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Garden pea
Garden pea
Garden pea
Garden pea
Garden pea
Garden pea
Garden pea
Pisum sativum
Also known as : Chinese Pea, Honey Pea, Shelling pea, Green pea, Pea
The garden pea (Pisum sativum) is an annual vegetable that makes a hardy, cold weather crop. Also known as the green pea or garden pea, it grows from 30 to 46 cm tall. Peapods form after the first year, and both peas and pods are edible and can be eaten cooked or raw. Excellent in stir-fry, tender tips, called pea shoots, are also edible.
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Early summer, Mid summer, Mid fall, Late fall, Mid winter, Late winter
care guide

Care Guide for Garden pea

Watering Care
Watering Care
The Garden pea does not need a large amount of water. Instead, the key, especially during the spring and summer growing season, is to keep the surrounding soil evenly moist. Check the soil, especially in hot weather, and water it whenever the surface becomes dry. The best time of day to water the plant is in the morning to prevent bud damage and leaf scorching.
Details on Watering Care Watering Care
Fertilizing Care
Fertilizing Care
Garden pea has quite specific nutrient needs, so testing the soil is the best way to establish how to feed it. Nitrogen- and potassium-rich, phosphorous-poor soil is best. Apply good manure or mulch when planting. The pea is sensitive to excess phosphorous so using a low-phosphorous fertilizer at the start of the growing season in a ratio such as 25-3-12 is advisable.
Details on Fertilizing Care Fertilizing Care
Pruning
Pruning
Trim the diseased, withered leaves once a month.
Details on Pruning Pruning
Soil Care
Soil Care
Sand, Loam, Neutral, Slightly alkaline
Details on Soil Care Soil Care
What Are the Lighting Requirements for Garden pea?
What Are the Lighting Requirements for Garden pea?
Full sun, Partial sun
Details on Sunlight Requirements What Are the Lighting Requirements for Garden pea?
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Garden pea
Water
Water
Twice per week
Sunlight
Sunlight
Full sun
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Early summer, Mid summer, Mid fall, Late fall, Mid winter, Late winter
question

Questions About Garden pea

Watering Watering Watering
Pruning Pruning Pruning
Sunlight Sunlight Sunlight
Temperature Temperature Temperature
Fertilizing Fertilizing Fertilizing
What is the best way to water my Garden pea?
Not only does the Garden pea have certain preferences regarding how much water it receives, but it also cares deeply about how you provide that water. In fact, if you don't use the proper watering technique, you risk harming your tomatoes. The best way to water Garden pea is to apply the water directly to the soil in a slow and gentle manner. You should not pour all of the water into the soil at once, and you should not do overhead watering for your Garden pea. Although you should water slowly, you should also water deeply to ensure that all of the soil in which your Garden pea grows is sufficiently moist.
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What should I do if I water my Garden pea too much or too little?
If you find that you have overwatered your Garden pea and you are concerned about the associated risk of disease, you should intervene immediately. Often the best approach for an overwatered Garden pea is to uproot it from its current growing location. Once the plant is out of the ground, you can allow its roots to dry a bit before planting it in a new growing location. Ensure that the new growing location has soil with good drainage. If you grow in pots, you may also want to move your plant to a pot with more or larger drainage holes. In the case of underwatering, all you will need to do is increase the frequency with which you supply water to your plant.
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How often should I water my Garden pea?
Overall, Garden pea requires a significant amount of water throughout the growing season. To meet that high water need, you'll need to water early and often throughout the spring and summer. During the earlier parts of the growing season, you should water your Garden pea about once or twice per week. As the season progresses, you should increase your watering frequency. You may need to water it twice per day or more during summer, depending on the weather. After your Garden pea have gone through their major seasonal growth phases, you can reduce the frequency of your watering to about once per week until the end of the growing season.
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How much water does my Garden pea need?
Since Garden pea are incredibly popular, with many professional and amateur gardeners growing them successfully, we have a pretty clear idea of how to care for these plants. That understanding includes specific knowledge about the precise volume of water an average Garden pea should receive. Generally, Garden pea will require about 1 - 1.5 inches of water per week. That volume should be dispersed evenly through your weekly watering. As the weather gets warmer, you may need to supply more water, but in most cases, two inches per week is a good baseline amount.
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How can I tell if i'm watering my Garden pea enough?
Underwatering and overwatering can both occur as problems for your Garden pea, and both these problems can manifest with similar symptoms. For example, foliage discoloration and wilting can both result from either overwatering or underwatering. When your Garden pea is underwatered, its leaves will be curling and drooping at the beginning. You will see a bunch of leaves turn less vigorous. Underwatering is also likely to cause stunted growth and poor overall development as both the flowers and this plant require a high amount of water. Overwatering is more likely to lead to disease, including rot. Overwatering may also lead to unpleasant smells rising from your plant's soil. The symptoms of underwatering will show up quicker than overwatering. Overwatering can also be evident in soil conditions. Mainly, if you notice a lot of standing water or waterlogged soils, overwatering is likely to occur.
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How should I water my Garden pea through the seasons?
As alluded to above, your Garden pea's water needs will repeatedly change throughout the seasons. During most of spring and summer, you should water your Garden pea about once every week. As the heat of summer arrives, you should plan to increase your watering frequency to once or twice per day. In the late summer and fall, towards the end of the harvest period, you can reduce your watering frequency to about once per week. After harvest has ended, you can cease watering as your Garden pea has reached the end of its life cycle and will require no further soil moisture.
The maintenance schedule of Garden pea will require you to alter the amount of water you provide depending on the plant's current growth stage. Early on, especially if you grow your Garden pea from seeds, you'll need to provide water often enough to maintain consistent soil moisture, which encourages root development. When the plant becomes old enough to produce flowers, it will likely need even more water. During the fruit development growth stage, your Garden pea will likely need the most water out of any growth period, at times requiring water more than twice per day. Following that phase, the water needs of Garden pea will decline significantly.
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What's the difference between watering Garden pea indoors and outdoors?
Whether you grow Garden pea indoors or outdoors can also play a role in how you water them. Garden pea that grows outdoors may receive water from natural rainfall, which will reduce the amount of supplemental water you should supply. However, it is incredibly rare for rainfall to adequately replace your watering entirely. Plants that grow indoors, along with any Garden pea that grows in a container, will need to be watered more frequently than those that grow in the ground outdoors. If you choose this route, please make sure that the plant gets enough water by checking the soil moisture within your pot often to keep your Garden pea healthy.
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Key Facts About Garden pea

