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Bush-grass
Bush-grass
Bush-grass
Bush-grass
Bush-grass
Bush-grass
Add to My Garden
Bush-grass
Calamagrostis epigejos
Also known as: Chee reedgrass, Nominate bushgrass
This tufted grass is native to Europe, Africa, and Asia, but has been naturalized in North and South America. It's commonly used as a garden plant valued for its ornamental features and the vertical interest it provides. Bush-grass is also used to prevent and control soil erosion.
Water
Twice per week
Water
care guide

Care Guide for Bush-grass

Water
Water
Average water needs,watering when the top 3 cm of soil has dried out.
Soil
Soil
Clay, Chalky, Sandy loam, Acidic, Neutral, Alkaline
Sunlight
Sunlight
Full sun, Partial sun
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
Z3 - Z9
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Fall
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Bush-grass
Water
Water
Twice per week
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
Z3 - Z9
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Fall
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Bush-grass
Water
Water
Twice per week
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
Z3 - Z9
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Fall
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Water
Water
Twice per week
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Z3 - Z9
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Planting Time
Spring, Fall
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Questions About Bush-grass

Watering Watering Watering
How Often to Water Your Bush-grass?
The watering needs of Bush-grass will vary depending on where it is planted. Generally, you should water this grass every week. In hot climates, once or twice a week watering in the summer may be necessary. In moderate climates, watering once every seven days or more may be enough. Grass in containers almost always need more frequent watering than grasses in the ground. But with a species such as this that can thrive in full sun or part shade, the location also matters. Shaded grasses need to be watered less frequently than in-ground grasses.

Bush-grass should only be watered when the soil is dry. If you’re unsure when to water, there are a few key signs you can use as your cue. Pressing your finger a couple of inches into the soil will tell you if the soil is dry. For a potted grass, you can weigh the grass with a portable scale to see how light it is, but you can also quickly feel when the pot is light from lack of water. Like many types of grass, the blades may appear folded along their centers and thinner than usual when the roots lack sufficient water. Despite its drought tolerance, regular, deep waterings will reward you with a beautiful color.

In the wild, Bush-grass grows in open scrubland, where it would be subject to extreme heat, loads of bright sun, and intermittent rain. Because this grass is drought resistant, you might expect never to need to water it. But don’t let its hardiness fool you, Bush-grass still needs care and attention. Even though this hardy grass can handle harsh, dry conditions, gardeners agree that it thrives best with consistent water.

When first planted, Bush-grass will need more frequent water until it has established deep roots. For Bush-grass in pots, the soil will dry out quickly, especially if the pot is in hot, direct sun for a large part of the day. Test the soil every 3 to 4 days and water only when it feels dry. Bush-grassed in the ground generally needs less watering, but that depends on the soil it is grown in. Heavy clay soil holds water for a long time and may feel dry at the surface while still retaining plenty of moisture below the ground. Sandy soils that drain quickly will need to be watered more often.
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What Should I Be Careful with When I Water My Bush-grass in Different Seasons, Climate or During Different Growing Periods of My Plants?
You can often tell if you are watering enough by the rate of growth of your grasses. Bush-grass during the hottest months of the year and has been known to double in size in a year’s time. If the weather is hot and the grass is not growing vigorously, you may need to adjust your watering schedule. In winter, you might be able to get away with watering only once a month, but you will still want to touch the soil to test for moisture.

During a growth cycle (in the warmest months), the grass will need more water than usual. But during winter and cooler months, the need for water will be dramatically reduced. The most important thing to remember about Bush-grass is that the soil it is planted in should always be allowed to dry out completely before adding water.
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What to Do If Your Water Bush-grass Too Much or Too Little?
Without proper watering, this beautiful ornamental grass will underperform. In the ground, watering issues can be solved, but In a container, too much or too little water will kill Bush-grass in short order. When Bush-grass isn't receiving the right amount of water, it may stop growing. In the case of overwatering, it will begin to display yellow leaves with brown tips. Underwatering can produce drooping leaves, weak seed head production, and browned leaves. If you suspect your Bush-grass has been improperly watered, the first thing to do is figure out if the problem is too much or too little. If your Bush-grass is getting too much water, stop watering it immediately. Sometimes it can take weeks for heavy soils to dry out, so be patient. At the first sign of new growth, test the soil for moisture and decide whether it needs more water or not. The solution for Bush-grass receiving too little water is even simpler: give the grasses a nice, deep drink and see if it perks up.

