camera identify
Try for Free
tab list
PictureThis
English
arrow
English
繁體中文
日本語
Español
Français
Deutsch
Pусский
Português
Italiano
한국어
Nederlands
العربية
Svenska
Polskie
ภาษาไทย
Bahasa Melayu
Bahasa Indonesia
PictureThis
Search
Search Plants
Try for Free
Global
English
English
繁體中文
日本語
Español
Français
Deutsch
Pусский
Português
Italiano
한국어
Nederlands
العربية
Svenska
Polskie
ภาษาไทย
Bahasa Melayu
Bahasa Indonesia
This page looks better in the app
about about
About
key_facts key_facts
Key Facts
toxic toxic
Toxicity
distribution_map distribution_map
Distribution
care_detail care_detail
How To Care
children children
All Species
pupular_genus pupular_genus
More Genus
pic top
Fig trees
Fig trees
Fig trees
Fig trees
Fig trees (Ficus)
Lifespan
Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Plant Type
Shrub
info

Key Facts About Fig trees

feedback
Feedback
feedback

Attributes of Fig trees

Planting Time
Spring, Early summer, Early fall, Mid fall
Leaf type
Evergreen
Ideal Temperature
10 - 41 ℃

Scientific Classification of Fig trees

toxic

Fig trees and Their Toxicity

feedback
Feedback
feedback
* The judgment on toxicity and danger is for reference only. We DO NOT GUARANTEE any accuracy of such judgment. Therefore, you SHALL NOT rely on such judgment. It is IMPORTANT TO SEEK PROFESSIONAL ADVICE in advance when necessary.
icon
Identify toxic plants in your garden
Find out what’s toxic and what’s safe for your loved one.
Slightly Toxic to Humans
Slightly Toxic to Humans
Toxic to Dogs
Toxic to Dogs
close
Who Is Most at Risk of Plant Poisoning?
Your pets like cats and dogs can be poisoned by them as well!
1
Do not let your lovely pets eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
2
It’s better to kill those growing around your house. Wear long-sleeved shirts, pants and gloves with sharp tools to dig it out completely;
3
Clean the tools with rubbing alcohol or soap and water but do not do that with bare hands;
4
Clean your hands and skin once exposed to plants with soap and water;
5
Consider using barrier creams that contain bentoquatam to prevent poison oak, ivy and sumac rashes;
6
Dump it in special trash cans in sealed garbage packages, and do not let your pets reach it;Do not let your lovely pets eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
7
If you take your pets to hike with you in the wild, please don’t let them eat any plants that you don’t know;
8
Once your pets eat, touch or inhale anything from toxic plants and act abnormally, please call the doctors for help ASAP!
pets
Pets
Some pets are less likely than children to eat and touch just about everything. This is good, as a pet owner. However, you know your pet best, and it is up to you to keep them safe. There are plenty of poisonous weeds that can grow within the confines of your lawn, which might make your dogs or cats ill or worse if they eat them. Try to have an idea of what toxic plants grow in your area and keep them under control and your pets away from them.
pets
Common Toxic Houseplants
Common Toxic Houseplants
When it comes to decorating a house, there is nothing more refreshing than adding some beautiful houseplants. Some common house plants can also be toxic.

Aloe

aloe
Aloe is famous for its sunburn-soothing properties and its gorgeous desert design. However, many people do not realize that the latex the aloe vera plant produces can be mildly toxic to pets and children.

The latex contains a chemical compound known as saponin. Which when ingested, can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and low blood sugar. This, if left unchecked, can lead to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. The proper response is to contact poison control or a veterinarian to know what to do in your particular circumstance if either your child or pet consumes aloe.

The latex of the plant is similar to the sap of the tree. It is inside the leaf, but sticks mainly toward the edges. If aloe gel is prepared properly it should be safe for use, but be sure to apply it only topically when treating burns.

Philodendron

Philodendron
Philodendron, also known as sweetheart vine, has become a resident at many houses and even businesses. They are glossy green and the leaves elegantly split, displaying interesting designs. Behind this beauty there is a needle-like toxin called calcium oxalate crystals.

These crystals are held within the plant and only affect you, your pets, or your loved ones if the plant tissue is broken. If ingested, the crystals can cause severe swelling, difficulty breathing, stomach pain, burning and pain. If they are accidentally caught on the skin, they can cause skin irritation.

If anyone accidentally ingests philodendron and they find it difficult to breathe or their tongue starts to swell up, it is important to seek medical attention immediately to avoid suffocation. If you have very young children or pets who have a tendency to tear at plants, keep them away from any philodendrons.

Peace Lily

Peace Lily
Peace lilies produce stunningly white flowers that bring to mind peace and serenity. This is one reason they are invited into our homes and given a place to stay. However, similar to philodendrons, the peace lily contains oxalate crystals known as raphides.

The raphides, once ingested, will cause swelling and burning sensations and can also cause skin irritation. Both pets and humans can get these symptoms so it is important to keep these plants from anyone who is likely to tear or chew it. Symptoms can become dire if the raphides cause the tongue and throat to swell to a point where the person or pet is having difficulty breathing. Seek proper medical attention if this is the case.

Snake Plant

Snake Plant
The snake plant is an interesting and popular house plant. Its stark architecture and wavy coloring has made it a fan favorite. This plant too, however, is toxic when ingested or if the sap touches your skin.

