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Chinese Dragon Lily
Chinese Dragon Lily
Chinese Dragon Lily
Chinese Dragon Lily
Chinese Dragon Lily
Chinese Dragon Lily
Chinese Dragon Lily
Arisaema serratum
Also known as : Japanese arisaema, Cobra Lily
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
4 to 8
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care guide

Care Guide for Chinese Dragon Lily

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Soil Care
Soil Care
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Ideal Lighting
Ideal Lighting
Partial sun, Full shade
Details on Sunlight Requirements Ideal Lighting
Ideal Temperature
Ideal Temperature
4 to 8
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Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring
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Harvest Time
Harvest Time
Mid summer, Late summer
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Chinese Dragon Lily
Water
Water
Every week
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
4 to 8
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring
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Questions About Chinese Dragon Lily

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Watering Watering Watering
Pruning Pruning Pruning
Sunlight Sunlight Sunlight
Temperature Temperature Temperature
Fertilizing Fertilizing Fertilizing
What is the best way to water my Chinese Dragon Lily?
There are plenty of viable ways to supply your Chinese Dragon Lily with water. If you grow your plant in an indoor pot, for the Chinese Dragon Lilys in small pots, you can bring your potted plant to your kitchen sink. Then, use the faucet to add water to the container. By holding the pot in your hands, you should easily notice when the water begins to run through the pot’s drainage holes, at which point you can stop watering. The cold temperature will hurt the plants' root system, so please don't do this during winter or in cold climates. Most of the time, watering via your faucet is permissible for the Chinese Dragon Lily. However, if the local tap water contains a high proportion of fluorine, chlorine or salts, you should consider using rainwater or lake water. Also, since the Chinese Dragon Lily can respond well to overhead watering and watering directly into the soil, you can use a watering can, hose, or just about any tool you’d like to water it.
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What should I do if I water my Chinese Dragon Lily too much or too little?
If you discover that you have underwatered your Chinese Dragon Lily, your first step towards remedying the situation is to give your plant some water. Water deeply until excess water runs from the container’s drainage hole, or if you grow outside, water until the soil has become entirely moist. If you find your Chinese Dragon Lily is receiving too much water, begin by reducing your watering schedule. You also want to address the soil and container your Chinese Dragon Lily grows in. If either the soil or the container makes it difficult for water to drain efficiently, your plant will likely become overwatered again. Resolve the issue by moving your plant to looser soils and/or a container with bigger drainage holes or a more porous material. Also check the location of the plant. If the plant is in places like a corner, then it is recommended to move it to a window or around a door to enhance ventilation. Making sure the plants are in a well-ventilated location can reduce the occurrence of overwatering to some extent.
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How often should I water my Chinese Dragon Lily?
The Chinese Dragon Lily is not a species that requires consistent soil moisture. Instead, it is better to allow this plant’s soil to become dry between waterings. If you are like the many gardeners who grow Chinese Dragon Lilys in containers, you can judge whether or not it is time to add water by how dry the soil within the container is. For instance, if about top half of the soil in your container has become dry, it is time to add water. You can feel it by inserting your fingers or sticks into the soil or with soil moisture meter. For those who grow the Chinese Dragon Lily outdoors, you can plan to do your watering about once every other week, provided it has not rained recently.
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How much water does my Chinese Dragon Lily need?
After waiting for the first several layers of soil surrounding your Chinese Dragon Lily’s root to become dry(top half of the soil), it is time to add enough water to make them moist again. The amount of water it takes to achieve that goal depends on if you use a container, how large that container is, and how large your plant itself is. For a small Chinese Dragon Lily growing in a small to a medium-sized container, one to two cups may be enough to dampen the soil sufficiently. As you would expect, the volume of water you supply should increase for a larger plant. The best way to make sure your plant has received enough water is to stick your finger or a trowel into the soil and feel whether it is entirely moist. Alternatively, you can water until you see excess water draining from the holes at the bottom of your container.
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How can I tell if i'm watering my Chinese Dragon Lily enough?
Overwatering and underwatering are both bad for the health of your Chinese Dragon Lily. These two issues also manifest themselves in subtly different ways when they occur. Chinese Dragon Lily that receives too little water may begin to develop yellow leaves. Underwatering may also cause the leaf margins to become brown and brittle. By contrast, Chinese Dragon Lily that gets overwatered will often show yellow and brown marks on its leaves at the same time. Overwatering can also lead to diseases like root rot, some of which may also be visible on your plant. However, if you know the signs of overwatering and underwatering, you stand a good chance of correcting both issues.
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How should I water my Chinese Dragon Lily through the seasons?
During spring and fall, your watering schedule for the Chinese Dragon Lily will remain relatively the same, which will involve watering this plant about once every week. During summer, you may find that the hot weather causes your plant to need more water than usual, especially if it grows where there is a considerable amount of daily light exposure. In the winter, if it's hard to find some warm places for you plant, your Chinese Dragon Lily will enter a dormant growth phase, in which it will need far less water than usual. At this time, you may get by without watering your plant at all. If you do choose to water during winter, you should not do so more often than once every two to three weeks.
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How should I water my Chinese Dragon Lily at different growth stages?
After planting a new, young Chinese Dragon Lily or after transplanting an older Chinese Dragon Lily, you will probably need to give this plant more water than usual. Young plants often need consistent soil moisture during the early stages of their growth to help them adapt to their new growing locations. Transplants also need more water for a brief time to overcome transplant shock. In either case, you may need to water multiple times per week until your plant has exhibited continuous healthy growth. In most situations, your water should be moderate and should never be significant enough to cause overwatering.
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What's the difference between watering Chinese Dragon Lily indoors and outdoors?
There are a few reasons why you may need to water an indoor Chinese Dragon Lily more often than one that grows in the ground outdoors. First, indoor growing settings tend to be drier than outdoor ones, often due to the effect of air conditioning units. While thw size of the pot and the soil determines the warer accumulating ability. Additionally, when your plant grows indoors, it will rely on you entirely for its water By contrast, Chinese Dragon Lily that grows outside can receive water from rain. If you are in an area with high rainfall, you may not have to give it extra watering. When there is not enough rain, you should water additionally to ensure that the soil does not dry out completely.
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Key Facts About Chinese Dragon Lily