Bearing all of this in mind, remember that a long, deep watering is always better than a lot of shallow, frequent waterings. The reason for this is that deep watering encourages grasses to grow deep roots, which makes them more drought resistant and less prone to problems from watering.
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pests

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Bush-grass based on 10 million real cases
Flower withering
Flower withering Flower withering
Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Solutions: If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible. For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface. In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well. If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Plant dried up
Plant dried up Plant dried up
Plant dried up
The entire plant may dry out due to dieback or normal seasonal dormancy.
Solutions: The solution for a dried out plant depends on the cause, so determine the cause before selecting a treatment method. Adjust your watering: Stick your finger in the soil near the roots. If it feels bone dry or overly saturated, you need to adjust your watering frequency accordingly. Prune back dead foliage: Snip off any brown stems and leaves on the plant to make space for new growth. This encourages the roots to send up fresh stems. Move to a proper environment. This may involve decreasing or increasing sun exposure, depending on the species. Decrease fertilizer applications. If you have applied too much fertilizer, you can repot plants with fresh potting soil. Wait. If your plant has dried out as daylight is decreasing, it is entering dormancy. Decrease watering and wait until the plant resumes growth.
Branch blight
Branch blight Branch blight
Branch blight
Branch blight can cause lignified branches to dry up entirely and die.
Solutions: Inspect trees frequently, and remove any infected branches as soon as possible. Branch blight cannot be cured, so the only treatment is to prune the tree and monitor it carefully for signs of the disease. All affected parts of the tree should be removed, since blight can survive over the winter inside the plant’s tissues. Blight can become systemic in the tree, in which case the entire plant should be removed so it does not remain a host for the pathogen and allow it to spread.
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Flower withering
plant poor
Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
DiseaseOverview
DiseaseOverview
Flower withering occurs when flowers become weak, droopy, wilted, or faded until they can’t be revived. During withering, they begin to wrinkle and shrink until the flower becomes completely dry or dead.
Any flowers, regardless of the plant type or the climate they are grown in, are susceptible to withering. It is a worldwide problem across houseplants, herbs, flowering ornamentals, trees, shrubs, garden vegetables, and food crops.
Unlike wilting—which withering is often confused with—withering can be caused by different things and is often due to more than a lack of water. Withering can be fatal in severe cases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Flower withering progresses from very mild cases to severe occurrences that kill the flower. The severity of the symptoms is related to the cause and how long the condition is allowed to progress before action is taken.
  • Wilted, droopy flowers
  • Petals and leaves begin to wrinkle
  • Brown papery streaks or spots appear on the petals and leaf tips
  • Flowerhead shrink in size
  • Petal color fades
  • Yellowing leaves
  • Complete death of the flower
DiseaseCause
DiseaseCause
The main causes of flower withering include natural age progress, lack of water, nutritional deficiencies, and bacterial or fungal diseases. It’s critical to determine the underlying cause when flower withering is noticed. This will guide the best course of action, if treatment is possible.
Check the soil for moisture and then closely examine the entire plant for signs of nutrient deficiencies. If neither of those appears to be the cause then cut open the stem below a flower. If a cross-section reveals brown or rust-colored stains it is safe to assume that this is a bacterial or fungal infection.
If the flower is nearing the end of its normal lifespan, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence, or cell aging and death. Cell division stops and the plant begins breaking down resources within the flower to use in other parts of the plant.
In all other cases, flower withering happens when the plant seals off the stem as a defense mechanism, stopping transport within the vascular system. This prevents further water loss through the flowers but also stops bacteria and fungi from moving to healthy parts of the plant. Once water and nutrient transport stops, the flower begins to wither and ultimately die.
Solutions
Solutions
If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface.
In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well.
If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Prevention
Prevention
This is definitely one of those instances where prevention is more effective than cure. Here are some preventative measures for avoiding premature flower withering.
  • Water plants according to their needs -- either keep the soil slightly moist or allow the top inch or two to dry out before watering again.
  • Fertilize lightly on a consistent basis, depending upon the plant’s growth. Quick-growing plants and those that flower or develop fruit will need more frequent fertilizing than slow-growing plants.
  • Purchase plants that are certified disease- or pathogen-free.
  • Look for disease-resistant cultivars.
  • Isolate plants showing disease symptoms to prevent the spread to neighboring plants.
  • Practice good plant hygiene by removing any fallen plant material as soon as possible.
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Plant dried up
plant poor
Plant dried up
The entire plant may dry out due to dieback or normal seasonal dormancy.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Your plant has dried out and turned brown. It might be starting to wilt, with no noticeable green around the stems and leaves. Touch the leaves, and they may crinkle under your fingers.
