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Sweet basil
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Sweet basil
Sweet basil
Sweet basil
Sweet basil
Add to My Garden
Sweet basil
Ocimum basilicum
Also known as: Saint-joseph's-wort, Common basil
Sweet basil is a species of mint plant native to Asia and Africa. It is a popular houseplant, and thrives when it receives plenty of regular sun and water. This plant is also easy to transfer from one soil environment to another. The edible sweet basil leaves can be eaten fresh or dried with pizza, salads, soups, teas, and many other dishes.
Water
Twice per week
Water
Sunlight
Full sun
Sunlight
care guide

Care Guide for Sweet basil

Sweet basil requires its soil to be kept moist at all times. This species needs frequent watering and will grow best if kept in a well-draining pot. Sweet basil leaves can be overly sensitive to moisture, so this species should be watered from the base of the plant.
Fertilization
Fertilization
See Details
Sweet basil doesn't need large amounts of fertilizer to thrive. If fertilization of this species is preferred, a well-balanced liquid fertilizer can be applied once a week to boost seedling and plant growth. Overfertilization can cause the leaves of this species to curl and turn brown.
Shape the plant every 2 months during the growing season.
Sand, Loam, Clay, Sandy loam, Acidic, Neutral, Alkaline
Potting Suggestions
Potting Suggestions
See Details
Needs excellent drainage in pots.
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Sweet basil
Water
Water
Twice per week
Sunlight
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Full sun
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
9 - 11
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Planting Time
Spring, Summer, Fall
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Sweet basil
Water
Water
Twice per week
Sunlight
Sunlight
Full sun
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
9 - 11
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Summer, Fall
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Sweet basil
Water
Water
Twice per week
Sunlight
Sunlight
Full sun
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
9 - 11
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Summer, Fall
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Questions About Sweet basil

Watering Watering Watering
Pruning Pruning Pruning
Temperature Temperature Temperature
Seasonal Care Seasonal Care Seasonal Care
How Often to Water Sweet basil?
Overall, Sweet basil requires a significant amount of water throughout the growing season. To meet that high water need, you'll need to water early and often throughout the spring and summer. During the earlier parts of the growing season, you should water your Sweet basil about once or twice per week. As the season progresses, you should increase your watering frequency. You may need to water it twice per day or more during summer, depending on the weather. After your Sweet basil have gone through their major seasonal growth phases, you can reduce the frequency of your watering to about once per week until the end of the growing season.
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How Much to Water Sweet basil?
Since Sweet basil are incredibly popular, with many professional and amateur gardeners growing them successfully, we have a pretty clear idea of how to care for these plants. That understanding includes specific knowledge about the precise volume of water an average Sweet basil should receive. Generally, Sweet basil will require about 1 - 1.5 inches of water per week. That volume should be dispersed evenly through your weekly watering. As the weather gets warmer, you may need to supply more water, but in most cases, two inches per week is a good baseline amount.
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What Is the Best Way to Water the Sweet basil?
Not only does the Sweet basil have certain preferences regarding how much water it receives, but it also cares deeply about how you provide that water. In fact, if you don't use the proper watering technique, you risk harming your tomatoes. The best way to water Sweet basil is to apply the water directly to the soil in a slow and gentle manner. You should not pour all of the water into the soil at once, and you should not do overhead watering for your Sweet basil. Although you should water slowly, you should also water deeply to ensure that all of the soil in which your Sweet basil grows is sufficiently moist.
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How to Know If You Are Watering Sweet basil Enough?
Underwatering and overwatering can both occur as problems for your Sweet basil, and both these problems can manifest with similar symptoms. For example, foliage discoloration and wilting can both result from either overwatering or underwatering. When your Sweet basil is underwatered, its leaves will be curling and drooping at the beginning. You will see a bunch of leaves turn less vigorous. Underwatering is also likely to cause stunted growth and poor overall development as both the flowers and this plant require a high amount of water. Overwatering is more likely to lead to disease, including rot. Overwatering may also lead to unpleasant smells rising from your plant's soil. The symptoms of underwatering will show up quicker than overwatering. Overwatering can also be evident in soil conditions. Mainly, if you notice a lot of standing water or waterlogged soils, overwatering is likely to occur.
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What to Do If Your Water Sweet basil Too Much or Too Little?
If you find that you have overwatered your Sweet basil and you are concerned about the associated risk of disease, you should intervene immediately. Often the best approach for an overwatered Sweet basil is to uproot it from its current growing location. Once the plant is out of the ground, you can allow its roots to dry a bit before planting it in a new growing location. Ensure that the new growing location has soil with good drainage. If you grow in pots, you may also want to move your plant to a pot with more or larger drainage holes. In the case of underwatering, all you will need to do is increase the frequency with which you supply water to your plant.
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How to Water Sweet basil Through the Seasons?
As alluded to above, your Sweet basil's water needs will repeatedly change throughout the seasons. During most of spring and summer, you should water your Sweet basil about once every week. As the heat of summer arrives, you should plan to increase your watering frequency to once or twice per day. In the late summer and fall, towards the end of the harvest period, you can reduce your watering frequency to about once per week. After harvest has ended, you can cease watering as your Sweet basil has reached the end of its life cycle and will require no further soil moisture.
The maintenance schedule of Sweet basil will require you to alter the amount of water you provide depending on the plant's current growth stage. Early on, especially if you grow your Sweet basil from seeds, you'll need to provide water often enough to maintain consistent soil moisture, which encourages root development. When the plant becomes old enough to produce flowers, it will likely need even more water. During the fruit development growth stage, your Sweet basil will likely need the most water out of any growth period, at times requiring water more than twice per day. Following that phase, the water needs of Sweet basil will decline significantly.
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What'S the Difference between Watering Sweet basil Indoors and Outdoors?
Whether you grow Sweet basil indoors or outdoors can also play a role in how you water them. Sweet basil that grows outdoors may receive water from natural rainfall, which will reduce the amount of supplemental water you should supply. However, it is incredibly rare for rainfall to adequately replace your watering entirely. Plants that grow indoors, along with any Sweet basil that grows in a container, will need to be watered more frequently than those that grow in the ground outdoors. If you choose this route, please make sure that the plant gets enough water by checking the soil moisture within your pot often to keep your Sweet basil healthy.
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pests

