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Annual bluegrass
Annual bluegrass
Annual bluegrass
Annual bluegrass
Annual bluegrass
Annual bluegrass
Add to My Garden
Annual bluegrass
Poa annua
Also known as: Wintergrass, Low spear grass
Annual bluegrass (Poa annua) is a low-growing grass native to Europe and Asia. Poa annua is known commonly as both annual bluegrass and poa. The Latin name is derived from the Greek word poa, which is a type of fodder grass.
Water
Twice per week
Water
Sunlight
Full sun
Sunlight
care guide

Care Guide for Annual bluegrass

Water
Water
Moisture-loving, keep the soil moist but do not let water accumulate.
Fertilization
Fertilization
Fertilization once in spring.
Soil
Soil
Sand, Clay, Acidic, Neutral, Alkaline
Sunlight
Sunlight
Full sun, Partial sun
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
4 - 8
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Annual bluegrass
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Fall
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Annual bluegrass
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Twice per week
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Sunlight
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Planting Time
Planting Time
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Annual bluegrass
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Fall
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Questions About Annual bluegrass

Watering Watering Watering
Pruning Pruning Pruning
Seasonal Care Seasonal Care Seasonal Care
How to Water Annual bluegrass?
In most places where grasses are used in landscaping, there will be sufficient rainfall to keep it looking good without supplemental irrigation or watering. However, if it is planted in a very dry climate or there is a lengthy drought, Annual bluegrass may die out if it isn’t watered. During the winter months, this grass goes dormant and may appear to be dead, but it still needs moisture to keep from becoming fully dehydrated. It regrows as weather warms up in the spring.

A good rule of thumb for watering Annual bluegrass is that it does best with about an inch of water every 1 week. A thorough drenching in a short period of time is better than a slow and steady drip, as it leads to a stronger, deeper root system.

Freshly planted grass has more specific requirements for watering. After planting, the young grass needs to be kept moist for the first 3 to 4 weeks until it has a chance to establish itself. The best time of year to plant Annual bluegrass is in the late spring to early summer, when there tends to be plenty of rainfall anyway. However, if your area experiences a dry spell after you’ve recently planted grass in your lawn, it is a good idea to cover the grass to prevent water evaporating or to water the lawn to keep soil moist.

Considerations for Watering Annual bluegrass
The environmental conditions, soil type, and amount of drainage will affect how often Annual bluegrass needs to be watered. If your lawn has sandy soil that doesn’t retain much moisture, you may need to irrigate to keep this grass looking its best. Clay soils that drain slowly and hold a lot of water are less likely to need additional water, but can be bad for Annual bluegrass as this grass is sensitive to too much water around its roots.
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What to Do If Your Water Annual bluegrass Too Much or Too Little?
Overwatered Annual bluegrass
If your grass is turning yellow or pale green, it may be getting too much water. Although Annual bluegrass is tolerant of almost any soil type (it is not sensitive to pH, and can be in sandy, loamy, or clay soil types), it doesn’t do well in soil that doesn’t drain well. Avoid planting this grass in marshy areas or where the ground feels spongy. If you irrigate your lawn, err on the side of too little water vs too much, since Annual bluegrass does best if it’s allowed to dry out before being watered again.

Wet soil can allow fungus to grow, or create a favorable habitat for insect pests and weeds. Of course you can’t control how much rain falls on your Zoysia grass, and the occasional heavy rainfall is unlikely to cause problems for this resilient plant. However, long-term overwatering can cause the plant to suffer and even die off.