Possible causes of a dried out plant include:
  1. Not enough water. A lack of water will lead to dry plant tissue.
  2. Too much water. Watering too much can lead to root rot which makes the plant struggle to take up water. Rotted, mushy roots are a sign of overeating.
  3. Entering dormancy. As perennial plants enter their resting period known as dormancy, their leaves dry out and may fall off. This happens during decreasing day length.
  4. Exposure to herbicides and other toxic substances. If a plant is hit with a large dose herbicide or other toxic chemical, the plant will turn brown.
  5. Too much fertility. An excess of fertilizer can prevent plants from taking up water, leading to drying.
  6. Improper sun exposure. Just like humans, plants can get sunburn by intense, direct light. Plants can also dry out if they don’t receive enough light.
To determine whether the plant is still alive and can be saved, you can:
  1. Bend a stem. If the stem is pliable, the plant is still alive. If the stem breaks, the plant is dead.
  2. Gently scratch the stem with your fingernail for signs of green inside. If your plant is dead, the stem will be brittle and brown throughout.
  3. Cut the stems back a little bit a time for visible green growth. If none of the stems have visible green growth, the plant is dead.
Solutions
Solutions
The solution for a dried out plant depends on the cause, so determine the cause before selecting a treatment method.
  1. Adjust your watering: Stick your finger in the soil near the roots. If it feels bone dry or overly saturated, you need to adjust your watering frequency accordingly.
  2. Prune back dead foliage: Snip off any brown stems and leaves on the plant to make space for new growth. This encourages the roots to send up fresh stems.
  3. Move to a proper environment. This may involve decreasing or increasing sun exposure, depending on the species.
  4. Decrease fertilizer applications. If you have applied too much fertilizer, you can repot plants with fresh potting soil.
  5. Wait. If your plant has dried out as daylight is decreasing, it is entering dormancy. Decrease watering and wait until the plant resumes growth.
Prevention
Prevention
Prevention involves providing your plant with the proper environment.
  1. Provide the proper amount of water. The amount of water depends on a plant’s size, species, and environment. A general rule is to allow soil to dry out between waterings.
  2. Place plants in the proper environment. Provide the proper hours of sun and temperature for your individual plant.
  3. Provide proper fertility. Most plants only need to be fertilized once or twice a year; don’t overapply.
  4. Keep plants free from toxic substances. Keep herbicides and toxic household chemicals away from your plants.
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Branch blight
plant poor
Branch blight
Branch blight can cause lignified branches to dry up entirely and die.
DiseaseOverview
DiseaseOverview
"Blight" is an umbrella term used to describe a category of tree diseases caused by fungus or bacteria. Branch blight occurs when fungus attacks the branches and twigs of a tree, resulting in branches slowly dying off.
Branch blight can affect most species of trees to some degree, and it may be called by different names including twig blight or stem blight. It is caused by a variety of fungi which attack branches first, especially immature growth.
Blight usually occurs in warm, humid conditions, so is most common in the spring and summer months. Because specific environmental conditions are required, the frequency of branch blight can vary from year to year. This makes the disease hard to control, as it can spread between trees and affect multiple plants in a short period of time.
In the worst-case scenario, trees can lose significant portions of their foliage and fail to produce fruit. Young or unhealthy trees could die off completely.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The first symptoms of branch blight are that the emerging foliage turns brown or gray at the tips, especially on the smallest branches. Brown spots cover the entire surface of the leaves, eventually causing leaves and stems to shrivel and fall off. Over time, the dying tissue will spread toward the center of the plant. If left untreated, spores from the attacking fungus may appear on dying foliage within 3-4 weeks of the infection.
In some cases, lesions may form at the spot where the twig branches off from the healthy tissue. Branches may display girdling, which is a band of damaged tissue encircling the branch. An untreated tree will eventually lose all of its foliage and die.
DiseaseCause
DiseaseCause
  • Pathogens on young twigs and foliage cause disease
  • Stressed and unhealthy trees are more susceptible - root injury due to physical or insect damage, infection, or aging can prevent adequate absorption of water and nutrients
  • Extremely wet conditions including sprinkler watering can attract fungus
  • Fungi can be transmitted between nearby trees
Solutions
Solutions
  • Inspect trees frequently, and remove any infected branches as soon as possible. Branch blight cannot be cured, so the only treatment is to prune the tree and monitor it carefully for signs of the disease.
  • All affected parts of the tree should be removed, since blight can survive over the winter inside the plant’s tissues.
  • Blight can become systemic in the tree, in which case the entire plant should be removed so it does not remain a host for the pathogen and allow it to spread.
Prevention
Prevention
  • Avoid purchasing trees with dead or dying growth.
  • Sterilize cutting tools frequently when pruning to avoid spreading fungus between plants.
  • Keep trees mulched and watered, especially during dry periods, to prevent stress.
  • Avoid splashing water on the leaves when watering, as wet foliage is attractive to fungi and bacteria.
  • When planting, allow enough room between trees that there will be sufficient air circulation for them to dry out. Crowding trees too close together can increase humidity and allow the fungi to transfer.
  • When conditions are wet and humid, a fungicide can be used on new growth.
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distribution