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Attributes of Chinese Dragon Lily

Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Herb
Planting Time
Spring
Bloom Time
Summer, Fall
Harvest Time
Mid summer, Late summer
Plant Height
76 cm to 1.2 m
Spread
30 cm to 45 cm
Flower Size
15 cm
Flower Color
Purple
Blue
Red
Brown
Black
Leaf type
Deciduous
Ideal Temperature
5 - 32 ℃

Scientific Classification of Chinese Dragon Lily

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Common Pests & Diseases About Chinese Dragon Lily

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Common issues for Chinese Dragon Lily based on 10 million real cases
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Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles are a class of colored insects 1 to 2 cm in size. They gnaw on leaves and petals resulting in small, round holes scattered over the surface.
Solutions: For less serious cases: Remove beetles, nymphs, and eggs. Remove all life stages of the beetles and kill them by placing them in a bucket of warm, soapy water. This can be done more easily by placing the bucket under affected leaves and shaking the plant. This method is most effective in the afternoon when leaf beetles are more active. Always dispose of insects in a sealed bag or container to avoid escape and spread. To treat more serious infestations: Apply organic insecticides. Use naturally-derived insecticides before moving on to synthetic insecticides. Neem oil and pyrethrum are naturally-derived insecticides that should be applied following label instructions. Apply synthetic insecticides. Examples of insecticides effective for leaf beetles include carbaryl, permethrin, and bifenthrin. Apply insecticides according to label instructions.
Leaf miners
Leaf miners Leaf miners
Leaf miners
Leaf miners scar the leaves with curved white streaks or rounded white spots with brown centers.
Solutions: Leaf miners, although relatively harmless at first, can quickly multiply and devastate your plants in the coming weeks. For severe cases: Spray an organic insecticide. For an organic solution, spray a diluted mixture of azadirachtin, a compound derived from neem seeds, above and below leaves. Spray a synthetic insecticide. Spray a product that contains spinosad, such as Entrust, making sure to cover all sides of the leaves. Introduce beneficial insects. Introduce beneficial insects that eat leaf miners, such as parasitic wasps or Syrphid flies. For less severe cases: Prune infected tissue. Remove and dispose of leaves that have any sign of leaf miner damage.
Yellow spot
Yellow spot Yellow spot
Yellow spot
Leaf spot can show up as yellow or white spots on the leaves.
Solutions: Diseases Fungicides can prevent the transmission of spores, but they may not treat the established infection. The first step is removing and disposing of all infected plant parts. Then apply recommended chemicals. For bacterial infections, apply a spray containing copper or streptomycin. For fungal infections, consult the local cooperative extension for recommendations on which fungicides will work best. Nutrient deficiency Apply a liquid fertilizer via foliar application to fix the deficiency quickly. Follow label directions regarding dosing instructions and application notes, such as not using before the rain or when temperatures are out of the recommended range. Incorrect watering Determine the water requirements for your specific plant, and follow accordingly. Some plants like consistently moist soil, and others like the soil to dry out slightly before being watered. Pests Thoroughly apply an insecticidal soap, an organic product like neem oil, or an appropriate chemical insecticide to the plant.
Nutrient deficiencies
Nutrient deficiencies Nutrient deficiencies
Nutrient deficiencies
A lack of nutrients will cause a widespread yellowing of the leaves. The yellowing may begin at the base or top of the plant.
Solutions: There are several easy ways to remedy the nutrient deficiencies in soils. Use a water-soluble fertilizer. Fertilizers will include most or all of the macro and micro-nutrients the plants need to thrive. Adding some fertilizer to the soil will make those nutrients available and can combat deficiencies. Regularly apply organic fertilizer pellets. Organic fertilizers such as animal manures and bonemeal can supply plants with all the nutrients that they need to grow strong and healthy. Apply compost. Though not as finely tuned as artificial fertilizer, compost can nevertheless be rich in important nutrients and should be applied to the soil regularly. Apply nutrients via foliar application. In addition to supplementing the soil with nutrients, foliar fertilizer can be applied directly to the plant's leaves. Nutrients offered via foliar application are often taken up even quicker than those put in the soil, so the foliar application can be great for swiftly addressing specific deficiencies.
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Leaf beetles
plant poor
Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles are a class of colored insects 1 to 2 cm in size. They gnaw on leaves and petals resulting in small, round holes scattered over the surface.
Overview
Overview
Leaf beetles range in size from 1.5 mm to 2 cm. Both adult beetles and their larvae eat the leaves of many different types of plants. There are over 35,000 different species of leaf beetles, in a variety of colors including gold, green, yellow-striped, and red striped. Some of these have been mistaken for ladybirds because of their shape and coloring. They can be oval, round, or elongated in shape. These insect pests are most active in spring and summer.
If not controlled, leaf beetles can do a lot of damage to vegetable crops and ornamental plants. They feed on the leaves, flowers, stems, roots, and fruits of different plants. They can fly, which means it's easy for them to move from one plant to another. Some species of leaf beetles only target one specific crop, while others will target many different types of plants. Although a lot of the damage that they cause is cosmetic, an infestation can weaken a plant and leave it prone to other more problematic diseases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The first signs of a leaf beetles infestation are small visible holes in leaves. Leaves then become discolored and dark beetle droppings can be seen. As the leaves turn yellow and brown, they will drop off the plant onto the ground. Some leaves will appear skeletonized with only the veins still remaining.
Infestation begins in spring, when the adult beetles emerge from the soil and lay their eggs on the leaves of plants. When these eggs hatch, the young nymphs start munching on the leaves as they grow up. Once leaf beetles are large and mature, they'll fall to the ground and pupate in the soil over winter before starting the cycle all over again.
Leaf beetles also eat holes in fruits and vegetables. These can be seen as small round holes that sometimes have a larger brown area surrounding them.
Solutions
Solutions
For less serious cases:
  1. Remove beetles, nymphs, and eggs. Remove all life stages of the beetles and kill them by placing them in a bucket of warm, soapy water. This can be done more easily by placing the bucket under affected leaves and shaking the plant. This method is most effective in the afternoon when leaf beetles are more active. Always dispose of insects in a sealed bag or container to avoid escape and spread.
To treat more serious infestations:
  1. Apply organic insecticides. Use naturally-derived insecticides before moving on to synthetic insecticides. Neem oil and pyrethrum are naturally-derived insecticides that should be applied following label instructions.