Underwatered Annual bluegrass
One of the advantages of growing Annual bluegrass is that it can survive without much water since it has adaptations that help it to conserve water. This grass has a deep root system, meaning it can use groundwater if it hasn’t been watered in a while. In drought conditions, this grass will turn yellow and get crispy, but it can recover once the dry spell is over. The ability to recover from a variety of conditions is one of the many reasons that Annual bluegrass is such a popular grass.
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pests

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Annual bluegrass based on 10 million real cases
Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Solutions: If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Underwatering
Underwatering Underwatering
Underwatering
Leaves may wilt for a variety of reasons.
Solutions: The easiest (and most obvious) way to address underwatering is to fully hydrate the plant. However, this must be done carefully. A common mistake that many gardeners make is to douse their underwatered plants with water. This can overwhelm the roots of the plant and shock its system, something that can be even more damaging than the lack of water to begin with. Instead, water thoroughly and slowly, taking breaks to let the water slowly saturate through the soil to get to the roots. Use room temperature water, as cold water might be too much of a shock. In the future, shorten the time between waterings. A good rule of thumb is to check the soil around each plant daily. If it’s dry to at least two inches down, it’s time to water. If a container plant is repeatedly drying out very quickly, repotting into a slower-draining container might be a good idea, too.
Root rot
Root rot Root rot
Root rot
Soft root rot can be caused by over-watering or pathogenic infection.
Solutions: These are the solutions for root rot: Stop applying water and allow the plant to dry out. In the case of potted plants, the gardener can remove plant from its container and lay it on a sheet of paper in a shady spot to speed the drying process. Cut away black mushy root material until healthy white material is reached. Sprinkle root ball with anti-fungal powder. Repot using sterilized potting mixture but don't water for first couple of days. Ensure that the new pot offers adequate drainage. Terracotta pots can absorb moisture into their walls. Adopt an appropriate watering regime. For most potted plants, refrain from watering until the first inch or two of the soil is dry to the touch. Even plants that prefer to be kept "evenly moist" should never be allowed to sit in soggy soil. Outdoor plants should not be receiving so much water that it pools at the surface of the soil.
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Aged yellow and dry
plant poor
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Overview
Overview
Regardless of the type of plant or where it is grown, at some point, it will begin to aged yellow and dry. This is a natural, unavoidable process that happens when the plant has completed all of the steps in its life.
Annual plants go through this process at the end of a single growing season. Perennial plants live for multiple years, if not tens or hundreds of years, but will still ultimately exhibit these symptoms.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
When plants have progressed through their natural developmental stages and are nearing the end of their lifecycle, they begin showing signs of decline. Leaves will start to yellow and droop, and over time they turn papery brown and dry.
Once completely dry, the leaves begin to fall from the plant until the entire plant has dried out.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
At the end of its life, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence or natural aging and death. Cell division stops, and the plant begins catabolizing resources to use in other parts of the plant.
As this happens, the tissues begin yellow and drying until the entire plant is desiccated and perishes.
Solutions
Solutions
If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Prevention
Prevention
Unfortunately, there is no way to prevent plants from dying of “old age.” To help prolong their life, and put off symptoms of aged yellow and dry for as long as possible, take care of them by giving them enough water, fertilizing them appropriately, and making sure they get enough sunlight.
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Underwatering
plant poor
Underwatering
Leaves may wilt for a variety of reasons.
Overview
Overview
Underwatering plants is one of the quickest ways to kill them. This is something that most gardeners are well aware of. Unfortunately, knowing exactly how much water a plant needs can be tricky, especially considering that underwatering and overwatering present similar symptoms in plants.
Therefore, it’s important to be vigilant and attentive to each plants’ individual needs.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
As mentioned earlier, overwatering and underwatering present similar symptoms in plants. These symptoms include poor growth, wilted leaves, defoliation, and brown leaf tips or margins. Ultimately, both underwatering and overwatering can lead to the death of a plant.
The easiest way to determine whether a plant has too much water or too little is to look at the leaves. If underwatering is the culprit, the leaves will look brown and crunchy, while if it’s overwatering, they will appear yellow or a pale green in color.
