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Mirrorplant
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Mirrorplant
Mirrorplant
Mirrorplant (Coprosma)
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Key Facts About Mirrorplant

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Attributes of Mirrorplant

Plant Height
2 m
Spread
2 m
Leaf type
Evergreen

Scientific Classification of Mirrorplant

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Distribution of Mirrorplant

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Distribution Map of Mirrorplant

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Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
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How to Grow and Care for Mirrorplant

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More Info About Caring for Mirrorplant
species

Exploring the Mirrorplant Plants

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8 most common species:
Coprosma repens
Mirror plant
Mirror plant (Coprosma repens) is a plant species native to New Zealand. Mirror plant is also called tree bedstraw or marble queen. This species is popular in coastal gardens because it is resistant to salt spray. The scientific name of this species Coprosma repens means "dung smell," referring to the foul smell that this species emits when the leaves are crushed.
Coprosma robusta
Large coprosma
Large coprosma (Coprosma robusta) is a flowering plant species native to New Zealand. This species can withstand a wide variety of climates and produces edible fruits. Large coprosma can be wiped out by mammals such as goats. This species is used for food, to make dyes, and in symbolic Baptist religious ceremonies.
Coprosma propinqua
Swamp coprosma
The genus name of Coprosma propinqua comes from the Greek words for “dung” (kopros) and “smell” (osme), referring to its unpleasant scent. The Maori name “mingimingi” is also quite expressive. Nevertheless, it is a useful plant for hedges, windbreaks, and soil reclamation. Its translucent blue berries are eaten by birds. The wood is a source of yellow dye.
Coprosma grandifolia
Fruit
Fruit (Coprosma grandifolia) is a shrub that is native to New Zealand, where it grows in wet, shaded forests. The genus name Coprosma means “dung-smelling,” a reference to the scent of the crushed leaves of some species. Coprosma grandifolia produces green-white flowers that mature into orange or red berries.
Coprosma rugosa
Needle-leaved mountain coprosma
Needle-leaved mountain coprosma (Coprosma rugosa) is a shrub that has ornamental appeal for its blue berries and orange-brown leaves. It is a dry climate specialist that is a great choice for arid gardens, particularly as a hedging plant due to its dense growth. Birds eat its berries and this is how needle-leaved mountain coprosma disperses its seeds.
Coprosma acerosa
Sand coprosma
Sand coprosma (Coprosma acerosa) is a coastal shrub that is under threat due to competition from the introduced species marram grass. Currently, it is listed as At risk - declining under the New Zealand Threat Classification System. The Latin genus name coprosma means dung smell, and refers to this plant's unpleasant odor.
Coprosma linariifolia
Yellow wood
Yellow wood (Coprosma linariifolia) is a foul-smelling plant of which is reflected in its Latin name. The Greek word kopros means 'dung' and osme means 'smell'. This 'dung smell' does not seem to bother birds who are still attracted to this plant. Yellow wood is known for its ability to be used as a dye.
Coprosma rotundifolia
Round-leaved coprosma
Round-leaved coprosma is a large species of shrub native to New Zealand. It is commonly found in riparian forests and shrubland, with a preference for alluvial and calcareous soils. It has also been planted as a horticultural plant, so it can be encountered in a wide range of habitats. The Latin name of the genus translates to ‘dung smell’, referring to the foul smell of these plants.