Attributes of Garden pea

Lifespan
Annual, Biennial
Plant Type
Vine, Herb
Planting Time
Spring, Early summer, Mid summer, Mid fall, Late fall, Mid winter, Late winter
Bloom Time
Mid spring
Harvest Time
Summer, Early fall, Mid fall
Plant Height
90 cm to 1.8 m
Spread
15 cm to 30 cm
Leaf Color
Green
Flower Size
1 cm to 2.5 cm
Flower Color
White
Purple
Fruit Color
Green
Purple
Lavender
Stem Color
Green
Dormancy
Summer dormancy, Winter dormancy
Leaf type
Deciduous
Growth Season
Spring, Fall
Growth Rate
Rapid

Name story

Pea
The term pea originates from the latin word pisum, which is the latinisation of the Greek word pison, neutered form of pisos. Therefore, its common name follows the genus name and it is called pea.

Symbolism

Money, Love

Usages

Garden Use
Garden pea is one of the most common vegetables planted by gardeners across the world. Various types of garden peas can be used in multitudes of dishes, making them very popular in vegetable or raised beds. They also can produce lovely flowers and can be used as a vining addition to flower beds, depending on the type. Garden pea grows harmoniously with chives, carrots, cucumbers, and beans.

Scientific Classification of Garden pea

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pests

Common Pests & Diseases About Garden pea

Common issues for Garden pea based on 10 million real cases
Powdery mildew
Powdery mildew Powdery mildew
Powdery mildew
Powdery mildew is a notorious fungal disease affecting a wide range of plants, including Garden pea. Characterized by a dusty white or gray coating on the plant surface, it often leads to poor growth, premature leaf drop, and reduced yield.
Wilting
Wilting Wilting
Wilting
Wilting is a plant disease affecting Garden pea, causing a lack of rigidity in stems and leaves, often resulting in the plant's collapse and severe yield loss. The condition can be severe, depending on the causative agent/factor, the plant's age, and environmental conditions.
Caterpillars
Caterpillars Caterpillars
Caterpillars
Caterpillars, the larval stage of butterflies and moths, cause bone-devouring infestations on Garden pea, weakening the plant and hindering yield. This guide provides vital information about the creature, its impact, symptomatic identification, and controlling and preventive strategies.
Leaf miners
Leaf miners Leaf miners
Leaf miners
Leaf miners are small insects that lay eggs inside leaves of Garden pea, causing visible trails and spots which can hamper the plant's photosynthesis process, potentially hindering its growth and productivity.
Brown blotch
Brown blotch Brown blotch
Brown blotch
Brown spot, a fungal disease caused by Cochliobolus miyabeanus, decimates Garden pea by inducing necrosis and premature defoliation. It significantly reduces yield, posing a grave threat to world food security.
Leaf rot
Leaf rot Leaf rot
Leaf rot
Leaf rot is a detrimental plant disease that severely affects Garden pea, causing wilting, yellowing, and the eventual demise of the plant. Resulting from fungal pathogens, the malady can cause significant losses in quality and crop yield if unmanaged.
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Powdery mildew
Overview
Symptom
Causes
Treatment
Prevention
Active Period
What is Powdery mildew Disease on Garden pea?
What is Powdery mildew Disease on Garden pea?
Powdery mildew is a notorious fungal disease affecting a wide range of plants, including Garden pea. Characterized by a dusty white or gray coating on the plant surface, it often leads to poor growth, premature leaf drop, and reduced yield.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Initial signs on Garden pea include small white or grayish patches on the leaves, stems, or pods. Over time, the entire plant can become coated with a powdery, dust-like fungal growth. Infected leaves may curl, yellow, and drop prematurely.
What Causes Powdery mildew Disease on Garden pea?
What Causes Powdery mildew Disease on Garden pea?
1
Pathogen
Erysiphe pisi is the specific fungal strain that causes Powdery mildew in Garden pea.
2
Environmental factors
Favorable conditions for the disease include low light, high humidity, moderate temperatures, and poor air circulation.
How to Treat Powdery mildew Disease on Garden pea?
How to Treat Powdery mildew Disease on Garden pea?
1
Non pesticide
Plant Removal: Immediately remove and destroy infected plant parts.

Good hygiene: Regularly clean tools and high-touch surfaces to prevent the spread of spores.

Air circulation: Increase spacing between plants to improve air circulation.
2
Pesticide
Fungicide: A variety of fungicides, containing active ingredients like sulphur, triforine, or tebuconazole, can be applied to control the disease.

Biological control: Use biological controls such as serenade, which contains Bacillus subtilis.
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Wilting
Overview
Symptom
Causes
Treatment
Prevention
Active Period
What is Wilting Disease on Garden pea?
What is Wilting Disease on Garden pea?
Wilting is a plant disease affecting Garden pea, causing a lack of rigidity in stems and leaves, often resulting in the plant's collapse and severe yield loss. The condition can be severe, depending on the causative agent/factor, the plant's age, and environmental conditions.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Garden pea's main manifestations include drooping, yellowing, and eventual browning of the lower leaves. The stems might display a lack of vigour and rigidity, with plants showing general signs of unthriftiness. In severe cases, this may progress to plant collapse and death.
What Causes Wilting Disease on Garden pea?
What Causes Wilting Disease on Garden pea?
1
Fungal Infection
Fusarium and Verticillium spp. cause wilting by invading the plants' vascular system, disrupting water and nutrient transport.
2
Bacterial Infection
Pseudomonas and Agrobacterium spp. cause bacterial wilt which obstruct the plant's water-conducting tissues.
3
Environmental factors
This includes water stress due to overwatering or underwatering, and temperature extremes.
How to Treat Wilting Disease on Garden pea?
How to Treat Wilting Disease on Garden pea?
1
Non pesticide
Promoting Good Health: Maintain good growing conditions and frequent monitoring of plants to keep them healthy and less susceptible to infections.