Snake plant sap will cause rashes if it comes into contact with your skin. In addition, it will cause diarrhea and vomiting when ingested. Again these symptoms are very serious and would be best avoided by keeping snake plants out of reach or by choosing a different houseplant.
Common Toxic Garden Plants
Common Toxic Garden Plants

Daffodil

Daffodil
Daffodils are a strikingly colorful flower. This can sometimes bring them much attention not from just onlooking adults but children as well. Since kids are more drawn to colorful objects, they may have a higher chance of just grabbing the flower and eating it. Adults have also been known to accidentally grab daffodil bulbs instead of onions.

Why are these mistakes so dangerous? Daffodils contain lycorine, which can induce nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It also contains oxalates which can cause swelling and pain. The symptoms can be worse in animals, because if your pets eat daffodils they may experience drowsiness, low blood pressure or even liver damage.

Make sure to call poison control when these symptoms set in. The vomiting and diarrhea have been known to go away after 3 hours, but it is better to be safe than sorry. Ingesting liquids to keep hydration up can be important. If the patient is having difficulty breathing, seek medical attention immediately.

Hydrangea

Hydrangea
Hydrangeas are unique, with their soft blue and pink flowers. They are a great addition to any garden, but should not be snacked on—not that you would want to. Hydrangeas can be especially nasty because they contain compounds known as glycosides. These will release hydrogen cyanide into the bloodstream when consumed. This will block your body’s ability to uptake oxygen to the cells in your body.

The way to combat this kind of poisoning is through getting IVs from the vet or doctor. It is important to contact your medical professional immediately since the symptoms can be fatal within minutes or hours.

Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons
Rhododendron, the state flower of Washington, is also toxic. The multitudinous, pink flowers can be quite dangerous. All parts of this plant are toxic, the leaves and seeds more so than the flowers. However, even the nectar of the flower is toxic and in the Mediterranean, where rhododendrons grow in more dense quantities, the honey from bees who gather rhododendron nectar can be poisonous.

Normally kids and pets do not eat enough to experience the full poisoning effect. However, just eating two leaves is enough to be considered dangerous. The grayanotoxin glycosides within the rhododendron can cause vomiting, diarrhea and irregular heartbeats. Things can get very serious when too much rhododendron is consumed and can lead to necessary medical intervention.

Start by calling poison control first if you suspect anyone has been munching on rhododendrons. The experts there will be able to help guide you through the necessary processes to cure your loved one.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb
Yummy rhubarb has a nasty side to it. While the stems are used in many recipes, including for rhubarb strawberry pie, the leaves are toxic. They contain oxalic acid which is known to blister the mouth, cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and kidney stones. The leaves are known to be more toxic to pets than humans, but in either case, it is important to contact poison control immediately to figure out necessary steps to cure the patient.
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard

Bittersweet Nightshade

Bittersweet Nightshade
Nightshade is an invasive, noxious weed that is extremely poisonous. It has been found along the East and West Coast of the U.S. It makes its home in areas with disturbed soil. This could be near your garden or areas that have recently had bushes/trees put in.

These plants are dark green with purple flowers that develop into bright red berries. The whole plant is toxic and should be avoided by pets and children alike. If ingested it can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The colorful berries are especially enticing to young children. If you see any plants that look similar to tomato or pepper plants that you did not plant in your yard, it is best to just pull them immediately.

Call poison control immediately if you think someone has fallen victim to nightshade.

Buttercups

Buttercups
Buttercups are found throughout the United States, especially in wet areas. The shiny, yellow flowers will pop up in the springtime, accompanying their dandelion friends. However, unlike dandelions, buttercups are not edible.

Buttercups will release a compound called protoanemonin. This toxin is known to cause vomiting, diarrhea, bloody stool, hypersalivation, depression, blisters, and more. These symptoms will affect both humans and animals. The sap may also cause irritation when it comes into contact with skin. These yellow flowers are dangerous and children should be observed cautiously when around them.

Foxgloves

Foxgloves
Foxgloves are beautiful plants that build towers out of vivid purple bell-shaped blossoms. They are very pretty to look at, but they contain a compound known as digoxin. This chemical is used in certain medicines to help people with certain heart conditions. However, the medicine is made by specialists, whereas someone eating foxgloves will receive unregulated amounts of the chemical.

This toxin can make you vomit and lower your heartbeat. This often causes dizziness and faintness. It is extremely important to call poison control immediately to know what to do in the case of foxglove poisoning. Some people have confused the young leaves of foxglove with borage, making adult foragers at risk as well as kids and pets.
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
Now that you know where to start with toxic plant identification, let us discuss how to either tend to the poisonous plants you decide to keep or get rid of them that plague your yard.

How to Tend to Poisonous Plants

Many plants that are toxic when ingested are also skin irritants. The philodendron is a good example of this. When the sap comes into contact with skin, it can cause a rash to form. To help protect yourself when tending to toxic plants, it is important to wear some sort of gloves.
Tend
Latex gloves may be the best solution due to their disposability. Regular gloves could potentially keep the poisonous sap on their surface. If the gloves aren’t cleaned then you could accidentally touch the irritant or pass it to someone else.

In addition you will want to plan where to keep your deadly beauties. If you have a toxic indoor plant try to keep it up high or out of reach of children and pets. This will keep accidents few and far between. Another idea is keeping your plants in areas that are usually inaccessible to children or pets. Areas such as an office, study room, or guest bedroom could be good locations. If applicable, you could also set up a terrarium for your little plant baby, making it more difficult for curious hands or paws to access.
tend2
If you plan to have outdoor plants, location will be key. You will want to put plants in an area that will be inaccessible to children, pets and even wild animals. You will probably want to avoid planting the plants in the front of your house if kids walk by on a regular basis, just to be cautious. Having the plants behind a fence will be best, but use your discretion when choosing a spot.

