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Chinese knotweed
Chinese knotweed
Chinese knotweed
Chinese knotweed
Chinese knotweed
Chinese knotweed
Chinese knotweed
Fallopia multiflora
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Care Guide for Chinese knotweed

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Fertilizing Care
Fertilizing Care
Details on Fertilizing Care Fertilizing Care
Pruning
Pruning
Trim the diseased, withered leaves once a month.
Details on Pruning Pruning
Soil Care
Soil Care
Slightly acidic
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Full sun, Partial sun
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7 to 11
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Questions About Chinese knotweed

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Watering Watering Watering
Pruning Pruning Pruning
Sunlight Sunlight Sunlight
Temperature Temperature Temperature
Fertilizing Fertilizing Fertilizing
What is the best way to water my Chinese knotweed?
When watering the Chinese knotweed, you should aim to use filtered water that is at room temperature. Filtered water is better for this plant, as tap water can contain particles that are harmful to its health. The reason that the water should be at room temperature or slightly warmer is that the Chinese knotweed comes from a warm environment, and cold water can be somewhat of a shock to its system. Also, you should avoid overhead watering for this plant, as it can cause foliage complications. Instead, simply apply your filtered room temperature water to the soil until the soil is entirely soaked. Soaking the soil can be very beneficial for this plant as it moistens the roots and helps them continue to spread through the soil and collect the nutrients they need.
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What should I do if I water my Chinese knotweed too much or too little?
Both overwatering and underwatering will be detrimental to the health of your Chinese knotweed, but overwatering is a far more common issue. When this species receives too much water, its stems and leaves may begin to wilt and turn from green to yellow. Overwatering over a prolonged period may also lead to diseases such as root rot, mold, and mildew, all of which can kill your plant. Underwatering is far less common for the Chinese knotweed, as this plant has decent drought tolerance. However, underwatering remains a possibility, and when it occurs, you can expect to find that the leaves of your Chinese knotweed have become brittle and brown. It is crucial that you notice the signs of overwatering as soon as possible when caring for your Chinese knotweed. Some of the diseases that arise from overwatering, such as root rot, may not be correctable if you wait too long. If you see early signs of overwatering, you should reduce your watering schedule immediately. You may also want to assess the quality of soil in which your Chinese knotweed grows. If you find that the soil drains very poorly, you should replace it immediately with a loose, well-draining potting mix. On the other hand, if you find signs that your Chinese knotweed is receiving too little water, all you need to do is water more regularly until those signs have subsided.
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How often should I water my Chinese knotweed?
If your plant is in a pot. The most precise way to decide whether your Chinese knotweed needs water is to plunge your finger into the soil. If you notice that the first two to three inches of soil have become dry, it is time to add some water. If you grow your Chinese knotweed outdoors in the ground, you can use a similar method to test the soil. Again, when you find that the first few inches of soil have dried out, it is time to add water. During the spring and early fall, this method will often lead you to water this plant about once every week. When extremely hot weather arrives, you may need to increase your watering frequency to about twice or more per week. With that said, mature, well-established the Chinese knotweed can show an admirable ability to withstand drought.
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How much water does my Chinese knotweed need?
When it comes time to water your Chinese knotweed, you should not be shy about how much water you give. With the first two to three inches of soil dry, this plant will appreciate a long and thorough watering. Supply enough water to soak the soil entirely. The amount of water you add should be enough to cause excess water to flow through the drainage holes at the bottom of your pot. If you don’t see excess water draining from the pot, you have likely underwatered your plant. But do not let the water accumulate inside the soil, which will be very dangerous to the plant as well. Alternatively, a lack of water draining through the pot could indicate poorly draining soils, which is detrimental to the health of this plant and should be avoided. If the plant is outside, 1 inch of rain per week will be sufficient.
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How should I water my Chinese knotweed at different growth stages?
The water needs of the Chinese knotweed can change depending on growth stages as well. For example, when your Chinese knotweed is in the first few years of its life, or if you have just transplanted it to a new growing location, you will need to give more water than usual. During both of those stages, your Chinese knotweed will put a lot of energy towards sprouting new roots that will then support future growth. For those roots to perform their best, they need a bit more moisture than they would at a more mature phase. After a few seasons, your Chinese knotweed will need much less water. Another growth stage in which this plant may need more water is during the bloom period. Flower development can make use of a significant amount of moisture, which is why you might need to give your Chinese knotweed more water at this time.
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How should I water my Chinese knotweed through the seasons?
The Chinese knotweed will have its highest water needs during the hottest months of the year. During the height of summer, you may need to give this plant water more than once per week, depending on how fast the soil dries out. The opposite is true during the winter. In winter, your plant will enter a dormant phase, in which it will need far less water than usual. In fact, you may not need to water this plant at all during the winter months. However, if you do water during winter, you should not do so more than about once per month. Watering too much at this time will make it more likely that your Chinese knotweed will contract a disease.
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What's the difference between watering my Chinese knotweed indoors and outdoors?
It is most common to grow the Chinese knotweed indoors for any gardener that does not live in temperate and tropical regions. Those gardeners should consider the fact that soil in a container can dry out a bit faster than ground soil. Also, the presence of drying elements such as air conditioning units can cause your Chinese knotweed to need water on a more frequent basis as well. if you planted it outside. When that is the case, it’s likely you won’t need to water your Chinese knotweed very much at all. If you receive rainfall on a regular basis, that may be enough to keep your plant alive. Alternatively, those who grow this plant inside will need to water it more often, as allowing rainwater to soak the soil will not be an option.
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Key Facts About Chinese knotweed