Proper Watering: Avoid overwatering or underwatering, as these stresses can make Garden pea more vulnerable to wilting pathogens.
2
Pesticide
Fungicide Treatment: Apply suitable systemic fungicides to control fungal pathogens.

Bactericide Application: For bacterial wilting, use specific bactericides to manage the disease.
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Caterpillars
Overview
Symptom
Causes
Treatment
Prevention
Active Period
What is Caterpillars Disease on Garden pea?
What is Caterpillars Disease on Garden pea?
Caterpillars, the larval stage of butterflies and moths, cause bone-devouring infestations on Garden pea, weakening the plant and hindering yield. This guide provides vital information about the creature, its impact, symptomatic identification, and controlling and preventive strategies.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The caterpillar infestation on Garden pea results in characteristic damage. Look for chewed leaves, defoliation, notched edges, visible frass (caterpillar droppings), and reduced pod production in severe cases.
What Causes Caterpillars Disease on Garden pea?
What Causes Caterpillars Disease on Garden pea?
1
Species
Caterpillars belong to the order Lepidoptera, which includes various species causing extensive damage.
2
Environment
Warm weather coupled with high moisture levels promote their breeding and propagation.
How to Treat Caterpillars Disease on Garden pea?
How to Treat Caterpillars Disease on Garden pea?
1
Non pesticide
Hand picking: Regular manual removal early in the day can help control populations.

Predator introduction: Encourage natural predators like birds, frogs, and beneficial insects.
2
Pesticide
Bacillus Thuringiensis: This bacterial pesticide is effective against young caterpillars.

Synthetic Insecticides: Use when the infestation is high. Opt for ones with low mammalian toxicity.
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Leaf miners
Overview
Symptom
Causes
Treatment
Prevention
Active Period
What is Leaf miners Disease on Garden pea?
What is Leaf miners Disease on Garden pea?
Leaf miners are small insects that lay eggs inside leaves of Garden pea, causing visible trails and spots which can hamper the plant's photosynthesis process, potentially hindering its growth and productivity.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Garden pea affected by Leaf miners show visible white or pale green winding trails or blotches in the leaves, with possible yellowing or wilting of the plant in severe cases.
What Causes Leaf miners Disease on Garden pea?
What Causes Leaf miners Disease on Garden pea?
1
Insects
Leaf miners are larvae of various insects like flies, beetles, moths and sawflies, which burrow into Garden pea's leaves and feed off the inner leaf tissue.
How to Treat Leaf miners Disease on Garden pea?
How to Treat Leaf miners Disease on Garden pea?
1
Non pesticide
Physical removal: Regularly inspect plants and manually remove affected leaves to prevent the spread of infestation.

Biological Control: Use natural predators like parasitic wasps or birds to help control the leaf miner population.
2
Pesticide
Systemic Insecticides: In severe cases, use systemic insecticides to kill the larvae within the leaves. Always follow the label instructions.
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Brown blotch
Overview
Symptom
Causes
Treatment
Prevention
Active Period
What is Brown blotch Disease on Garden pea?
What is Brown blotch Disease on Garden pea?
Brown spot, a fungal disease caused by Cochliobolus miyabeanus, decimates Garden pea by inducing necrosis and premature defoliation. It significantly reduces yield, posing a grave threat to world food security.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Symptoms on Garden pea include brown or dark-brown spots on leaves and stems, usually surrounded by a yellow halo. The affected tissues may undergo necrosis and cause defoliation.
What Causes Brown blotch Disease on Garden pea?
What Causes Brown blotch Disease on Garden pea?
1
Pathogen
Cochliobolus miyabeanus, a plant-pathogenic fungus
2
Environmental factors
High humidity, prolonged leaf wetness and warm temperature
How to Treat Brown blotch Disease on Garden pea?
How to Treat Brown blotch Disease on Garden pea?
1
Non pesticide
Crop rotation: Periodically changing the crop grown in a particular field aids in breaking the lifecycle of the pathogen

Genetic resistance: Use of brown-spot-resistant varieties of Garden pea
2
Pesticide
Fungicidal sprays: Usage of approved fungicides at the onset of the disease and regularly thereafter until the conditions unfavorable to the pathogen prevail
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Leaf rot
Overview
Symptom
Causes
Treatment
Prevention
Active Period
What is Leaf rot Disease on Garden pea?
What is Leaf rot Disease on Garden pea?
Leaf rot is a detrimental plant disease that severely affects Garden pea, causing wilting, yellowing, and the eventual demise of the plant. Resulting from fungal pathogens, the malady can cause significant losses in quality and crop yield if unmanaged.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
In Garden pea, infected leaves turn yellow and wilt before rotting and falling off. Dark-brown lesions appear on stems, roots, and tendrils. Plants manifest overall stunted growth and occasional wilting.
What Causes Leaf rot Disease on Garden pea?
What Causes Leaf rot Disease on Garden pea?
1
Fungal infection
Proliferation of fungi like Phytophthora, Fusarium, and Pythium that causes the decay of plant tissue.
2
Environmental conditions
Waterlogged soil, poor ventilation, excessive shade, and improper watering contribute to the disease's prevalence.
How to Treat Leaf rot Disease on Garden pea?
How to Treat Leaf rot Disease on Garden pea?
1
Non pesticide
Cultural practices: Regularly removing infected plant parts and enhancing drainage to avoid waterlogging.