All Species of Mirrorplant

Mirror plant
Coprosma repens
Mirror plant
Mirror plant (Coprosma repens) is a plant species native to New Zealand. Mirror plant is also called tree bedstraw or marble queen. This species is popular in coastal gardens because it is resistant to salt spray. The scientific name of this species Coprosma repens means "dung smell," referring to the foul smell that this species emits when the leaves are crushed.
Large coprosma
Coprosma robusta
Large coprosma
Large coprosma (Coprosma robusta) is a flowering plant species native to New Zealand. This species can withstand a wide variety of climates and produces edible fruits. Large coprosma can be wiped out by mammals such as goats. This species is used for food, to make dyes, and in symbolic Baptist religious ceremonies.
Swamp coprosma
Coprosma propinqua
Swamp coprosma
The genus name of Coprosma propinqua comes from the Greek words for “dung” (kopros) and “smell” (osme), referring to its unpleasant scent. The Maori name “mingimingi” is also quite expressive. Nevertheless, it is a useful plant for hedges, windbreaks, and soil reclamation. Its translucent blue berries are eaten by birds. The wood is a source of yellow dye.
Fruit
Coprosma grandifolia
Fruit
Fruit (Coprosma grandifolia) is a shrub that is native to New Zealand, where it grows in wet, shaded forests. The genus name Coprosma means “dung-smelling,” a reference to the scent of the crushed leaves of some species. Coprosma grandifolia produces green-white flowers that mature into orange or red berries.
Needle-leaved mountain coprosma
Coprosma rugosa
Needle-leaved mountain coprosma
Needle-leaved mountain coprosma (Coprosma rugosa) is a shrub that has ornamental appeal for its blue berries and orange-brown leaves. It is a dry climate specialist that is a great choice for arid gardens, particularly as a hedging plant due to its dense growth. Birds eat its berries and this is how needle-leaved mountain coprosma disperses its seeds.
Sand coprosma
Coprosma acerosa
Sand coprosma
Sand coprosma (Coprosma acerosa) is a coastal shrub that is under threat due to competition from the introduced species marram grass. Currently, it is listed as At risk - declining under the New Zealand Threat Classification System. The Latin genus name coprosma means dung smell, and refers to this plant's unpleasant odor.
Yellow wood
Coprosma linariifolia
Yellow wood
Yellow wood (Coprosma linariifolia) is a foul-smelling plant of which is reflected in its Latin name. The Greek word kopros means 'dung' and osme means 'smell'. This 'dung smell' does not seem to bother birds who are still attracted to this plant. Yellow wood is known for its ability to be used as a dye.
Round-leaved coprosma
Coprosma rotundifolia
Round-leaved coprosma
Round-leaved coprosma is a large species of shrub native to New Zealand. It is commonly found in riparian forests and shrubland, with a preference for alluvial and calcareous soils. It has also been planted as a horticultural plant, so it can be encountered in a wide range of habitats. The Latin name of the genus translates to ‘dung smell’, referring to the foul smell of these plants.
Stiff karamu
Coprosma rigida
Stiff karamu
Stiff karamu is a shrub that has an unpleasant smell like dung. This shrub has green-colored flowers and grows in damp areas. It is native to New Zealand and prefers soil with poor drainage.
Red-currant coprosma
Coprosma rhamnoides
Red-currant coprosma
The red berries of red-currant coprosma attract a number of animals including geckos, skinks, rats, and various birds. This small, but dense and twiggy shrub endemic to New Zealand is sometimes used in ornamental gardening.
Thin-leaved coprosma
Coprosma areolata
Thin-leaved coprosma
And areolata is netted, with a network pattern between the veins.
Stinkwood
Coprosma foetidissima
Stinkwood
Stinkwood is a dioecious plant, having both male and female plants.
Coprosma dumosa
Coprosma dumosa
Coprosma dumosa
Coprosma dumosa has been reported as being tricky to identify due to the numerous hybrids that have been produced. Coprosma dumosa is noted for producing a foul dung-like odor. This bushy shrub flowers in the late Spring, producing berries in the late summer.
Variable coprosma
Coprosma pseudocuneata
Variable coprosma
The variable coprosma is a bushy shrub endemic to New Zealand. The species' Latin name Coprosma pseudocuneata comes from its distinctive, unpleasant, dung-like smell—the word coprosma was derived from the Greek "kopros" (dung) and "some" (smell). Its red drupes (fruit) are eaten by a number of birds and animals who, in return, disperse its seeds.
Swamp coprosma
Coprosma tenuicaulis
Swamp coprosma
The shrub flowers in early spring and produces black/red fruit that ripen between winter and summer.
Prickly Currant Bush
Coprosma quadrifida
Prickly Currant Bush
Prickly Currant Bush is a hardy shrub endemic to Tasmania and Southeastern Australia, distinguished by its pointed, quadrifid leaves with four distinct lobes. Adapting to both moist forests and rocky coasts, it exhibits resilience and variability. During the cooler months, prickly Currant Bush produces small, inconspicuous yellow-green flowers, followed by vibrant orange-red berries that provide sustenance to local wildlife.
Creeping mirrorplant 'Lemon and Lime'
Coprosma repens 'Lemon and Lime'
Creeping mirrorplant 'Lemon and Lime'