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Attributes of Chinese knotweed

Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Herb
Bloom Time
Late summer, Early fall, Mid fall
Plant Height
2 m to 4 m
Flower Size
6 mm to 7 mm
Flower Color
White
Cream
Red
Leaf type
Deciduous
Ideal Temperature
15 - 38 ℃

Symbolism

Usages

Garden Use

Trivia and Interesting Facts

Scientific Classification of Chinese knotweed

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Common Pests & Diseases About Chinese knotweed

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Common issues for Chinese knotweed based on 10 million real cases
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Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles are a class of colored insects 1 to 2 cm in size. They gnaw on leaves and petals resulting in small, round holes scattered over the surface.
Solutions: For less serious cases: Remove beetles, nymphs, and eggs. Remove all life stages of the beetles and kill them by placing them in a bucket of warm, soapy water. This can be done more easily by placing the bucket under affected leaves and shaking the plant. This method is most effective in the afternoon when leaf beetles are more active. Always dispose of insects in a sealed bag or container to avoid escape and spread. To treat more serious infestations: Apply organic insecticides. Use naturally-derived insecticides before moving on to synthetic insecticides. Neem oil and pyrethrum are naturally-derived insecticides that should be applied following label instructions. Apply synthetic insecticides. Examples of insecticides effective for leaf beetles include carbaryl, permethrin, and bifenthrin. Apply insecticides according to label instructions.
Caterpillars
Caterpillars Caterpillars
Caterpillars
Caterpillars are fleshy moth or butterfly larvae that come in an array of colors, patterns, and even hairstyles. They chew on leaves and flower petals, creating large, irregular holes.
Solutions: Even though caterpillars are diverse, they all chew on plant parts and can cause significant damage if present in large numbers. For severe cases: Apply insecticide. For an organic solution, spray plants with a Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which specifically affects the larval stage of moths and butterflies. Be sure to coat plants, since caterpillars need to ingest Bt for it to be effective. This will not harm other insects. Spray a chili extract. Chili seeds can be cooked in water to make a spicy spray that caterpillars don't like. Spray this mixture on the plants, but be aware it will also be spicy to humans. Introduce beneficial insects. Release beneficial insects to the garden that eat caterpillars, such as parasitic wasps. For less severe cases: Hand pick. Using gloves, pick off caterpillars on plants and dispose of them in a bucket of soapy water. Dust plants with diatomaceous earth. This powder is harmless to humans but irritates caterpillars. Therefore, it will make it difficult for caterpillars to move and eat.
Scars
Scars Scars
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Solutions: Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Leaf Weevils
Leaf Weevils Leaf Weevils
Leaf Weevils
Leaf Weevils are insects that feed on the leaves of plants.
Solutions: Leaf Weevils are relatively easy to control once their presence is discovered. Here’s what to do: Spray the foliage with an insecticide Place sticky traps around the lower trunks of fruit trees and other woody plants. Weevils can’t fly, and have to crawl up the plants when they emerge from the soil. Dig into the soil around plants with a garden fork and remove and dispose of any larvae. Let chickens roam around the garden, as they love to feed on weevil larvae.
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Leaf beetles
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Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles are a class of colored insects 1 to 2 cm in size. They gnaw on leaves and petals resulting in small, round holes scattered over the surface.
Overview
Overview
Leaf beetles range in size from 1.5 mm to 2 cm. Both adult beetles and their larvae eat the leaves of many different types of plants. There are over 35,000 different species of leaf beetles, in a variety of colors including gold, green, yellow-striped, and red striped. Some of these have been mistaken for ladybirds because of their shape and coloring. They can be oval, round, or elongated in shape. These insect pests are most active in spring and summer.
If not controlled, leaf beetles can do a lot of damage to vegetable crops and ornamental plants. They feed on the leaves, flowers, stems, roots, and fruits of different plants. They can fly, which means it's easy for them to move from one plant to another. Some species of leaf beetles only target one specific crop, while others will target many different types of plants. Although a lot of the damage that they cause is cosmetic, an infestation can weaken a plant and leave it prone to other more problematic diseases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The first signs of a leaf beetles infestation are small visible holes in leaves. Leaves then become discolored and dark beetle droppings can be seen. As the leaves turn yellow and brown, they will drop off the plant onto the ground. Some leaves will appear skeletonized with only the veins still remaining.
Infestation begins in spring, when the adult beetles emerge from the soil and lay their eggs on the leaves of plants. When these eggs hatch, the young nymphs start munching on the leaves as they grow up. Once leaf beetles are large and mature, they'll fall to the ground and pupate in the soil over winter before starting the cycle all over again.
Leaf beetles also eat holes in fruits and vegetables. These can be seen as small round holes that sometimes have a larger brown area surrounding them.
Solutions
Solutions
For less serious cases:
  1. Remove beetles, nymphs, and eggs. Remove all life stages of the beetles and kill them by placing them in a bucket of warm, soapy water. This can be done more easily by placing the bucket under affected leaves and shaking the plant. This method is most effective in the afternoon when leaf beetles are more active. Always dispose of insects in a sealed bag or container to avoid escape and spread.
To treat more serious infestations:
  1. Apply organic insecticides. Use naturally-derived insecticides before moving on to synthetic insecticides. Neem oil and pyrethrum are naturally-derived insecticides that should be applied following label instructions.
  2. Apply synthetic insecticides. Examples of insecticides effective for leaf beetles include carbaryl, permethrin, and bifenthrin. Apply insecticides according to label instructions.
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Caterpillars
plant poor
Caterpillars
Caterpillars are fleshy moth or butterfly larvae that come in an array of colors, patterns, and even hairstyles. They chew on leaves and flower petals, creating large, irregular holes.
Overview
Overview
