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Fairy castle cactus
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Fairy castle cactus
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Fairy castle cactus
Cereus tetragonus 'Fairy Castle'
Fairy castle cactus is a miniature cactus that grows as clumps of columnar spires that resemble a castle’s turrets. A spined succulent that grows slowly and blooms only infrequently, it is an extremely popular choice for indoor growing in full-sun locations.
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care guide

Care Guide for Fairy castle cactus

Fairy castle cactus should be watered when the soil has dried out. Give a good soaking before allowing it to drain. Re-water when the soil has dried out again. During the winter months, it is not necessary to give a lot of water. Overwatering will damage the plant.
Fertilization
Fertilization
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Fairy castle cactus should be fertilized during the spring with a cactus fertilizer. Feed monthly with a water soluble cacti fertilizer until the winter, when the succulent does not require further feeding.
Sand, Loam, Alkaline
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Full sun, Partial sun
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Questions About Fairy castle cactus

Temperature Temperature Temperature
Seasonal Care Seasonal Care Seasonal Care
Does Fairy castle cactus Need Different Temperatures for Different Growing Phases?
While Fairy castle cactus doesn’t require any changes in temperature to enter different growing phases, it is important to stay consistent. Wild temperature fluctuations can slow down its growth regardless of its current phase, so it's always better to keep them in a controlled environment. That optimal temperature range of 77°F and 90°F (25-32℃) is vital to maintain, especially staying above the lower limit. Going above 90°F isn’t ideal, but as tropical plant it won’t suffer too much. On the other hand, going below 77°F (25℃) (and especially 41°F/5℃) will begin to directly damage this heat-loving plant species.
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Does Fairy castle cactus Need Different Temperatures for Different Seasons?
Fairy castle cactus does not need different temperatures for different growing seasons. The most important step in seasonal care is to keep the environment within the optimal temperature range. That's why it's always best to keep this plant indoors. That way, you can control the temperature no matter what the climate is like outside.

Light is also important for tropical species, with all of these plants preferring a partial side level of sun exposure. This means any light they receive needs to be dappled or filtered, with bright but indirect light being the best option when growing your plants indoors. Too much direct sunlight can negatively affect your plant’s leaves, reducing its growth potential.
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What Are the Temperature Tips to Keep Your Fairy castle cactus Healthy?
Tip #1: Don’t Leave Your Plant Near Windows in Colder Months
If you want to make sure your plant isn’t exposed to colder temperatures, you may want to keep them away from windows. In colder months like late fall and winter, even the smallest draft can leak cold air into your home through cracks in your windows. While this air usually dissipates and warms up as it travels throughout your home, any plants placed in close proximity to the window will be affected. Move your tropical plants into an area where they will still get bright but indirect light, while making sure they won’t be affected by potential drafts.

Tip #2: If You Find Dry Patches, Your Plant May Be Getting Too Much Sunlight or Heat
You may notice the leaves become white or even scorched on a sunny day. These discolorations and unusual markings usually indicate that a plant is getting too much heat or sunlight, and it may be dehydrated. Excess light and heat will dry out the soil, stopping plants from getting the moisture they need to support their cellular structure. It also slows down or stops the process of photosynthesis, further hindering growth. If ignored for too long, these dry spots can spread and eventually result in the death of your plants.

Tip #3: Avoid Frost at All Costs
Colder temperatures and frost can damage your plants by causing ice crystals or disrupt normal physiological activity. This makes it nearly impossible for water to move freely throughout plant tissue, creating a deficit of moisture in their stems and leaves. You can tell a plant has been damaged by frost if it begins to suffer from hydrosis (it will appear as though it's soaked with water.) If the problem persists, your plants may begin shriveling and turning a dark brown or black hue. After that, the plant will almost certainly die.
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What Is the Best Way to Keep Fairy castle cactus at the Right Temperature?
The best way to maintain the right temperature range for Fairy castle cactus is by keeping an eye on both the climate and humidity. You’ll want to try to keep each species in a room where you have access to climate control, keeping the heat in the temperature range best mimics its natural habitat. The humidity levels will also have a direct effect on temperature, so it's important to monitor these as well. You can artificially raise the humidity of your growing space by using a humidifier or lightly misting the leaves with water.