The creeping mirrorplant 'Lemon and Lime' is a mirror bush named for its yellow and green variegated leaves. It was cultivated for this lovely decorative foliage, which is very glossy and hardy. This evergreen shrub is hardy, disease and pest resistant, and takes several years to grow to maturity, making it a garden staple for a long time.
Creeping mirrorplant 'Pacific Dawn'
Coprosma repens 'Pacific Dawn'
Creeping mirrorplant 'Pacific Dawn'
Comparing the eye-catching, deep red foliage of creeping mirrorplant 'Pacific Dawn' with its parent's green leaves, it's easy to see the difference between the two. This Coprosma repens cultivar was given the name "Pacific Dawn" for unknown reasons. The highly unusual coloration of its foliage is what makes this plant such a popular shrub.
Creeping mirrorplant 'Tequila Sunrise'
Coprosma repens 'Tequila Sunrise'
Creeping mirrorplant 'Tequila Sunrise'
Creeping mirrorplant 'Tequila Sunrise' delights the eye with dense glossy foliage that emerges in emerald green with gold edges. As the season progresses, the leaves turn to orange with gold and burgundy tones. It is a cultivar of the Coprosma repens plant, named for its stunning ‘sunrise’ colors. Gardeners love this plant for its bold rich tones. It is also low-care, and generally pest and disease-free.
Mirrorplant 'Inferno'
Coprosma 'Inferno'
Mirrorplant 'Inferno'
Mirrorplant 'Inferno' is distinct for its glossy, variegated light and dark green leaves with bold red margins, which become entirely red in winter. A cultivar of Coprosma, its name comes from its fiery color. Gardeners love it for the color it adds to winter gardens and its resistance to pests and disease.
Creeping coprosma
Coprosma niphophila
Creeping coprosma
Creeping coprosma is a resilient shrub, thriving in alpine regions with cold, harsh climates. Its glossy green leaves and silvery undercoat provide a striking visual contrast, optimized for reflecting excess sunlight and conserving moisture. The compact growth habit and small, white or pale blue berries are distinctive, reflecting creeping coprosma's ability to adapt to its challenging environment.
Coprosma chathamica
Coprosma chathamica
Coprosma chathamica
Coprosma chathamica is a hardy shrub indigenous to the Chatham Islands. It flaunts a dense, branching habit with glossy green leaves often adorned with dark margins. Small, inconspicuous flowers give way to vivid-orange berries, attracting wildlife and aiding seed dispersal. Thriving in coastal conditions, coprosma chathamica demonstrates resilience to wind and salt spray, making it an emblematic feature of local vegetation.
Coprosma petiolata
Coprosma petiolata
Coprosma petiolata
Coprosma petiolata is known for its slender branches adorned with small, rounded leaves hugging closely to the stem. The leaves often display a glossy sheen and may vary in coloration, reflecting the plant's adaptability to different light exposures. Its growth habit is typically low-lying, suggesting an evolutionary preference for sheltered understories or wind-protected microhabitats.
Coprosma cheesemanii
Coprosma cheesemanii
Coprosma cheesemanii
Coprosma cheesemanii is a hardy evergreen shrub, native to New Zealand, featuring glossy, small green leaves and bearing pale blue to white berries. It thrives in coastal conditions, adapting well to sandy soils and wind exposure. The dense foliage and bright berries make it an attractive option for gardeners, while also providing a habitat and food source for local wildlife.
Mikimiki
Coprosma virescens
Mikimiki
Mikimiki is a resilient shrub known for its glossy green foliage, which looks vibrant year-round. Its leaves are small to medium in size, with a distinctive thick and leathery texture. Mikimiki flourishes in a variety of environments, often found in coastal areas where it adapts well to sandy soils and exposure to salt spray. Its toughness and adaptability make it a favorite for gardeners seeking a low-maintenance yet attractive plant.
Coprosma elatirioides
Coprosma elatirioides
Coprosma elatirioides
Coprosma elatirioides is known for its tough, glossy leaves that glisten in the sunlight. This resilient shrub thrives in the challenging coastal cliffs, where salt-laden winds sculpt its dense, compact form. Its small, inconspicuous flowers are a subtle highlight, but it's the bright orange-red berries that catch the eye, providing a stark contrast to the dark green foliage and beckoning birds that aid in their seed dispersal.
Coprosma microcarpa
Coprosma microcarpa
Coprosma microcarpa
Coprosma microcarpa is a resilient evergreen shrub with a dense, rounded growth habit. Its small, leathery leaves exhibit a glossy green hue that contrasts with its minute, yet bright, red-orange berries. Adapted to a range of environmental conditions, coprosma microcarpa thrives in both shaded and sun-drenched locales, often utilizing well-drained soil to anchor its hardy root system. This adaptability makes coprosma microcarpa a versatile choice for gardeners and a persistent feature in its native ecosystem.
Coprosma conferta
Coprosma conferta
Coprosma conferta
Coprosma conferta is a resilient shrub, distinguished by its compact form and dense, small foliage. The leaves are glossy with a unique texture, facilitating water retention, and hint at its preference for well-drained, rocky habitats. Coprosma conferta's berries add a splash of color, serving as a vital food source for local fauna and contributing to its ecosystem role.