Caterpillars can cause problems for home gardeners. If not managed, these insects can defoliate a plant in just a matter of days. However, home gardeners face a challenge because these caterpillars eventually turn into beautiful butterflies and moths, which are important for pollination and the general ecosystem.
There are thousands of different species of caterpillars and many will only target certain plants. If caterpillars are posing a problem, they can be removed by hand, or gardeners can use insect-proof netting to protect their valuable plants.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Caterpillars are the larvae of butterflies and moths. During the warmer months, butterflies and moths that visit gardens will lay their eggs on the underside of leaves.
When the tiny eggs hatch, the young larvae emerge and start feeding on the leaves of the plant. Depending on how many larvae have hatched, they can easily defoliate the plant in a very short period of time. Caterpillars will shed their skin as they grow, around 4 or 5 times during this feeding cycle.
Symptoms of caterpillars eating plants appear as holes in the leaves. The edges of the leaves may be eaten away as well, and flowers can be affected as well.
Some are easy to see, but others need to be searched for. This is because their bodies are often camouflaged to look like part of the plant. Gardeners need to look carefully along the stems of the plant as well as under the leaves. Also, look for tiny white, yellow, or brown eggs that can be found in groups on the underside of leaves.
Once the caterpillar is fully grown, it transforms into a pupa or chrysalis. Then, after a period of time that varies according to the species, a butterfly or moth will emerge from the pupa and the cycle begins again.
Solutions
Solutions
Even though caterpillars are diverse, they all chew on plant parts and can cause significant damage if present in large numbers.
For severe cases:
  1. Apply insecticide. For an organic solution, spray plants with a Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which specifically affects the larval stage of moths and butterflies. Be sure to coat plants, since caterpillars need to ingest Bt for it to be effective. This will not harm other insects.
  2. Spray a chili extract. Chili seeds can be cooked in water to make a spicy spray that caterpillars don't like. Spray this mixture on the plants, but be aware it will also be spicy to humans.
  3. Introduce beneficial insects. Release beneficial insects to the garden that eat caterpillars, such as parasitic wasps.
For less severe cases:
  1. Hand pick. Using gloves, pick off caterpillars on plants and dispose of them in a bucket of soapy water.
  2. Dust plants with diatomaceous earth. This powder is harmless to humans but irritates caterpillars. Therefore, it will make it difficult for caterpillars to move and eat.
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Scars
plant poor
Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Scars form when the plant repairs wounds. They can be the result of people or pets passing by and scraping the plant. Once the underlying issue is resolved, the plant will heal but a scar may remain.
Pests and pathogens can also cause scarring. Insects may attack the plant for a meal, resulting in extensive scarring when a few invaders turn into an infestation. Diseases such as fungus and bacteria can weaken the plant, causing brown spots, mushy areas, or blisters that lead to scars.
Scars occur on stems when a leaf or bud has been lost and the plant has healed. The harder tissue is like a scab that protects a wound.
On other occasions, scars can signal problems from environmental conditions, such as overexposure to sunlight or heat. It might surprise you to know that plants can suffer from sunburn, even desert dwellers like cactus!
Solutions
Solutions
Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover.
  1. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes.
  2. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray.
  3. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs.
  4. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Prevention
Prevention
Preventing some sources of scarring is easier than others, but all start with careful attention to your plants once you decide to bring them home.
  1. Review specific guidelines for your plant, including soil drainage, watering, and fertilizer requirements.
  2. Inspect plants before planting and use sterile pots and fresh potting soil or media to limit transfer of fungi or bacteria.
  3. Once established, check your plants regularly for signs of scarring or the presence of pests, as it is better to catch problems as early as possible.
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Leaf Weevils
plant poor
Leaf Weevils
Leaf Weevils are insects that feed on the leaves of plants.
Overview
Overview
Leaf Weevils are insects that feed on the leaves of plants. They can cause major damage to both edible and non-edible plants. Watch out for these garden pests and use control measures to get rid of them as soon as the problem is noticed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Leaf Weevils are small flightless insects that are typically around 6 mm long. They have a hard body that is oval shaped and covered in short hairs, a long snout on their head that is downward facing, and 3 pairs of legs with hooked claws.
Once mated, the female weevil with lay around 20 eggs at one time, either in leaf litter on the ground or sometimes on the soil. Weevils generally only produce one batch of eggs a year but may produce 2 if conditions are ideal.
The eggs take around 6 to 15 days to hatch. When the larva emerges, it burrows into the soil. These larvae have chewing mouth parts and no legs. They feed on the roots of the plants. When this happens, you may see signs of wilting of the leaves, stems, and flowers as the plant can’t deliver enough water from the roots to the above-ground growing parts.
Eventually, the larva evolves into a soft white pupa. The pupating period normally takes around 1 to 3 weeks. After this, the adult leaf weevil will emerge and crawl up the plant to feed on the leaves.
Adult leaf Weevils feed on young leaves, stems, flowers, and buds of almost any plant. This includes many varieties of fruits and vegetables as well as ornamental plants. This creates irregular round holes in the leaves. These holes normally start at the edges of the leaf. Holes may also be made in flowers, lesions may be caused on the skin of fruit, and sometimes whole stems are chewed off.
These insects prefer a humid environment with warm temperatures. They are mostly active during the night and will hide in leaf litter, mulch, and other debris during the day.
Solutions
Solutions
Leaf Weevils are relatively easy to control once their presence is discovered. Here’s what to do:
  • Spray the foliage with an insecticide
  • Place sticky traps around the lower trunks of fruit trees and other woody plants. Weevils can’t fly, and have to crawl up the plants when they emerge from the soil.
  • Dig into the soil around plants with a garden fork and remove and dispose of any larvae.
  • Let chickens roam around the garden, as they love to feed on weevil larvae.
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distribution