When this issue first begins, there may be no noticeable symptoms at all, particularly in hardy or drought-tolerant plants. However, they will begin to wilt once they start suffering from a lack of water. The edges of the plant’s leaves will become brown or curled. Soil pulling away from the edges of the planter is a telltale sign, or a crispy, brittle stem.
Prolonged underwatering can cause a plant’s growth to become stunted. The leaves might drop and the plant can be more susceptible to pest infestations, too.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Underwatering is caused by, quite simply, not watering plants often or deeply enough. There is a heightened risk of underwatering if any of these situations apply:
  • Extreme heat and dry weather (when growing outdoors)
  • Grow lights or indoor lighting that is too bright or intense for the type of plant
  • Using fast-draining growing media such as sand
Solutions
Solutions
The easiest (and most obvious) way to address underwatering is to fully hydrate the plant. However, this must be done carefully. A common mistake that many gardeners make is to douse their underwatered plants with water. This can overwhelm the roots of the plant and shock its system, something that can be even more damaging than the lack of water to begin with.
Instead, water thoroughly and slowly, taking breaks to let the water slowly saturate through the soil to get to the roots. Use room temperature water, as cold water might be too much of a shock.
In the future, shorten the time between waterings. A good rule of thumb is to check the soil around each plant daily. If it’s dry to at least two inches down, it’s time to water. If a container plant is repeatedly drying out very quickly, repotting into a slower-draining container might be a good idea, too.
Prevention
Prevention
Always check the soil before watering. If the top inch of soil feels moist, though not wet, the watering is perfect. If it’s dry, water it immediately. If it feels soggy, you avoid watering until it dries out a bit more.
Also, make sure the lighting is sufficient for the species. Plants grow faster and need more water when there is intense light or lots of heat. Being aware of these conditions and modifying them, if possible, is a good way to prevent underwatering. Many container plants are potted in soil mixtures mean to be well-draining. Adding materials that retain moisture, like compost or peat moss, can also prevent these symptoms.
Other tips to prevent underwatering include:
  • Choose pots with adequately-sized drainage holes
  • Avoid warm temperatures
  • Use large pots with additional soil (these take longer to dry out)
  • Avoid terracotta pots, which lose water quickly
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Root rot
plant poor
Root rot
Soft root rot can be caused by over-watering or pathogenic infection.
Overview
Overview
Root rot is a common and devastating problem that can infect trees, shrubs and other plants, often with fatal results. It is caused by excessive moisture in the soil, which activates a fungus that can lie dormant in soil and only emerge when conditions are ideal (soggy and wet). Because primary symptoms are hidden beneath the soil, the gardener may not become aware of the problem until upper sections of the plant start to show signs of distress.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Early symptoms may occur below ground and not be obvious until they advance into more visible plant material. Above ground the gardener may be alerted by:
  1. Wilting and yellowing of the leaves.
  2. Softening and discoloration of the stems.
At this stage it is worth making a closer examination of what is going on below the soil.
  1. Soil will feel noticeably damp and boggy.
  2. There will often be a swampy smell emanating from the soil.
  3. Examination of the roots will reveal black or dark brown mushy material.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Root rot is caused by plant pathogens in the soil which are activated by overly-wet conditions. They invade the root material, which begins to die and rot. With roots no longer functioning effectively, there is a shortage of oxygen and nutrients being carried to the upper sections of the plant. These will show the signs of distress that may be what first alerts the gardener to this issue.
Solutions
Solutions
These are the solutions for root rot:
  1. Stop applying water and allow the plant to dry out.
  2. In the case of potted plants, the gardener can remove plant from its container and lay it on a sheet of paper in a shady spot to speed the drying process.
  3. Cut away black mushy root material until healthy white material is reached.
  4. Sprinkle root ball with anti-fungal powder.
  5. Repot using sterilized potting mixture but don't water for first couple of days. Ensure that the new pot offers adequate drainage. Terracotta pots can absorb moisture into their walls.
  6. Adopt an appropriate watering regime. For most potted plants, refrain from watering until the first inch or two of the soil is dry to the touch. Even plants that prefer to be kept "evenly moist" should never be allowed to sit in soggy soil. Outdoor plants should not be receiving so much water that it pools at the surface of the soil.
Prevention
Prevention
With indoor plants these are the best preventative measures:
  1. Ensure that the container offers adequate drainage.
  2. Don't allow the plant to stand in a saucer filled with water.
  3. Adopt an appropriate watering regime which allows the plant to dry out between each watering, according to the preference of each species.
  4. Only use sterilized potting mixtures when planting up or re-potting.
With outdoor plants:
  1. Choose planting positions that offer effective drainage.
  2. Don't over-water.
  3. Rotate plants so that pathogens don't build up.
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weed