Distribution Map

Habitat

Meadows and fields
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Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
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More Info

Plant Type
Plant Type
Herb
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Summer, Fall, Winter
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green
Yellow
Brown
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Bloom Time
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Bush-grass
Bush-grass
Bush-grass
Bush-grass
Bush-grass
Bush-grass
Add to My Garden
Bush-grass
Calamagrostis epigejos
Also known as: Chee reedgrass, Nominate bushgrass
Water
Twice per week
Water
care guide

Care Guide for Bush-grass

Water
Water
Average water needs,watering when the top 3 cm of soil has dried out.
Soil
Soil
Clay, Chalky, Sandy loam, Acidic, Neutral, Alkaline
Sunlight
Sunlight
Full sun, Partial sun
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
Z3 - Z9
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Fall
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Tips, advice, and instructions for over 13,000 species that you will find nowhere else
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Bush-grass
Calamagrostis epigejos
Water
Water
Twice per week
Hardiness Zones
Hardiness Zones
Z3 - Z9
Planting Time
Planting Time
Spring, Fall
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Questions About Bush-grass

Watering Watering Watering
How Often to Water Your Bush-grass?
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What Should I Be Careful with When I Water My Bush-grass in Different Seasons, Climate or During Different Growing Periods of My Plants?
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What to Do If Your Water Bush-grass Too Much or Too Little?
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pests