If you intend to grow this species outside, you may find it difficult to maintain the right balance of temperature and humidity. If temperatures begin to drop or the air becomes too dry, your best option is to find room within your home and move your plant inside. An indoor growing space will allow you to control the climate more closely, helping your plant reach its full potential.
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What'S the Best Temperature for Fairy castle cactus?
For this tropical plant to thrive, you’ll want to keep them between 75°F and 90°F (25-30°C). Each species can handle temperatures outside of this range, but keeping it within several degrees of these limits will ensure they grow to their maximum potential.

As for its extreme temperature limits, any environment below 41°F (5℃) or above 104°F (40℃) will begin to hinder its growth and cause various aberrations to its leaves and stems. This is especially true with low temperatures; even a light frost can cause your tropical plants to perish. Cellular death can begin to happen at a rapid pace, with some species dying in as little as 12 to 24 hours.
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Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Fairy castle cactus based on 10 million real cases
Scars
Scars Scars
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Solutions: Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Plant dried up
Plant dried up Plant dried up
Plant dried up
The entire plant may dry out due to dieback or normal seasonal dormancy.
Solutions: The solution for a dried out plant depends on the cause, so determine the cause before selecting a treatment method. Adjust your watering: Stick your finger in the soil near the roots. If it feels bone dry or overly saturated, you need to adjust your watering frequency accordingly. Prune back dead foliage: Snip off any brown stems and leaves on the plant to make space for new growth. This encourages the roots to send up fresh stems. Move to a proper environment. This may involve decreasing or increasing sun exposure, depending on the species. Decrease fertilizer applications. If you have applied too much fertilizer, you can repot plants with fresh potting soil. Wait. If your plant has dried out as daylight is decreasing, it is entering dormancy. Decrease watering and wait until the plant resumes growth.
Low light
Low light Low light
Low light
A lack of sunlight will cause the stems and leaves to elongate and appear lighter in color.
Solutions: Low light can only be addressed by increasing light availability, and these measures will only stop further etoliation; current distortion cannot be reversed. Move plant to a position where it receives more light. Check the requirements for specific species, as too much sunlight can cause a plant to burn. Introduce appropriate artificial lighting. Some people choose to prune the longest stems so the plant can concentrate on healthy new growth under the improved lighting.
Stem rot
Stem rot Stem rot
Stem rot
Bacterial infection can cause the stems to become soft and rotten.
Solutions: If the plant is only infected a little, it can sometimes be saved. This mainly applies to houseplants that are grown in pots. Here's what to do. Remove the plant from the pot and gently shake off as much soil as possible. Using pruning tools that have been disinfected, remove any diseased foliage and roots. Be sure the new pot has good drainage holes and wash it with one part bleach and nine parts water to ensure that it is completely clean and sanitized. Dip the plant's roots in fungicide to kill off any remaining fungal spores before potting into the clean growing medium. Only water the plant when the top inch of the soil is dry and never let the plant sit in water. For plants that are grown in the ground, it's best just to remove the infected plants and destroy them. Do not plant in the same spot until the soil has been allowed to dry out and has been treated with a fungicide.
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Scars
plant poor
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Scars form when the plant repairs wounds. They can be the result of people or pets passing by and scraping the plant. Once the underlying issue is resolved, the plant will heal but a scar may remain.
Pests and pathogens can also cause scarring. Insects may attack the plant for a meal, resulting in extensive scarring when a few invaders turn into an infestation. Diseases such as fungus and bacteria can weaken the plant, causing brown spots, mushy areas, or blisters that lead to scars.
Scars occur on stems when a leaf or bud has been lost and the plant has healed. The harder tissue is like a scab that protects a wound.
On other occasions, scars can signal problems from environmental conditions, such as overexposure to sunlight or heat. It might surprise you to know that plants can suffer from sunburn, even desert dwellers like cactus!
Solutions
Solutions
Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover.
  1. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes.
  2. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray.
  3. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs.
  4. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Prevention
Prevention
Preventing some sources of scarring is easier than others, but all start with careful attention to your plants once you decide to bring them home.
  1. Review specific guidelines for your plant, including soil drainage, watering, and fertilizer requirements.
  2. Inspect plants before planting and use sterile pots and fresh potting soil or media to limit transfer of fungi or bacteria.