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Sweet basil based on 10 million real cases
Brown spot
Brown spot Brown spot
Brown spot
This infection can cause brown spots or patches to appear on the plant.
Solutions: In minor cases of brown spot, there isn’t any need to treat the disease. However, if much of the foliage is affected and defoliation occurs, the plant will benefit from getting rid of the infection. It is recommended to start by applying organic treatment options, working up to the more potent synthetic, chemical fungicides if necessary. Organic options won’t kill the fungus, but will prevent it from spreading. Dissolve ½ teaspoon of baking soda and one teaspoon of liquid soap in a gallon of water. Using a spray bottle, spray on tops and bottoms of leaves until the mixture drips off. Repeat every two weeks until existing spots stop enlarging and new spots no longer appear. Spray a copper-based fungicidal soap on the leaves, coating the top and bottom leaf surfaces. Reapply as directed on the product label. Copper penetrates the leaf surface and prevents germination of spores so the fungus cannot spread. Apply an all-purpose fungicide to the entire plant, following the label instructions carefully.
Leaf rot
Leaf rot Leaf rot
Leaf rot
This pathogen can cause the leaves to rot.
Solutions: Bacterial infections need to be treated quickly to prevent the spread to neighboring, healthy plants, potentially wiping out large sections of your indoor or outdoor garden. In mild cases: Use sterilized (10% bleach solution) pruning shears or scissors to remove any infected plant parts, making sure to dispose of them off site. Use a copper-based bactericide to treat the unaffected foliage, as well as the soil, and neighboring plants. Follow the manufacturer’s rate and timing directions found on the product label. In severe cases, where more than half the leaves are affected: Remove all of the infected plants from the garden, disposing of them off site. Treat the soil and neighboring plants using a copper-based bactericide. Follow the manufacturer’s rate and timing directions found on the product label.
Underwatering
Underwatering Underwatering
Underwatering
Leaves may wilt for a variety of reasons.
Solutions: The easiest (and most obvious) way to address underwatering is to fully hydrate the plant. However, this must be done carefully. A common mistake that many gardeners make is to douse their underwatered plants with water. This can overwhelm the roots of the plant and shock its system, something that can be even more damaging than the lack of water to begin with. Instead, water thoroughly and slowly, taking breaks to let the water slowly saturate through the soil to get to the roots. Use room temperature water, as cold water might be too much of a shock. In the future, shorten the time between waterings. A good rule of thumb is to check the soil around each plant daily. If it’s dry to at least two inches down, it’s time to water. If a container plant is repeatedly drying out very quickly, repotting into a slower-draining container might be a good idea, too.
Leaf deformity
Leaf deformity Leaf deformity
Leaf deformity
Leaf deformities can have a variety of causes.
Solutions: Follow these steps to revive plants with abnormal leaves. Remove damaged leaves: Plants can recover from damage when given the time to do so. Remove any deformed leaves so they don't continue drawing energy from the plant. This also creates room for healthier ones to grow. Stop using herbicide: Though herbicide damage is challenging to diagnose, gardeners can potentially prevent deformed leaves by not using any and by strictly following manufacturers instructions. Spray insecticide: Prevent pests from inhabiting plant leaves by spraying with insecticide regularly and practicing good natural pest prevention techniques. Apply a balanced fertilizer: Solve nutrient deficiencies and excesses by using a well-balanced fertilizer (organic or conventional both work) before planting, and consider topdressing when signs of stress are apparent. Fix watering schedule: If plant leaves are curled downward due to too much or too little water, adjust the watering schedule so the soil is moist, but not damp. Remove infected plants: If the plant has succumbed to a viral infection, not much can be done to revive it. Remove and destroy all compromised plant material to prevent spread to other plants.
Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Solutions: If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
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Brown spot
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Brown spot
This infection can cause brown spots or patches to appear on the plant.
Overview
Overview
Discolored spots on the foliage of plants are one of the most common disease problems people observe. These spots are caused by fungal and bacterial diseases, with most infections related to a fungal pathogen.
Brown spot can occurs on all houseplants, flowering ornamentals, vegetable plants, and leaves of trees, bushes, and shrubs. No plants are resistant to it, and the problem is worse in warm, wet environments. It can occur at any point in the life stage as long as leaves are present.
Small brownish spots appear on the foliage and enlarge as the disease progresses. In severe cases, the plant or tree is weakened when the lesions interrupt photosynthesis or cause defoliation.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
In most cases, brown spot only affects a small percentage of the whole plant, appearing on a small amount of the leaves. A small infection only puts minor stress on the plant. However, if left untreated and the disease progresses over numerous seasons, it will severely impact the health and productivity of the infected specimen.
  • Sporulation begins (reproduction of the fungal spores), and tiny spots appear on leaves.
  • Placement is often random and scattered as diseases are spread through raindrops.
  • May appear on lower leaves and the interior of the plant where humidity is higher.
  • Brown spots enlarge and grow large enough to touch neighboring spots to form a more prominent blotch.
  • Leaf margins may turn yellow.
  • Tiny black dots (fruiting bodies of the fungi) appear in the dead spots.
  • Blotches grow in size until the entire leaf is brown.
  • The leaf falls off the plant.
Severe Symptoms
  • Partial or complete premature defoliation
  • Reduced growth
  • Increased susceptibility to pests and other diseases
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Brown spot, or leaf spot, is a common descriptive term given to several diseases affecting the leaves of plants and trees. Around 85% of diseases exhibiting leaf spots are due to fungus or fungus-like organisms. Sometimes brown spot is caused by a bacterial infection, or insect activity with similar symptoms.
When conditions are warm and the leaf surfaces are wet, fungal spores being transported by wind or rain land on the surface and cling to it. They do not rupture the cell walls but grow in the space between the plant plasma membrane and the plant cell wall. As the spores reproduce, they release toxins and enzymes that cause necrotic spots (i.e., dead tissue) on the leaves, allowing the fungi to consume the products released when the cells degrade.
Solutions
Solutions
In minor cases of brown spot, there isn’t any need to treat the disease. However, if much of the foliage is affected and defoliation occurs, the plant will benefit from getting rid of the infection. It is recommended to start by applying organic treatment options, working up to the more potent synthetic, chemical fungicides if necessary.
Organic options won’t kill the fungus, but will prevent it from spreading.
  1. Dissolve ½ teaspoon of baking soda and one teaspoon of liquid soap in a gallon of water. Using a spray bottle, spray on tops and bottoms of leaves until the mixture drips off. Repeat every two weeks until existing spots stop enlarging and new spots no longer appear.
  2. Spray a copper-based fungicidal soap on the leaves, coating the top and bottom leaf surfaces. Reapply as directed on the product label. Copper penetrates the leaf surface and prevents germination of spores so the fungus cannot spread.
  3. Apply an all-purpose fungicide to the entire plant, following the label instructions carefully.
Prevention
Prevention
Like many other diseases, it is easier to prevent brown spot than cure it, and this is done through cultural practices.
  • Clear fall leaves from the ground before winter to minimize places where fungi and bacteria can overwinter.
  • Maintain good air movement between plants through proper plant spacing.
  • Increase air circulation through the center of plants through pruning.
  • Thoroughly clean all pruning tools after working with diseased plants.
  • Never dispose of disease plant material in a compost pile.
  • Avoid overhead watering to keep moisture off of the foliage.
  • Keep plants healthy by providing adequate sunlight, water, and fertilizer.
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Leaf rot
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Leaf rot
This pathogen can cause the leaves to rot.
Overview
Overview
Leaf rot is very common among both house plants and garden plants. It affects foliage and occurs mainly when the leaves become wet due to rain or misting by the gardener. The cause is fungal disease and this is facilitated by the fungal spores adhering to wet leaves then penetrating the leaf and expanding rapidly. Damp conditions and poor air circulation will increase chances of infection taking place. Another factor are leaves that are damaged or have been penetrated by sap sucking insects that facilitate plant penetration.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
  1. Spores are able to cling to a damp leaf and penetrate, often through an existing wound.
  2. A small dark brown mark appears which expands rapidly as sporulation starts to take place.
  3. Quite quickly these bull's eye like circles can link together and the whole leaf turns dark and loses texture.
  4. Leaf drop occurs.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
These symptoms are caused by a bacterial infection invading the plant. Bacteria from many sources in the environment (air, water, soil, diseased plants) enter a plant through wounds, or in some cases the stomata when they are open. Once inside the leaf tissue, the bacteria feed and reproduce quickly, breaking down healthy leaves.
Bacterial infections threaten most plant species, and are more prominent in wet weather that more easily transfers the bacteria from plant to plant, or from soil to plant.
Solutions
Solutions
Bacterial infections need to be treated quickly to prevent the spread to neighboring, healthy plants, potentially wiping out large sections of your indoor or outdoor garden.
In mild cases: Use sterilized (10% bleach solution) pruning shears or scissors to remove any infected plant parts, making sure to dispose of them off site. Use a copper-based bactericide to treat the unaffected foliage, as well as the soil, and neighboring plants. Follow the manufacturer’s rate and timing directions found on the product label.
