the seeds are a favorite with birds. The leaves turn bright red in fall. Its sister species, Western poison ivy (Toxicodendron rydbergii), is not considered to be invasive in the United States, but is noxious in Australia and New Zealand.
Pokeweed
Pokeweed
Although its berries look juicy and tempting, the fruits and the root of pokeweed are toxic and should not be eaten. Pokeweed is considered a pest species by farmers but is nevertheless often grown as an ornamental plant. Its berries can be made into pokeberry ink as well.
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Velvet tree-pear
Velvet tree-pear
Velvet tree-pear
Velvet tree-pear
Velvet tree-pear
Velvet tree-pear
Velvet tree-pear
Opuntia tomentosa
The scientific name of the Opuntia tomentosa comes from the Latin word "tomento," which means "extremely fine hairs," since instead of spines like most cacti, velvet tree-pear has green segments that feel velvety due to the very fine hairs that cover it. This plant is grown in Central America to collect the insect cochineal, which is used to make carmine dye.
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
9 to 11
more
question

Questions About Velvet tree-pear

Watering Watering Watering
Pruning Pruning Pruning
Sunlight Sunlight Sunlight
Fertilizing Fertilizing Fertilizing
What is the best way to water my Velvet tree-pear?
more
What should I do if I water my Velvet tree-pear too much or too little?
more
How often should I water my Velvet tree-pear?
more
How much water does my Velvet tree-pear need?
more
How can I tell if i'm watering my Velvet tree-pear enough?
more
How can I water my Velvet tree-pear at different growth stages?
more
How can I water my Velvet tree-pear through the seasons?
more
What's the difference between watering my Velvet tree-pear indoors vs outdoors?
more
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plant_info

Key Facts About Velvet tree-pear

Attributes of Velvet tree-pear

Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Tree, Shrub
Plant Height
3 m to 8 m
Leaf Color
Green
Blue
Flower Size
4 cm to 5 cm
Flower Color
Red
Orange
Leaf type
Evergreen
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Scientific Classification of Velvet tree-pear