Distribution of Chinese knotweed

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Habitat of Chinese knotweed

Mountain slopes, rock crevices, thickets in valleys
Northern Hemisphere
South Hemisphere

Distribution Map of Chinese knotweed

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Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
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More Info on Chinese Knotweed Growth and Care

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Basic Care Guide
Transplant
2-3 feet (60-90 cm)
The optimal transplanting period for chinese knotweed is from the burgeoning warmth of late spring into early summer or the cooling embrace of mid to late autumn, as these seasons provide mild temperatures and favorable conditions for root establishment. When relocating chinese knotweed, select a location with well-drained soil and partial shade to ensure the best outcome for your verdant friend. Remember, delicate handling can make a world of difference.
Transplant Techniques
Temperature
-10 - 43 ℃
Chinese knotweed is native to environments with a moderate temperate climate. Its preferred temperature range is 59 to 100.4°F (15 to 38℃). For optimal growth, adjust temperatures to mimic natural conditions depending on the season.
Temp for Healthy Growth
Pruning
Spring, Summer
This perennial herb is renowned for its climbing vines and tuberous roots, often used in traditional medicine. For chinese knotweed, pruning should focus on controlling growth and removing dead or overcrowded stems to rejuvenate the plant and maintain its shape. The best time to prune is in spring or early summer, when it actively grows. Pruning can enhance air circulation, which prevents disease and encourages healthier foliage. Gardeners should use sharp, sterilized tools to make clean cuts without damaging the vines.
Pruning techniques
Propagation
Spring
Chinese knotweed is known for its robust growth and medicinal properties. Propagation is successfully achieved through sowing, where care should be taken to use well-draining soil combined with adequate moisture to encourage germination. Seeds should be sown at a depth that allows for sufficient soil coverage without impeding the emergence of new shoots. Consistent monitoring for pests and diseases ensures healthy development during the germination phase. For optimal results, it's beneficial to maintain an environment with stable temperatures and protection from extreme conditions.
Propagation Techniques
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Plants Related to Chinese knotweed