Weed Control

Weeds
Annual bluegrass is native to temperate Eurasia but has been introduced to much of the rest of the world. It is considered a nuisance within its native range and invasive outside of it. This large range is partially due to high phenotypic plasticity, which allows annual bluegrass to adapt more readily to a variety of habitats. Additionally, each plant can produce thousands of seeds annually that can be spread by livestock, birds, wind, water, and clothes/boots. While a variety of herbicides have been shown to be effective in controlling annual bluegrass, some populations have evolved resistances. Thus, a rotation of different herbicides can be more effective. Alternatively, hand pulling can be effective at controlling small infestations, while mulching can also help suppress weed development.
How to Control it
If annual bluegrass becomes a problem, it can be dug up while it’s still growing, before it seeds and spreads into larger patches. Otherwise, herbicides may be required. If so, it is best to start treatments before the seeds germinate, sometime in the fall, in order to prevent new infestations. A second application may be needed 8 to 10 weeks later. Solitary plants can also be removed by hand or with a hoe before seed production starts. This can be effective as long as it’s done frequently.
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distribution

Distribution Map

Habitat

Waste places, cultivated land, grassland
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Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
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More Info

Plant Type
Plant Type
Herb
Flower Color
Flower Color
White
Green
Yellow
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green

Name story

Annual bluegrass
Annua refers to the meaning of annual. The bluegrass in the common name refers to the bluish appearance of the massed grass in late Spring. Although Poa annua is commonly considered as a solely annual plant for its name, perennial biotypes do exist.

Symbolism

Psychic powers, Protection. It symbolizes food, concealment and hardiness.

Usages

Garden Use
Annual bluegrass is a popular turf in cool and warm climates since it spreads readily. It's often used in lawns or causeways, where its vibrant green clumps are pleasant to the eye. This grass sprouts tall whispy seed stalks in the summer months, which can be raked away. It grows in full sun but will turn brown in hotter weather during the summer.
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Related Plants

Hairy beggarticks
Hairy beggarticks
Hairy beggarticks (Bidens pilosa) is a slender, annual flowering plant native to North and South America and grown all over the world. Hairy beggarticks is also called black-jack and devils needles. Seed dispersal occurs with this plant, and its seeds are transported by animals. As a result, hairy beggarticks has become an invasive species in many countries.
Chandelier plant
Chandelier plant
Chandelier plant (Kalanchoe delagoensis) is a succulent plant that originated in Madagascar. A synonym for Kalanchoe delagoensis is Bryophyllum delagoense. An alternative name for chandelier plant is mother of millions. This plant's tolerance of drought conditions have made it a popular garden plant.
Purple amaranth
Purple amaranth
Purple amaranth (Amaranthus blitum) is an annual plant that often grows as a weed. It is not often cultivated, but some people around the world gather the leaves and stems to be eaten as boiled vegetables. It is particularly common in Greek and Lebanese kitchens.
Japanese maple
Japanese maple
A woody plant native to East Asia, the japanese maple features hand-shaped leaves with five-pointed lobes that resemble the palm of a hand. It has been cultivated for millennia in Japan for bonsai creation. Extracts from the branches and leaves of this plant are used as medicine in Chinese traditional medicine.
Asthma-plant
Asthma-plant
Asthma-plant (Euphorbia hirta) is a ground-hugging spurge weed whose branches can grow to 61 cm long. It blooms from summer through early fall, dying off after the first frost. A milky sap will seep from broken stems or leaves. It can be a nuisance weed that reproduces rapidly.
Monarch fern
Monarch fern
Monarch fern (Phymatosorus scolopendria) is a perennial fern that is also known as the wart fern. It has broad, glossy fronds that have wart-like bumps on the surface. It is native to Hawaii and prefers full sun to partial shade. It is a slow growing fern that grows well in tropical climates. The leaves, when crushed, have a musky scent.
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Annual bluegrass
Annual bluegrass
Annual bluegrass
Annual bluegrass
Annual bluegrass
Annual bluegrass
Add to My Garden
Annual bluegrass
Poa annua
Also known as: Wintergrass, Low spear grass
Water
Twice per week
Water
Sunlight
Full sun
Sunlight
care guide