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pests

Common Pests & Diseases About Velvet tree-pear

Common issues for Velvet tree-pear based on 10 million real cases
Scars
Scars Scars Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Solutions: Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Learn More About the Scars more
Fruit Spot
Fruit Spot Fruit Spot Fruit Spot
Pathogenic infections can cause spots (typically black or brown) to appear on the fruit.
Solutions: Prune regularly - prune as a preventative measure as well as to remove any plants and plant parts affected by fruit Spot. Improve air circulation and drainage Fertilize as needed Spray applications - there are few programs that are effective at controlling fruit Spot for home growers, but the local cooperative extension may be able to provide information regarding potential chemical treatments if the disease is severe.
Learn More About the Fruit Spot more
Dieback
Dieback Dieback Dieback
There are several possible causes for dieback.
Solutions: There are a few things to try when dieback becomes apparent: Fertilize and water the plants - these two steps, along with judicious pruning, can help reduce the stress on the root system and encourage renewed vigor Have an arborist check to see if plant roots are girdling Test soil pH and adjust accordingly Remove and destroy infected twigs and branches
Learn More About the Dieback more
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close
Scars
plant poor
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Scars form when the plant repairs wounds. They can be the result of people or pets passing by and scraping the plant. Once the underlying issue is resolved, the plant will heal but a scar may remain.
Pests and pathogens can also cause scarring. Insects may attack the plant for a meal, resulting in extensive scarring when a few invaders turn into an infestation. Diseases such as fungus and bacteria can weaken the plant, causing brown spots, mushy areas, or blisters that lead to scars.
Scars occur on stems when a leaf or bud has been lost and the plant has healed. The harder tissue is like a scab that protects a wound.
On other occasions, scars can signal problems from environmental conditions, such as overexposure to sunlight or heat. It might surprise you to know that plants can suffer from sunburn, even desert dwellers like cactus!
Solutions
Solutions
Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover.
  1. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes.
  2. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray.
  3. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs.
  4. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Prevention
Prevention
Preventing some sources of scarring is easier than others, but all start with careful attention to your plants once you decide to bring them home.
  1. Review specific guidelines for your plant, including soil drainage, watering, and fertilizer requirements.
  2. Inspect plants before planting and use sterile pots and fresh potting soil or media to limit transfer of fungi or bacteria.
  3. Once established, check your plants regularly for signs of scarring or the presence of pests, as it is better to catch problems as early as possible.
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Fruit Spot
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Fruit Spot
Pathogenic infections can cause spots (typically black or brown) to appear on the fruit.
Overview
Overview
If there are brown or black spots on the unripened fruits of plants, there is a good chance that fruit Spot could be to blame. This is an informal term used to describe several types of diseases that all cause these same symptoms: unattractive spots on fruits and vegetables.
There are a few different culprits behind fruit Spot, including bacterial spot, bacterial speck, and other related diseases (like early blight). Here are some symptoms and potential solutions to consider.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The symptoms of fruit Spot vary depending on which type of plant is affected as well as by which specific pathogen is to blame. Just about every type of plant can be affected by fruit Spot, including tomatoes, pears, plums, onions, strawberries, celery, peaches, and more.
Here are some examples of potential symptoms:
Small Fruit Spot
Small spots are most commonly associated with bacterial speck.
  • Spots may appear on fruits as well as leaves and other aboveground areas of the plant
  • Small black specks appear on infected fruits (spots are less than 1/16” in diameter)
  • Spots are raised with distinct margins, developing into sunken pits as the fruit matures
  • Fruit tissue near the spot stays green longer than the rest of the fruit
  • Spots are dark brown to black in color, with nearby spots often growing together
Large Fruit Spot
Large spots are often seen on plants suffering from bacterial spot, early blight, and related diseases.
  • Spots are large, sometimes larger than 1.3 cm
  • Some spots may look like targets with a brown to greyish coloration
  • Older spots are black and raised with lobed borders
  • Spots are superficial only, not penetrating into the seed cavity
  • Spots may turn into sunken pits, turning into craters as they get older
  • The skin of the fruit can be cracked and produce a water-soaked border
  • Some spots may ooze a gelatinous substance
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
There are a few culprits behind the fruit Spot. These depend on the pathogen as well as the type of plant. Bacterial speck and bacterial spot are both common diseases that can affect tomatoes, ground cherries, and other plants.
Bacterial speck is caused by Pseudomonas syringae. First discovered in the United States in 1933, it is most common in tomatoes and nearby weeds but can affect other kinds of plants and their fruits, too. It is more prevalent in low temperatures (less than 24 ℃) and high moisture.