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Avocado
Avocado
Persea americana, widely known as the avocado plant, is an evergreen tree (semi-deciduous in cooler climates) that is native to Central America. It is cultivated all over the world for its nutritious fruits. Avocado has become an important plant in many cuisines due to its high nutrient and fat content, creamy texture, and distinct taste.
Watermelon
Watermelon
Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) is a flowering plant with a vine-like appearance native to Western Africa. Watermelon bears fruit that are widely cultivated and consumed across the world. Watermelon grow in tropical and temperate climates and requires warmth to grow. There are 1000 varieties around the world.
Guava
Guava
Guava (*Psidium guajava*) is a fruit-producing evergreen shrub that grows natively in the Caribbean region and South America. Guava attracts the honey bee and other insects, and guava fruit is edible. Additionally, guava wood is used for smoking meat.
Cantaloupe
Cantaloupe
Cucumis melo includes a variety of melons, including honeydew, cantaloupe, and muskmelon. These melons are an excellent source of vitamins A and C and are commonly eaten fresh or dried. It is occasionally turned into oil or liqueur.
Alfalfa
Alfalfa
Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is a perennial flowering plant in the legume family of Fabaceae. The common name alfalfa is mainly used in North America. In the rest of the world, this crop is called "lucerne." This plant looks similar to clover due to its purple flowers.
Poison ivy
Poison ivy
In pop culture, poison ivy is a symbol of an obnoxious weed because, despite its unthreatening looks, it gives a highly unpleasant contact rash to the unfortunate person who touches it. Still, it is commonly eaten by many animals, and the seeds are a favorite with birds. The leaves turn bright red in fall. Its sister species, Western poison ivy (Toxicodendron rydbergii), is not considered to be invasive in the United States, but is noxious in Australia and New Zealand.
Pokeweed
Pokeweed
Although its berries look juicy and tempting, the fruits and the root of pokeweed are toxic and should not be eaten. Pokeweed is considered a pest species by farmers but is nevertheless often grown as an ornamental plant. Its berries can be made into pokeberry ink as well.
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Care Guide for Chinese knotweed

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Questions About Chinese knotweed

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Watering Watering Watering
Pruning Pruning Pruning
Sunlight Sunlight Sunlight
Temperature Temperature Temperature
Fertilizing Fertilizing Fertilizing
What is the best way to water my Chinese knotweed?
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What should I do if I water my Chinese knotweed too much or too little?
more
How often should I water my Chinese knotweed?
more
How much water does my Chinese knotweed need?
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How should I water my Chinese knotweed at different growth stages?
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How should I water my Chinese knotweed through the seasons?
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What's the difference between watering my Chinese knotweed indoors and outdoors?
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Key Facts About Chinese knotweed

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Attributes of Chinese knotweed

Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Herb
Bloom Time
Late summer, Early fall, Mid fall
Plant Height
2 m to 4 m
Flower Size
6 mm to 7 mm
Flower Color
White
Cream
Red
Leaf type
Deciduous
Ideal Temperature
15 - 38 ℃
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Symbolism

Usages

Garden Use

Trivia and Interesting Facts

Scientific Classification of Chinese knotweed

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Common Pests & Diseases About Chinese knotweed