Crop rotation: Planting Garden pea in different areas each season to disrupt fungal reproduction cycles.
2
Pesticide
Fungicidal treatment: Applying fungicides such as Mancozeb or Captan can control the disease.

Biological control: Using fungi or bacteria that kill or inhibit the leaf rot causing pathogen.
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distribution

Distribution of Garden pea

Habitat of Garden pea

Cultivated Beds
Northern Hemisphere
South Hemisphere

Distribution Map of Garden pea

Garden pea is native to parts of Asia, Europe, and Africa. It is rarely found in the wild now. It likes moist, well-drained soil. It has been introduced as a crop to the rest of the world, excluding Antarctica.
distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
habit
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More Info on Garden Pea Growth and Care

Basic Care Guide
Common Pests & Diseases
Explore More
Lighting
Full sun
The garden pea flourishes best under an abundant amount of sunlight throughout the day, reinforcing its healthy growth. It can manage in less than ample light, though it might hinder optimum development. Excessive shade could lead to frail plants, while overexposure may potentially harm the plant. Its native habitat shares a similar light profile.
Best Sunlight Practices
Temperature
0 43 ℃
Native to temperate regions, garden pea prefers temperatures of 68 to 100 °F (20 to 38 ℃). In hotter seasons, care should be taken to keep it cool. In cooler winters, the temperature should not fall drastically below the preferred range.
Temp for Healthy Growth
Transplant
8-12 inches
The prime time for transplanting garden pea is from late spring until the heart of summer, ensuring warmth and adequate sunlight. Choose a sunny location with well-draining soil for optimal growth. Be gentle with the roots during transplanting to minimize stress on garden pea.
Transplant Techniques
Powdery mildew
Powdery mildew is a notorious fungal disease affecting a wide range of plants, including Garden pea. Characterized by a dusty white or gray coating on the plant surface, it often leads to poor growth, premature leaf drop, and reduced yield.
Learn More About the Disease
Wilting
Wilting is a plant disease affecting Garden pea, causing a lack of rigidity in stems and leaves, often resulting in the plant's collapse and severe yield loss. The condition can be severe, depending on the causative agent/factor, the plant's age, and environmental conditions.
Learn More About the Disease
Caterpillars
Caterpillars, the larval stage of butterflies and moths, cause bone-devouring infestations on Garden pea, weakening the plant and hindering yield. This guide provides vital information about the creature, its impact, symptomatic identification, and controlling and preventive strategies.
Learn More About the Disease
Leaf miners
Leaf miners are small insects that lay eggs inside leaves of Garden pea, causing visible trails and spots which can hamper the plant's photosynthesis process, potentially hindering its growth and productivity.
Learn More About the Disease
Brown blotch
Brown spot, a fungal disease caused by Cochliobolus miyabeanus, decimates Garden pea by inducing necrosis and premature defoliation. It significantly reduces yield, posing a grave threat to world food security.
Learn More About the Disease
Leaf rot
Leaf rot is a detrimental plant disease that severely affects Garden pea, causing wilting, yellowing, and the eventual demise of the plant. Resulting from fungal pathogens, the malady can cause significant losses in quality and crop yield if unmanaged.
Learn More About the Disease
Feng shui direction
Southwest
The garden pea harbors a harmonious energy making it intriguing for a southwest-facing location. This direction is associated with love and relationships in Feng Shui, which correlates well with the garden pea's characteristic vigour and growth. However, placement should be guided by individual intuition, maintaining balance with other elements within the space.
Fengshui Details
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Related Plants
Garden pea
Garden pea
Garden pea
Garden pea
Garden pea
Garden pea
Garden pea
Pisum sativum
Also known as: Chinese Pea, Honey Pea, Shelling pea, Green pea, Pea
The garden pea (Pisum sativum) is an annual vegetable that makes a hardy, cold weather crop. Also known as the green pea or garden pea, it grows from 30 to 46 cm tall. Peapods form after the first year, and both peas and pods are edible and can be eaten cooked or raw. Excellent in stir-fry, tender tips, called pea shoots, are also edible.
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Early summer, Mid summer, Mid fall, Late fall, Mid winter, Late winter
question

Questions About Garden pea

Watering Watering Watering
Pruning Pruning Pruning
Sunlight Sunlight Sunlight
Temperature Temperature Temperature
Fertilizing Fertilizing Fertilizing
What is the best way to water my Garden pea?
more
What should I do if I water my Garden pea too much or too little?
more
How often should I water my Garden pea?
more
How much water does my Garden pea need?
more
How can I tell if i'm watering my Garden pea enough?
more
How should I water my Garden pea through the seasons?
more
What's the difference between watering Garden pea indoors and outdoors?
more
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Keep your plants happy and healthy with our guide to watering, lighting, feeding and more.
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close
plant_info

Key Facts About Garden pea

Attributes of Garden pea

Lifespan
Annual, Biennial
Plant Type
Vine, Herb
Planting Time
Spring, Early summer, Mid summer, Mid fall, Late fall, Mid winter, Late winter
Bloom Time
Mid spring
Harvest Time
Summer, Early fall, Mid fall
Plant Height
90 cm to 1.8 m
Spread
15 cm to 30 cm
Leaf Color
Green
Flower Size
1 cm to 2.5 cm
Flower Color
White
Purple
Fruit Color
Green
Purple
Lavender
Stem Color
Green
Dormancy
Summer dormancy, Winter dormancy
Leaf type
Deciduous
Growth Season
Spring, Fall
Growth Rate
Rapid
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Name story

Pea
The term pea originates from the latin word pisum, which is the latinisation of the Greek word pison, neutered form of pisos. Therefore, its common name follows the genus name and it is called pea.

Symbolism

Money, Love

Usages

Garden Use
Garden pea is one of the most common vegetables planted by gardeners across the world. Various types of garden peas can be used in multitudes of dishes, making them very popular in vegetable or raised beds. They also can produce lovely flowers and can be used as a vining addition to flower beds, depending on the type. Garden pea grows harmoniously with chives, carrots, cucumbers, and beans.