Care Guide for Annual bluegrass

Water
Water
Moisture-loving, keep the soil moist but do not let water accumulate.
Fertilization
Fertilization
Fertilization once in spring.
Soil
Soil
Sand, Clay, Acidic, Neutral, Alkaline
Sunlight
Sunlight
Full sun, Partial sun
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
4 - 8
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Tips, advice, and instructions for over 13,000 species that you will find nowhere else
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Annual bluegrass
Poa annua
Water
Water
Twice per week
Sunlight
Sunlight
Full sun
Planting Time
Planting Time
Fall
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Questions About Annual bluegrass

Watering Watering Watering
Pruning Pruning Pruning
Seasonal Care Seasonal Care Seasonal Care
How to Water Annual bluegrass?
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What to Do If Your Water Annual bluegrass Too Much or Too Little?
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pests

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Annual bluegrass based on 10 million real cases
Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry  Aged yellow and dry  Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Solutions: If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Learn More more
Underwatering
Underwatering  Underwatering  Underwatering
Leaves may wilt for a variety of reasons.
Solutions: The easiest (and most obvious) way to address underwatering is to fully hydrate the plant. However, this must be done carefully. A common mistake that many gardeners make is to douse their underwatered plants with water. This can overwhelm the roots of the plant and shock its system, something that can be even more damaging than the lack of water to begin with. Instead, water thoroughly and slowly, taking breaks to let the water slowly saturate through the soil to get to the roots. Use room temperature water, as cold water might be too much of a shock. In the future, shorten the time between waterings. A good rule of thumb is to check the soil around each plant daily. If it’s dry to at least two inches down, it’s time to water. If a container plant is repeatedly drying out very quickly, repotting into a slower-draining container might be a good idea, too.
Learn More more
Root rot
Root rot  Root rot  Root rot
Soft root rot can be caused by over-watering or pathogenic infection.
Solutions: These are the solutions for root rot: Stop applying water and allow the plant to dry out. In the case of potted plants, the gardener can remove plant from its container and lay it on a sheet of paper in a shady spot to speed the drying process. Cut away black mushy root material until healthy white material is reached. Sprinkle root ball with anti-fungal powder. Repot using sterilized potting mixture but don't water for first couple of days. Ensure that the new pot offers adequate drainage. Terracotta pots can absorb moisture into their walls. Adopt an appropriate watering regime. For most potted plants, refrain from watering until the first inch or two of the soil is dry to the touch. Even plants that prefer to be kept "evenly moist" should never be allowed to sit in soggy soil. Outdoor plants should not be receiving so much water that it pools at the surface of the soil.
Learn More more
buy vip bg
Keep your leafy friends healthy and happy.
Diagnose your plant, and learn how to prevent and treat plant diseases.
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Aged yellow and dry
plant poor
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Overview
Overview
Regardless of the type of plant or where it is grown, at some point, it will begin to aged yellow and dry. This is a natural, unavoidable process that happens when the plant has completed all of the steps in its life.
Annual plants go through this process at the end of a single growing season. Perennial plants live for multiple years, if not tens or hundreds of years, but will still ultimately exhibit these symptoms.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
When plants have progressed through their natural developmental stages and are nearing the end of their lifecycle, they begin showing signs of decline. Leaves will start to yellow and droop, and over time they turn papery brown and dry.
Once completely dry, the leaves begin to fall from the plant until the entire plant has dried out.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
At the end of its life, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence or natural aging and death. Cell division stops, and the plant begins catabolizing resources to use in other parts of the plant.
As this happens, the tissues begin yellow and drying until the entire plant is desiccated and perishes.
Solutions
Solutions
If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Prevention
Prevention
Unfortunately, there is no way to prevent plants from dying of “old age.” To help prolong their life, and put off symptoms of aged yellow and dry for as long as possible, take care of them by giving them enough water, fertilizing them appropriately, and making sure they get enough sunlight.
Show More
more
Become a premium member and read all about it!
Learn how to prevent and treat plant diseases.
close
Underwatering
plant poor
Underwatering
Leaves may wilt for a variety of reasons.
Overview
Overview
Underwatering plants is one of the quickest ways to kill them. This is something that most gardeners are well aware of. Unfortunately, knowing exactly how much water a plant needs can be tricky, especially considering that underwatering and overwatering present similar symptoms in plants.
Therefore, it’s important to be vigilant and attentive to each plants’ individual needs.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
As mentioned earlier, overwatering and underwatering present similar symptoms in plants. These symptoms include poor growth, wilted leaves, defoliation, and brown leaf tips or margins. Ultimately, both underwatering and overwatering can lead to the death of a plant.