Bacterial spot is caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. Vesicatoria. First discovered in Texas in 1912, this disease is more common in warm weather and conditions of high moisture.
Solutions
Solutions
  • Prune regularly - prune as a preventative measure as well as to remove any plants and plant parts affected by fruit Spot.
  • Improve air circulation and drainage
  • Fertilize as needed
  • Spray applications - there are few programs that are effective at controlling fruit Spot for home growers, but the local cooperative extension may be able to provide information regarding potential chemical treatments if the disease is severe.
Prevention
Prevention
There are several ways to prevent both types of fruit Spot from affecting yields and harvests:
  • Rotate crops - do not plant the same kind of plant in the same spot each year, instead switching out locations every two to three years
  • Use disease-free seeds and transplants - using a hot water treatment to sterilize seeds before planting can also be effective
  • Irrigate early in the day to give plants time to dry off before nightfall
  • Avoid working around plants when they are wet
  • Control weeds
  • Remove debris or plow it under at the end of the growing season
  • Fertilize with higher amounts of nitrogen and use less calcium
  • Plant resistant cultivars when available
  • Do not clip plants when transplanting
  • Dispose of affected plant parts immediately (do not compost)
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Dieback
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Dieback
There are several possible causes for dieback.
Overview
Overview
Dealing with dieback in plants can be tricky, in part because this is both the name of a disease itself and a common symptom of many other types of diseases. Dieback can be characterized by the progressive, gradual death of shoots, twigs, roots, and branches, generally starting first at the tips.
In many cases, dieback is caused by fungi or bacteria. These pathogens can produce cankers, wilts, stem or root rots, and even anthracnose, but the most common symptom, of course, is that various plant parts (or the entire plant) will begin to die back.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The symptoms of dieback can be gradual or slightly more abrupt. Usually, however, they are slow in developing and tend to be uniform among the various parts of a plant.
Some plants may have more localized symptoms, with all twigs affected or all branches affected but not the rest of the plant. Some potential symptoms include:
  • Dead or dying branches and twigs
  • Dieback that starts in the top of a plant and progresses downward (though it can start lower, especially for conifers)
  • A delayed flush of growth in the spring
  • Leaf margins become scorched
  • Pale green or yellow leaves
  • Leaves that are small or otherwise distorted
  • Early leaf drop
  • Reduced growth of twigs and stems
  • Thinning of crown foliage
  • Production of suckers on trunk and branches
  • Premature fall coloration (in tree species like birch, sweetgum, maple, oak, ash, etc)
The symptoms of dieback can occur within just one season or become worse each and every year.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
There are several types of dieback, each of which has a different cause with which it is associated.
"dieback" as a standalone issue, including the condition known as Staghead, is caused by fungal or bacterial infections. Staghead is a slow dieback that occurs on the upper branches of a tree, named as such because the dead limbs look much like the head of a stag.
Other causes of dieback symptoms include:
  • Cankers or wilts
  • Stem or root rots
  • Nematodes
  • Stem or root boring insects
  • Pavement being placed over root systems
  • Winter injury from cold
  • Salt damage
  • Lack of moisture (or excess of moisture)
  • Lack of an essential nutrient or element
Trees and shrubs that are attacked by insects, exposed to extremely high or low temperatures, or experience severe and frequent fluctuations in soil moisture are the most likely to suffer from dieback. These stress factors alone or in combination with each other can reduce leaf and shoot growth, and progress into death of twigs and branches.
Although any of these issues can lead to dieback, the most serious consequences tend to occur when the roots of a plant are damaged. Similarly, trees and shrubs that are planted improperly or in unfavorable locations are more likely to develop this condition.
Solutions
Solutions
There are a few things to try when dieback becomes apparent:
  • Fertilize and water the plants - these two steps, along with judicious pruning, can help reduce the stress on the root system and encourage renewed vigor
  • Have an arborist check to see if plant roots are girdling
  • Test soil pH and adjust accordingly
  • Remove and destroy infected twigs and branches
Prevention
Prevention
The best way to prevent dieback is to match the plant to the site. Make sure the conditions provided for a new planting match its needs.
  • Plant properly in deep, fertile well-draining soil
  • Make sure plant roots won’t be confined when the plant reaches its mature size
  • Avoid changes to the growing site
  • If soil compaction might be an issue, apply a few inches of wood chips and eliminate traffic over the root area
  • Fertilize and water appropriately
It is also important to avoid potential infection with pathogens that can cause dieback:
  • Avoid binding or wounding the roots and trunk whenever possible
  • Avoid excessive pruning
  • Disinfect all tools before working with plants to reduce the spread of disease
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distribution