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Common issues for Chinese knotweed based on 10 million real cases
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Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles Leaf beetles Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles are a class of colored insects 1 to 2 cm in size. They gnaw on leaves and petals resulting in small, round holes scattered over the surface.
Solutions: For less serious cases: Remove beetles, nymphs, and eggs. Remove all life stages of the beetles and kill them by placing them in a bucket of warm, soapy water. This can be done more easily by placing the bucket under affected leaves and shaking the plant. This method is most effective in the afternoon when leaf beetles are more active. Always dispose of insects in a sealed bag or container to avoid escape and spread. To treat more serious infestations: Apply organic insecticides. Use naturally-derived insecticides before moving on to synthetic insecticides. Neem oil and pyrethrum are naturally-derived insecticides that should be applied following label instructions. Apply synthetic insecticides. Examples of insecticides effective for leaf beetles include carbaryl, permethrin, and bifenthrin. Apply insecticides according to label instructions.
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Caterpillars
Caterpillars Caterpillars Caterpillars
Caterpillars are fleshy moth or butterfly larvae that come in an array of colors, patterns, and even hairstyles. They chew on leaves and flower petals, creating large, irregular holes.
Solutions: Even though caterpillars are diverse, they all chew on plant parts and can cause significant damage if present in large numbers. For severe cases: Apply insecticide. For an organic solution, spray plants with a Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which specifically affects the larval stage of moths and butterflies. Be sure to coat plants, since caterpillars need to ingest Bt for it to be effective. This will not harm other insects. Spray a chili extract. Chili seeds can be cooked in water to make a spicy spray that caterpillars don't like. Spray this mixture on the plants, but be aware it will also be spicy to humans. Introduce beneficial insects. Release beneficial insects to the garden that eat caterpillars, such as parasitic wasps. For less severe cases: Hand pick. Using gloves, pick off caterpillars on plants and dispose of them in a bucket of soapy water. Dust plants with diatomaceous earth. This powder is harmless to humans but irritates caterpillars. Therefore, it will make it difficult for caterpillars to move and eat.
Learn More About the Caterpillars more
Scars
Scars Scars Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Solutions: Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
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Leaf Weevils
Leaf Weevils Leaf Weevils Leaf Weevils
Leaf Weevils are insects that feed on the leaves of plants.
Solutions: Leaf Weevils are relatively easy to control once their presence is discovered. Here’s what to do: Spray the foliage with an insecticide Place sticky traps around the lower trunks of fruit trees and other woody plants. Weevils can’t fly, and have to crawl up the plants when they emerge from the soil. Dig into the soil around plants with a garden fork and remove and dispose of any larvae. Let chickens roam around the garden, as they love to feed on weevil larvae.
Learn More About the Leaf Weevils more
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Leaf beetles
plant poor
Leaf beetles
Leaf beetles are a class of colored insects 1 to 2 cm in size. They gnaw on leaves and petals resulting in small, round holes scattered over the surface.
Overview
Overview
Leaf beetles range in size from 1.5 mm to 2 cm. Both adult beetles and their larvae eat the leaves of many different types of plants. There are over 35,000 different species of leaf beetles, in a variety of colors including gold, green, yellow-striped, and red striped. Some of these have been mistaken for ladybirds because of their shape and coloring. They can be oval, round, or elongated in shape. These insect pests are most active in spring and summer.
If not controlled, leaf beetles can do a lot of damage to vegetable crops and ornamental plants. They feed on the leaves, flowers, stems, roots, and fruits of different plants. They can fly, which means it's easy for them to move from one plant to another. Some species of leaf beetles only target one specific crop, while others will target many different types of plants. Although a lot of the damage that they cause is cosmetic, an infestation can weaken a plant and leave it prone to other more problematic diseases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The first signs of a leaf beetles infestation are small visible holes in leaves. Leaves then become discolored and dark beetle droppings can be seen. As the leaves turn yellow and brown, they will drop off the plant onto the ground. Some leaves will appear skeletonized with only the veins still remaining.
Infestation begins in spring, when the adult beetles emerge from the soil and lay their eggs on the leaves of plants. When these eggs hatch, the young nymphs start munching on the leaves as they grow up. Once leaf beetles are large and mature, they'll fall to the ground and pupate in the soil over winter before starting the cycle all over again.
Leaf beetles also eat holes in fruits and vegetables. These can be seen as small round holes that sometimes have a larger brown area surrounding them.
Solutions
Solutions
For less serious cases:
  1. Remove beetles, nymphs, and eggs. Remove all life stages of the beetles and kill them by placing them in a bucket of warm, soapy water. This can be done more easily by placing the bucket under affected leaves and shaking the plant. This method is most effective in the afternoon when leaf beetles are more active. Always dispose of insects in a sealed bag or container to avoid escape and spread.
To treat more serious infestations:
  1. Apply organic insecticides. Use naturally-derived insecticides before moving on to synthetic insecticides. Neem oil and pyrethrum are naturally-derived insecticides that should be applied following label instructions.
  2. Apply synthetic insecticides. Examples of insecticides effective for leaf beetles include carbaryl, permethrin, and bifenthrin. Apply insecticides according to label instructions.
Prevention
Prevention
To prevent infestations of leaf beetles, follow these practices.
  1. Regularly check for beetles. To prevent large pest infestations, be proactive about frequently checking plants for pests and removing them quickly.
  2. Clear debris. Clear weeds and debris to remove areas where these beetles may overwinter and hide.
  3. Attract natural predators. Birds and other insects, such as wasps and ladybugs, are effective natural predators of leaf beetles. Encourage them to visit by including a diverse array of plants to provide habitat and food. Also, avoid applying broad-spectrum herbicides that can harm and kill beneficial insects.
  4. Plant aromatic herbs like mint, garlic, or rosemary, as these can repel leaf beetles.
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Caterpillars
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Caterpillars
Caterpillars are fleshy moth or butterfly larvae that come in an array of colors, patterns, and even hairstyles. They chew on leaves and flower petals, creating large, irregular holes.
Overview
Overview
Caterpillars can cause problems for home gardeners. If not managed, these insects can defoliate a plant in just a matter of days. However, home gardeners face a challenge because these caterpillars eventually turn into beautiful butterflies and moths, which are important for pollination and the general ecosystem.
There are thousands of different species of caterpillars and many will only target certain plants. If caterpillars are posing a problem, they can be removed by hand, or gardeners can use insect-proof netting to protect their valuable plants.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Caterpillars are the larvae of butterflies and moths. During the warmer months, butterflies and moths that visit gardens will lay their eggs on the underside of leaves.