  2. Apply synthetic insecticides. Examples of insecticides effective for leaf beetles include carbaryl, permethrin, and bifenthrin. Apply insecticides according to label instructions.
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Leaf miners
plant poor
Leaf miners
Leaf miners scar the leaves with curved white streaks or rounded white spots with brown centers.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The leaves on your plants are showing clear/white trails, which appear like parts have been hollowed out. These trails are narrow at first and become wide patches over time. In some cases, leaves will be completely hollow and dry on the plant. As the name suggests, leaf miners are responsible.
Leaf miners are most common in the early spring when they begin to hatch and reproduce. They are tiny 1/16th inch larvae that resemble small grains of rice. The larvae are found inside leaves. The adult stage, a fly, lays eggs in between the layers of a leaf. When the eggs hatch, the larvae eat the tender nutritious inner leaves.
Solutions
Solutions
Leaf miners, although relatively harmless at first, can quickly multiply and devastate your plants in the coming weeks.
For severe cases:
  1. Spray an organic insecticide. For an organic solution, spray a diluted mixture of azadirachtin, a compound derived from neem seeds, above and below leaves.
  2. Spray a synthetic insecticide. Spray a product that contains spinosad, such as Entrust, making sure to cover all sides of the leaves.
  3. Introduce beneficial insects. Introduce beneficial insects that eat leaf miners, such as parasitic wasps or Syrphid flies.
For less severe cases:
  1. Prune infected tissue. Remove and dispose of leaves that have any sign of leaf miner damage.
Prevention
Prevention
Although leaf miners are easy to control, preventing them is ideal. Our recommendations are:
  1. Physically exclude adults. Cover plants with floating row covers as soon as you put them in the ground.
  2. Remove weeds and debris. Keep your garden weeded to lower the number of plants leaf miners can feed and breed on.
  3. Avoid introducing infected plants. Carefully inspect new plants for leaf miners before adding them to your garden or home.
  4. Avoid broad-spectrum pesticides. Leaf miners can usually be controlled by natural predatory insects. Do not apply broad-spectrum insecticides that could harm these beneficial insects.
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Yellow spot
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Yellow spot
Leaf spot can show up as yellow or white spots on the leaves.
Overview
Overview
Yellow spot is a common condition that affects all types of plants -- flowering ornamentals, trees, shrubs, herbs, and vegetable plants -- worldwide. Yellow spots may appear because of dozens of potential causes and occur in various environmental and climatic conditions, but fortunately, most are easy to address. The most common causes of yellow spots include diseases, nutrient deficiency, watering problems, and pests.
In most cases, yellow spots can be treated without permanent damage to the plant. However, in some fungal disease cases, nothing can be done to treat the disease after infection, and the plant will ultimately perish from the disease.
Due to this, the most critical aspect of addressing yellow spots on plants is correctly determining the cause.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Symptoms occur on varying parts of the plant, depending upon the cause. Smaller spots tend to be indicative of younger infections or newly developing problems.
  • Small yellow spots appear on leaves
  • Spots can occur on the lower or upper leaf surfaces, or both
  • Raised, rounded, or sunken spots with fringed or smooth edges
  • Spots may grow together, causing leaves to become totally discolored
  • Stunted growth
  • Premature leaf drop
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The vast majority of yellow spot diseases are caused by fungal pathogens. However, there are some situations in which bacteria, environmental conditions, or other issues may be blamed.
Diseases are typically host-specific, so they may only affect plants within the same family. That said, just about every single species of plant is vulnerable to at least one disease that causes yellow spot. The most common problems are leaf blight, leaf septoria, powdery mildew, and downy mildew, to name a few.
All plants need specific nutrients from the soil to survive. When these nutrients become depleted or unavailable for plant uptake due to particular conditions, deficiencies occur, and yellow spots are seen.
  • Nitrogen is an integral component of chlorophyll.
  • Iron is needed in the enzymes that make chlorophyll.
Yellow spots may also appear because of incorrect watering, mainly underwatering, or infestations of sap-sucking pests such as aphids.
  • Too little water inhibits photosynthesis. Too much water pushes oxygen out of the soil and the roots cannot take in nutrients or even water from the soil.
  • Insect problems can cause yellow spots directly by damaging leaf tissue when feeding, or they may introduce pathogens.
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Nutrient deficiencies
plant poor
Nutrient deficiencies
A lack of nutrients will cause a widespread yellowing of the leaves. The yellowing may begin at the base or top of the plant.
Overview
Overview
Nutrient deficiencies can be seen in many different ways on plants. Basically, the lack of nutrients will inhibit plant growth, produce weak stems and leaves, and leave plants open to infection from pests and diseases. Plants use the nutrients from the soil to help them with photosynthesis. This, in turn, produces healthy plant growth. Plants that lack adequate amounts of nutrients will look lackluster and unhealthy. Eventually, if this is not addressed, it will cause the plants to die. The most important nutrients that plants need are nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and sulfur. Additionally, plants require small amounts of micronutrients such as iron, boron, manganese, zinc, copper, and molybdenum.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
A common sign that plants are experiencing nutrient deficiencies is the yellowing of leaves. This may be an overall yellowing or leaves that are yellow but still have green veins. These leaves will eventually brown off and die.
Another sign is the loss of plant vigor. The plants may not be growing as well as they should or their growth may be stunted.
Below are some common symptoms that appear when plants are lacking in nutrients.
Nitrogen (N): Inner, older leaves yellow first. If the deficiency is severe, yellowing progresses outward to newer growth.
Potassium (K): Leaf edges may turn brown and crinkly, with a yellowing layer forming just inside of the edge. Older leaves tend to be impacted first.
Phosphorus (P): Lack of vigorous growth. Plants will appear stunted.
Zinc (Zn): Yellowing tends to occur first at the base of the leaf.
Copper (Cu): Newer leaves begin to yellow first, with older leaves yellowing only if the deficiency becomes severe.
Boron (B): Newer leaves are impacted first. Foliage may also become particularly brittle in cases of boron deficiency.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
There are several factors that can lead to nutrient deficiencies, a situation where plants are not receiving the nutrients that they need. This could be because they are planted in nutrient-deficient soils, or that the soil's pH is too high or low. Incorrect soil pH can lock up certain nutrients, thus making them unavailable to plants. Lack of soil moisture can also be a problem, because plants need water to be able to absorb the nutrients from the soil.
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Weed Control About Chinese Dragon Lily