Scientific Classification of Garden pea

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pests

Common Pests & Diseases About Garden pea

Common issues for Garden pea based on 10 million real cases
Powdery mildew
Powdery mildew Powdery mildew Powdery mildew
Powdery mildew is a notorious fungal disease affecting a wide range of plants, including Garden pea. Characterized by a dusty white or gray coating on the plant surface, it often leads to poor growth, premature leaf drop, and reduced yield.
Learn More About the Powdery mildew more
Wilting
Wilting Wilting Wilting
Wilting is a plant disease affecting Garden pea, causing a lack of rigidity in stems and leaves, often resulting in the plant's collapse and severe yield loss. The condition can be severe, depending on the causative agent/factor, the plant's age, and environmental conditions.
Learn More About the Wilting more
Caterpillars
Caterpillars Caterpillars Caterpillars
Caterpillars, the larval stage of butterflies and moths, cause bone-devouring infestations on Garden pea, weakening the plant and hindering yield. This guide provides vital information about the creature, its impact, symptomatic identification, and controlling and preventive strategies.
Learn More About the Caterpillars more
Leaf miners
Leaf miners Leaf miners Leaf miners
Leaf miners are small insects that lay eggs inside leaves of Garden pea, causing visible trails and spots which can hamper the plant's photosynthesis process, potentially hindering its growth and productivity.
Learn More About the Leaf miners more
Brown blotch
Brown blotch Brown blotch Brown blotch
Brown spot, a fungal disease caused by Cochliobolus miyabeanus, decimates Garden pea by inducing necrosis and premature defoliation. It significantly reduces yield, posing a grave threat to world food security.
Learn More About the Brown blotch more
Leaf rot
Leaf rot Leaf rot Leaf rot
Leaf rot is a detrimental plant disease that severely affects Garden pea, causing wilting, yellowing, and the eventual demise of the plant. Resulting from fungal pathogens, the malady can cause significant losses in quality and crop yield if unmanaged.
Learn More About the Leaf rot more
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Powdery mildew
Overview
Symptom
Causes
Treatment
Prevention
Active Period
What is Powdery mildew Disease on Garden pea?
What is Powdery mildew Disease on Garden pea?
Powdery mildew is a notorious fungal disease affecting a wide range of plants, including Garden pea. Characterized by a dusty white or gray coating on the plant surface, it often leads to poor growth, premature leaf drop, and reduced yield.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Initial signs on Garden pea include small white or grayish patches on the leaves, stems, or pods. Over time, the entire plant can become coated with a powdery, dust-like fungal growth. Infected leaves may curl, yellow, and drop prematurely.
What Causes Powdery mildew Disease on Garden pea?
What Causes Powdery mildew Disease on Garden pea?
1
Pathogen
Erysiphe pisi is the specific fungal strain that causes Powdery mildew in Garden pea.
2
Environmental factors
Favorable conditions for the disease include low light, high humidity, moderate temperatures, and poor air circulation.
How to Treat Powdery mildew Disease on Garden pea?
How to Treat Powdery mildew Disease on Garden pea?
1
Non pesticide
Plant Removal: Immediately remove and destroy infected plant parts.

Good hygiene: Regularly clean tools and high-touch surfaces to prevent the spread of spores.

Air circulation: Increase spacing between plants to improve air circulation.
2
Pesticide
Fungicide: A variety of fungicides, containing active ingredients like sulphur, triforine, or tebuconazole, can be applied to control the disease.

Biological control: Use biological controls such as serenade, which contains Bacillus subtilis.
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Wilting
Overview
Symptom
Causes
Treatment
Prevention
Active Period
What is Wilting Disease on Garden pea?
What is Wilting Disease on Garden pea?
Wilting is a plant disease affecting Garden pea, causing a lack of rigidity in stems and leaves, often resulting in the plant's collapse and severe yield loss. The condition can be severe, depending on the causative agent/factor, the plant's age, and environmental conditions.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Garden pea's main manifestations include drooping, yellowing, and eventual browning of the lower leaves. The stems might display a lack of vigour and rigidity, with plants showing general signs of unthriftiness. In severe cases, this may progress to plant collapse and death.
What Causes Wilting Disease on Garden pea?
What Causes Wilting Disease on Garden pea?
1
Fungal Infection
Fusarium and Verticillium spp. cause wilting by invading the plants' vascular system, disrupting water and nutrient transport.
2
Bacterial Infection
Pseudomonas and Agrobacterium spp. cause bacterial wilt which obstruct the plant's water-conducting tissues.
3
Environmental factors
This includes water stress due to overwatering or underwatering, and temperature extremes.
How to Treat Wilting Disease on Garden pea?
How to Treat Wilting Disease on Garden pea?
1
Non pesticide
Promoting Good Health: Maintain good growing conditions and frequent monitoring of plants to keep them healthy and less susceptible to infections.

Proper Watering: Avoid overwatering or underwatering, as these stresses can make Garden pea more vulnerable to wilting pathogens.
2
Pesticide
Fungicide Treatment: Apply suitable systemic fungicides to control fungal pathogens.

Bactericide Application: For bacterial wilting, use specific bactericides to manage the disease.
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Caterpillars
Overview
Symptom
Causes
Treatment
Prevention
Active Period
What is Caterpillars Disease on Garden pea?
What is Caterpillars Disease on Garden pea?
Caterpillars, the larval stage of butterflies and moths, cause bone-devouring infestations on Garden pea, weakening the plant and hindering yield. This guide provides vital information about the creature, its impact, symptomatic identification, and controlling and preventive strategies.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The caterpillar infestation on Garden pea results in characteristic damage. Look for chewed leaves, defoliation, notched edges, visible frass (caterpillar droppings), and reduced pod production in severe cases.
What Causes Caterpillars Disease on Garden pea?
What Causes Caterpillars Disease on Garden pea?
1
Species
Caterpillars belong to the order Lepidoptera, which includes various species causing extensive damage.
2
Environment
Warm weather coupled with high moisture levels promote their breeding and propagation.
How to Treat Caterpillars Disease on Garden pea?
How to Treat Caterpillars Disease on Garden pea?
1
Non pesticide
Hand picking: Regular manual removal early in the day can help control populations.