The easiest way to determine whether a plant has too much water or too little is to look at the leaves. If underwatering is the culprit, the leaves will look brown and crunchy, while if it’s overwatering, they will appear yellow or a pale green in color.
When this issue first begins, there may be no noticeable symptoms at all, particularly in hardy or drought-tolerant plants. However, they will begin to wilt once they start suffering from a lack of water. The edges of the plant’s leaves will become brown or curled. Soil pulling away from the edges of the planter is a telltale sign, or a crispy, brittle stem.
Prolonged underwatering can cause a plant’s growth to become stunted. The leaves might drop and the plant can be more susceptible to pest infestations, too.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Underwatering is caused by, quite simply, not watering plants often or deeply enough. There is a heightened risk of underwatering if any of these situations apply:
  • Extreme heat and dry weather (when growing outdoors)
  • Grow lights or indoor lighting that is too bright or intense for the type of plant
  • Using fast-draining growing media such as sand
Solutions
Solutions
The easiest (and most obvious) way to address underwatering is to fully hydrate the plant. However, this must be done carefully. A common mistake that many gardeners make is to douse their underwatered plants with water. This can overwhelm the roots of the plant and shock its system, something that can be even more damaging than the lack of water to begin with.
Instead, water thoroughly and slowly, taking breaks to let the water slowly saturate through the soil to get to the roots. Use room temperature water, as cold water might be too much of a shock.
In the future, shorten the time between waterings. A good rule of thumb is to check the soil around each plant daily. If it’s dry to at least two inches down, it’s time to water. If a container plant is repeatedly drying out very quickly, repotting into a slower-draining container might be a good idea, too.
Prevention
Prevention
Always check the soil before watering. If the top inch of soil feels moist, though not wet, the watering is perfect. If it’s dry, water it immediately. If it feels soggy, you avoid watering until it dries out a bit more.
Also, make sure the lighting is sufficient for the species. Plants grow faster and need more water when there is intense light or lots of heat. Being aware of these conditions and modifying them, if possible, is a good way to prevent underwatering. Many container plants are potted in soil mixtures mean to be well-draining. Adding materials that retain moisture, like compost or peat moss, can also prevent these symptoms.
Other tips to prevent underwatering include:
  • Choose pots with adequately-sized drainage holes
  • Avoid warm temperatures
  • Use large pots with additional soil (these take longer to dry out)
  • Avoid terracotta pots, which lose water quickly
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Root rot
plant poor
Root rot
Soft root rot can be caused by over-watering or pathogenic infection.
Overview
Overview
Root rot is a common and devastating problem that can infect trees, shrubs and other plants, often with fatal results. It is caused by excessive moisture in the soil, which activates a fungus that can lie dormant in soil and only emerge when conditions are ideal (soggy and wet). Because primary symptoms are hidden beneath the soil, the gardener may not become aware of the problem until upper sections of the plant start to show signs of distress.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Early symptoms may occur below ground and not be obvious until they advance into more visible plant material. Above ground the gardener may be alerted by:
  1. Wilting and yellowing of the leaves.
  2. Softening and discoloration of the stems.
At this stage it is worth making a closer examination of what is going on below the soil.
  1. Soil will feel noticeably damp and boggy.
  2. There will often be a swampy smell emanating from the soil.
  3. Examination of the roots will reveal black or dark brown mushy material.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Root rot is caused by plant pathogens in the soil which are activated by overly-wet conditions. They invade the root material, which begins to die and rot. With roots no longer functioning effectively, there is a shortage of oxygen and nutrients being carried to the upper sections of the plant. These will show the signs of distress that may be what first alerts the gardener to this issue.
Solutions
Solutions
These are the solutions for root rot:
  1. Stop applying water and allow the plant to dry out.
  2. In the case of potted plants, the gardener can remove plant from its container and lay it on a sheet of paper in a shady spot to speed the drying process.
  3. Cut away black mushy root material until healthy white material is reached.
  4. Sprinkle root ball with anti-fungal powder.
  5. Repot using sterilized potting mixture but don't water for first couple of days. Ensure that the new pot offers adequate drainage. Terracotta pots can absorb moisture into their walls.
  6. Adopt an appropriate watering regime. For most potted plants, refrain from watering until the first inch or two of the soil is dry to the touch. Even plants that prefer to be kept "evenly moist" should never be allowed to sit in soggy soil. Outdoor plants should not be receiving so much water that it pools at the surface of the soil.
Prevention
Prevention
With indoor plants these are the best preventative measures:
  1. Ensure that the container offers adequate drainage.
  2. Don't allow the plant to stand in a saucer filled with water.
  3. Adopt an appropriate watering regime which allows the plant to dry out between each watering, according to the preference of each species.
  4. Only use sterilized potting mixtures when planting up or re-potting.
With outdoor plants:
  1. Choose planting positions that offer effective drainage.
  2. Don't over-water.
  3. Rotate plants so that pathogens don't build up.
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weed