Distribution of Velvet tree-pear

Distribution Map of Velvet tree-pear

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Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
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More Info on Velvet Tree-pear Growth and Care

Basic Care Guide
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Lighting
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Indoor
Indoor
Outdoor
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Requirements
Full sun
Ideal
Above 6 hours sunlight
Watch how sunlight gracefully moves through your garden, and choose spots that provide the perfect balance of light and shade for your plants, ensuring their happiness.
Essentials
The velvet tree-pear thrives under a sun-drenched environment, soaking up generous amounts of light. This characteristic is rooted in its original habitat, which is exposed to ample sunlight. While it is resilient, prolonged periods of insufficient light may hinder its growth. Similarly, overexposure can also lead to possible harm, although this plant tolerates such conditions better than most.
Preferred
Tolerable
Unsuitable
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Artificial lighting
Indoor plants require adequate lighting for optimal growth. When natural sunlight is insufficient, particularly in winter or in less sunny spaces, artificial lights offer a vital solution, promoting faster, healthier growth.
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Indoor plants require adequate lighting for optimal growth. When natural sunlight is insufficient, particularly in winter or in less sunny spaces, artificial lights offer a vital solution, promoting faster, healthier growth.
1. Choose the right type of artificial light: LED lights are a popular choice for indoor plant lighting because they can be customized to provide the specific wavelengths of light that your plants need.
Full sun plants need 30-50W/sq ft of artificial light, partial sun plants need 20-30W/sq ft, and full shade plants need 10-20W/sq ft.
2. Determine the appropriate distance: Place the light source 12-36 inches above the plant to mimic natural sunlight.
3. Determine the duration: Mimic the length of natural daylight hours for your plant species. most plants need 8-12 hours of light per day.
Important Symptoms
Insufficient light
Velvet tree-pear thrives in full sunlight but is sensitive to heat. As a plant commonly grown outdoors with abundant sunlight, it may exhibit subtle symptoms of light deficiency when placed in rooms with suboptimal lighting.
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(Symptom details and solutions)
Small leaves
New leaves may grow smaller in size compared to the previous ones once they have matured.
Leggy or sparse growth
The spaces between leaves or stems of your Velvet tree-pear may become longer, resulting in a thin and stretched-out appearance. This can make the plant look sparse and weak, and it may easily break or lean due to its own weight.
Faster leaf drop
When plants are exposed to low light conditions, they tend to shed older leaves early to conserve resources. Within a limited time, these resources can be utilized to grow new leaves until the plant's energy reserves are depleted.
Slower or no new growth
Velvet tree-pear enters a survival mode when light conditions are poor, which leads to a halt in leaf production. As a result, the plant's growth becomes delayed or stops altogether.
Lighter-colored new leaves
Insufficient sunlight can cause leaves to develop irregular color patterns or appear pale. This indicates a lack of chlorophyll and essential nutrients.
Solutions
1. To ensure optimal growth, gradually move plants to a sunnier location each week, until they receive at least 6 hours of direct sunlight daily. Use a south-facing window and keep curtains open during the day for maximum sunlight exposure and nutrient accumulation.2. To provide additional light for your plant, consider using artificial light if it's large or not easily movable. Keep a desk or ceiling lamp on for at least 8 hours daily, or invest in professional plant grow lights for ample light.
Excessive light
Velvet tree-pear thrives in full sun exposure but is sensitive to heat. Although sunburn symptoms occasionally occur, they are unable to withstand intense sunlight in high-temperature environments.
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(Symptom details and solutions)
Chlorosis
Chlorosis is a condition where the plant's leaves lose their green color and turn yellow. This is due to the breakdown of chlorophyll from excessive sunlight, which negatively affects the plant's ability to photosynthesize.
Sunscald
Sunscald occurs when the plant's leaves or stems are damaged by intense sunlight exposure. It appears as pale, bleached, or necrotic areas on the plant tissue and can reduce the plant's overall health.