How to Get Rid of Poisonous Plants

plants
The easiest but possibly most controversial way to get rid of poisonous plants is by using herbicides. This can be especially easy if you own a grass lawn and use an herbicide that targets broadleaf (non-grass) species. You can find many herbicides meant for yard use by simply searching the term online. Once you have purchased the herbicide you will want to make sure to follow the label posted on the container. If you follow the instructions precisely, then everything should run smoothly for you.

If you don’t plan on using herbicides, there are a few organic methods you can use to try to get rid of toxic plants. You can manually pull the plants out of the ground. This is probably one of the most difficult methods because there is no assurance that you will get the whole plant out this way.

You can also try pouring boiling hot water or spraying white vinegar on the target plants. This may take more time than using a synthetic herbicide, but you can feel a little better about using these products.

You can also try to use wood chips to cover a certain area where you do not want anything to grow. This will not stop all the weeds, but the few that make it through can be easily picked by hand.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
qrcode
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
Who Is Most at Risk of Plant Poisoning?
Everyone should keep the following in mind to prevent being poisoned:
1
Do not eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
2
If you need to kill it, wear long-sleeved shirts, pants and gloves with sharp tools to dig it out completely;
3
Clean the tools with rubbing alcohol or soap and water but do not do that with bare hands;
4
Clean your hands and skin once exposed to plants with soap and water;
5
Consider using barrier creams that contain bentoquatam to prevent poison oak, ivy and sumac rashes;
6
Dump it in special trash cans in sealed garbage packages;
7
Wear properly when you hiking or working in the wilderness. Long pants, long sleeves, gloves, hiking shoes, etc., that protect you from being hurt by any plants;
8
Once you or your family aren’t feeling well after eating, touching or inhaling anything from toxic plants, please call your doctor for help ASAP!
Outdoor Workers
Outdoor Workers and Recreationalists
Those who enjoy the outdoors either as a hobby or as part of their work will rarely see a plant and decide to munch on it (although the scenario is not unheard of). However, they do tend to deal with moving through and brushing aside plants. These people are more at risk of being poisoned by touching toxic plants than by ingesting them.
Outdoor Workers
Foragers
Foragers
Foraging for food and medicinal plants is a desirable skill among people who want to feel at one with the land. This hobby can be very useful and enjoyable, but if done wrong , it can lead to disastrous effects. People who forage are picking and grabbing plants with the full intention of using those plants, most of the time to ingest them.
Foragers
Children
Children
While outdoor workers are more likely to touch poison and foragers are more likely to ingest poison, children can easily do both. These bundles of joy just love to run around and explore the world. They enjoy touching things and occasionally shoving random stuff in their mouth; this is a terrible combination with toxic plants in the mix.
If you let your children run about, it is important to know what are the local toxic plants that they could accidentally get into. Try to educate the children and steer them away from where the toxic plants are located.
Children
Common Toxic Houseplants
Common Toxic Houseplants
When it comes to decorating a house, there is nothing more refreshing than adding some beautiful houseplants. Some common house plants can also be toxic.

Aloe

aloe
Aloe is famous for its sunburn-soothing properties and its gorgeous desert design. However, many people do not realize that the latex the aloe vera plant produces can be mildly toxic to pets and children.

The latex contains a chemical compound known as saponin. Which when ingested, can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and low blood sugar. This, if left unchecked, can lead to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. The proper response is to contact poison control or a veterinarian to know what to do in your particular circumstance if either your child or pet consumes aloe.

The latex of the plant is similar to the sap of the tree. It is inside the leaf, but sticks mainly toward the edges. If aloe gel is prepared properly it should be safe for use, but be sure to apply it only topically when treating burns.

Philodendron

Philodendron
Philodendron, also known as sweetheart vine, has become a resident at many houses and even businesses. They are glossy green and the leaves elegantly split, displaying interesting designs. Behind this beauty there is a needle-like toxin called calcium oxalate crystals.

These crystals are held within the plant and only affect you, your pets, or your loved ones if the plant tissue is broken. If ingested, the crystals can cause severe swelling, difficulty breathing, stomach pain, burning and pain. If they are accidentally caught on the skin, they can cause skin irritation.

If anyone accidentally ingests philodendron and they find it difficult to breathe or their tongue starts to swell up, it is important to seek medical attention immediately to avoid suffocation. If you have very young children or pets who have a tendency to tear at plants, keep them away from any philodendrons.

Peace Lily

Peace Lily
Peace lilies produce stunningly white flowers that bring to mind peace and serenity. This is one reason they are invited into our homes and given a place to stay. However, similar to philodendrons, the peace lily contains oxalate crystals known as raphides.

The raphides, once ingested, will cause swelling and burning sensations and can also cause skin irritation. Both pets and humans can get these symptoms so it is important to keep these plants from anyone who is likely to tear or chew it. Symptoms can become dire if the raphides cause the tongue and throat to swell to a point where the person or pet is having difficulty breathing. Seek proper medical attention if this is the case.

Snake Plant

Snake Plant
The snake plant is an interesting and popular house plant. Its stark architecture and wavy coloring has made it a fan favorite. This plant too, however, is toxic when ingested or if the sap touches your skin.

Snake plant sap will cause rashes if it comes into contact with your skin. In addition, it will cause diarrhea and vomiting when ingested. Again these symptoms are very serious and would be best avoided by keeping snake plants out of reach or by choosing a different houseplant.
Common Toxic Garden Plants
Common Toxic Garden Plants

Daffodil

Daffodil
Daffodils are a strikingly colorful flower. This can sometimes bring them much attention not from just onlooking adults but children as well. Since kids are more drawn to colorful objects, they may have a higher chance of just grabbing the flower and eating it. Adults have also been known to accidentally grab daffodil bulbs instead of onions.