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Weeds
Chinese Dragon Lily is a striking perennial wildflower as well as garden ornamental, but it also highly toxic to both humans and animals due to its calcium oxalate content.
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Distribution of Chinese Dragon Lily

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Habitat of Chinese Dragon Lily

Shady forests

Distribution Map of Chinese Dragon Lily

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Cultivated
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More Info on Chinese Dragon Lily Growth and Care

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Lighting
Partial sun
Chinese Dragon Lily thrives best in areas where sunlight is limited, typical of its native forest understory habitat. It can endure places with less sunlight exposure, but lesser light can slow the plant's growth rate and can cause pale foliage. Excessive sunlight can scorch its leaves and inhibit its overall development.
Best Sunlight Practices
Transplant
1-2 feet
The optimum time to transplant chinese Dragon Lily is the onset of the growing season, ensuring a smooth transition. Position chinese Dragon Lily in a shaded area with moist, well-draining soil. Only handle the delicate roots if necessary, maintaining their integrity.
Transplant Techniques
Temperature
-25 - 35 ℃
Chinese Dragon Lily is best suited for temperatures spanning 41 to 90 °F (5 to 32 ℃). Naturally adapted to fluctuating climatic conditions, it can handle low winter temperatures but enjoys warmth in summer. Timely adjustments as per season drastically help thrive.
Temp for Healthy Growth
Pruning
Spring, Summer, Fall
This perennial, known for its distinctive hooded spathe, thrives in woodland settings. When pruning chinese Dragon Lily, remove dead or damaged foliage and spent flowers to maintain vigor and appearance. Prune in spring to shape and encourage new growth or after flowering in summer to late fall. Mulching after fall pruning can protect the rhizome. Pruning benefits chinese Dragon Lily by preventing disease, promoting air circulation, and directing energy to healthy growth.
Pruning techniques
Propagation
Spring
Chinese Dragon Lily is a perennial species that thrives in partial to full shade conditions with moist, well-drained soil. Propagating chinese Dragon Lily typically involves sowing seeds, which should be cleaned and stratified before planting to enhance germination rates. It is critical to maintain consistently moist soil without waterlogging. Seedlings require careful handling due to their delicate nature. Organic mulch can aid moisture retention and provide essential nutrients as they develop.
Propagation Techniques
Feng shui direction
Northwest
The chinese Dragon Lily might bring an enlightening energy when placed in Northwest-facing rooms, a direction related to helpful people and travel in Feng Shui. However, as energy is fluid and volatile in nature, the results are individual and may slightly differ based on certain conditions.
Fengshui Details
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Plants Related to Chinese Dragon Lily

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Easter Lily Cactus
Easter Lily Cactus
Echinopsis tubiflora is a rare flowering plant species endemic to Argentina. Echinopsis tubiflora is valued ornamentally for its blossoms and sometimes planted as part of landscaping arrangements. This species is considered easy to grow by gardeners.
Siam tulip
Siam tulip
Siam tulip (Curcuma alismatifolia) is an exotic perennial that produces tropical-looking pink blossoms from late spring to early fall. Its moderate salt tolerance makes it ideal for coastal areas. It prefers full sun to partial shade and will grow to 61 cm tall in moderately moist soil.
Ghost orchid
Ghost orchid
Ghost orchid is a perennial herbaceous plant that reaches stature heights of 5 to 30 cm . It is a leafless and chlorophyll-free geophyte with a fleshy rhizome that is highly branched and resembles a coral. This type of plant, with its mycoheterotrophic diet, relies on fungal symbiosis for life.
Singapore graveyard flower
Singapore graveyard flower
Singapore graveyard flower (Plumeria obtusa) is a plant species native to the West Indies and naturalized elsewhere. The singapore graveyard flower is grown for its showy, aromatic flowers, and in Cambodia the blossoms are used in religious offerings. This plant is most commonly cultivated in Southeast Asia.
China aster
China aster
The china aster is best known for its bright flowers, which can be purple, pink, red, or white. It is native to China and Korea, making the origin of the common name, china aster quite obvious. The plants are relatively susceptible to diseases, so gardeners must watch them closely.
Orpine
Orpine
Orpine (Hylotelephium telephium) is a perennial succulent native to Eurasia. This species is often planted in gardens for ornamental purposes and grows best in gravelly or calcareous soils. In Finland, the orpine is an officially protected species because its leaves are the most important food source for the Apollo butterfly, the largest type of butterfly in that country.
Cape jasmine
Cape jasmine
Gardenia jasminoides is an evergreen shrub with unique, glossy evergreen leaves and stunning flowers. The sophisticated, matte white flowers are often used in bouquets. The exceptional beauty of this ornamental plant has made it a popular and highly appreciated plant amongst gardeners and horticulturalists.
Golden pothos
Golden pothos
The golden pothos (Epipremnum aureum) is a popular houseplant that is commonly seen in Australia, Asia, and the West Indies. It goes by many nicknames, including "devil's ivy", because it is so hard to kill and can even grow in low light conditions. Golden pothos has poisonous sap, so it should be kept away from pets and children.
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Chinese Dragon Lily
Chinese Dragon Lily
Chinese Dragon Lily
Chinese Dragon Lily
Chinese Dragon Lily
Chinese Dragon Lily
Chinese Dragon Lily
Arisaema serratum
Also known as: Japanese arisaema, Cobra Lily
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
4 to 8
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Care Guide for Chinese Dragon Lily

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Questions About Chinese Dragon Lily