Common Pests & Diseases

Common issues for Bush-grass based on 10 million real cases
Flower withering
Flower withering  Flower withering  Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
Solutions: If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible. For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface. In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well. If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Learn More more
Plant dried up
Plant dried up  Plant dried up  Plant dried up
The entire plant may dry out due to dieback or normal seasonal dormancy.
Solutions: The solution for a dried out plant depends on the cause, so determine the cause before selecting a treatment method. Adjust your watering: Stick your finger in the soil near the roots. If it feels bone dry or overly saturated, you need to adjust your watering frequency accordingly. Prune back dead foliage: Snip off any brown stems and leaves on the plant to make space for new growth. This encourages the roots to send up fresh stems. Move to a proper environment. This may involve decreasing or increasing sun exposure, depending on the species. Decrease fertilizer applications. If you have applied too much fertilizer, you can repot plants with fresh potting soil. Wait. If your plant has dried out as daylight is decreasing, it is entering dormancy. Decrease watering and wait until the plant resumes growth.
Learn More more
Branch blight
Branch blight  Branch blight  Branch blight
Branch blight can cause lignified branches to dry up entirely and die.
Solutions: Inspect trees frequently, and remove any infected branches as soon as possible. Branch blight cannot be cured, so the only treatment is to prune the tree and monitor it carefully for signs of the disease. All affected parts of the tree should be removed, since blight can survive over the winter inside the plant’s tissues. Blight can become systemic in the tree, in which case the entire plant should be removed so it does not remain a host for the pathogen and allow it to spread.
Learn More more
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Flower withering
plant poor
Flower withering
Flowers may dry out due to a sudden change in environment or because the plant has completed its normal flowering period.
DiseaseOverview
DiseaseOverview
Flower withering occurs when flowers become weak, droopy, wilted, or faded until they can’t be revived. During withering, they begin to wrinkle and shrink until the flower becomes completely dry or dead.
Any flowers, regardless of the plant type or the climate they are grown in, are susceptible to withering. It is a worldwide problem across houseplants, herbs, flowering ornamentals, trees, shrubs, garden vegetables, and food crops.
Unlike wilting—which withering is often confused with—withering can be caused by different things and is often due to more than a lack of water. Withering can be fatal in severe cases.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Flower withering progresses from very mild cases to severe occurrences that kill the flower. The severity of the symptoms is related to the cause and how long the condition is allowed to progress before action is taken.
  • Wilted, droopy flowers
  • Petals and leaves begin to wrinkle
  • Brown papery streaks or spots appear on the petals and leaf tips
  • Flowerhead shrink in size
  • Petal color fades
  • Yellowing leaves
  • Complete death of the flower
DiseaseCause
DiseaseCause
The main causes of flower withering include natural age progress, lack of water, nutritional deficiencies, and bacterial or fungal diseases. It’s critical to determine the underlying cause when flower withering is noticed. This will guide the best course of action, if treatment is possible.
Check the soil for moisture and then closely examine the entire plant for signs of nutrient deficiencies. If neither of those appears to be the cause then cut open the stem below a flower. If a cross-section reveals brown or rust-colored stains it is safe to assume that this is a bacterial or fungal infection.
If the flower is nearing the end of its normal lifespan, genetic coding within the plant increases the production of ethylene, a phytohormone that controls senescence, or cell aging and death. Cell division stops and the plant begins breaking down resources within the flower to use in other parts of the plant.
In all other cases, flower withering happens when the plant seals off the stem as a defense mechanism, stopping transport within the vascular system. This prevents further water loss through the flowers but also stops bacteria and fungi from moving to healthy parts of the plant. Once water and nutrient transport stops, the flower begins to wither and ultimately die.
Solutions
Solutions
If flower withering is a natural progression due to age, there is nothing that can be done to slow or stop the process. Once hormones within the plant begin the process of senescence, it’s irreversible.
For lack of water, immediately water the plant using room temperature rainwater, bottled spring water, or filtered tap water. Water container plants until excess water drains out the bottom; water in-ground plants until the soil is soaked but there isn’t standing water on the surface.
In the event of nutritional deficiencies, the best solution is to use a granular or water-soluble liquid fertilizer, and apply it to the soil at about half the recommended dosage. Keep it off the leaves and make sure granular products are watered into the soil well.
If the plant is infected with a bacterial or fungal pathogen, there is no course of treatment that cures the diseased plants. The best solution is to remove the infected plants and dispose of the plant material off-site. Do not put in a compost pile.
Prevention
Prevention
This is definitely one of those instances where prevention is more effective than cure. Here are some preventative measures for avoiding premature flower withering.
  • Water plants according to their needs -- either keep the soil slightly moist or allow the top inch or two to dry out before watering again.
  • Fertilize lightly on a consistent basis, depending upon the plant’s growth. Quick-growing plants and those that flower or develop fruit will need more frequent fertilizing than slow-growing plants.
  • Purchase plants that are certified disease- or pathogen-free.
  • Look for disease-resistant cultivars.
  • Isolate plants showing disease symptoms to prevent the spread to neighboring plants.
  • Practice good plant hygiene by removing any fallen plant material as soon as possible.
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Plant dried up
plant poor
Plant dried up
The entire plant may dry out due to dieback or normal seasonal dormancy.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