Why are these mistakes so dangerous? Daffodils contain lycorine, which can induce nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It also contains oxalates which can cause swelling and pain. The symptoms can be worse in animals, because if your pets eat daffodils they may experience drowsiness, low blood pressure or even liver damage.

Make sure to call poison control when these symptoms set in. The vomiting and diarrhea have been known to go away after 3 hours, but it is better to be safe than sorry. Ingesting liquids to keep hydration up can be important. If the patient is having difficulty breathing, seek medical attention immediately.

Hydrangea

Hydrangea
Hydrangeas are unique, with their soft blue and pink flowers. They are a great addition to any garden, but should not be snacked on—not that you would want to. Hydrangeas can be especially nasty because they contain compounds known as glycosides. These will release hydrogen cyanide into the bloodstream when consumed. This will block your body’s ability to uptake oxygen to the cells in your body.

The way to combat this kind of poisoning is through getting IVs from the vet or doctor. It is important to contact your medical professional immediately since the symptoms can be fatal within minutes or hours.

Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons
Rhododendron, the state flower of Washington, is also toxic. The multitudinous, pink flowers can be quite dangerous. All parts of this plant are toxic, the leaves and seeds more so than the flowers. However, even the nectar of the flower is toxic and in the Mediterranean, where rhododendrons grow in more dense quantities, the honey from bees who gather rhododendron nectar can be poisonous.

Normally kids and pets do not eat enough to experience the full poisoning effect. However, just eating two leaves is enough to be considered dangerous. The grayanotoxin glycosides within the rhododendron can cause vomiting, diarrhea and irregular heartbeats. Things can get very serious when too much rhododendron is consumed and can lead to necessary medical intervention.

Start by calling poison control first if you suspect anyone has been munching on rhododendrons. The experts there will be able to help guide you through the necessary processes to cure your loved one.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb
Yummy rhubarb has a nasty side to it. While the stems are used in many recipes, including for rhubarb strawberry pie, the leaves are toxic. They contain oxalic acid which is known to blister the mouth, cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and kidney stones. The leaves are known to be more toxic to pets than humans, but in either case, it is important to contact poison control immediately to figure out necessary steps to cure the patient.
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard

Bittersweet Nightshade

Bittersweet Nightshade
Nightshade is an invasive, noxious weed that is extremely poisonous. It has been found along the East and West Coast of the U.S. It makes its home in areas with disturbed soil. This could be near your garden or areas that have recently had bushes/trees put in.

These plants are dark green with purple flowers that develop into bright red berries. The whole plant is toxic and should be avoided by pets and children alike. If ingested it can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The colorful berries are especially enticing to young children. If you see any plants that look similar to tomato or pepper plants that you did not plant in your yard, it is best to just pull them immediately.

Call poison control immediately if you think someone has fallen victim to nightshade.

Buttercups

Buttercups
Buttercups are found throughout the United States, especially in wet areas. The shiny, yellow flowers will pop up in the springtime, accompanying their dandelion friends. However, unlike dandelions, buttercups are not edible.

Buttercups will release a compound called protoanemonin. This toxin is known to cause vomiting, diarrhea, bloody stool, hypersalivation, depression, blisters, and more. These symptoms will affect both humans and animals. The sap may also cause irritation when it comes into contact with skin. These yellow flowers are dangerous and children should be observed cautiously when around them.

Foxgloves

Foxgloves
Foxgloves are beautiful plants that build towers out of vivid purple bell-shaped blossoms. They are very pretty to look at, but they contain a compound known as digoxin. This chemical is used in certain medicines to help people with certain heart conditions. However, the medicine is made by specialists, whereas someone eating foxgloves will receive unregulated amounts of the chemical.

This toxin can make you vomit and lower your heartbeat. This often causes dizziness and faintness. It is extremely important to call poison control immediately to know what to do in the case of foxglove poisoning. Some people have confused the young leaves of foxglove with borage, making adult foragers at risk as well as kids and pets.
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
Now that you know where to start with toxic plant identification, let us discuss how to either tend to the poisonous plants you decide to keep or get rid of them that plague your yard.

How to Tend to Poisonous Plants

Many plants that are toxic when ingested are also skin irritants. The philodendron is a good example of this. When the sap comes into contact with skin, it can cause a rash to form. To help protect yourself when tending to toxic plants, it is important to wear some sort of gloves.
Tend
Latex gloves may be the best solution due to their disposability. Regular gloves could potentially keep the poisonous sap on their surface. If the gloves aren’t cleaned then you could accidentally touch the irritant or pass it to someone else.

In addition you will want to plan where to keep your deadly beauties. If you have a toxic indoor plant try to keep it up high or out of reach of children and pets. This will keep accidents few and far between. Another idea is keeping your plants in areas that are usually inaccessible to children or pets. Areas such as an office, study room, or guest bedroom could be good locations. If applicable, you could also set up a terrarium for your little plant baby, making it more difficult for curious hands or paws to access.
tend2
If you plan to have outdoor plants, location will be key. You will want to put plants in an area that will be inaccessible to children, pets and even wild animals. You will probably want to avoid planting the plants in the front of your house if kids walk by on a regular basis, just to be cautious. Having the plants behind a fence will be best, but use your discretion when choosing a spot.