Predator introduction: Encourage natural predators like birds, frogs, and beneficial insects.
2
Pesticide
Bacillus Thuringiensis: This bacterial pesticide is effective against young caterpillars.

Synthetic Insecticides: Use when the infestation is high. Opt for ones with low mammalian toxicity.
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Leaf miners
Overview
Symptom
Causes
Treatment
Prevention
Active Period
What is Leaf miners Disease on Garden pea?
What is Leaf miners Disease on Garden pea?
Leaf miners are small insects that lay eggs inside leaves of Garden pea, causing visible trails and spots which can hamper the plant's photosynthesis process, potentially hindering its growth and productivity.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Garden pea affected by Leaf miners show visible white or pale green winding trails or blotches in the leaves, with possible yellowing or wilting of the plant in severe cases.
What Causes Leaf miners Disease on Garden pea?
What Causes Leaf miners Disease on Garden pea?
1
Insects
Leaf miners are larvae of various insects like flies, beetles, moths and sawflies, which burrow into Garden pea's leaves and feed off the inner leaf tissue.
How to Treat Leaf miners Disease on Garden pea?
How to Treat Leaf miners Disease on Garden pea?
1
Non pesticide
Physical removal: Regularly inspect plants and manually remove affected leaves to prevent the spread of infestation.

Biological Control: Use natural predators like parasitic wasps or birds to help control the leaf miner population.
2
Pesticide
Systemic Insecticides: In severe cases, use systemic insecticides to kill the larvae within the leaves. Always follow the label instructions.
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Brown blotch
Overview
Symptom
Causes
Treatment
Prevention
Active Period
What is Brown blotch Disease on Garden pea?
What is Brown blotch Disease on Garden pea?
Brown spot, a fungal disease caused by Cochliobolus miyabeanus, decimates Garden pea by inducing necrosis and premature defoliation. It significantly reduces yield, posing a grave threat to world food security.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Symptoms on Garden pea include brown or dark-brown spots on leaves and stems, usually surrounded by a yellow halo. The affected tissues may undergo necrosis and cause defoliation.
What Causes Brown blotch Disease on Garden pea?
What Causes Brown blotch Disease on Garden pea?
1
Pathogen
Cochliobolus miyabeanus, a plant-pathogenic fungus
2
Environmental factors
High humidity, prolonged leaf wetness and warm temperature
How to Treat Brown blotch Disease on Garden pea?
How to Treat Brown blotch Disease on Garden pea?
1
Non pesticide
Crop rotation: Periodically changing the crop grown in a particular field aids in breaking the lifecycle of the pathogen

Genetic resistance: Use of brown-spot-resistant varieties of Garden pea
2
Pesticide
Fungicidal sprays: Usage of approved fungicides at the onset of the disease and regularly thereafter until the conditions unfavorable to the pathogen prevail
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Leaf rot
Overview
Symptom
Causes
Treatment
Prevention
Active Period
What is Leaf rot Disease on Garden pea?
What is Leaf rot Disease on Garden pea?
Leaf rot is a detrimental plant disease that severely affects Garden pea, causing wilting, yellowing, and the eventual demise of the plant. Resulting from fungal pathogens, the malady can cause significant losses in quality and crop yield if unmanaged.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
In Garden pea, infected leaves turn yellow and wilt before rotting and falling off. Dark-brown lesions appear on stems, roots, and tendrils. Plants manifest overall stunted growth and occasional wilting.
What Causes Leaf rot Disease on Garden pea?
What Causes Leaf rot Disease on Garden pea?
1
Fungal infection
Proliferation of fungi like Phytophthora, Fusarium, and Pythium that causes the decay of plant tissue.
2
Environmental conditions
Waterlogged soil, poor ventilation, excessive shade, and improper watering contribute to the disease's prevalence.
How to Treat Leaf rot Disease on Garden pea?
How to Treat Leaf rot Disease on Garden pea?
1
Non pesticide
Cultural practices: Regularly removing infected plant parts and enhancing drainage to avoid waterlogging.

Crop rotation: Planting Garden pea in different areas each season to disrupt fungal reproduction cycles.
2
Pesticide
Fungicidal treatment: Applying fungicides such as Mancozeb or Captan can control the disease.

Biological control: Using fungi or bacteria that kill or inhibit the leaf rot causing pathogen.
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distribution

Distribution of Garden pea

Habitat of Garden pea

Cultivated Beds
Northern Hemisphere
South Hemisphere

Distribution Map of Garden pea

Garden pea is native to parts of Asia, Europe, and Africa. It is rarely found in the wild now. It likes moist, well-drained soil. It has been introduced as a crop to the rest of the world, excluding Antarctica.
distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
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Plants Related to Garden pea