When the tiny eggs hatch, the young larvae emerge and start feeding on the leaves of the plant. Depending on how many larvae have hatched, they can easily defoliate the plant in a very short period of time. Caterpillars will shed their skin as they grow, around 4 or 5 times during this feeding cycle.
Symptoms of caterpillars eating plants appear as holes in the leaves. The edges of the leaves may be eaten away as well, and flowers can be affected as well.
Some are easy to see, but others need to be searched for. This is because their bodies are often camouflaged to look like part of the plant. Gardeners need to look carefully along the stems of the plant as well as under the leaves. Also, look for tiny white, yellow, or brown eggs that can be found in groups on the underside of leaves.
Once the caterpillar is fully grown, it transforms into a pupa or chrysalis. Then, after a period of time that varies according to the species, a butterfly or moth will emerge from the pupa and the cycle begins again.
Solutions
Solutions
Even though caterpillars are diverse, they all chew on plant parts and can cause significant damage if present in large numbers.
For severe cases:
  1. Apply insecticide. For an organic solution, spray plants with a Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which specifically affects the larval stage of moths and butterflies. Be sure to coat plants, since caterpillars need to ingest Bt for it to be effective. This will not harm other insects.
  2. Spray a chili extract. Chili seeds can be cooked in water to make a spicy spray that caterpillars don't like. Spray this mixture on the plants, but be aware it will also be spicy to humans.
  3. Introduce beneficial insects. Release beneficial insects to the garden that eat caterpillars, such as parasitic wasps.
For less severe cases:
  1. Hand pick. Using gloves, pick off caterpillars on plants and dispose of them in a bucket of soapy water.
  2. Dust plants with diatomaceous earth. This powder is harmless to humans but irritates caterpillars. Therefore, it will make it difficult for caterpillars to move and eat.
Prevention
Prevention
Prevention may require less effort than attempts to eradicate infestations that have already begun. Here are our top steps for prevention:
  1. Monitor plants. Check plants regularly for caterpillar eggs on leaves. If they do not belong to an endangered species, they should be squished.
  2. Use insect netting. Cover plants with insect netting to prevent butterflies and moths from laying eggs on plants.
  3. Apply diatomaceous earth. Apply DE to plants early in the season and reapply after rain.
  4. Encourage plant diversity. This will attract predatory insects including parasitic wasps.
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Scars
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Scars
Any light-colored markings that appear on stems but which do not enlarge or multiply are simply scars that have healed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Scars form when the plant repairs wounds. They can be the result of people or pets passing by and scraping the plant. Once the underlying issue is resolved, the plant will heal but a scar may remain.
Pests and pathogens can also cause scarring. Insects may attack the plant for a meal, resulting in extensive scarring when a few invaders turn into an infestation. Diseases such as fungus and bacteria can weaken the plant, causing brown spots, mushy areas, or blisters that lead to scars.
Scars occur on stems when a leaf or bud has been lost and the plant has healed. The harder tissue is like a scab that protects a wound.
On other occasions, scars can signal problems from environmental conditions, such as overexposure to sunlight or heat. It might surprise you to know that plants can suffer from sunburn, even desert dwellers like cactus!
Solutions
Solutions
Each source of scarring requires a different approach to help your plant recover.
  1. Protect the trunk and leaves from physical damage like scrapes.
  2. If pests or disease are the cause of scarring, isolate the plant from others to avoid further spread. Some pests can be removed with organic remedies such as a soft cloth and soapy water solution or diluted isopropyl alcohol spray.
  3. Stop sunburn by moving your plant away from direct sunlight and making sure it has the water it needs.
  4. Frequent leaf or bud loss may be due to insufficient light or nutrients.
Prevention
Prevention
Preventing some sources of scarring is easier than others, but all start with careful attention to your plants once you decide to bring them home.
  1. Review specific guidelines for your plant, including soil drainage, watering, and fertilizer requirements.
  2. Inspect plants before planting and use sterile pots and fresh potting soil or media to limit transfer of fungi or bacteria.
  3. Once established, check your plants regularly for signs of scarring or the presence of pests, as it is better to catch problems as early as possible.
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Leaf Weevils
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Leaf Weevils
Leaf Weevils are insects that feed on the leaves of plants.
Overview
Overview
Leaf Weevils are insects that feed on the leaves of plants. They can cause major damage to both edible and non-edible plants. Watch out for these garden pests and use control measures to get rid of them as soon as the problem is noticed.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Leaf Weevils are small flightless insects that are typically around 6 mm long. They have a hard body that is oval shaped and covered in short hairs, a long snout on their head that is downward facing, and 3 pairs of legs with hooked claws.
Once mated, the female weevil with lay around 20 eggs at one time, either in leaf litter on the ground or sometimes on the soil. Weevils generally only produce one batch of eggs a year but may produce 2 if conditions are ideal.
The eggs take around 6 to 15 days to hatch. When the larva emerges, it burrows into the soil. These larvae have chewing mouth parts and no legs. They feed on the roots of the plants. When this happens, you may see signs of wilting of the leaves, stems, and flowers as the plant can’t deliver enough water from the roots to the above-ground growing parts.
Eventually, the larva evolves into a soft white pupa. The pupating period normally takes around 1 to 3 weeks. After this, the adult leaf weevil will emerge and crawl up the plant to feed on the leaves.
Adult leaf Weevils feed on young leaves, stems, flowers, and buds of almost any plant. This includes many varieties of fruits and vegetables as well as ornamental plants. This creates irregular round holes in the leaves. These holes normally start at the edges of the leaf. Holes may also be made in flowers, lesions may be caused on the skin of fruit, and sometimes whole stems are chewed off.
These insects prefer a humid environment with warm temperatures. They are mostly active during the night and will hide in leaf litter, mulch, and other debris during the day.
Solutions
Solutions
Leaf Weevils are relatively easy to control once their presence is discovered. Here’s what to do:
  • Spray the foliage with an insecticide
  • Place sticky traps around the lower trunks of fruit trees and other woody plants. Weevils can’t fly, and have to crawl up the plants when they emerge from the soil.
  • Dig into the soil around plants with a garden fork and remove and dispose of any larvae.
  • Let chickens roam around the garden, as they love to feed on weevil larvae.
Prevention
Prevention
There are various ways to keep leaf Weevils away from plants.
  • Remove weeds such as dandelion, capeweed, portulaca, mallow, sorrel, and dock. Leaf Weevils are attracted to these weeds and will set up a colony.
  • Make sure fruit trees are well spaced from each other. This ensures that the weevils and their larvae don’t spread from one tree to the next.
  • Cultivate the soil before planting a new crop. This allows any larvae or pupae in the soil to be unearthed and disposed of.
  • Regularly fertilize the soil to encourage both earthworm and microbial activity.
  • Check plants regularly to see any signs of leaf weevil activity. Also check under loose bark, mulch, leaf litter, and in the junction of stems on the plant.
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distribution