In severe cases, where more than half the leaves are affected: Remove all of the infected plants from the garden, disposing of them off site. Treat the soil and neighboring plants using a copper-based bactericide. Follow the manufacturer’s rate and timing directions found on the product label.
Prevention
Prevention
  1. Clean up garden debris at the end of the season, especially if it contains any diseased plant tissue. Diseases can overwinter from season to season and infect new plants.
  2. Avoid overhead watering to prevent transferring pathogens from one plant to another, and to keep foliage dry.
  3. Mulch around the base of plants to prevent soil-borne bacteria from splashing up onto uninfected plants.
  4. Sterilize cutting tools using a 10% bleach solution when gardening and moving from one plant to another.
  5. Do not work in your garden when it is wet.
  6. Rotate crops to prevent the buildup of bacteria in one site due to continuous cropping.
  7. Use a copper or streptomycin-containing bactericide in early spring to prevent infection. Read label directions carefully as they are not suitable for all plants.
  8. Ensure plants are well spaced and thin leaves on densely leaved plants so that air circulation is maximised.
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Underwatering
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Underwatering
Leaves may wilt for a variety of reasons.
Overview
Overview
Underwatering plants is one of the quickest ways to kill them. This is something that most gardeners are well aware of. Unfortunately, knowing exactly how much water a plant needs can be tricky, especially considering that underwatering and overwatering present similar symptoms in plants.
Therefore, it’s important to be vigilant and attentive to each plants’ individual needs.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
As mentioned earlier, overwatering and underwatering present similar symptoms in plants. These symptoms include poor growth, wilted leaves, defoliation, and brown leaf tips or margins. Ultimately, both underwatering and overwatering can lead to the death of a plant.
The easiest way to determine whether a plant has too much water or too little is to look at the leaves. If underwatering is the culprit, the leaves will look brown and crunchy, while if it’s overwatering, they will appear yellow or a pale green in color.
When this issue first begins, there may be no noticeable symptoms at all, particularly in hardy or drought-tolerant plants. However, they will begin to wilt once they start suffering from a lack of water. The edges of the plant’s leaves will become brown or curled. Soil pulling away from the edges of the planter is a telltale sign, or a crispy, brittle stem.
Prolonged underwatering can cause a plant’s growth to become stunted. The leaves might drop and the plant can be more susceptible to pest infestations, too.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Underwatering is caused by, quite simply, not watering plants often or deeply enough. There is a heightened risk of underwatering if any of these situations apply:
  • Extreme heat and dry weather (when growing outdoors)
  • Grow lights or indoor lighting that is too bright or intense for the type of plant
  • Using fast-draining growing media such as sand
Solutions
Solutions
The easiest (and most obvious) way to address underwatering is to fully hydrate the plant. However, this must be done carefully. A common mistake that many gardeners make is to douse their underwatered plants with water. This can overwhelm the roots of the plant and shock its system, something that can be even more damaging than the lack of water to begin with.
Instead, water thoroughly and slowly, taking breaks to let the water slowly saturate through the soil to get to the roots. Use room temperature water, as cold water might be too much of a shock.
In the future, shorten the time between waterings. A good rule of thumb is to check the soil around each plant daily. If it’s dry to at least two inches down, it’s time to water. If a container plant is repeatedly drying out very quickly, repotting into a slower-draining container might be a good idea, too.
Prevention
Prevention
Always check the soil before watering. If the top inch of soil feels moist, though not wet, the watering is perfect. If it’s dry, water it immediately. If it feels soggy, you avoid watering until it dries out a bit more.
Also, make sure the lighting is sufficient for the species. Plants grow faster and need more water when there is intense light or lots of heat. Being aware of these conditions and modifying them, if possible, is a good way to prevent underwatering. Many container plants are potted in soil mixtures mean to be well-draining. Adding materials that retain moisture, like compost or peat moss, can also prevent these symptoms.
Other tips to prevent underwatering include:
  • Choose pots with adequately-sized drainage holes
  • Avoid warm temperatures
  • Use large pots with additional soil (these take longer to dry out)
  • Avoid terracotta pots, which lose water quickly
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Leaf deformity
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Leaf deformity
Leaf deformities can have a variety of causes.
Overview
Overview
Leaf deformity manifests in the form of curled, cupped, or distorted leaves, often first seen in the spring. There are a number of different possibilities as to the cause and it will not always be easy to isolate the problem without laboratory analysis. In the majority of cases, however, the gardener should be able to isolate the cause through close examination of the plant and the local conditions.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The plant has developed abnormal leaves. They may look similar to leaf curl, but show other problems such as:
  • stunting
  • abnormal shapes
  • a bumpy texture
  • gaps between leaf sections
  • raised growths on the top surface
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The causes are widespread and varied and the gardener will need to examine plants carefully as well as consider environmental factors.
Disease due to insect damage: Mites, aphids, and other insects that feast on plant leaves can leave them vulnerable to viral and bacterial disease. Some, like leaf galls and rust, produce distorted leaves. If the gardener sees insects on the plants, it is likely the insect is the culprit. Some mites are too small to see, and laboratory analysis may be required.
Herbicide exposure: Herbicides can stress plant leaves. This may lead to stunted growth and a curling, cupped appearance. Even if the plant owner didn't apply herbicides, herbicide drift and planting in contaminated soils can expose plants to these chemicals. If all plants in an area have deformed leaves, the cause is likely herbicides. Herbicide exposure is also characterized by narrow new leaves.
Less than ideal growing conditions: If plants are exposed to cold temperatures right as their leaves are coming out of the bud, they might become stunted and malformed. If deformed leaves occur right after a cold spell or frost, this is likely the cause. Too much and too little water can also cause deformed leaves. Leaves curling down but not distorting is more likely to be a watering issue than a leaf deformity.
Nutrient deficiencies: A lack of critical nutrients during the growing phase, including boron, calcium, and molybdenum, may lead plant leaves to grow stunted or disfigured. If a nutrient deficiency is to blame, the leaves will also show discoloring.
Fungal infections: a variety of fungal pathogens can distort leaves, as is the case with Peach leaf curl.
Solutions
Solutions
Follow these steps to revive plants with abnormal leaves.
  1. Remove damaged leaves: Plants can recover from damage when given the time to do so. Remove any deformed leaves so they don't continue drawing energy from the plant. This also creates room for healthier ones to grow.
  2. Stop using herbicide: Though herbicide damage is challenging to diagnose, gardeners can potentially prevent deformed leaves by not using any and by strictly following manufacturers instructions.
  3. Spray insecticide: Prevent pests from inhabiting plant leaves by spraying with insecticide regularly and practicing good natural pest prevention techniques.
  4. Apply a balanced fertilizer: Solve nutrient deficiencies and excesses by using a well-balanced fertilizer (organic or conventional both work) before planting, and consider topdressing when signs of stress are apparent.
  5. Fix watering schedule: If plant leaves are curled downward due to too much or too little water, adjust the watering schedule so the soil is moist, but not damp.
  6. Remove infected plants: If the plant has succumbed to a viral infection, not much can be done to revive it. Remove and destroy all compromised plant material to prevent spread to other plants.
Prevention
Prevention
  1. Fertilize properly. Keep your plants full of essential nutrients with a balanced fertilizer.
  2. Regularly monitor for pests. Remove all pests by hand or treat them with an insecticide. Early discovery and treatment will prevent the spread of pests and diseases.
  3. Provide the proper amount of water. Water until the soil is moist, but not damp. Only once the soil dries out, should the plant be watered again.
  4. Protect plants from cold. Bring plants indoors or protect them with frost cloth when bad weather is forecast.
  5. Avoid herbicide exposure. If the gardener or surrounding neighbors are applying herbicides, consider moving vulnerable plants to where they are less exposed to any chemicals that may be carried on the wind.
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Aged yellow and dry
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Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Overview
Overview
Regardless of the type of plant or where it is grown, at some point, it will begin to aged yellow and dry. This is a natural, unavoidable process that happens when the plant has completed all of the steps in its life.
Annual plants go through this process at the end of a single growing season. Perennial plants live for multiple years, if not tens or hundreds of years, but will still ultimately exhibit these symptoms.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
When plants have progressed through their natural developmental stages and are nearing the end of their lifecycle, they begin showing signs of decline. Leaves will start to yellow and droop, and over time they turn papery brown and dry.
Once completely dry, the leaves begin to fall from the plant until the entire plant has dried out.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
At the end of its life, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence or natural aging and death. Cell division stops, and the plant begins catabolizing resources to use in other parts of the plant.
As this happens, the tissues begin yellow and drying until the entire plant is desiccated and perishes.
Solutions
Solutions
If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Prevention
Prevention
Unfortunately, there is no way to prevent plants from dying of “old age.” To help prolong their life, and put off symptoms of aged yellow and dry for as long as possible, take care of them by giving them enough water, fertilizing them appropriately, and making sure they get enough sunlight.
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weed