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Lighting
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Indoor
Indoor
Outdoor
Choose a site here for personalized care tips.
Requirements
Full sun
Ideal
Above 6 hours sunlight
Partial sun
Tolerance
About 3-6 hours sunlight
Watch how sunlight gracefully moves through your garden, and choose spots that provide the perfect balance of light and shade for your plants, ensuring their happiness.
Essentials
The garden pea flourishes best under an abundant amount of sunlight throughout the day, reinforcing its healthy growth. It can manage in less than ample light, though it might hinder optimum development. Excessive shade could lead to frail plants, while overexposure may potentially harm the plant. Its native habitat shares a similar light profile.
Preferred
Tolerable
Unsuitable
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Artificial lighting
Indoor plants require adequate lighting for optimal growth. When natural sunlight is insufficient, particularly in winter or in less sunny spaces, artificial lights offer a vital solution, promoting faster, healthier growth.
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Indoor plants require adequate lighting for optimal growth. When natural sunlight is insufficient, particularly in winter or in less sunny spaces, artificial lights offer a vital solution, promoting faster, healthier growth.
1. Choose the right type of artificial light: LED lights are a popular choice for indoor plant lighting because they can be customized to provide the specific wavelengths of light that your plants need.
Full sun plants need 30-50W/sq ft of artificial light, partial sun plants need 20-30W/sq ft, and full shade plants need 10-20W/sq ft.
2. Determine the appropriate distance: Place the light source 12-36 inches above the plant to mimic natural sunlight.
3. Determine the duration: Mimic the length of natural daylight hours for your plant species. most plants need 8-12 hours of light per day.
Important Symptoms
Insufficient light
Garden pea thrives in full sunlight and is commonly cultivated outdoors. When grown indoors with limited light, it may exhibit subtle symptoms of light deficiency that can easily go unnoticed.
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(Symptom details and solutions)
Lighter-colored new leaves
Insufficient sunlight can cause leaves to develop irregular color patterns or appear pale. This indicates a lack of chlorophyll and essential nutrients.
Leggy or sparse growth
The spaces between leaves or stems of your garden pea may become longer, resulting in a thin and stretched-out appearance. This can make the plant look sparse and weak, and it may easily break or lean due to its own weight.
Slower or no new growth
Garden pea enters a survival mode when light conditions are poor, which leads to a halt in leaf production. As a result, the plant's growth becomes delayed or stops altogether.
Impact on flowering and fruiting
Your plant may not show obvious abnormalities due to insufficient sunlight, but it can have adverse effects on future flowering and fruiting.
Solutions
1. To ensure optimal growth, gradually move plants to a sunnier location each week, until they receive at least 6 hours of direct sunlight daily. Use a south-facing window and keep curtains open during the day for maximum sunlight exposure and nutrient accumulation.2. To provide additional light for your plant, consider using artificial light if it's large or not easily movable. Keep a desk or ceiling lamp on for at least 8 hours daily, or invest in professional plant grow lights for ample light.
Excessive light
Garden pea thrives in full sun exposure and can tolerate intense sunlight. With their remarkable resilience, symptoms of sunburn may not be easily visible, as they rarely suffer from it.
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(Symptom details and solutions)
Chlorosis
Chlorosis is a condition where the plant's leaves lose their green color and turn yellow. This is due to the breakdown of chlorophyll from excessive sunlight, which negatively affects the plant's ability to photosynthesize.
Sunscald
Sunscald occurs when the plant's leaves or stems are damaged by intense sunlight exposure. It appears as pale, bleached, or necrotic areas on the plant tissue and can reduce the plant's overall health.
Leaf Curling
Leaf curling is a symptom where leaves curl or twist under extreme sunlight conditions. This is a defense mechanism used by the plant to reduce its surface area exposed to sunlight, minimizing water loss and damage.
Wilting
Wilting occurs when a plant loses turgor pressure and its leaves and stems begin to droop. Overexposure to sunlight can cause wilting by increasing the plant's water loss through transpiration, making it difficult for the plant to maintain adequate hydration.
Leaf Scorching
Leaf scorching is a symptom characterized by the appearance of brown, dry, and crispy edges or patches on leaves due to excessive sunlight. This can lead to a reduction in photosynthetic capacity and overall plant health.
Solutions
1. Move your plant to the optimal position where it can receive abundant sunlight but also have some shade. An east-facing window is an ideal choice as the morning sunlight is gentler. This way, your plant can enjoy ample sunlight while reducing the risk of sunburn.2. It is recommended to trim off any completely dehydrated or withered parts of the plant.
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Temperature
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Indoor
Indoor
Outdoor
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Requirements
Ideal
Tolerable
Unsuitable
Just like people, each plant has its own preferences. Learn about your plants' temperature needs and create a comforting environment for them to flourish. As you care for your plants, your bond with them will deepen. Trust your intuition as you learn about their temperature needs, celebrating the journey you share. Lovingly monitor the temperature around your plants and adjust their environment as needed. A thermometer can be your ally in this heartfelt endeavor. Be patient and gentle with yourself as you explore your plants' temperature needs. Cherish your successes, learn from challenges, and nurture your garden with love, creating a haven that reflects the warmth of your care.
Essentials
Native to temperate regions, garden pea prefers temperatures of 68 to 100 °F (20 to 38 ℃). In hotter seasons, care should be taken to keep it cool. In cooler winters, the temperature should not fall drastically below the preferred range.
Regional wintering strategies
Garden pea prefers relatively warm temperatures, so maintaining temperatures above {Suitable_growth_temperature_min} during winter cultivation is beneficial for plant growth. The minimum temperature should be kept above freezing point to prevent the plant from freezing damage. When the outdoor temperature approaches -5°C (25°F) during winter, it is advisable to bring Garden pea indoors or provide protection by setting up a temporary greenhouse or using materials such as plastic film or fabric to wrap the plant.
Important Symptoms
Low Temperature
Garden pea has moderate tolerance to low temperatures and thrives best when the temperature is between {Suitable_growth_temperature_min} and {Suitable_growth_temperature_max}. During winter, it should be kept above {Tolerable_growing_temperature_min}. When the temperature falls below {Limit_growth_temperature}, the leaves may darken in color. In severe cases, water-soaked necrosis, wilting, and drooping may occur, and the color of the leaves gradually turns brown.