Your plant has dried out and turned brown. It might be starting to wilt, with no noticeable green around the stems and leaves. Touch the leaves, and they may crinkle under your fingers.
Possible causes of a dried out plant include:
  1. Not enough water. A lack of water will lead to dry plant tissue.
  2. Too much water. Watering too much can lead to root rot which makes the plant struggle to take up water. Rotted, mushy roots are a sign of overeating.
  3. Entering dormancy. As perennial plants enter their resting period known as dormancy, their leaves dry out and may fall off. This happens during decreasing day length.
  4. Exposure to herbicides and other toxic substances. If a plant is hit with a large dose herbicide or other toxic chemical, the plant will turn brown.
  5. Too much fertility. An excess of fertilizer can prevent plants from taking up water, leading to drying.
  6. Improper sun exposure. Just like humans, plants can get sunburn by intense, direct light. Plants can also dry out if they don’t receive enough light.
To determine whether the plant is still alive and can be saved, you can:
  1. Bend a stem. If the stem is pliable, the plant is still alive. If the stem breaks, the plant is dead.
  2. Gently scratch the stem with your fingernail for signs of green inside. If your plant is dead, the stem will be brittle and brown throughout.
  3. Cut the stems back a little bit a time for visible green growth. If none of the stems have visible green growth, the plant is dead.
Solutions
Solutions
The solution for a dried out plant depends on the cause, so determine the cause before selecting a treatment method.
  1. Adjust your watering: Stick your finger in the soil near the roots. If it feels bone dry or overly saturated, you need to adjust your watering frequency accordingly.
  2. Prune back dead foliage: Snip off any brown stems and leaves on the plant to make space for new growth. This encourages the roots to send up fresh stems.
  3. Move to a proper environment. This may involve decreasing or increasing sun exposure, depending on the species.
  4. Decrease fertilizer applications. If you have applied too much fertilizer, you can repot plants with fresh potting soil.
  5. Wait. If your plant has dried out as daylight is decreasing, it is entering dormancy. Decrease watering and wait until the plant resumes growth.
Prevention
Prevention
Prevention involves providing your plant with the proper environment.
  1. Provide the proper amount of water. The amount of water depends on a plant’s size, species, and environment. A general rule is to allow soil to dry out between waterings.
  2. Place plants in the proper environment. Provide the proper hours of sun and temperature for your individual plant.
  3. Provide proper fertility. Most plants only need to be fertilized once or twice a year; don’t overapply.
  4. Keep plants free from toxic substances. Keep herbicides and toxic household chemicals away from your plants.
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Branch blight
plant poor
Branch blight
Branch blight can cause lignified branches to dry up entirely and die.
DiseaseOverview
DiseaseOverview
"Blight" is an umbrella term used to describe a category of tree diseases caused by fungus or bacteria. Branch blight occurs when fungus attacks the branches and twigs of a tree, resulting in branches slowly dying off.
Branch blight can affect most species of trees to some degree, and it may be called by different names including twig blight or stem blight. It is caused by a variety of fungi which attack branches first, especially immature growth.
Blight usually occurs in warm, humid conditions, so is most common in the spring and summer months. Because specific environmental conditions are required, the frequency of branch blight can vary from year to year. This makes the disease hard to control, as it can spread between trees and affect multiple plants in a short period of time.
In the worst-case scenario, trees can lose significant portions of their foliage and fail to produce fruit. Young or unhealthy trees could die off completely.
Symptom Analysis
Symptom Analysis
The first symptoms of branch blight are that the emerging foliage turns brown or gray at the tips, especially on the smallest branches. Brown spots cover the entire surface of the leaves, eventually causing leaves and stems to shrivel and fall off. Over time, the dying tissue will spread toward the center of the plant. If left untreated, spores from the attacking fungus may appear on dying foliage within 3-4 weeks of the infection.
In some cases, lesions may form at the spot where the twig branches off from the healthy tissue. Branches may display girdling, which is a band of damaged tissue encircling the branch. An untreated tree will eventually lose all of its foliage and die.
DiseaseCause
DiseaseCause
  • Pathogens on young twigs and foliage cause disease
  • Stressed and unhealthy trees are more susceptible - root injury due to physical or insect damage, infection, or aging can prevent adequate absorption of water and nutrients
  • Extremely wet conditions including sprinkler watering can attract fungus
  • Fungi can be transmitted between nearby trees
Solutions
Solutions
  • Inspect trees frequently, and remove any infected branches as soon as possible. Branch blight cannot be cured, so the only treatment is to prune the tree and monitor it carefully for signs of the disease.
  • All affected parts of the tree should be removed, since blight can survive over the winter inside the plant’s tissues.
  • Blight can become systemic in the tree, in which case the entire plant should be removed so it does not remain a host for the pathogen and allow it to spread.
Prevention
Prevention
  • Avoid purchasing trees with dead or dying growth.
  • Sterilize cutting tools frequently when pruning to avoid spreading fungus between plants.
  • Keep trees mulched and watered, especially during dry periods, to prevent stress.
  • Avoid splashing water on the leaves when watering, as wet foliage is attractive to fungi and bacteria.
  • When planting, allow enough room between trees that there will be sufficient air circulation for them to dry out. Crowding trees too close together can increase humidity and allow the fungi to transfer.
  • When conditions are wet and humid, a fungicide can be used on new growth.
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distribution

Distribution Map

Habitat

Meadows and fields

Map

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
plant_info

More Info

Plant Type
Plant Type
Herb
Bloom Time
Bloom Time
Summer, Fall, Winter
Leaf Color
Leaf Color
Green
Yellow
Brown
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