Distribution of Chinese knotweed

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Habitat of Chinese knotweed

Mountain slopes, rock crevices, thickets in valleys
Northern Hemisphere
South Hemisphere

Distribution Map of Chinese knotweed

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
plant_info

Plants Related to Chinese knotweed

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Temperature
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Requirements
Ideal
Tolerable
Unsuitable
Just like people, each plant has its own preferences. Learn about your plants' temperature needs and create a comforting environment for them to flourish. As you care for your plants, your bond with them will deepen. Trust your intuition as you learn about their temperature needs, celebrating the journey you share. Lovingly monitor the temperature around your plants and adjust their environment as needed. A thermometer can be your ally in this heartfelt endeavor. Be patient and gentle with yourself as you explore your plants' temperature needs. Cherish your successes, learn from challenges, and nurture your garden with love, creating a haven that reflects the warmth of your care.
Essentials
Chinese knotweed is native to environments with a moderate temperate climate. Its preferred temperature range is 59 to 100.4°F (15 to 38℃). For optimal growth, adjust temperatures to mimic natural conditions depending on the season.
Regional wintering strategies
Chinese knotweed has strong cold resistance, so special frost protection measures are usually not necessary during winter. However, if the winter temperatures are expected to drop below {Limit_growth_temperature}, it is still important to provide cold protection. This can be achieved by covering the plant with materials such as soil or straw. Before the first freeze in autumn, it is recommended to water the plant abundantly, ensuring the soil remains moist and enters a frozen state. This helps prevent drought and water scarcity for the plant during winter and early spring.
Important Symptoms
Symptoms of Low Temperature in Chinese knotweed
Chinese knotweed is cold-tolerant and thrives best when the temperature is above {Suitable_growth_temperature_min}. During winter, it should be kept above {Tolerable_growing_temperature_min}. When the temperature falls below {Limit_growth_temperature}, although there may not be any noticeable changes during winter, there may be a decrease in sprouting or even no sprouting during springtime.
Solutions
In spring, remove any parts that have failed to sprout.
Symptoms of High Temperature in Chinese knotweed
During summer, Chinese knotweed should be kept below {Suitable_growth_temperature_max}. When the temperature exceeds {Tolerable_growing_temperature_max}, the leaves of the plant may become lighter in color, prone to curling, susceptible to sunburn, and in severe cases, the entire plant may wilt and become dry.
Solutions
Trim away the sunburned and dried-up parts. Move the plant to a location that provides shade from the midday and afternoon sun, or use a shade cloth to create shade. Water the plant in the morning and evening to keep the soil moist.
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