Weed Control

Weeds
Sweet basil has become naturalized globally due to its widespread culinary use, but it is considered a weed and an invasive species in many areas where it has escaped cultivation. For example, many cultivars of escaped culinary sweet basil are considered invasive species in the state of Florida within the United States. Basil is considered invasive because it is able to self-seed, and when left unchecked will take over the garden, crowding out other herb species. It is advisible to keep this species trimmed and pinch off flowers when they form. Care should be exercised when planting sweet basil for ornamental or culinary purposes not to let the species escape from its planted area or container.
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distribution

Distribution Map

Habitat

Roadside
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Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
habit
plant_info

More Info

Plant Type
Plant Type
Herb
Flower Color
Flower Color
White
Pink
Purple
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Summer, Fall
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green
Purple

Name story

Sweet basil
In European cuisine, it will be like losing its soul when there is no basil in the dish. No matter what recipe it is, you will like to add a little of it into the dish. It is because it gives off a strong and intense smell yet it adds a hint of sweetness into the dish. Hence, it is called Sweet basil.

Symbolism

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Usages

Beauty Improvement Value
Sweet basil can be made into essential oil to moisturize and tighten skin, balance oil secretion, and refresh the mind with its cooling smell.
Garden Use
Anyone with an herb garden is likely to have at least one sweet basil plant growing. It is a staple of food and herb gardens because of its aromatic properties and resistance to deer and rabbits. Sweet basil can be grown by other herbs or veggies, such as tomatoes and peppers, and will naturally repel insects.
other_plant

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Bloom Time
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Chinese hibiscus
Chinese hibiscus
Chinese hibiscus is a small flowering tree. Its fragrant flowers are well known the world over, leading to many cultivated variants. Chinese hibiscus is the national flower of Malaysia and is featured on Malaysian coins. Although the Latin name, Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, means “the rose of China,” it is not related to true roses.
Bloom Time
Summer, autumn
Garden Usage
Most Hibiscus plants of the Malvaceae (Hibiscus spp.) family are native to tropical and subtropical zones. With large, bright flowers, they are widely utilized as garden plants, bringing a tropical style to gardens. They also attract butterflies and hummingbirds, and have edible flowers that can be used for tea.
African false hosta
African false hosta
African false hosta (Drimiopsis maculata) is a flowering plant that is native to parts of Africa. It is sometimes known as “leopard plant” because of the dark green spots on its light green leaves. Each plant produces a spike of small, creamy-white flowers.
Bloom Time
Spring
Pohutukawa
Pohutukawa
Another name for pohutukawa (Metrosideros excelsa) is an evergreen tree native to New Zealand with showy flowers that look like crimson bottlebrushes. If you take good care of it, this tree will last ten years.
Bloom Time
Summer
Mandacaru
Mandacaru
Mandacaru is a spiny flowering succulent tree that has no leaves. In spring, the blossoms bloom at dusk and wither by the morning. In the past, it has been used for timber and construction or feed for livestock at times of drought; now, it can be used as a living fence or as an ornamental.
Bloom Time
Winter
Garden Usage
Cactus are popular choices to plant in pots or in gardens for ornamental effect. They often have succulent stems, are commonly covered with thorns, and give delicate flowers. Most plants of Cactaceae family are resistant to drought, need sufficient sunlight, and are easy to care for.
Flame of the woods
Flame of the woods
The flame of the woods is a popular warm-weather garden shrub due to its versatility and unique, bright red leaves. It can be used as a hedge, in flower beds, or even grown as a small tree. The flame of the woods is also popular as a standalone patio plant because of its hardiness and distinctive appearance. The genus name, Ixora, was derived from a poorly transliterated rendition of the Hindu god, Shiva's name.
Bloom Time
Spring, summer
Garden Usage
The flame of the woods is a tropical shrub native to Southeast Asia that will flower year-round in warm climates. It's suitable for growing both in the ground and in containers, and it can also be used for bonsai cultivation. It makes an excellent colorful hedge in suitable climates too, and is relatively easy to care for. The flame of the woods can be found in different colors, including red, orange, pink, yellow, and white., Flame of the woods can grow 3 - 4.5 m tall or be kept pruned to a houseplant size. The flowers each have four petals and grow in large clusters, and are excellent for attracting hummingbirds, bees, and butterflies to a garden.
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Sweet basil
Sweet basil
Sweet basil
Sweet basil
Sweet basil
Add to My Garden
Sweet basil
Ocimum basilicum
Also known as: Saint-joseph's-wort, Common basil
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Twice per week
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Sunlight
Full sun
Sunlight
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pests