Leaf Curling
Leaf curling is a symptom where leaves curl or twist under extreme sunlight conditions. This is a defense mechanism used by the plant to reduce its surface area exposed to sunlight, minimizing water loss and damage.
Wilting
Wilting occurs when a plant loses turgor pressure and its leaves and stems begin to droop. Overexposure to sunlight can cause wilting by increasing the plant's water loss through transpiration, making it difficult for the plant to maintain adequate hydration.
Leaf Scorching
Leaf scorching is a symptom characterized by the appearance of brown, dry, and crispy edges or patches on leaves due to excessive sunlight. This can lead to a reduction in photosynthetic capacity and overall plant health.
Solutions
1. Move your plant to the optimal position where it can receive abundant sunlight but also have some shade. An east-facing window is an ideal choice as the morning sunlight is gentler. This way, your plant can enjoy ample sunlight while reducing the risk of sunburn.2. It is recommended to trim off any completely dehydrated or withered parts of the plant.
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Temperature
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Requirements
Ideal
Tolerable
Unsuitable
Just like people, each plant has its own preferences. Learn about your plants' temperature needs and create a comforting environment for them to flourish. As you care for your plants, your bond with them will deepen. Trust your intuition as you learn about their temperature needs, celebrating the journey you share. Lovingly monitor the temperature around your plants and adjust their environment as needed. A thermometer can be your ally in this heartfelt endeavor. Be patient and gentle with yourself as you explore your plants' temperature needs. Cherish your successes, learn from challenges, and nurture your garden with love, creating a haven that reflects the warmth of your care.
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Transplant
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How to Successfully Transplant Velvet Tree-pear?
The prime time to transfer velvet tree-pear is during the second and third seasons. This is due to its high survival rate during mild weather. Velvet tree-pear thrives in full sun or partial shade. Remind to water moderately after relocating, avoid excess, to promote healthy root development.
What Preparations are Needed Before Transplanting Velvet Tree-pear?
What is the Ideal Time for Transplanting Velvet Tree-pear?
The optimal period for moving your beloved velvet tree-pear is between late summer and early fall - S2-S3 season. This period offers a delicate balance of warmth and rainfall, ideally suited to help velvet tree-pear establish new roots. Transplanting during this time reduces transplant shock and promotes robust growth, resulting in a healthier, vibrant plant. Your velvet tree-pear will appreciate the extra care and flourish in its new home!
How Much Space Should You Leave Between Velvet Tree-pear Plants?
Make sure to space each velvet tree-pear about 3-4 feet (0.9-1.2 meters) apart. This will give them plenty of room to grow and spread out. It's important not to crowd these beauties!
What is the Best Soil Mix for Velvet Tree-pear Transplanting?
Prepare your soil with a well-draining sandy or gritty mix, and incorporate a balanced base fertilizer into it. These are the best conditions for velvet tree-pear's growth and will help it thrive!
Where Should You Relocate Your Velvet Tree-pear?
Velvet tree-pear enjoys lots of sunshine! Choose a location where it will get at least 6-8 hours of direct sunlight each day. This will ensure its healthy growth and beautiful bloom.
What Equipments Should You Prepare Before Transplantation Velvet Tree-pear?
Gardening Gloves
For protection while handling the velvet tree-pear as it has some prickles which can cause skin irritation.
Shovel or Trowel
For digging up the velvet tree-pear from its original location and for digging the new planting hole.
Gardening Spade
For smoothly lifting the plant out of its previous spot ensuring minimal damage to the roots.
Wheelbarrow or Sack
For transporting the plant to its new location.
Watering Can or Hose
For watering the plant before and after transplanting.
Mulch
To help the soil retain moisture and reduce weed competition after transplanting.
How Do You Remove Velvet Tree-pear from the Soil?
From Ground: First, give the velvet tree-pear a good drink of water to dampen the soil which will make the removal easier. Next, use a shovel or spade to dig a broad circle around the plant, being careful to not disrupt the healthy roots. Once this is done, carefully dig underneath the plant and lift it gently ensuring the root ball remains intact. If the plant is larger, you may need to use a wheelbarrow or sack for transport to its new location.