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Watering Watering Watering
Pruning Pruning Pruning
Sunlight Sunlight Sunlight
Temperature Temperature Temperature
Fertilizing Fertilizing Fertilizing
What is the best way to water my Chinese Dragon Lily?
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What should I do if I water my Chinese Dragon Lily too much or too little?
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How often should I water my Chinese Dragon Lily?
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How much water does my Chinese Dragon Lily need?
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How can I tell if i'm watering my Chinese Dragon Lily enough?
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How should I water my Chinese Dragon Lily through the seasons?
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How should I water my Chinese Dragon Lily at different growth stages?
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What's the difference between watering Chinese Dragon Lily indoors and outdoors?
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Key Facts About Chinese Dragon Lily

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Attributes of Chinese Dragon Lily

Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Herb
Planting Time
Spring
Bloom Time
Summer, Fall
Harvest Time
Mid summer, Late summer
Plant Height
76 cm to 1.2 m
Spread
30 cm to 45 cm
Flower Size
15 cm
Flower Color
Purple
Blue
Red
Brown
Black
Leaf type
Deciduous
Ideal Temperature
5 - 32 ℃
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Scientific Classification of Chinese Dragon Lily

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Common Pests & Diseases About Chinese Dragon Lily

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Common issues for Chinese Dragon Lily based on 10 million real cases
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Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles Leaf beetles Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles are a class of colored insects 1 to 2 cm in size. They gnaw on leaves and petals resulting in small, round holes scattered over the surface.
Solutions: For less serious cases: Remove beetles, nymphs, and eggs. Remove all life stages of the beetles and kill them by placing them in a bucket of warm, soapy water. This can be done more easily by placing the bucket under affected leaves and shaking the plant. This method is most effective in the afternoon when leaf beetles are more active. Always dispose of insects in a sealed bag or container to avoid escape and spread. To treat more serious infestations: Apply organic insecticides. Use naturally-derived insecticides before moving on to synthetic insecticides. Neem oil and pyrethrum are naturally-derived insecticides that should be applied following label instructions. Apply synthetic insecticides. Examples of insecticides effective for leaf beetles include carbaryl, permethrin, and bifenthrin. Apply insecticides according to label instructions.
Learn More About the Leaf beetles more
Leaf miners
Leaf miners Leaf miners Leaf miners
Leaf miners scar the leaves with curved white streaks or rounded white spots with brown centers.
Solutions: Leaf miners, although relatively harmless at first, can quickly multiply and devastate your plants in the coming weeks. For severe cases: Spray an organic insecticide. For an organic solution, spray a diluted mixture of azadirachtin, a compound derived from neem seeds, above and below leaves. Spray a synthetic insecticide. Spray a product that contains spinosad, such as Entrust, making sure to cover all sides of the leaves. Introduce beneficial insects. Introduce beneficial insects that eat leaf miners, such as parasitic wasps or Syrphid flies. For less severe cases: Prune infected tissue. Remove and dispose of leaves that have any sign of leaf miner damage.
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Yellow spot
Yellow spot Yellow spot Yellow spot
Leaf spot can show up as yellow or white spots on the leaves.
Solutions: Diseases Fungicides can prevent the transmission of spores, but they may not treat the established infection. The first step is removing and disposing of all infected plant parts. Then apply recommended chemicals. For bacterial infections, apply a spray containing copper or streptomycin. For fungal infections, consult the local cooperative extension for recommendations on which fungicides will work best. Nutrient deficiency Apply a liquid fertilizer via foliar application to fix the deficiency quickly. Follow label directions regarding dosing instructions and application notes, such as not using before the rain or when temperatures are out of the recommended range. Incorrect watering Determine the water requirements for your specific plant, and follow accordingly. Some plants like consistently moist soil, and others like the soil to dry out slightly before being watered. Pests Thoroughly apply an insecticidal soap, an organic product like neem oil, or an appropriate chemical insecticide to the plant.
Learn More About the Yellow spot more
Nutrient deficiencies
Nutrient deficiencies Nutrient deficiencies Nutrient deficiencies
A lack of nutrients will cause a widespread yellowing of the leaves. The yellowing may begin at the base or top of the plant.
Solutions: There are several easy ways to remedy the nutrient deficiencies in soils. Use a water-soluble fertilizer. Fertilizers will include most or all of the macro and micro-nutrients the plants need to thrive. Adding some fertilizer to the soil will make those nutrients available and can combat deficiencies. Regularly apply organic fertilizer pellets. Organic fertilizers such as animal manures and bonemeal can supply plants with all the nutrients that they need to grow strong and healthy. Apply compost. Though not as finely tuned as artificial fertilizer, compost can nevertheless be rich in important nutrients and should be applied to the soil regularly. Apply nutrients via foliar application. In addition to supplementing the soil with nutrients, foliar fertilizer can be applied directly to the plant's leaves. Nutrients offered via foliar application are often taken up even quicker than those put in the soil, so the foliar application can be great for swiftly addressing specific deficiencies.
Learn More About the Nutrient deficiencies more
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Leaf beetles
plant poor
Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles are a class of colored insects 1 to 2 cm in size. They gnaw on leaves and petals resulting in small, round holes scattered over the surface.
Overview
Overview
Leaf beetles range in size from 1.5 mm to 2 cm. Both adult beetles and their larvae eat the leaves of many different types of plants. There are over 35,000 different species of leaf beetles, in a variety of colors including gold, green, yellow-striped, and red striped. Some of these have been mistaken for ladybirds because of their shape and coloring. They can be oval, round, or elongated in shape. These insect pests are most active in spring and summer.