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Sweet basil based on 10 million real cases
Brown spot
Brown spot  Brown spot  Brown spot
This infection can cause brown spots or patches to appear on the plant.
Solutions: In minor cases of brown spot, there isn’t any need to treat the disease. However, if much of the foliage is affected and defoliation occurs, the plant will benefit from getting rid of the infection. It is recommended to start by applying organic treatment options, working up to the more potent synthetic, chemical fungicides if necessary. Organic options won’t kill the fungus, but will prevent it from spreading. Dissolve ½ teaspoon of baking soda and one teaspoon of liquid soap in a gallon of water. Using a spray bottle, spray on tops and bottoms of leaves until the mixture drips off. Repeat every two weeks until existing spots stop enlarging and new spots no longer appear. Spray a copper-based fungicidal soap on the leaves, coating the top and bottom leaf surfaces. Reapply as directed on the product label. Copper penetrates the leaf surface and prevents germination of spores so the fungus cannot spread. Apply an all-purpose fungicide to the entire plant, following the label instructions carefully.
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Leaf rot
Leaf rot  Leaf rot  Leaf rot
This pathogen can cause the leaves to rot.
Solutions: Bacterial infections need to be treated quickly to prevent the spread to neighboring, healthy plants, potentially wiping out large sections of your indoor or outdoor garden. In mild cases: Use sterilized (10% bleach solution) pruning shears or scissors to remove any infected plant parts, making sure to dispose of them off site. Use a copper-based bactericide to treat the unaffected foliage, as well as the soil, and neighboring plants. Follow the manufacturer’s rate and timing directions found on the product label. In severe cases, where more than half the leaves are affected: Remove all of the infected plants from the garden, disposing of them off site. Treat the soil and neighboring plants using a copper-based bactericide. Follow the manufacturer’s rate and timing directions found on the product label.
Learn More more
Underwatering
Underwatering  Underwatering  Underwatering
Leaves may wilt for a variety of reasons.
Solutions: The easiest (and most obvious) way to address underwatering is to fully hydrate the plant. However, this must be done carefully. A common mistake that many gardeners make is to douse their underwatered plants with water. This can overwhelm the roots of the plant and shock its system, something that can be even more damaging than the lack of water to begin with. Instead, water thoroughly and slowly, taking breaks to let the water slowly saturate through the soil to get to the roots. Use room temperature water, as cold water might be too much of a shock. In the future, shorten the time between waterings. A good rule of thumb is to check the soil around each plant daily. If it’s dry to at least two inches down, it’s time to water. If a container plant is repeatedly drying out very quickly, repotting into a slower-draining container might be a good idea, too.
Learn More more
Leaf deformity
Leaf deformity  Leaf deformity  Leaf deformity
Leaf deformities can have a variety of causes.
Solutions: Follow these steps to revive plants with abnormal leaves. Remove damaged leaves: Plants can recover from damage when given the time to do so. Remove any deformed leaves so they don't continue drawing energy from the plant. This also creates room for healthier ones to grow. Stop using herbicide: Though herbicide damage is challenging to diagnose, gardeners can potentially prevent deformed leaves by not using any and by strictly following manufacturers instructions. Spray insecticide: Prevent pests from inhabiting plant leaves by spraying with insecticide regularly and practicing good natural pest prevention techniques. Apply a balanced fertilizer: Solve nutrient deficiencies and excesses by using a well-balanced fertilizer (organic or conventional both work) before planting, and consider topdressing when signs of stress are apparent. Fix watering schedule: If plant leaves are curled downward due to too much or too little water, adjust the watering schedule so the soil is moist, but not damp. Remove infected plants: If the plant has succumbed to a viral infection, not much can be done to revive it. Remove and destroy all compromised plant material to prevent spread to other plants.
Learn More more
Aged yellow and dry
Aged yellow and dry  Aged yellow and dry  Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Solutions: If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
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Brown spot
plant poor
Brown spot
This infection can cause brown spots or patches to appear on the plant.
Overview
Overview
Discolored spots on the foliage of plants are one of the most common disease problems people observe. These spots are caused by fungal and bacterial diseases, with most infections related to a fungal pathogen.
Brown spot can occurs on all houseplants, flowering ornamentals, vegetable plants, and leaves of trees, bushes, and shrubs. No plants are resistant to it, and the problem is worse in warm, wet environments. It can occur at any point in the life stage as long as leaves are present.
Small brownish spots appear on the foliage and enlarge as the disease progresses. In severe cases, the plant or tree is weakened when the lesions interrupt photosynthesis or cause defoliation.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
In most cases, brown spot only affects a small percentage of the whole plant, appearing on a small amount of the leaves. A small infection only puts minor stress on the plant. However, if left untreated and the disease progresses over numerous seasons, it will severely impact the health and productivity of the infected specimen.
  • Sporulation begins (reproduction of the fungal spores), and tiny spots appear on leaves.
  • Placement is often random and scattered as diseases are spread through raindrops.
  • May appear on lower leaves and the interior of the plant where humidity is higher.
  • Brown spots enlarge and grow large enough to touch neighboring spots to form a more prominent blotch.
  • Leaf margins may turn yellow.
  • Tiny black dots (fruiting bodies of the fungi) appear in the dead spots.
  • Blotches grow in size until the entire leaf is brown.
  • The leaf falls off the plant.
Severe Symptoms
  • Partial or complete premature defoliation
  • Reduced growth
  • Increased susceptibility to pests and other diseases
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Brown spot, or leaf spot, is a common descriptive term given to several diseases affecting the leaves of plants and trees. Around 85% of diseases exhibiting leaf spots are due to fungus or fungus-like organisms. Sometimes brown spot is caused by a bacterial infection, or insect activity with similar symptoms.
When conditions are warm and the leaf surfaces are wet, fungal spores being transported by wind or rain land on the surface and cling to it. They do not rupture the cell walls but grow in the space between the plant plasma membrane and the plant cell wall. As the spores reproduce, they release toxins and enzymes that cause necrotic spots (i.e., dead tissue) on the leaves, allowing the fungi to consume the products released when the cells degrade.
Solutions
Solutions