How to Get Rid of Poisonous Plants

plants
The easiest but possibly most controversial way to get rid of poisonous plants is by using herbicides. This can be especially easy if you own a grass lawn and use an herbicide that targets broadleaf (non-grass) species. You can find many herbicides meant for yard use by simply searching the term online. Once you have purchased the herbicide you will want to make sure to follow the label posted on the container. If you follow the instructions precisely, then everything should run smoothly for you.

If you don’t plan on using herbicides, there are a few organic methods you can use to try to get rid of toxic plants. You can manually pull the plants out of the ground. This is probably one of the most difficult methods because there is no assurance that you will get the whole plant out this way.

You can also try pouring boiling hot water or spraying white vinegar on the target plants. This may take more time than using a synthetic herbicide, but you can feel a little better about using these products.

You can also try to use wood chips to cover a certain area where you do not want anything to grow. This will not stop all the weeds, but the few that make it through can be easily picked by hand.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
qrcode
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
distribution

Distribution of Fig trees

feedback
Feedback
feedback

Distribution Map of Fig trees

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
habit
care detail

How to Grow and Care for Fig trees

feedback
Feedback
feedback
how to grow and care
More Info About Caring for Fig trees
species

Exploring the Fig trees Plants

feedback
Feedback
feedback
8 most common species:
Ficus benjamina
Weeping fig
Weeping fig (Ficus benjamina) is an evergreen tree native to Asia and Australia. It is one of the most popular houseplants in the world, known for its elegant, glossy leaves. However, people with allergies should avoid weeping fig, considering that it is a major source of indoor allergens. All parts of the plant are poisonous except the fruits.
Ficus elastica
Rubber tree
Rubber tree (Ficus elastica) is a large tree with wide, oval, glossy leaves. Its milky white latex was used for making rubber before Pará rubber tree came into use, hence the name. Rubber tree is an ornamental species, often grown as a houseplant in cooler climates.
Ficus lyrata
Fiddle-leaf fig
As its name implies, the fiddle-leaf fig has leaves that are shaped like a violin. Wildly popular as a houseplant, the Ficus lyrata makes an architectural statement with its unique and lush leaves. However, please be aware that this plant is finicky and can be hard to keep alive.
Ficus microcarpa
Indian Laurel
Indian Laurel (Ficus microcarpa) is a fig tree originating in China. The indian Laurel attracts the fig wasp pollinator. In some east Asian cultures, it is believed the indian Laurel is a meeting place for spirits.
Ficus carica
Common fig
Ficus carica, colloquially known as the common fig, is a deciduous small tree or shrub widely known for its sweet, chewy fruits. This shrubby plant has a very, very long cultivation history. The earliest evidence of its cultivation was found in the Jordan Valley and go all the way back to the tenth millennium BC.
Ficus pumila
Creeping fig
Creeping fig (Ficus pumila) is a plant species native to China, Japan and Vietnam. Creeping fig has been naturalized in parts of the United States. It can be cultivated as a houseplant. The FDA lists this species in its Database of Poisonous Plants due to the plant's toxic sap, which causes inflammation.
Ficus benghalensis
Banyan tree
Banyan tree (Ficus benghalensis) is a tree species that germinates in cracks and crevices of other trees or structures. Banyan tree grows by emitting aerial roots and forming a canopy. The banyan tree is the national tree of the Republic of India and has religious significance.
Ficus macrophylla
Moreton bay fig
Moreton bay fig (Ficus macrophylla) Is an evergreen tree and one of the largest cultivated fig trees that will grow from 23 to 55 m tall and 21 to 40 m wide. Known to live for more than 150 years, this tree grows an average of 91 cm per year. Blooms in summer, but flowers are inconspicuous. Produces edible figs that turn purple as they ripen in fall. Thrives in full sun and requires ample growing space.