If not controlled, leaf beetles can do a lot of damage to vegetable crops and ornamental plants. They feed on the leaves, flowers, stems, roots, and fruits of different plants. They can fly, which means it's easy for them to move from one plant to another. Some species of leaf beetles only target one specific crop, while others will target many different types of plants. Although a lot of the damage that they cause is cosmetic, an infestation can weaken a plant and leave it prone to other more problematic diseases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The first signs of a leaf beetles infestation are small visible holes in leaves. Leaves then become discolored and dark beetle droppings can be seen. As the leaves turn yellow and brown, they will drop off the plant onto the ground. Some leaves will appear skeletonized with only the veins still remaining.
Infestation begins in spring, when the adult beetles emerge from the soil and lay their eggs on the leaves of plants. When these eggs hatch, the young nymphs start munching on the leaves as they grow up. Once leaf beetles are large and mature, they'll fall to the ground and pupate in the soil over winter before starting the cycle all over again.
Leaf beetles also eat holes in fruits and vegetables. These can be seen as small round holes that sometimes have a larger brown area surrounding them.
Solutions
Solutions
For less serious cases:
  1. Remove beetles, nymphs, and eggs. Remove all life stages of the beetles and kill them by placing them in a bucket of warm, soapy water. This can be done more easily by placing the bucket under affected leaves and shaking the plant. This method is most effective in the afternoon when leaf beetles are more active. Always dispose of insects in a sealed bag or container to avoid escape and spread.
To treat more serious infestations:
  1. Apply organic insecticides. Use naturally-derived insecticides before moving on to synthetic insecticides. Neem oil and pyrethrum are naturally-derived insecticides that should be applied following label instructions.
  2. Apply synthetic insecticides. Examples of insecticides effective for leaf beetles include carbaryl, permethrin, and bifenthrin. Apply insecticides according to label instructions.
Prevention
Prevention
To prevent infestations of leaf beetles, follow these practices.
  1. Regularly check for beetles. To prevent large pest infestations, be proactive about frequently checking plants for pests and removing them quickly.
  2. Clear debris. Clear weeds and debris to remove areas where these beetles may overwinter and hide.
  3. Attract natural predators. Birds and other insects, such as wasps and ladybugs, are effective natural predators of leaf beetles. Encourage them to visit by including a diverse array of plants to provide habitat and food. Also, avoid applying broad-spectrum herbicides that can harm and kill beneficial insects.
  4. Plant aromatic herbs like mint, garlic, or rosemary, as these can repel leaf beetles.
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Leaf miners
plant poor
Leaf miners
Leaf miners scar the leaves with curved white streaks or rounded white spots with brown centers.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The leaves on your plants are showing clear/white trails, which appear like parts have been hollowed out. These trails are narrow at first and become wide patches over time. In some cases, leaves will be completely hollow and dry on the plant. As the name suggests, leaf miners are responsible.
Leaf miners are most common in the early spring when they begin to hatch and reproduce. They are tiny 1/16th inch larvae that resemble small grains of rice. The larvae are found inside leaves. The adult stage, a fly, lays eggs in between the layers of a leaf. When the eggs hatch, the larvae eat the tender nutritious inner leaves.
Solutions
Solutions
Leaf miners, although relatively harmless at first, can quickly multiply and devastate your plants in the coming weeks.
For severe cases:
  1. Spray an organic insecticide. For an organic solution, spray a diluted mixture of azadirachtin, a compound derived from neem seeds, above and below leaves.
  2. Spray a synthetic insecticide. Spray a product that contains spinosad, such as Entrust, making sure to cover all sides of the leaves.
  3. Introduce beneficial insects. Introduce beneficial insects that eat leaf miners, such as parasitic wasps or Syrphid flies.
For less severe cases:
  1. Prune infected tissue. Remove and dispose of leaves that have any sign of leaf miner damage.
Prevention
Prevention
Although leaf miners are easy to control, preventing them is ideal. Our recommendations are:
  1. Physically exclude adults. Cover plants with floating row covers as soon as you put them in the ground.
  2. Remove weeds and debris. Keep your garden weeded to lower the number of plants leaf miners can feed and breed on.
  3. Avoid introducing infected plants. Carefully inspect new plants for leaf miners before adding them to your garden or home.
  4. Avoid broad-spectrum pesticides. Leaf miners can usually be controlled by natural predatory insects. Do not apply broad-spectrum insecticides that could harm these beneficial insects.
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Yellow spot
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Yellow spot
Leaf spot can show up as yellow or white spots on the leaves.
Overview
Overview
Yellow spot is a common condition that affects all types of plants -- flowering ornamentals, trees, shrubs, herbs, and vegetable plants -- worldwide. Yellow spots may appear because of dozens of potential causes and occur in various environmental and climatic conditions, but fortunately, most are easy to address. The most common causes of yellow spots include diseases, nutrient deficiency, watering problems, and pests.
In most cases, yellow spots can be treated without permanent damage to the plant. However, in some fungal disease cases, nothing can be done to treat the disease after infection, and the plant will ultimately perish from the disease.
Due to this, the most critical aspect of addressing yellow spots on plants is correctly determining the cause.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Symptoms occur on varying parts of the plant, depending upon the cause. Smaller spots tend to be indicative of younger infections or newly developing problems.
  • Small yellow spots appear on leaves
  • Spots can occur on the lower or upper leaf surfaces, or both
  • Raised, rounded, or sunken spots with fringed or smooth edges
  • Spots may grow together, causing leaves to become totally discolored
  • Stunted growth
  • Premature leaf drop
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The vast majority of yellow spot diseases are caused by fungal pathogens. However, there are some situations in which bacteria, environmental conditions, or other issues may be blamed.
Diseases are typically host-specific, so they may only affect plants within the same family. That said, just about every single species of plant is vulnerable to at least one disease that causes yellow spot. The most common problems are leaf blight, leaf septoria, powdery mildew, and downy mildew, to name a few.