In minor cases of brown spot, there isn’t any need to treat the disease. However, if much of the foliage is affected and defoliation occurs, the plant will benefit from getting rid of the infection. It is recommended to start by applying organic treatment options, working up to the more potent synthetic, chemical fungicides if necessary.
Organic options won’t kill the fungus, but will prevent it from spreading.
  1. Dissolve ½ teaspoon of baking soda and one teaspoon of liquid soap in a gallon of water. Using a spray bottle, spray on tops and bottoms of leaves until the mixture drips off. Repeat every two weeks until existing spots stop enlarging and new spots no longer appear.
  2. Spray a copper-based fungicidal soap on the leaves, coating the top and bottom leaf surfaces. Reapply as directed on the product label. Copper penetrates the leaf surface and prevents germination of spores so the fungus cannot spread.
  3. Apply an all-purpose fungicide to the entire plant, following the label instructions carefully.
Prevention
Prevention
Like many other diseases, it is easier to prevent brown spot than cure it, and this is done through cultural practices.
  • Clear fall leaves from the ground before winter to minimize places where fungi and bacteria can overwinter.
  • Maintain good air movement between plants through proper plant spacing.
  • Increase air circulation through the center of plants through pruning.
  • Thoroughly clean all pruning tools after working with diseased plants.
  • Never dispose of disease plant material in a compost pile.
  • Avoid overhead watering to keep moisture off of the foliage.
  • Keep plants healthy by providing adequate sunlight, water, and fertilizer.
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Leaf rot
plant poor
Leaf rot
This pathogen can cause the leaves to rot.
Overview
Overview
Leaf rot is very common among both house plants and garden plants. It affects foliage and occurs mainly when the leaves become wet due to rain or misting by the gardener. The cause is fungal disease and this is facilitated by the fungal spores adhering to wet leaves then penetrating the leaf and expanding rapidly. Damp conditions and poor air circulation will increase chances of infection taking place. Another factor are leaves that are damaged or have been penetrated by sap sucking insects that facilitate plant penetration.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
  1. Spores are able to cling to a damp leaf and penetrate, often through an existing wound.
  2. A small dark brown mark appears which expands rapidly as sporulation starts to take place.
  3. Quite quickly these bull's eye like circles can link together and the whole leaf turns dark and loses texture.
  4. Leaf drop occurs.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
These symptoms are caused by a bacterial infection invading the plant. Bacteria from many sources in the environment (air, water, soil, diseased plants) enter a plant through wounds, or in some cases the stomata when they are open. Once inside the leaf tissue, the bacteria feed and reproduce quickly, breaking down healthy leaves.
Bacterial infections threaten most plant species, and are more prominent in wet weather that more easily transfers the bacteria from plant to plant, or from soil to plant.
Solutions
Solutions
Bacterial infections need to be treated quickly to prevent the spread to neighboring, healthy plants, potentially wiping out large sections of your indoor or outdoor garden.
In mild cases: Use sterilized (10% bleach solution) pruning shears or scissors to remove any infected plant parts, making sure to dispose of them off site. Use a copper-based bactericide to treat the unaffected foliage, as well as the soil, and neighboring plants. Follow the manufacturer’s rate and timing directions found on the product label.
In severe cases, where more than half the leaves are affected: Remove all of the infected plants from the garden, disposing of them off site. Treat the soil and neighboring plants using a copper-based bactericide. Follow the manufacturer’s rate and timing directions found on the product label.
Prevention
Prevention
  1. Clean up garden debris at the end of the season, especially if it contains any diseased plant tissue. Diseases can overwinter from season to season and infect new plants.
  2. Avoid overhead watering to prevent transferring pathogens from one plant to another, and to keep foliage dry.
  3. Mulch around the base of plants to prevent soil-borne bacteria from splashing up onto uninfected plants.
  4. Sterilize cutting tools using a 10% bleach solution when gardening and moving from one plant to another.
  5. Do not work in your garden when it is wet.
  6. Rotate crops to prevent the buildup of bacteria in one site due to continuous cropping.
  7. Use a copper or streptomycin-containing bactericide in early spring to prevent infection. Read label directions carefully as they are not suitable for all plants.
  8. Ensure plants are well spaced and thin leaves on densely leaved plants so that air circulation is maximised.
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Underwatering
plant poor
Underwatering
Leaves may wilt for a variety of reasons.
Overview
Overview
Underwatering plants is one of the quickest ways to kill them. This is something that most gardeners are well aware of. Unfortunately, knowing exactly how much water a plant needs can be tricky, especially considering that underwatering and overwatering present similar symptoms in plants.
Therefore, it’s important to be vigilant and attentive to each plants’ individual needs.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
As mentioned earlier, overwatering and underwatering present similar symptoms in plants. These symptoms include poor growth, wilted leaves, defoliation, and brown leaf tips or margins. Ultimately, both underwatering and overwatering can lead to the death of a plant.
The easiest way to determine whether a plant has too much water or too little is to look at the leaves. If underwatering is the culprit, the leaves will look brown and crunchy, while if it’s overwatering, they will appear yellow or a pale green in color.
When this issue first begins, there may be no noticeable symptoms at all, particularly in hardy or drought-tolerant plants. However, they will begin to wilt once they start suffering from a lack of water. The edges of the plant’s leaves will become brown or curled. Soil pulling away from the edges of the planter is a telltale sign, or a crispy, brittle stem.
Prolonged underwatering can cause a plant’s growth to become stunted. The leaves might drop and the plant can be more susceptible to pest infestations, too.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
Underwatering is caused by, quite simply, not watering plants often or deeply enough. There is a heightened risk of underwatering if any of these situations apply:
  • Extreme heat and dry weather (when growing outdoors)
  • Grow lights or indoor lighting that is too bright or intense for the type of plant
  • Using fast-draining growing media such as sand
Solutions
Solutions
The easiest (and most obvious) way to address underwatering is to fully hydrate the plant. However, this must be done carefully. A common mistake that many gardeners make is to douse their underwatered plants with water. This can overwhelm the roots of the plant and shock its system, something that can be even more damaging than the lack of water to begin with.
Instead, water thoroughly and slowly, taking breaks to let the water slowly saturate through the soil to get to the roots. Use room temperature water, as cold water might be too much of a shock.