Coprosma perpusilla
Coprosma perpusilla
Coprosma perpusilla
Coprosma perpusilla is a diminutive, evergreen shrub with a sprawling habit, often found clinging to rocky alpine terrains. Its small, glossy, teal-like leaves form dense mats, providing protection against harsh winds and cold. The plant's inconspicuous white flowers bloom under summer's mild embrace, followed by translucent blueberries that stand out against the foliage.
Turfy coprosma
Coprosma petriei
Turfy coprosma
Turfy coprosma is a resilient, low-growing ground cover with small, round leaves that are glossy green in summer, changing to hues of orange and red as the seasons shift. This hardy plant thrives in rocky, alpine environments, displaying its adaptability to harsh, cold climates. The plant's compact form offers shelter to alpine fauna and aids in preventing soil erosion.
Coprosma cuneata
Coprosma cuneata
Coprosma cuneata
Coprosma cuneata is a hardy shrub with a compact, wedge-shaped form, known for its resilience in rocky and alpine environments. Its small, glossy, dark green leaves are tailored for water conservation, and during its flowering season, it exhibits inconspicuous yellow-green blossoms. This adaptability allows coprosma cuneata to thrive in a variety of harsh conditions, making it a robust and attractive option for gardeners seeking a low-maintenance plant.
Mountain currant
Coprosma nitida
Mountain currant
Mountain currant is a resilient shrub, notable for its glossy green leaves with a sheen that glints in sunlight. Usually thriving in well-drained soils, it stands out due to the leaves' striking difference in color between the upper and lower surfaces. Mountain currant's berries, ranging from blue to purple, serve as a vital food source for local wildlife, highlighting its role in ecosystem balance.
Coprosma intertexta
Coprosma intertexta
Coprosma intertexta
Coprosma intertexta is a hardy shrub, distinct for its dense, interwoven branches that provide shelter amid rugged terrain. It sports small, glossy, and evergreen leaves that retain moisture, adapting well to variable climates. The inconspicuous flowers give way to vibrant berries, enhancing its survival through seed dispersal by birds.
Coprosma crenulata
Coprosma crenulata
Coprosma crenulata
Coprosma crenulata is a small, evergreen shrub noted for its glossy, green leaves with finely toothed margins. It thrives in well-drained soils of its native habitat, often in shaded forests. The dense, rounded form and robust foliage are characteristic, while small, inconspicuous flowers reveal themselves upon closer inspection, followed by brightly colored berries that attract birds and other wildlife.
Coprosma depressa
Coprosma depressa
Coprosma depressa
Coprosma depressa is a low-growing, sprawling shrub often found embracing rocky terrain and coastal cliffs. Its stems are intricately branched, forming dense mats that can withstand harsh winds and salt spray. Small, oval leaves with a glossy finish cluster tightly on the branches, while inconspicuous flowers bloom, primarily adapted to attract specific pollinators.
Koi
Coprosma kauensis
Koi
Koi is a rare, evergreen shrub native to the Hawaiian Islands, known for its hardy nature in upland bogs and shrubby wet forests. Its leathery, glossy leaves and small, inconspicuous berries are adaptations to its moist and volatile habitat. The shiny foliage may reflect excess sunlight, while the berries disperse seeds through birds, ensuring survival in a challenging ecosystem.
Coprosma dodonaeifolia
Coprosma dodonaeifolia
Coprosma dodonaeifolia
Coprosma dodonaeifolia is a resilient evergreen shrub with leaves that echo the narrow, lance-like shape of the willow. Its waxy, green foliage responds to its typically dry habitat by minimizing water loss, and its small, inconspicuous flowers adapt well to pollination by native fauna. The plant thrives in gravely soils, often found in coastal or rocky environments, showcasing nature's ability to flourish in challenging conditions.
Coprosma colensoi
Coprosma colensoi
Coprosma colensoi
Coprosma colensoi is a hardy shrub, indigenous to New Zealand's rugged terrains, where adaptability is key to survival. It sports small, leathery leaves and produces inconspicuous flowers, followed by colorful berries that appeal to local bird species. This plant's resilience is reflected in its ability to thrive in both sun-drenched open fields and semi-shaded forest understories, indicative of its versatile nature.
Coprosma obconica
Coprosma obconica
Coprosma obconica
Coprosma obconica, a resilient shrub native to rocky areas, is notable for its glossy, leathery leaves that efficiently retain moisture. Its compact, rounded form is accentuated by small, inconspicuous flowers that evolve into colorful, berry-like fruits. This hardy plant adapts well to wind-prone coastal terrains, exemplifying nature's ingenuity in resource-conservation.
Coprosma obconica subsp. distantia
Coprosma obconica subsp. distantia
Coprosma obconica subsp. distantia
Coprosma obconica subsp. distantia features a distinctive growth pattern with glossy, evergreen leaves that range in color from light green to a more intense hue, depending on light exposure. Its compact form adapts well to various environments, often flourishing in soil that is well-draining. This plant's resilience makes it a favored choice in gardens where it can provide year-round visual interest.
popular genus