Weed Control

weed
Weeds
Annual bluegrass is native to temperate Eurasia but has been introduced to much of the rest of the world. It is considered a nuisance within its native range and invasive outside of it. This large range is partially due to high phenotypic plasticity, which allows annual bluegrass to adapt more readily to a variety of habitats. Additionally, each plant can produce thousands of seeds annually that can be spread by livestock, birds, wind, water, and clothes/boots. While a variety of herbicides have been shown to be effective in controlling annual bluegrass, some populations have evolved resistances. Thus, a rotation of different herbicides can be more effective. Alternatively, hand pulling can be effective at controlling small infestations, while mulching can also help suppress weed development.
How to Control it
If annual bluegrass becomes a problem, it can be dug up while it’s still growing, before it seeds and spreads into larger patches. Otherwise, herbicides may be required. If so, it is best to start treatments before the seeds germinate, sometime in the fall, in order to prevent new infestations. A second application may be needed 8 to 10 weeks later. Solitary plants can also be removed by hand or with a hoe before seed production starts. This can be effective as long as it’s done frequently.
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distribution

Distribution Map

Habitat

Waste places, cultivated land, grassland

Map

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
plant_info

More Info

Plant Type
Plant Type
Herb
Flower Color
Flower Color
White
Green
Yellow
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green

Name story

Annual bluegrass
Annua refers to the meaning of annual. The bluegrass in the common name refers to the bluish appearance of the massed grass in late Spring. Although Poa annua is commonly considered as a solely annual plant for its name, perennial biotypes do exist.

Symbolism

Psychic powers, Protection. It symbolizes food, concealment and hardiness.

Usages

Garden Use
Annual bluegrass is a popular turf in cool and warm climates since it spreads readily. It's often used in lawns or causeways, where its vibrant green clumps are pleasant to the eye. This grass sprouts tall whispy seed stalks in the summer months, which can be raked away. It grows in full sun but will turn brown in hotter weather during the summer.
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