  3. Once established, check your plants regularly for signs of scarring or the presence of pests, as it is better to catch problems as early as possible.
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Plant dried up
plant poor
Plant dried up
The entire plant may dry out due to dieback or normal seasonal dormancy.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Your plant has dried out and turned brown. It might be starting to wilt, with no noticeable green around the stems and leaves. Touch the leaves, and they may crinkle under your fingers.
Possible causes of a dried out plant include:
  1. Not enough water. A lack of water will lead to dry plant tissue.
  2. Too much water. Watering too much can lead to root rot which makes the plant struggle to take up water. Rotted, mushy roots are a sign of overeating.
  3. Entering dormancy. As perennial plants enter their resting period known as dormancy, their leaves dry out and may fall off. This happens during decreasing day length.
  4. Exposure to herbicides and other toxic substances. If a plant is hit with a large dose herbicide or other toxic chemical, the plant will turn brown.
  5. Too much fertility. An excess of fertilizer can prevent plants from taking up water, leading to drying.
  6. Improper sun exposure. Just like humans, plants can get sunburn by intense, direct light. Plants can also dry out if they don’t receive enough light.
To determine whether the plant is still alive and can be saved, you can:
  1. Bend a stem. If the stem is pliable, the plant is still alive. If the stem breaks, the plant is dead.
  2. Gently scratch the stem with your fingernail for signs of green inside. If your plant is dead, the stem will be brittle and brown throughout.
  3. Cut the stems back a little bit a time for visible green growth. If none of the stems have visible green growth, the plant is dead.
Solutions
Solutions
The solution for a dried out plant depends on the cause, so determine the cause before selecting a treatment method.
  1. Adjust your watering: Stick your finger in the soil near the roots. If it feels bone dry or overly saturated, you need to adjust your watering frequency accordingly.
  2. Prune back dead foliage: Snip off any brown stems and leaves on the plant to make space for new growth. This encourages the roots to send up fresh stems.
  3. Move to a proper environment. This may involve decreasing or increasing sun exposure, depending on the species.
  4. Decrease fertilizer applications. If you have applied too much fertilizer, you can repot plants with fresh potting soil.
  5. Wait. If your plant has dried out as daylight is decreasing, it is entering dormancy. Decrease watering and wait until the plant resumes growth.
Prevention
Prevention
Prevention involves providing your plant with the proper environment.
  1. Provide the proper amount of water. The amount of water depends on a plant’s size, species, and environment. A general rule is to allow soil to dry out between waterings.
  2. Place plants in the proper environment. Provide the proper hours of sun and temperature for your individual plant.
  3. Provide proper fertility. Most plants only need to be fertilized once or twice a year; don’t overapply.
  4. Keep plants free from toxic substances. Keep herbicides and toxic household chemicals away from your plants.
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Low light
plant poor
Low light
A lack of sunlight will cause the stems and leaves to elongate and appear lighter in color.
Overview
Overview
All plants require light, and if they do not receive it in the quantities that they require this distorts their growth in a process known as etiolation. In essence, etiolated plants are diverting all of their energy to growing taller in a desperate attempt to reach a position where they can meet their light requirements. Many other growth factors are harmed by this, and so light-deprived plants can become weak and distorted until they are almost unrecognizable. Low light symptoms are most commonly seen in houseplants, but outdoor specimens can also be affected.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Although symptoms will vary in different plants, the general symptoms of low light are easy to spot.
  1. Plant stems grow tall and lanky.
  2. There are less leaves, and both leaves and stems tend to be pale and insipid looking. This is due to a shortage of chlorophyll.
  3. All plant parts become weakened and may droop, as energy is diverted toward too-fast growth as the plant stretches itself toward any source of light.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Plants need sunlight in varying amounts for photosynthesis – a process that produces energy for growth and fruit and flower production. Low light causes a plant to divert all energy to upward (apical) growth in order to find better light. Plant hormones called auxins are transported from the actively-growing tip of the plant downwards, to suppress lateral growth. A drop in cellular pH triggers expansins, nonenzymatic cell wall proteins, to loosen cell walls and allow them to elongate. This elongation results in the abnormal lengthening of stems, especially internodes, or plant "legginess" which is observed in etoliated plants.
Solutions
Solutions
Low light can only be addressed by increasing light availability, and these measures will only stop further etoliation; current distortion cannot be reversed.
  • Move plant to a position where it receives more light. Check the requirements for specific species, as too much sunlight can cause a plant to burn.