All Species of Fig trees

Weeping fig
Ficus benjamina
Weeping fig
Weeping fig (Ficus benjamina) is an evergreen tree native to Asia and Australia. It is one of the most popular houseplants in the world, known for its elegant, glossy leaves. However, people with allergies should avoid weeping fig, considering that it is a major source of indoor allergens. All parts of the plant are poisonous except the fruits.
Rubber tree
Ficus elastica
Rubber tree
Rubber tree (Ficus elastica) is a large tree with wide, oval, glossy leaves. Its milky white latex was used for making rubber before Pará rubber tree came into use, hence the name. Rubber tree is an ornamental species, often grown as a houseplant in cooler climates.
Fiddle-leaf fig
Ficus lyrata
Fiddle-leaf fig
As its name implies, the fiddle-leaf fig has leaves that are shaped like a violin. Wildly popular as a houseplant, the Ficus lyrata makes an architectural statement with its unique and lush leaves. However, please be aware that this plant is finicky and can be hard to keep alive.
Indian Laurel
Ficus microcarpa
Indian Laurel
Indian Laurel (Ficus microcarpa) is a fig tree originating in China. The indian Laurel attracts the fig wasp pollinator. In some east Asian cultures, it is believed the indian Laurel is a meeting place for spirits.
Common fig
Ficus carica
Common fig
Ficus carica, colloquially known as the common fig, is a deciduous small tree or shrub widely known for its sweet, chewy fruits. This shrubby plant has a very, very long cultivation history. The earliest evidence of its cultivation was found in the Jordan Valley and go all the way back to the tenth millennium BC.
Creeping fig
Ficus pumila
Creeping fig
Creeping fig (Ficus pumila) is a plant species native to China, Japan and Vietnam. Creeping fig has been naturalized in parts of the United States. It can be cultivated as a houseplant. The FDA lists this species in its Database of Poisonous Plants due to the plant's toxic sap, which causes inflammation.
Banyan tree
Ficus benghalensis
Banyan tree
Banyan tree (Ficus benghalensis) is a tree species that germinates in cracks and crevices of other trees or structures. Banyan tree grows by emitting aerial roots and forming a canopy. The banyan tree is the national tree of the Republic of India and has religious significance.
Moreton bay fig
Ficus macrophylla
Moreton bay fig
Moreton bay fig (Ficus macrophylla) Is an evergreen tree and one of the largest cultivated fig trees that will grow from 23 to 55 m tall and 21 to 40 m wide. Known to live for more than 150 years, this tree grows an average of 91 cm per year. Blooms in summer, but flowers are inconspicuous. Produces edible figs that turn purple as they ripen in fall. Thrives in full sun and requires ample growing space.
Florida strangler fig
Ficus aurea
Florida strangler fig
The florida strangler fig, or Ficus aurea, is named for its habit of overtaking other species of trees. It is a member of the mulberry family and the only one of ten strangler trees native to Florida. It is sometimes known as the golden fig for its yellow colored fruits. This unique tree can live for centuries.
Japanese fig
Ficus erecta
Japanese fig
Up to about 5 m in height. The leaves are narrow oval to elliptical and the base is slightly heart-shaped or rounded. The leaves are thin and grassy and the surface is smooth or short hairs. It is a hermaphrodite and the flowering period is spring. The fruit sac is fully ripe in fall and has a diameter of about 1 to 1.3 cm and becomes a deep purple blue like white powder.
Sacred fig
Ficus religiosa
Sacred fig
Sacred fig or Ficus religiosa, gets its name because it is considered sacred to Buddhism, Jainism, and Hinduism. Although a member of the mulberry family, the sap of the sacred fig may cause skin reactions if handled.
Cluster fig
Ficus racemosa
Cluster fig
Cluster fig gets its common name from the unusual clusters of figs that form on its trunk. It is native to Australia, India, and Malaysia. This tree is worshipped in Hinduism and thought to bring enlightenment in Buddhism.
Superb fig
Ficus subpisocarpa
Superb fig
The superb fig grows native in Southeast Asia, southern China, and Japan. Naturally occurring cavities within the wood are often inhabited by colonies of ants that tend aphid populations. When the trees produce fruit, they become popular destinations for local birds.
Opposite leaf fig
Ficus hispida
Opposite leaf fig
If you've never seen how opposite leaf fig fruits, then you're in for a surprise. The fruit grows directly from the trunk and branches off the tree rather front than from the twigs and leaves. This tree is only fertilized by one species of wasp that in turn is entirely dependent on the tree for survival, a great example of symbiosis.
Sandpaper fig
Ficus virgata
Sandpaper fig
An evergreen shrub or small tree, the height is 3-7 meters. Wakae is hairless. The bark is a little gray. Kashiwaha has a linear needle shape and has a sharp tip. The leaves alternate in two rows. The petiole is 5 to 15 mm long. The leaf blades are oval, with tips protruding slightly and pointed or rounded. The base is asymmetrical and gradually narrows and flows directly into the petiole. The length of the leaf blades is 7 to 20 cm, the width is 3 to 8 cm, the edges are smooth, hairless on both sides, and the surface is slightly shiny. The flower sac is 5 to 6 mm in diameter and 1 cm in diameter when ripened. When ripe, the color is yellow for males and red for females.
Common yellow-stem fig
Ficus fistulosa
Common yellow-stem fig
Like many figs, the common yellow-stem fig (Ficus fistulosa) fruits directly from its branches and trunk. This tropical forest tree is a common sight in its native South and East Asia. The young leaves and fruits are eaten in salads.
Strangler Fig
Ficus thonningii
Strangler Fig
Strangler Fig (Ficus thonningii) is an evergreen tree with multiple uses. The fruits are food for both humans and animals, the bark can be used to create fiber cloth, and the wood is used as timber and fuel. The scientific epithet refers to Peter Thonning (1775-1848), who was a Danish plant collector.
Ficus heteromorpha
Ficus heteromorpha
Ficus heteromorpha
Ficus heteromorpha is a unique fig tree that lacks the common fig’s edible fruit. Its name comes from the Greek word ‘heteros’, meaning different, as its leaves are variable in shape.
Ivory fig
Ficus septica
Ivory fig