All plants need specific nutrients from the soil to survive. When these nutrients become depleted or unavailable for plant uptake due to particular conditions, deficiencies occur, and yellow spots are seen.
  • Nitrogen is an integral component of chlorophyll.
  • Iron is needed in the enzymes that make chlorophyll.
Yellow spots may also appear because of incorrect watering, mainly underwatering, or infestations of sap-sucking pests such as aphids.
  • Too little water inhibits photosynthesis. Too much water pushes oxygen out of the soil and the roots cannot take in nutrients or even water from the soil.
  • Insect problems can cause yellow spots directly by damaging leaf tissue when feeding, or they may introduce pathogens.
Solutions
Solutions
Diseases
Fungicides can prevent the transmission of spores, but they may not treat the established infection. The first step is removing and disposing of all infected plant parts. Then apply recommended chemicals.
For bacterial infections, apply a spray containing copper or streptomycin.
For fungal infections, consult the local cooperative extension for recommendations on which fungicides will work best.
Nutrient deficiency
Apply a liquid fertilizer via foliar application to fix the deficiency quickly. Follow label directions regarding dosing instructions and application notes, such as not using before the rain or when temperatures are out of the recommended range.
Incorrect watering
Determine the water requirements for your specific plant, and follow accordingly. Some plants like consistently moist soil, and others like the soil to dry out slightly before being watered.
Pests
Thoroughly apply an insecticidal soap, an organic product like neem oil, or an appropriate chemical insecticide to the plant.
Prevention
Prevention
Depending on the type of plant and which specific disease is causing yellow spot, problems may be avoided by taking the following preventative steps:
  • Plant resistant varieties
  • Avoid planting susceptible varieties close together - space susceptible plants further apart from one another so it’s more difficult for the fungal spores to find new plant hosts.
  • Water wisely - water from below rather than splashing water on foliage. This can reduce the spread of both bacterial and fungal pathogens responsible for yellow spot.
  • Prune - prune as a way of getting rid of affected leaves but also to control the spread of yellow spot to new plants. Pruning can also improve air circulation to limit disease spread.
  • Rotate crops - many diseases, including downy mildew, can live in the soil over the winter and produce problems for many years. Rotate annual crops to new locations each year so that they aren’t growing anywhere in which plants in the same family were grown within the last three to four years.
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Nutrient deficiencies
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Nutrient deficiencies
A lack of nutrients will cause a widespread yellowing of the leaves. The yellowing may begin at the base or top of the plant.
Overview
Overview
Nutrient deficiencies can be seen in many different ways on plants. Basically, the lack of nutrients will inhibit plant growth, produce weak stems and leaves, and leave plants open to infection from pests and diseases. Plants use the nutrients from the soil to help them with photosynthesis. This, in turn, produces healthy plant growth. Plants that lack adequate amounts of nutrients will look lackluster and unhealthy. Eventually, if this is not addressed, it will cause the plants to die. The most important nutrients that plants need are nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and sulfur. Additionally, plants require small amounts of micronutrients such as iron, boron, manganese, zinc, copper, and molybdenum.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
A common sign that plants are experiencing nutrient deficiencies is the yellowing of leaves. This may be an overall yellowing or leaves that are yellow but still have green veins. These leaves will eventually brown off and die.
Another sign is the loss of plant vigor. The plants may not be growing as well as they should or their growth may be stunted.
Below are some common symptoms that appear when plants are lacking in nutrients.
Nitrogen (N): Inner, older leaves yellow first. If the deficiency is severe, yellowing progresses outward to newer growth.
Potassium (K): Leaf edges may turn brown and crinkly, with a yellowing layer forming just inside of the edge. Older leaves tend to be impacted first.
Phosphorus (P): Lack of vigorous growth. Plants will appear stunted.
Zinc (Zn): Yellowing tends to occur first at the base of the leaf.
Copper (Cu): Newer leaves begin to yellow first, with older leaves yellowing only if the deficiency becomes severe.
Boron (B): Newer leaves are impacted first. Foliage may also become particularly brittle in cases of boron deficiency.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
There are several factors that can lead to nutrient deficiencies, a situation where plants are not receiving the nutrients that they need. This could be because they are planted in nutrient-deficient soils, or that the soil's pH is too high or low. Incorrect soil pH can lock up certain nutrients, thus making them unavailable to plants. Lack of soil moisture can also be a problem, because plants need water to be able to absorb the nutrients from the soil.
Solutions
Solutions
There are several easy ways to remedy the nutrient deficiencies in soils.
  1. Use a water-soluble fertilizer. Fertilizers will include most or all of the macro and micro-nutrients the plants need to thrive. Adding some fertilizer to the soil will make those nutrients available and can combat deficiencies.
  2. Regularly apply organic fertilizer pellets. Organic fertilizers such as animal manures and bonemeal can supply plants with all the nutrients that they need to grow strong and healthy.
  3. Apply compost. Though not as finely tuned as artificial fertilizer, compost can nevertheless be rich in important nutrients and should be applied to the soil regularly.
  4. Apply nutrients via foliar application. In addition to supplementing the soil with nutrients, foliar fertilizer can be applied directly to the plant's leaves. Nutrients offered via foliar application are often taken up even quicker than those put in the soil, so the foliar application can be great for swiftly addressing specific deficiencies.
Prevention
Prevention
There are several easy ways to prevent nutrient deficiencies in plants.
  1. Regular fertilizing. Regular addition of fertilizer to the soil is one of the simplest and most effective ways to prevent deficiencies.
  2. Proper watering. Both over and under watering can adversely impact a plant's roots, which in turn makes it harder for them to properly take up nutrients.
  3. Testing the soil's pH. A soil's acidity or alkalinity will impact the degree to which certain nutrients are available to be taken up by plants. Knowing the soil's pH means it can be amended to suit the needs of the individual plants.
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weed