  • Introduce appropriate artificial lighting.
  • Some people choose to prune the longest stems so the plant can concentrate on healthy new growth under the improved lighting.
Prevention
Prevention
To avoid etiolation, provide an adequate amount of light from the beginning.
  1. Choose a location that matches each plant's ideal light needs. Many indoor plants do best in or near a south-facing window, which will provide the longest hours of sunlight. Flowering plants and those with colored leaves typically need more light than purely-green plants, as photosynthesis occurs in the green portions of leaves.
  2. Select plants with light needs that match a location's conditions. Some cultivars and varieties require less light than others.
  3. Use a grow light. Darker locations may require artificial illumination. A grow light may also become more necessary during winter, when sunlit hours are at their shortest.
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Stem rot
plant poor
Stem rot
Bacterial infection can cause the stems to become soft and rotten.
Overview
Overview
Stem rot is a serious disease and can affect many different types of plants. it can be particularly prevalent when the temperature of the soil is over 16 ℃ and there's a lot of moisture in the soil. This could be from unusually heavy rainfalls or too much irrigation. Once stem rot sets in, it's very difficult to get rid of the disease and most affected plants will have to be discarded. This is especially the case for vegetables, herbs, and other herbaceous plants that have soft stems. This is why it's important to ensure that the soil used for growing these plants is well-drained and that overwatering is avoided. Using good cultural practices also help in curbing these types of fungal diseases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Plants that have been affected by stem rot will first display a yellowing of the lower leaves. This is followed by obvious wilting and stunted growth.
If the stem of the affected plant is examined closely, there will be some dark discolorations starting near the base and moving upward. If the roots of affected plants are examined, they will appear dark and mushy instead of white and healthy-looking. Eventually, the entire plant will wilt and die.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Stem rot is caused by a variety of soil-borne fungus pathogens. The type of fungus depends on the species of plant that is affected. Two fungi responsible for stem rot are Rhizoctonia and Fusarium. These fungal pathogens live in soil and migrate to the plant when conditions are optimum. This includes warm, humid weather and excessive soil moisture. Commonly, vegetable seedlings are affected by these fungi.
Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is another fungus that causes stem rot in plants. This fungus has a host range of over 350 different species of plants. Plants most susceptible to this fungus include many vegetable varieties such as cucumbers, beans, cilantro, carrots, cabbage, melons, lettuce, peas, onions, tomatoes, pumpkins, and squash. This fungus can produce different symptoms in different species. In some cases, the fungus causes irregular spots on stems and other plant material that appear water-soaked. On other plant species, the fungus appears as dry lesions that grow and girdle the stem of the plant.
The third type of fungus that causes stem rot is Phytophthora capsici. Plants that belong to the cucumber family are most susceptible to this fungal infection. This fungus manifests as water-soaked lesions on the stems that then turn brown and girdle the stem.
All of these fungal pathogens are transmitted to the plant by water splashing from the soil up onto the plant. That's because the fungal spores live in the soil where they wait for the right conditions to infect the plants.
Solutions
Solutions
If the plant is only infected a little, it can sometimes be saved. This mainly applies to houseplants that are grown in pots. Here's what to do.
  1. Remove the plant from the pot and gently shake off as much soil as possible.
  2. Using pruning tools that have been disinfected, remove any diseased foliage and roots.
  3. Be sure the new pot has good drainage holes and wash it with one part bleach and nine parts water to ensure that it is completely clean and sanitized.
  4. Dip the plant's roots in fungicide to kill off any remaining fungal spores before potting into the clean growing medium.
  5. Only water the plant when the top inch of the soil is dry and never let the plant sit in water.
For plants that are grown in the ground, it's best just to remove the infected plants and destroy them. Do not plant in the same spot until the soil has been allowed to dry out and has been treated with a fungicide.
Prevention
Prevention
For outdoor gardens:
  1. Raking the garden thoroughly in the springtime will help to cut down on pathogens that may be living in the soil.
  2. Using a copper fungicide on plants in the springtime will cut down on fungal growth and prevent the spread of infection.
  3. Placing a heavy layer of mulch on top of the soil will also prevent pathogens from splashing up onto the stems of plants.
  4. Place plants at the recommended spacing to encourage better air flow between them.
  5. Water plants at the base instead of overhead to prevent excessive moisture on foliage.
For indoor plants:
  1. Avoid overwatering houseplants and ensure the roots do not sit in water.
  2. Make sure that indoor plants receive adequate air circulation and light.
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More Info