Ivory fig is a member of the fig family, pollinated only by fig wasps, which in turn rely on the tree for their survival. The tree's fruit is enjoyed by many forest dwellers and its seeds are commonly spread by fruit bats.
Council tree
Ficus altissima
Council tree
A popular indoor and patio-plant in its smaller forms, the council tree (Ficus altissima) may reach heights of one hundred feet in its natural habitat. Its spreading crown of waxy leaves do not wither and die in winter. Essentially parasitic in nature, this tree often strangles its host as it grows. By the time its host has died, the council tree usually has a large enough root system to sustain itself.
Milk fig tree
Ficus erecta var. beecheyana
Milk fig tree
Milk fig tree boasts a robust growth habit, typically unfurling glossy green leaves that offer a lush visual texture. This variety thrives in dappled light environments, mimicking its native understory origins. The foliage, although simple, is remarkably tough—adapted to resist damage from both pests and erratic weather. Its resilience and modest form make milk fig tree a favoured choice for ornamental cultivation.
Nepal fig
Ficus sarmentosa
Nepal fig
Nepal fig is a fascinating plant with a uniquely beautiful appearance. This plant is known for its ability to attract a wide variety of insects and birds, making it a great addition to any garden. It also has an interesting name origin, derived from its vine-like growth habit. Another intriguing fact about the nepal fig is its toxicity, which should be taken into consideration when planting it near pets or children. With its striking features and ecological benefits, the nepal fig is a must-have for any plant enthusiast.
Red-leaved fig
Ficus ingens
Red-leaved fig
The red-leaved fig (Ficus ingens) has an aggressive root system famous for pushing through rocks and helping the plant thrive on cliff faces and other rocky areas. New leaves sprout red before turning green. Its figs, which grow white before maturing to pink, red or purple, peak in summer but can be found year-round.
Mistletoe fig
Ficus deltoidea
Mistletoe fig
The mistletoe fig is named for its white berries which bear a close resemblance to those of the mistletoe plant, which is not a relative. This evergreen shrub is native to southeast Asia but is commonly grown as an evergreen garden plant or indoor houseplant in cooler climates. Male and female plants are easily differentiated by the shape of their leaves, large and round in the female plant and small and long in the male.
Wild fig
Ficus insipida
Wild fig
The wild fig's Latin name translates to the 'insipid fig' and the fruit of this tree is commonly eaten by mammals and birds. The wild fig tree also has economic use for humans as the latex sap produced by the tree is useful for different food processing mechanisms and the fruits are often used for arts and crafts such as hatmaking.
White fig
Ficus virens
White fig
Don't be mistaken by the innocuous appearance of the white fig (Ficus virens), because it's a killer. It belongs to the family of strangler figs which are able to germinate on another tree and then grow around and eventually kill it. Often the tree displays long dangling roots that hang impressively from branches.
Sonoran strangler fig
Ficus pertusa
Sonoran strangler fig
Sonoran strangler fig is a parasitic plant found in the Sonoran desert. It grows by killing and taking over a host tree, hence the name "strangler." The figs produced by this plant are a crucial food source for the desert's wildlife.
Fiddle-leaf fig
Ficus pandurata
Fiddle-leaf fig
This version of fig tree shows up in wet forests. Leaves from the fiddle-leaf fig possess a fiddle- or violin-like shape. The tree typically grows no higher than 1.8 m; it makes a great indoor potted tree as long as it gets enough water and humidity.
Alii ficus
Ficus binnendijkii
Alii ficus
Also known as the alii ficus, this plant has long narrow leaves that are perfect for a modern or minimalist decor. It's easy to care for and can thrive in low light conditions. In its natural habitat, it provides food and shelter for many animals.
Natal fig
Ficus natalensis subsp. leprieurii
Natal fig
Natal fig is a dwarf, shrub-like fig tree in the Mulberry family, with triangular-shaped, bright green leaves. It produces round-yellow figs that birds love to munch on! An identifying feature is that the center vein forks just before reaching the leaf's tip.
Creeping fig
Ficus pumila 'Curly'
Creeping fig
An unusual variety of creeping fig, creeping fig(Ficus pumila 'Curly') differentiates itself by the shape of its leaves, which are curly and ruffled, and its leaf coloring, which unlike the commoner 'variegata' has pale green to yellow stripes and edging instead of white. Popular for its unusual good looks and hardiness, 'Curly' is named for its distinctive leaf shape.
Dwarf Fiddle Leaf Fig
Ficus lyrata 'Bambino'
Dwarf Fiddle Leaf Fig
Dwarf Fiddle Leaf Fig is cultivated from the Fig trees genus and is easily distinguishable by its smaller leaves that are also thicker than those of other cultivars. The unique small shape of the leaves is what gives the plant its name and makes it a popular houseplant.
Indian Rubber Tree 'Sylvie'
Ficus elastica 'Sylvie'
Indian Rubber Tree 'Sylvie'
Indian Rubber Tree 'Sylvie' has dark green leaves with a white-to-yellow variegation. Unlike its parent cultivar, Ficus elastica 'Belga', this cultivar is noted for its large amount of pale coloration in comparison to the green part of the leaf. This particular plant was discovered by the inventor Rene G. M. A. Denis in Belgium in 1989.
Weeping fig 'Twilight'
Ficus benjamina 'Twilight'
Weeping fig 'Twilight'
A Ficus cultivar with a difference, the variegation in weeping fig 'Twilight' blooms gives it extra beauty when compared to the monochromatic parent plant, Ficus benjamin. It's unknown why this houseplant was given the name "Twilight," as it isn't dark in color. Regardless, this plant is adored for its foliage color and weeping growth habit.
Curtain fig 'Ginseng'
Ficus microcarpa 'Ginseng' in ceramic pot
Curtain fig 'Ginseng'
Curtain fig 'Ginseng' is distinct for its thick, bulbous roots. A cultivar of Ficus microcarpa, its name refers to these roots' resemblance to those of ginseng. This plant is easy to grow and it grows fast. It is a popular plant for bonsai.
Rubber plant 'Schrijveriana'
Ficus elastica 'Schrijveriana'