In the future, shorten the time between waterings. A good rule of thumb is to check the soil around each plant daily. If it’s dry to at least two inches down, it’s time to water. If a container plant is repeatedly drying out very quickly, repotting into a slower-draining container might be a good idea, too.
Prevention
Prevention
Always check the soil before watering. If the top inch of soil feels moist, though not wet, the watering is perfect. If it’s dry, water it immediately. If it feels soggy, you avoid watering until it dries out a bit more.
Also, make sure the lighting is sufficient for the species. Plants grow faster and need more water when there is intense light or lots of heat. Being aware of these conditions and modifying them, if possible, is a good way to prevent underwatering. Many container plants are potted in soil mixtures mean to be well-draining. Adding materials that retain moisture, like compost or peat moss, can also prevent these symptoms.
Other tips to prevent underwatering include:
  • Choose pots with adequately-sized drainage holes
  • Avoid warm temperatures
  • Use large pots with additional soil (these take longer to dry out)
  • Avoid terracotta pots, which lose water quickly
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Leaf deformity
plant poor
Leaf deformity
Leaf deformities can have a variety of causes.
Overview
Overview
Leaf deformity manifests in the form of curled, cupped, or distorted leaves, often first seen in the spring. There are a number of different possibilities as to the cause and it will not always be easy to isolate the problem without laboratory analysis. In the majority of cases, however, the gardener should be able to isolate the cause through close examination of the plant and the local conditions.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The plant has developed abnormal leaves. They may look similar to leaf curl, but show other problems such as:
  • stunting
  • abnormal shapes
  • a bumpy texture
  • gaps between leaf sections
  • raised growths on the top surface
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
The causes are widespread and varied and the gardener will need to examine plants carefully as well as consider environmental factors.
Disease due to insect damage: Mites, aphids, and other insects that feast on plant leaves can leave them vulnerable to viral and bacterial disease. Some, like leaf galls and rust, produce distorted leaves. If the gardener sees insects on the plants, it is likely the insect is the culprit. Some mites are too small to see, and laboratory analysis may be required.
Herbicide exposure: Herbicides can stress plant leaves. This may lead to stunted growth and a curling, cupped appearance. Even if the plant owner didn't apply herbicides, herbicide drift and planting in contaminated soils can expose plants to these chemicals. If all plants in an area have deformed leaves, the cause is likely herbicides. Herbicide exposure is also characterized by narrow new leaves.
Less than ideal growing conditions: If plants are exposed to cold temperatures right as their leaves are coming out of the bud, they might become stunted and malformed. If deformed leaves occur right after a cold spell or frost, this is likely the cause. Too much and too little water can also cause deformed leaves. Leaves curling down but not distorting is more likely to be a watering issue than a leaf deformity.
Nutrient deficiencies: A lack of critical nutrients during the growing phase, including boron, calcium, and molybdenum, may lead plant leaves to grow stunted or disfigured. If a nutrient deficiency is to blame, the leaves will also show discoloring.
Fungal infections: a variety of fungal pathogens can distort leaves, as is the case with Peach leaf curl.
Solutions
Solutions
Follow these steps to revive plants with abnormal leaves.
  1. Remove damaged leaves: Plants can recover from damage when given the time to do so. Remove any deformed leaves so they don't continue drawing energy from the plant. This also creates room for healthier ones to grow.
  2. Stop using herbicide: Though herbicide damage is challenging to diagnose, gardeners can potentially prevent deformed leaves by not using any and by strictly following manufacturers instructions.
  3. Spray insecticide: Prevent pests from inhabiting plant leaves by spraying with insecticide regularly and practicing good natural pest prevention techniques.
  4. Apply a balanced fertilizer: Solve nutrient deficiencies and excesses by using a well-balanced fertilizer (organic or conventional both work) before planting, and consider topdressing when signs of stress are apparent.
  5. Fix watering schedule: If plant leaves are curled downward due to too much or too little water, adjust the watering schedule so the soil is moist, but not damp.
  6. Remove infected plants: If the plant has succumbed to a viral infection, not much can be done to revive it. Remove and destroy all compromised plant material to prevent spread to other plants.
Prevention
Prevention
  1. Fertilize properly. Keep your plants full of essential nutrients with a balanced fertilizer.
  2. Regularly monitor for pests. Remove all pests by hand or treat them with an insecticide. Early discovery and treatment will prevent the spread of pests and diseases.
  3. Provide the proper amount of water. Water until the soil is moist, but not damp. Only once the soil dries out, should the plant be watered again.
  4. Protect plants from cold. Bring plants indoors or protect them with frost cloth when bad weather is forecast.
  5. Avoid herbicide exposure. If the gardener or surrounding neighbors are applying herbicides, consider moving vulnerable plants to where they are less exposed to any chemicals that may be carried on the wind.
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Aged yellow and dry
plant poor
Aged yellow and dry
Natural aging can cause leaves to turn yellow and dry out.
Overview
Overview
Regardless of the type of plant or where it is grown, at some point, it will begin to aged yellow and dry. This is a natural, unavoidable process that happens when the plant has completed all of the steps in its life.
Annual plants go through this process at the end of a single growing season. Perennial plants live for multiple years, if not tens or hundreds of years, but will still ultimately exhibit these symptoms.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
When plants have progressed through their natural developmental stages and are nearing the end of their lifecycle, they begin showing signs of decline. Leaves will start to yellow and droop, and over time they turn papery brown and dry.
Once completely dry, the leaves begin to fall from the plant until the entire plant has dried out.
Disease Cause
Disease Cause
At the end of its life, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence or natural aging and death. Cell division stops, and the plant begins catabolizing resources to use in other parts of the plant.
As this happens, the tissues begin yellow and drying until the entire plant is desiccated and perishes.
Solutions
Solutions
If the yellowing and drying of leaves and flowers is a natural progression due to age, nothing can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
Prevention
Prevention
Unfortunately, there is no way to prevent plants from dying of “old age.” To help prolong their life, and put off symptoms of aged yellow and dry for as long as possible, take care of them by giving them enough water, fertilizing them appropriately, and making sure they get enough sunlight.
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weed