Flower Color
Flower Color
White
Yellow
Pink
Purple
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green
Blue

Usages

Garden Use
Fairy castle cactus is an attractive and easy-to-care-for succulent. Indoor gardeners will fair well with this low-maintenance and compact potted plant. Outdoors, this succulent will do well in dry succulent gardens, desert gardens as well as xeriscapes, and similar environments.
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Bloom Time
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Fairy castle cactus
Fairy castle cactus
Add to My Garden
Fairy castle cactus
Cereus tetragonus 'Fairy Castle'
Sunlight
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question

Questions About Fairy castle cactus

Temperature Temperature Temperature
Seasonal Care Seasonal Care Seasonal Care
Does Fairy castle cactus Need Different Temperatures for Different Growing Phases?
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Does Fairy castle cactus Need Different Temperatures for Different Seasons?
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Free
What Are the Temperature Tips to Keep Your Fairy castle cactus Healthy?
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What Is the Best Way to Keep Fairy castle cactus at the Right Temperature?
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What'S the Best Temperature for Fairy castle cactus?
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pests

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Fairy castle cactus based on 10 million real cases
Scars
Scars  Scars  Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Solutions: Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Learn More more
Plant dried up
Plant dried up  Plant dried up  Plant dried up
The entire plant may dry out due to dieback or normal seasonal dormancy.
Solutions: The solution for a dried out plant depends on the cause, so determine the cause before selecting a treatment method. Adjust your watering: Stick your finger in the soil near the roots. If it feels bone dry or overly saturated, you need to adjust your watering frequency accordingly. Prune back dead foliage: Snip off any brown stems and leaves on the plant to make space for new growth. This encourages the roots to send up fresh stems. Move to a proper environment. This may involve decreasing or increasing sun exposure, depending on the species. Decrease fertilizer applications. If you have applied too much fertilizer, you can repot plants with fresh potting soil. Wait. If your plant has dried out as daylight is decreasing, it is entering dormancy. Decrease watering and wait until the plant resumes growth.
Learn More more
Low light
Low light  Low light  Low light
A lack of sunlight will cause the stems and leaves to elongate and appear lighter in color.
Solutions: Low light can only be addressed by increasing light availability, and these measures will only stop further etoliation; current distortion cannot be reversed. Move plant to a position where it receives more light. Check the requirements for specific species, as too much sunlight can cause a plant to burn. Introduce appropriate artificial lighting. Some people choose to prune the longest stems so the plant can concentrate on healthy new growth under the improved lighting.
Learn More more
Stem rot
Stem rot  Stem rot  Stem rot
Bacterial infection can cause the stems to become soft and rotten.
Solutions: If the plant is only infected a little, it can sometimes be saved. This mainly applies to houseplants that are grown in pots. Here's what to do. Remove the plant from the pot and gently shake off as much soil as possible. Using pruning tools that have been disinfected, remove any diseased foliage and roots. Be sure the new pot has good drainage holes and wash it with one part bleach and nine parts water to ensure that it is completely clean and sanitized. Dip the plant's roots in fungicide to kill off any remaining fungal spores before potting into the clean growing medium. Only water the plant when the top inch of the soil is dry and never let the plant sit in water. For plants that are grown in the ground, it's best just to remove the infected plants and destroy them. Do not plant in the same spot until the soil has been allowed to dry out and has been treated with a fungicide.
Learn More more
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Keep your leafy friends healthy and happy.
Diagnose your plant, and learn how to prevent and treat plant diseases.