More Popular Genus

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Dracaena
Dracaena
Dracaena are popular house plants that are easy to grow. They can tolerate low-light conditions and require little watering. Their leaves range from variegated to dark green. Their characteristic traits include woody stems that grow slowly but offer a striking appearance for small spaces such as apartments or offices.
Ficus
Fig trees
Fig trees have been cultivated in many regions for their fruits, particularly the common fig, F. carica. Most of the species have edible fruits, although the common fig is the only one of commercial value. Fig trees are also important food sources for wildlife in the tropics, including monkeys, bats, and insects.
Rubus
Brambles
Brambles are members of the rose family, and there are hundreds of different types to be found throughout the European countryside. They have been culturally significant for centuries; Christian folklore stories hold that when the devil was thrown from heaven, he landed on a bramble bush. Their vigorous growth habit can tangle into native plants and take over.
Acer
Maples
The popular tree family known as maples change the color of their leaves in the fall. Many cultural traditions encourage people to watch the colors change, such as momijigari in Japan. Maples popular options for bonsai art. Alternately, their sap is used to create maple syrup.
Prunus
Prunus
Prunus is a genus of flowering fruit trees that includes almonds, cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines, and apricots. These are often known as "stone fruits" because their pits are large seeds or "stones." When prunus trees are damaged, they exhibit "gummosis," a condition in which the tree's gum (similar to sap) is secreted to the bark to help heal external wounds.
Solanum
Nightshades
Nightshades is a large and diverse genus of plants, with more than 1500 different types worldwide. This genus incorporates both important staple food crops like tomato, potato, and eggplant, but also dangerous poisonous plants from the nightshade family. The name was coined by Pliny the Elder almost two thousand years ago.
Rosa
Roses
Most species of roses are shrubs or climbing plants that have showy flowers and sharp thorns. They are commonly cultivated for cut flowers or as ornamental plants in gardens due to their attractive appearance, pleasant fragrance, and cultural significance in many countries. The rose hips (fruits) can also be used in jams and teas.
Quercus
Oaks
Oaks are among the world's longest-lived trees, sometimes growing for over 1,000 years! The oldest known oak tree is in the southern United States and is over 1,500 years old. Oaks produce an exceedingly popular type of wood which is used to make different products, from furniture and flooring to wine barrels and even cosmetic creams.
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Mirrorplant
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Coprosma
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Key Facts About Mirrorplant

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Attributes of Mirrorplant

Plant Height
2 m
Spread
2 m
Leaf type
Evergreen

Scientific Classification of Mirrorplant

distribution

Distribution of Mirrorplant

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Distribution Map of Mirrorplant

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
care detail

How to Grow and Care for Mirrorplant

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More Info About Caring for Mirrorplant
species