Weed Control About Chinese Dragon Lily

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Weeds
Chinese Dragon Lily is a striking perennial wildflower as well as garden ornamental, but it also highly toxic to both humans and animals due to its calcium oxalate content.
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Distribution of Chinese Dragon Lily

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Habitat of Chinese Dragon Lily

Shady forests

Distribution Map of Chinese Dragon Lily

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Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
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Plants Related to Chinese Dragon Lily

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Lighting
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Indoor
Indoor
Outdoor
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Requirements
Partial sun
Ideal
About 3-6 hours sunlight
Full shade
Tolerance
Less than 3 hours of sunlight
Watch how sunlight gracefully moves through your garden, and choose spots that provide the perfect balance of light and shade for your plants, ensuring their happiness.
Essentials
Chinese Dragon Lily thrives best in areas where sunlight is limited, typical of its native forest understory habitat. It can endure places with less sunlight exposure, but lesser light can slow the plant's growth rate and can cause pale foliage. Excessive sunlight can scorch its leaves and inhibit its overall development.
Preferred
Tolerable
Unsuitable
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Artificial lighting
Indoor plants require adequate lighting for optimal growth. When natural sunlight is insufficient, particularly in winter or in less sunny spaces, artificial lights offer a vital solution, promoting faster, healthier growth.
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Indoor plants require adequate lighting for optimal growth. When natural sunlight is insufficient, particularly in winter or in less sunny spaces, artificial lights offer a vital solution, promoting faster, healthier growth.
1. Choose the right type of artificial light: LED lights are a popular choice for indoor plant lighting because they can be customized to provide the specific wavelengths of light that your plants need.
Full sun plants need 30-50W/sq ft of artificial light, partial sun plants need 20-30W/sq ft, and full shade plants need 10-20W/sq ft.
2. Determine the appropriate distance: Place the light source 12-36 inches above the plant to mimic natural sunlight.
3. Determine the duration: Mimic the length of natural daylight hours for your plant species. most plants need 8-12 hours of light per day.
Important Symptoms
Symptoms of Insufficient Light in %s
Chinese Dragon Lily is a versatile plant that thrives in full sunlight but can tolerate partial shade. While it can adapt to different light conditions, when grown indoors with insufficient light, subtle symptoms of light deficiency may arise.
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Small leaves
New leaves may grow smaller in size compared to the previous ones once they have matured.
Leggy or sparse growth
The spaces between leaves or stems of your Chinese Dragon Lily may become longer, resulting in a thin and stretched-out appearance. This can make the plant look sparse and weak, and it may easily break or lean due to its own weight.
Faster leaf drop
When plants are exposed to low light conditions, they tend to shed older leaves early to conserve resources. Within a limited time, these resources can be utilized to grow new leaves until the plant's energy reserves are depleted.
Slower or no new growth
Chinese Dragon Lily enters a survival mode when light conditions are poor, which leads to a halt in leaf production. As a result, the plant's growth becomes delayed or stops altogether.
Lighter-colored new leaves
Insufficient sunlight can cause leaves to develop irregular color patterns or appear pale. This indicates a lack of chlorophyll and essential nutrients.
Solutions
1. To optimize plant growth, shift them to increasingly sunnier spots each week until they receive 3-6 hours of direct sunlight daily, enabling gradual adaptation to changing light conditions.2. To provide additional light for your plant, consider using artificial light if it's large or not easily movable. Keep a desk or ceiling lamp on for at least 8 hours daily, or invest in professional plant grow lights for ample light.
Symptoms of Excessive light in %s
Chinese Dragon Lily thrives in full sun exposure but can adapt to partial shade. Although sunburn symptoms occur occasionally, they are generally tolerant of different light conditions due to their resilience.
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Chlorosis
Chlorosis is a condition where the plant's leaves lose their green color and turn yellow. This is due to the breakdown of chlorophyll from excessive sunlight, which negatively affects the plant's ability to photosynthesize.
Sunscald
Sunscald occurs when the plant's leaves or stems are damaged by intense sunlight exposure. It appears as pale, bleached, or necrotic areas on the plant tissue and can reduce the plant's overall health.
Leaf Curling
Leaf curling is a symptom where leaves curl or twist under extreme sunlight conditions. This is a defense mechanism used by the plant to reduce its surface area exposed to sunlight, minimizing water loss and damage.
Wilting
Wilting occurs when a plant loses turgor pressure and its leaves and stems begin to droop. Overexposure to sunlight can cause wilting by increasing the plant's water loss through transpiration, making it difficult for the plant to maintain adequate hydration.
Leaf Scorching
Leaf scorching is a symptom characterized by the appearance of brown, dry, and crispy edges or patches on leaves due to excessive sunlight. This can lead to a reduction in photosynthetic capacity and overall plant health.
Solutions
1. Move your plant to the optimal position where it can receive abundant sunlight but also have some shade. An east-facing window is an ideal choice as the morning sunlight is gentler. This way, your plant can enjoy ample sunlight while reducing the risk of sunburn.2. It is recommended to trim off any completely dehydrated or withered parts of the plant.
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Temperature
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Requirements
Ideal
Tolerable
Unsuitable
Just like people, each plant has its own preferences. Learn about your plants' temperature needs and create a comforting environment for them to flourish. As you care for your plants, your bond with them will deepen. Trust your intuition as you learn about their temperature needs, celebrating the journey you share. Lovingly monitor the temperature around your plants and adjust their environment as needed. A thermometer can be your ally in this heartfelt endeavor. Be patient and gentle with yourself as you explore your plants' temperature needs. Cherish your successes, learn from challenges, and nurture your garden with love, creating a haven that reflects the warmth of your care.
Essentials
Chinese Dragon Lily is best suited for temperatures spanning 41 to 90 °F (5 to 32 ℃). Naturally adapted to fluctuating climatic conditions, it can handle low winter temperatures but enjoys warmth in summer. Timely adjustments as per season drastically help thrive.
Regional wintering strategies
Chinese Dragon Lily has strong cold resistance, so special frost protection measures are usually not necessary during winter. However, if the winter temperatures are expected to drop below {Limit_growth_temperature}, it is still important to provide cold protection. This can be achieved by covering the plant with materials such as soil or straw. Before the first freeze in autumn, it is recommended to water the plant abundantly, ensuring the soil remains moist and enters a frozen state. This helps prevent drought and water scarcity for the plant during winter and early spring.
Important Symptoms
Symptoms of Low Temperature in Chinese Dragon Lily
Chinese Dragon Lily is cold-tolerant and thrives best when the temperature is above {Suitable_growth_temperature_min}. During winter, it should be kept above {Tolerable_growing_temperature_min}. When the temperature falls below {Limit_growth_temperature}, although there may not be any noticeable changes during winter, there may be a decrease in sprouting or even no sprouting during springtime.
Solutions
In spring, remove any parts that have failed to sprout.
Symptoms of High Temperature in Chinese Dragon Lily
During summer, Chinese Dragon Lily should be kept below {Suitable_growth_temperature_max}. When the temperature exceeds {Tolerable_growing_temperature_max}, the leaves of the plant may become lighter in color, prone to curling, susceptible to sunburn, and in severe cases, the entire plant may wilt and become dry.
Solutions
Trim away the sunburned and dried-up parts. Move the plant to a location that provides shade from the midday and afternoon sun, or use a shade cloth to create shade. Water the plant in the morning and evening to keep the soil moist.
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