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Scars
plant poor
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Scars form when the plant repairs wounds. They can be the result of people or pets passing by and scraping the plant. Once the underlying issue is resolved, the plant will heal but a scar may remain.
Pests and pathogens can also cause scarring. Insects may attack the plant for a meal, resulting in extensive scarring when a few invaders turn into an infestation. Diseases such as fungus and bacteria can weaken the plant, causing brown spots, mushy areas, or blisters that lead to scars.
Scars occur on stems when a leaf or bud has been lost and the plant has healed. The harder tissue is like a scab that protects a wound.
On other occasions, scars can signal problems from environmental conditions, such as overexposure to sunlight or heat. It might surprise you to know that plants can suffer from sunburn, even desert dwellers like cactus!
Solutions
Solutions
Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover.
  1. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes.
  2. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray.
  3. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs.
  4. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Prevention
Prevention
Preventing some sources of scarring is easier than others, but all start with careful attention to your plants once you decide to bring them home.
  1. Review specific guidelines for your plant, including soil drainage, watering, and fertilizer requirements.
  2. Inspect plants before planting and use sterile pots and fresh potting soil or media to limit transfer of fungi or bacteria.
  3. Once established, check your plants regularly for signs of scarring or the presence of pests, as it is better to catch problems as early as possible.
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Plant dried up
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Plant dried up
The entire plant may dry out due to dieback or normal seasonal dormancy.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Your plant has dried out and turned brown. It might be starting to wilt, with no noticeable green around the stems and leaves. Touch the leaves, and they may crinkle under your fingers.
Possible causes of a dried out plant include:
  1. Not enough water. A lack of water will lead to dry plant tissue.
  2. Too much water. Watering too much can lead to root rot which makes the plant struggle to take up water. Rotted, mushy roots are a sign of overeating.
  3. Entering dormancy. As perennial plants enter their resting period known as dormancy, their leaves dry out and may fall off. This happens during decreasing day length.
  4. Exposure to herbicides and other toxic substances. If a plant is hit with a large dose herbicide or other toxic chemical, the plant will turn brown.
  5. Too much fertility. An excess of fertilizer can prevent plants from taking up water, leading to drying.
  6. Improper sun exposure. Just like humans, plants can get sunburn by intense, direct light. Plants can also dry out if they don’t receive enough light.
To determine whether the plant is still alive and can be saved, you can:
  1. Bend a stem. If the stem is pliable, the plant is still alive. If the stem breaks, the plant is dead.
  2. Gently scratch the stem with your fingernail for signs of green inside. If your plant is dead, the stem will be brittle and brown throughout.
  3. Cut the stems back a little bit a time for visible green growth. If none of the stems have visible green growth, the plant is dead.
Solutions
Solutions
The solution for a dried out plant depends on the cause, so determine the cause before selecting a treatment method.
  1. Adjust your watering: Stick your finger in the soil near the roots. If it feels bone dry or overly saturated, you need to adjust your watering frequency accordingly.
  2. Prune back dead foliage: Snip off any brown stems and leaves on the plant to make space for new growth. This encourages the roots to send up fresh stems.
  3. Move to a proper environment. This may involve decreasing or increasing sun exposure, depending on the species.
  4. Decrease fertilizer applications. If you have applied too much fertilizer, you can repot plants with fresh potting soil.
  5. Wait. If your plant has dried out as daylight is decreasing, it is entering dormancy. Decrease watering and wait until the plant resumes growth.
Prevention
Prevention