Exploring the Mirrorplant Plants

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8 most common species:
Coprosma repens
Mirror plant
Mirror plant (Coprosma repens) is a plant species native to New Zealand. Mirror plant is also called tree bedstraw or marble queen. This species is popular in coastal gardens because it is resistant to salt spray. The scientific name of this species Coprosma repens means "dung smell," referring to the foul smell that this species emits when the leaves are crushed.
Coprosma robusta
Large coprosma
Large coprosma (Coprosma robusta) is a flowering plant species native to New Zealand. This species can withstand a wide variety of climates and produces edible fruits. Large coprosma can be wiped out by mammals such as goats. This species is used for food, to make dyes, and in symbolic Baptist religious ceremonies.
Coprosma propinqua
Swamp coprosma
The genus name of Coprosma propinqua comes from the Greek words for “dung” (kopros) and “smell” (osme), referring to its unpleasant scent. The Maori name “mingimingi” is also quite expressive. Nevertheless, it is a useful plant for hedges, windbreaks, and soil reclamation. Its translucent blue berries are eaten by birds. The wood is a source of yellow dye.
Coprosma grandifolia
Fruit
Fruit (Coprosma grandifolia) is a shrub that is native to New Zealand, where it grows in wet, shaded forests. The genus name Coprosma means “dung-smelling,” a reference to the scent of the crushed leaves of some species. Coprosma grandifolia produces green-white flowers that mature into orange or red berries.
Show More Species

All Species of Mirrorplant

popular genus

More Popular Genus

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Dracaena
Dracaena
Dracaena are popular house plants that are easy to grow. They can tolerate low-light conditions and require little watering. Their leaves range from variegated to dark green. Their characteristic traits include woody stems that grow slowly but offer a striking appearance for small spaces such as apartments or offices.
Ficus
Fig trees
Fig trees have been cultivated in many regions for their fruits, particularly the common fig, F. carica. Most of the species have edible fruits, although the common fig is the only one of commercial value. Fig trees are also important food sources for wildlife in the tropics, including monkeys, bats, and insects.
Rubus
Brambles
Brambles are members of the rose family, and there are hundreds of different types to be found throughout the European countryside. They have been culturally significant for centuries; Christian folklore stories hold that when the devil was thrown from heaven, he landed on a bramble bush. Their vigorous growth habit can tangle into native plants and take over.
Acer
Maples
The popular tree family known as maples change the color of their leaves in the fall. Many cultural traditions encourage people to watch the colors change, such as momijigari in Japan. Maples popular options for bonsai art. Alternately, their sap is used to create maple syrup.
Prunus
Prunus
Prunus is a genus of flowering fruit trees that includes almonds, cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines, and apricots. These are often known as "stone fruits" because their pits are large seeds or "stones." When prunus trees are damaged, they exhibit "gummosis," a condition in which the tree's gum (similar to sap) is secreted to the bark to help heal external wounds.
Solanum
Nightshades
Nightshades is a large and diverse genus of plants, with more than 1500 different types worldwide. This genus incorporates both important staple food crops like tomato, potato, and eggplant, but also dangerous poisonous plants from the nightshade family. The name was coined by Pliny the Elder almost two thousand years ago.
Rosa
Roses
Most species of roses are shrubs or climbing plants that have showy flowers and sharp thorns. They are commonly cultivated for cut flowers or as ornamental plants in gardens due to their attractive appearance, pleasant fragrance, and cultural significance in many countries. The rose hips (fruits) can also be used in jams and teas.
Quercus
Oaks
Oaks are among the world's longest-lived trees, sometimes growing for over 1,000 years! The oldest known oak tree is in the southern United States and is over 1,500 years old. Oaks produce an exceedingly popular type of wood which is used to make different products, from furniture and flooring to wine barrels and even cosmetic creams.
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Lifespan
1 Year

Cookie Name
_pta
Source
PictureThis Analytics
Purpose
We use these cookies to collect information about how you use our site, monitor site performance, and improve our site performance, our services, and your experience.
Lifespan
1 Year
Marketing Cookies
Marketing cookies are used by advertising companies to serve ads that are relevant to your interests.
Cookie Name Source Purpose Lifespan
_fbp Facebook Pixel A conversion pixel tracking that we use for retargeting campaigns. Learn more here. 1 Year
_adj Adjust This cookie provides mobile analytics and attribution services that enable us to measure and analyze the effectiveness of marketing campaigns, certain events and actions within the Application. Learn more here. 1 Year
Cookie Name
_fbp
Source
Facebook Pixel
Purpose
A conversion pixel tracking that we use for retargeting campaigns. Learn more here.
Lifespan
1 Year

Cookie Name
_adj
Source
Adjust
Purpose
This cookie provides mobile analytics and attribution services that enable us to measure and analyze the effectiveness of marketing campaigns, certain events and actions within the Application. Learn more here.
Lifespan
1 Year
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