From a Pot: Water the plant well and gently tip the pot sideways, then ease out the velvet tree-pear while supporting the root ball. If the plant doesn't slide out, you may need to tap the bottom of the pot to loosen the soil and roots.
From a Seedling Tray: Water the seedlings first to make the soil easier to work with. Gently loosen the soil around the roots with your fingers and lift the velvet tree-pear from the tray. Be sure to handle the seedlings by their leaves, not by their stems or roots.
Step-by-Step Guide for Transplanting Velvet Tree-pear
Step1 Preparation
Preparation is key when moving the velvet tree-pear. Before starting, clear the new area of any other plants, rocks, or other debris. This includes preparing the new hole, which should be twice as wide and equal in depth to the velvet tree-pear's root ball.
Step2 Plant Removal
Use the removal process instructions given above to safely lift the velvet tree-pear from its current location.
Step3 Transportation
Use a wheelbarrow or sack to transport the plant to its new location, if necessary, to minimize root damage.
Step4 Planting
Set the velvet tree-pear into the new hole. Make sure the top of the root ball is level with or slightly higher than the surrounding soil. Back-fill the hole with original soil, gently firming it around the root ball.
Step5 Watering
Water the plant thoroughly after transplanting. This helps the soil settle in around the roots and minimizes plant stress.
Step6 Mulching
Add a layer of mulch around the base of the velvet tree-pear to conserve soil moisture and keep weeds at bay.
How Do You Care For Velvet Tree-pear After Transplanting?
Regular Watering
The velvet tree-pear needs consistent watering until it establishes in the new location. However, care should be taken to avoid waterlogging as it prefers well-drained soil. Make sure the soil is drying out between waterings.
Pruning
Pruning isn't necessary immediately after transplanting, but it will be important in the future to control the velvet tree-pear's size and to promote its health. Any dead, damaged or diseased branches should be pruned out.
Pest/Disease Observations
Keep an eye out for any signs of pest infestation or disease on your velvet tree-pear. Timely action can save your plant from significant damage.
Re-adjustment
Our leafy friend may experience some transplant shock, which may include wilting leaves or stalled growth. Be patient! Give the plant some time - it's adjusting to its new home.
Troubleshooting Common Issues with Velvet Tree-pear Transplantation.
When is the best time to transplant velvet tree-pear?
The ideal transplanting period for velvet tree-pear is during S2-S3. Transplanting in accordance with local seasons will greatly increase the plant's survival rate.
How much space should I leave between each velvet tree-pear while transplanting?
Give each velvet tree-pear a generous amount of space. Ideally, aim for 3-4 feet (0.9-1.2 meters) in spacing which allows each plant to grow healthily.
What size should the hole be when transplanting velvet tree-pear?
Dig a hole that is twice as wide as the root ball and slightly shallower. This provides ample room for new root growth when transplanting velvet tree-pear.
How deep should I plant velvet tree-pear during transplanting?
Plant velvet tree-pear at comparable depth to how it was in its previous pot. This prevents the root collar from being too deep which can cause rot.
What type of soil is best for transplanting velvet tree-pear?
Velvet tree-pear prefers well-drained soil, so incorporate grit or sharp sand into your planting hole if your soil is heavy or clay-like.
How should I care for velvet tree-pear after transplanting?
Water velvet tree-pear thoroughly after transplanting. Then keep the soil slightly moist but not soggy. Protect newly transplanted velvet tree-pear from strong direct sunlight for a few days.
How much sunlight does velvet tree-pear require post-transplanting?
Velvet tree-pear loves sunlight! But for the first few days post-transplanting, keep it in a sheltered location. Gradually introduce it to more sunlight as it gets settled.
How can I increase the survival rate of velvet tree-pear during transplanting?
Carefully handling velvet tree-pear during transplanting and keeping the roots undamaged can significantly boost the plant's survival rate. Also, using a fresh, well-draining soil mix helps.
What if the leaves of velvet tree-pear start drooping after transplanting?
Drooping leaves after transplanting are usually a stress sign. Ensure velvet tree-pear is not overwatered or under-watered, and it's not exposed to harsh sunlight immediately post-transplant.
Can velvet tree-pear be transplanted in a container?
Absolutely! Velvet tree-pear can be successfully transplanted in a container. Just ensure it has ample drainage and is large enough for the plant's size.
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