Prevention involves providing your plant with the proper environment.
  1. Provide the proper amount of water. The amount of water depends on a plant’s size, species, and environment. A general rule is to allow soil to dry out between waterings.
  2. Place plants in the proper environment. Provide the proper hours of sun and temperature for your individual plant.
  3. Provide proper fertility. Most plants only need to be fertilized once or twice a year; don’t overapply.
  4. Keep plants free from toxic substances. Keep herbicides and toxic household chemicals away from your plants.
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Low light
plant poor
Low light
A lack of sunlight will cause the stems and leaves to elongate and appear lighter in color.
Overview
Overview
All plants require light, and if they do not receive it in the quantities that they require this distorts their growth in a process known as etiolation. In essence, etiolated plants are diverting all of their energy to growing taller in a desperate attempt to reach a position where they can meet their light requirements. Many other growth factors are harmed by this, and so light-deprived plants can become weak and distorted until they are almost unrecognizable. Low light symptoms are most commonly seen in houseplants, but outdoor specimens can also be affected.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Although symptoms will vary in different plants, the general symptoms of low light are easy to spot.
  1. Plant stems grow tall and lanky.
  2. There are less leaves, and both leaves and stems tend to be pale and insipid looking. This is due to a shortage of chlorophyll.
  3. All plant parts become weakened and may droop, as energy is diverted toward too-fast growth as the plant stretches itself toward any source of light.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Plants need sunlight in varying amounts for photosynthesis – a process that produces energy for growth and fruit and flower production. Low light causes a plant to divert all energy to upward (apical) growth in order to find better light. Plant hormones called auxins are transported from the actively-growing tip of the plant downwards, to suppress lateral growth. A drop in cellular pH triggers expansins, nonenzymatic cell wall proteins, to loosen cell walls and allow them to elongate. This elongation results in the abnormal lengthening of stems, especially internodes, or plant "legginess" which is observed in etoliated plants.
Solutions
Solutions
Low light can only be addressed by increasing light availability, and these measures will only stop further etoliation; current distortion cannot be reversed.
  • Move plant to a position where it receives more light. Check the requirements for specific species, as too much sunlight can cause a plant to burn.
  • Introduce appropriate artificial lighting.
  • Some people choose to prune the longest stems so the plant can concentrate on healthy new growth under the improved lighting.
Prevention
Prevention
To avoid etiolation, provide an adequate amount of light from the beginning.
  1. Choose a location that matches each plant's ideal light needs. Many indoor plants do best in or near a south-facing window, which will provide the longest hours of sunlight. Flowering plants and those with colored leaves typically need more light than purely-green plants, as photosynthesis occurs in the green portions of leaves.
  2. Select plants with light needs that match a location's conditions. Some cultivars and varieties require less light than others.
  3. Use a grow light. Darker locations may require artificial illumination. A grow light may also become more necessary during winter, when sunlit hours are at their shortest.
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Stem rot
plant poor
Stem rot
Bacterial infection can cause the stems to become soft and rotten.
Overview
Overview
Stem rot is a serious disease and can affect many different types of plants. it can be particularly prevalent when the temperature of the soil is over 16 ℃ and there's a lot of moisture in the soil. This could be from unusually heavy rainfalls or too much irrigation. Once stem rot sets in, it's very difficult to get rid of the disease and most affected plants will have to be discarded. This is especially the case for vegetables, herbs, and other herbaceous plants that have soft stems. This is why it's important to ensure that the soil used for growing these plants is well-drained and that overwatering is avoided. Using good cultural practices also help in curbing these types of fungal diseases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Plants that have been affected by stem rot will first display a yellowing of the lower leaves. This is followed by obvious wilting and stunted growth.