Weed Control

weed
Weeds
Sweet basil has become naturalized globally due to its widespread culinary use, but it is considered a weed and an invasive species in many areas where it has escaped cultivation. For example, many cultivars of escaped culinary sweet basil are considered invasive species in the state of Florida within the United States. Basil is considered invasive because it is able to self-seed, and when left unchecked will take over the garden, crowding out other herb species. It is advisible to keep this species trimmed and pinch off flowers when they form. Care should be exercised when planting sweet basil for ornamental or culinary purposes not to let the species escape from its planted area or container.
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Distribution Map

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More Info

Plant Type
Plant Type
Herb
Flower Color
Flower Color
White
Pink
Purple
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Summer, Fall
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green
Purple

Name story

Sweet basil
In European cuisine, it will be like losing its soul when there is no basil in the dish. No matter what recipe it is, you will like to add a little of it into the dish. It is because it gives off a strong and intense smell yet it adds a hint of sweetness into the dish. Hence, it is called Sweet basil.

Symbolism

good wishes, love

Usages

Beauty Improvement Value
Sweet basil can be made into essential oil to moisturize and tighten skin, balance oil secretion, and refresh the mind with its cooling smell.
Garden Use
Anyone with an herb garden is likely to have at least one sweet basil plant growing. It is a staple of food and herb gardens because of its aromatic properties and resistance to deer and rabbits. Sweet basil can be grown by other herbs or veggies, such as tomatoes and peppers, and will naturally repel insects.
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_ga Google Analytics These cookies are set because of our use of Google Analytics. They are used to collect information about your use of our application/website. The cookies collect specific information, such as your IP address, data related to your device and other information about your use of the application/website. Please note that the data processing is essentially carried out by Google LLC and Google may use your data collected by the cookies for own purposes, e.g. profiling and will combine it with other data such as your Google Account. For more information about how Google processes your data and Google’s approach to privacy as well as implemented safeguards for your data, please see here. 1 Year
_pta PictureThis Analytics We use these cookies to collect information about how you use our site, monitor site performance, and improve our site performance, our services, and your experience. 1 Year
Cookie Name
_ga
Source
Google Analytics
Purpose
These cookies are set because of our use of Google Analytics. They are used to collect information about your use of our application/website. The cookies collect specific information, such as your IP address, data related to your device and other information about your use of the application/website. Please note that the data processing is essentially carried out by Google LLC and Google may use your data collected by the cookies for own purposes, e.g. profiling and will combine it with other data such as your Google Account. For more information about how Google processes your data and Google’s approach to privacy as well as implemented safeguards for your data, please see here.
Lifespan
1 Year

Cookie Name
_pta
Source
PictureThis Analytics
Purpose
We use these cookies to collect information about how you use our site, monitor site performance, and improve our site performance, our services, and your experience.
Lifespan
1 Year
Marketing Cookies
Marketing cookies are used by advertising companies to serve ads that are relevant to your interests.
Cookie Name Source Purpose Lifespan
_fbp Facebook Pixel A conversion pixel tracking that we use for retargeting campaigns. Learn more here. 1 Year
_adj Adjust This cookie provides mobile analytics and attribution services that enable us to measure and analyze the effectiveness of marketing campaigns, certain events and actions within the Application. Learn more here. 1 Year
Cookie Name
_fbp
Source
Facebook Pixel
Purpose
A conversion pixel tracking that we use for retargeting campaigns. Learn more here.
Lifespan
1 Year

Cookie Name
_adj
Source
Adjust
Purpose
This cookie provides mobile analytics and attribution services that enable us to measure and analyze the effectiveness of marketing campaigns, certain events and actions within the Application. Learn more here.
Lifespan
1 Year
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