Solutions
Trim away the frost-damaged parts. Immediately move indoors to a warm environment or set up a makeshift greenhouse for cold protection. When placing the plant indoors, choose a location near a south-facing window to ensure ample sunlight. If there is insufficient light, you can use supplemental lighting.
High Temperature
During summer, Garden pea should be kept below {Suitable_growth_temperature_max}. When the temperature exceeds {Tolerable_growing_temperature_max}, the plant's growth slows down, the color of its leaves becomes lighter, and it becomes more susceptible to sunburn.
Solutions
Trim away the sunburned and dried-up parts. Move the plant to a location that provides shade from the afternoon sun. Water the plant in the morning and evening to keep the soil moist.
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Transplant
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How to Successfully Transplant Garden Pea?
The prime time for transplanting garden pea is from late spring until the heart of summer, ensuring warmth and adequate sunlight. Choose a sunny location with well-draining soil for optimal growth. Be gentle with the roots during transplanting to minimize stress on garden pea.
What Preparations are Needed Before Transplanting Garden Pea?
What is the Ideal Time for Transplanting Garden Pea?
The optimal time to transplant garden pea is during the warming period stretch from late spring to the heart of summer. This is the sweet spot in the calendar when the conditions are just right for garden pea to truly flourish. When we transplant garden pea in this window, we ensure that the plant gets enough sunlight and temperature, both being key influencers for garden pea growth. Moreover, this is your opportunity to help garden pea evolve from a delicate sprout to a robust plant. Remember, your decisions today will have a lasting impact on garden pea's growth story.
How Much Space Should You Leave Between Garden Pea Plants?
For a successful transplant of garden pea, space each plant about 8-12 inches (20-30 cm) apart. This will give them enough room to grow and thrive without competing for nutrients.
What is the Best Soil Mix for Garden Pea Transplanting?
Prepare the soil with a rich, well-draining potting mix, which garden pea loves. Add some slow-release granular fertilizer to the planting hole to provide essential nutrients throughout the growing season.
Where Should You Relocate Your Garden Pea?
Choose a location where garden pea will receive at least 6-8 hours of sunlight daily. Partial shade is also suitable, but make sure the plants get adequate sunlight for healthy growth and good yields.
What Equipments Should You Prepare Before Transplantation Garden Pea?
Gardening Gloves
Required to protect your hands from the soil, plant, or any insects.
Shovel
Helps in digging the new planting hole and removing the plant from the previous location.
Watering Can
Used to water the garden pea before and after transplanting.
Wheelbarrow
Helps to transport the garden pea from the original location to the new site safely.
Garden Trowel
Used to dig smaller holes, especially when removing garden pea from pots or seedling trays.
Mulch
Helps retain moisture in the soil after transplanting.
Stake and Tie
To offer some support to the garden pea plant after transplanting.
How Do You Remove Garden Pea from the Soil?
From Ground: Initially, water the garden pea plant to moisten the soil, which makes it easier to remove. Gently dig a wide trench around the plant using a shovel without disturbing the root ball. Lift the plant steadily from its original location by working the shovel under the root ball.
From Pot: Water the plant properly and gently tip the pot on its side or upside down, then slowly coax the plant out. Try not to pull the plant out forcefully as it may damage the roots.
From Seedling Tray: Wet the seedlings thoroughly and gently pull them out by grasping the leaves, not the stem. If a seedling doesn't easily lift out, use a table knife to loosen the soil around it.
Step-by-Step Guide for Transplanting Garden Pea
Step1 Preparing the New Site
Once you've chosen the new location in the garden, prepare a hole that's twice as wide and the similar depth as the garden pea's root ball.
Step2 Placing the Plant
Place the garden pea in the hole gradually. Ensure the plant is at the same depth as it was in the original pot or ground. Adjust the soil if necessary.
Step3 Backfilling
Start filling in the hole while ensuring there are no air pockets, which could dry out the roots. Firm the soil around the roots but do not compact it too much.
Step4 Watering
Water the garden pea generously right after planting to establish contact between the roots and soil.
Step5 Staking
Use a stake and tie to help the garden pea plant stand upright and stable in its new location if needed.
How Do You Care For Garden Pea After Transplanting?
Watering
Ensure that garden pea is consistently watered to foster healthy growth, avoid either overwatering or under watering.
Mulching
Add a layer of mulch around the garden pea but not touching the stem to retain moisture and regulate soil temperature.
Checking
Regularly check the garden pea for any signs of stress like wilting or yellowing. If found, address it appropriately, which may involve changing watering frequency, addition of compost, or pest control measures.
Staking
The stake should be regularly checked to see if it's providing the necessary support and adjusted if necessary.
Troubleshooting Common Issues with Garden Pea Transplantation.
When is the best time to transplant garden pea?
The ideal time to transplant garden pea is from late spring to mid-summer. It loves the warmth this season provides.
How much space should be between my garden pea plants for healthy growth?
Give each garden pea plant 8-12 inches (20-30 cm) of space. This provides adequate room for root and foliage development.
Why are my transplanted garden pea plants wilting?
Wilting may suggest overwatering, under watering or shock from transplanting. Ensure proper watering and give your garden pea time to adjust to the new location.
How much water does a transplanted garden pea need?
Garden pea likes well-drained soil. Water thoroughly but let the soil dry between watering. Never let the plant sit in standing water.
Should I fertilize garden pea after transplanting?
Fertilize after transplanting can help the garden pea establish but it's not mandatory. Use a balanced fertilizer, and always follow the package instructions.
Why are the leaves of my transplanted garden pea turning yellow?
Yellowing leaves can indicate overwatering or nutrient deficiencies. Check your watering routine first, then consider a soil test to identify potential nutrient issues.
What is the best soil type for transplanting garden pea?
Garden pea prefers well-drained, fertile soil with plenty of organic matter. If your soil is heavy clay or sandy, consider adding compost to improve it.
Why are my transplanted garden pea not flowering?
Garden pea may not flower if they're not getting enough sunlight, if they've been excessively pruned, or if they're stressed from the transplant. Check these factors.
How do I heal a transplanted garden pea that's experiencing transplant shock?
Minimize transplant shock by keeping the garden pea well-watered and shaded for a few days post-transplant. Gradually reintroduce it to sun as it recovers.
Should I prune garden pea after transplanting?
You don't need to prune garden pea right after transplanting. Let the plant establish first, then prune away any dead or diseased branches to keep it healthy.
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