If the stem of the affected plant is examined closely, there will be some dark discolorations starting near the base and moving upward. If the roots of affected plants are examined, they will appear dark and mushy instead of white and healthy-looking. Eventually, the entire plant will wilt and die.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Stem rot is caused by a variety of soil-borne fungus pathogens. The type of fungus depends on the species of plant that is affected. Two fungi responsible for stem rot are Rhizoctonia and Fusarium. These fungal pathogens live in soil and migrate to the plant when conditions are optimum. This includes warm, humid weather and excessive soil moisture. Commonly, vegetable seedlings are affected by these fungi.
Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is another fungus that causes stem rot in plants. This fungus has a host range of over 350 different species of plants. Plants most susceptible to this fungus include many vegetable varieties such as cucumbers, beans, cilantro, carrots, cabbage, melons, lettuce, peas, onions, tomatoes, pumpkins, and squash. This fungus can produce different symptoms in different species. In some cases, the fungus causes irregular spots on stems and other plant material that appear water-soaked. On other plant species, the fungus appears as dry lesions that grow and girdle the stem of the plant.
The third type of fungus that causes stem rot is Phytophthora capsici. Plants that belong to the cucumber family are most susceptible to this fungal infection. This fungus manifests as water-soaked lesions on the stems that then turn brown and girdle the stem.
All of these fungal pathogens are transmitted to the plant by water splashing from the soil up onto the plant. That's because the fungal spores live in the soil where they wait for the right conditions to infect the plants.
Solutions
Solutions
If the plant is only infected a little, it can sometimes be saved. This mainly applies to houseplants that are grown in pots. Here's what to do.
  1. Remove the plant from the pot and gently shake off as much soil as possible.
  2. Using pruning tools that have been disinfected, remove any diseased foliage and roots.
  3. Be sure the new pot has good drainage holes and wash it with one part bleach and nine parts water to ensure that it is completely clean and sanitized.
  4. Dip the plant's roots in fungicide to kill off any remaining fungal spores before potting into the clean growing medium.
  5. Only water the plant when the top inch of the soil is dry and never let the plant sit in water.
For plants that are grown in the ground, it's best just to remove the infected plants and destroy them. Do not plant in the same spot until the soil has been allowed to dry out and has been treated with a fungicide.
Prevention
Prevention
For outdoor gardens:
  1. Raking the garden thoroughly in the springtime will help to cut down on pathogens that may be living in the soil.
  2. Using a copper fungicide on plants in the springtime will cut down on fungal growth and prevent the spread of infection.
  3. Placing a heavy layer of mulch on top of the soil will also prevent pathogens from splashing up onto the stems of plants.
  4. Place plants at the recommended spacing to encourage better air flow between them.
  5. Water plants at the base instead of overhead to prevent excessive moisture on foliage.
For indoor plants:
  1. Avoid overwatering houseplants and ensure the roots do not sit in water.
  2. Make sure that indoor plants receive adequate air circulation and light.
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Flower Color
Flower Color
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Pink
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Leaf Color
Leaf Color
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Usages

Garden Use
Fairy castle cactus is an attractive and easy-to-care-for succulent. Indoor gardeners will fair well with this low-maintenance and compact potted plant. Outdoors, this succulent will do well in dry succulent gardens, desert gardens as well as xeriscapes, and similar environments.
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