Rubber plant 'Schrijveriana'
Rubber plant 'Schrijveriana' is a cultivated plant from the mulberry family bred as a houseplant. It is noticeably shorter than other plants in the genus that can reach heights up to 30 m. Its smaller size makes rubber plant 'Schrijveriana' a common houseplant. Its foliage is also different. Leaves are light green with darker spots.
Common fig 'Chicago Hardy'
Ficus carica 'Chicago Hardy'
Common fig 'Chicago Hardy'
Common fig 'Chicago Hardy' is distinct for its hardiness and purple-skinned fruit. A cultivar of Ficus carica, its name refers to its ability to even withstand Chicago winters. The stems may die back in cold conditions, but new stems will sprout in spring and produce sweet fruit in late summer.
Burgundy Rubber Tree
Ficus elastica 'Burgundy'
Burgundy Rubber Tree
Burgundy Rubber Tree sports leaves that are a much darker green - almost black, in some cases - than typical varieties. The veins on these leaves take on a dark maroon or burgundy color. This two-toned coloration makes this otherwise humble plant really "pop." It is a favorite in both gardens and homes for this unique coloration.
Variegated Rubber Tree
Ficus elastica 'Tineke'
Variegated Rubber Tree
The variegated Rubber Tree is a variegated cultivar that is quite similar-looking to the Ruby Ficus, though with some slight differences in coloration. This cultivar is two- or three-toned but its complementary colors are lighter - usually light yellow, pink, or a creamy white color (rather than deep red or orange). As with other variegated Ficus elastica cultivars, the variegated Rubber Tree will require some extra sunlight to maintain its flashy colors.
Rubber Plant
Ficus elastica 'Robusta'
Rubber Plant
The rubber Plant is one of the more popular Ficus cultivars. This particular variety can be tricky to distinguish from other Ficuses but can be distinguished by its leaves, which tend to be wider and glossier than other cultivars. Requiring very little natural sunlight and thriving at room temperature, these plants are popular in offices and homes.
Variegated rubber tree
Ficus elastica 'Variegata'
Variegated rubber tree
Like many of its close cultivar cousins, variegated rubber tree sports striking and attractive variegated leaves (hence the name "Variegata"). In this particular cultivar's case, deep green leaves are complemented by cream, light pink, or light yellow edges. This cultivar also tends to have noticeably redder midribs, similar to those found in Burgundy varieties.
Mountain fig dapasan
Ficus nervosa
Mountain fig dapasan
Ficus nervosa is a tree in the family Moraceae which grows up to a height of 35 metres. It is found in India, southern China and Indo-China.
Dye fig
Ficus tinctoria
Dye fig
The dye fig tree is unusual in that its seeds germinate in the canopy of other trees. It then parasitizes the host tree's moisture and nutrients while its own "trunk" grows down toward the ground. As the name suggests, the dye fig's fruits can be used to create a red fabric dye.
King's fig
Ficus ampelas
King's fig
King's fig is a versatile tropical fig tree that flourishes in warm, humid climates, typically found winding its way upward as it clings to other trees. Its large, glossy leaves are a vibrant green, contributing to its role as a natural air purifier. Characterized by a sturdy root system, king's fig often thrives where other plants might not, making it prominent in its native ecosystem's tapestry.
Calloused fig
Ficus callosa
Calloused fig
Ficus callosa is an Asian species of fig tree in the family Moraceae. No subspecies are listed in the Catalogue of Life; the native range of this species is India, southern China, Indo-China and Malesia (not New Guinea). The species can be found in Vietnam: where it may be called đa chai or đa gùa.
Bush fig
Ficus sur
Bush fig
The bush fig is also called the broom cluster fig because of the drooping clusters of fruit it produces in the spring and summer. The fruits attract a wide variety of birds and even fruit bats. The large tree, growing up to 35 meters, is perhaps most valued for the shade it provides across African countries.
Common red stem fig
Ficus variegata
Common red stem fig
Ficus variegata may refer to: Ficus variegata (plant), a species of tropical fig tree Ficus variegata (gastropod), a species of sea snail
Sycamore fig
Ficus sycomorus
Sycamore fig
The sycamore fig (Ficus sycomorus) has had impacts on many cultures and religions. The Egyptian "tree of life," sycamore fig was prominent in ancient Egyptian agriculture, with its wood used to build coffins and its fruits buried with the pharaohs. It is also mentioned numerous times in the Bible as a sign of prosperity and sustenance.
Ficus Moclame
Ficus microcarpa 'Moclame'
Ficus Moclame
Ficus Moclame is a dwarf cultivar of the Chinese banyan, or Indian laurel, a tropical tree that grows to a height in excess of 12 m. Ficus Moclame is a popular temperate houseplant or tropical outdoor plant that reaches a modest height of 3 m, so it's a much better choice for smaller spaces!
Decora Rubber Tree
Ficus elastica 'Decora'
Decora Rubber Tree
Decora Rubber Tree is cultivated from the Fig trees Elastica, but easily distinguishable by its glossy green leaves that can grow up to 30 cm in length. Its decorative foliage is also what gives the cultivar its name and makes it a popular houseplant.
Creeping Fig
Ficus pumila var. awkeotsang
Creeping Fig
Known as creeping Fig, this creeping vine is a popular plant for ground cover. Its small leaves and aerial roots make it easy to propagate.
Triangle ficus
Ficus triangularis
Triangle ficus
Often grown as a houseplant, Ficus triangularis' foliage sets it apart: The leaves are shaped like triangles, which is why the plant is sometimes called the "triangle ficus." Milky-white sap from the plant's leaves is considered toxic, as it can cause skin irritation in humans.
Common fig 'Celeste'
Ficus carica 'Celeste'
Common fig 'Celeste'
One of the most frequently grown figs, the common fig 'Celeste' is a Common fig cultivar with worldwide popularity. This self-pollinating, high-yielding fig was bred to be heat and cold-resistant, and it's distinguished by its mid-sized, extremely sweet fruit with buttery-smooth taste. Thanks to its "closed-eye" (the "eye" on the bottom of the fruit stays tight), it resists pests very well and it's not prone to spoilage.
Long leaf fig
Ficus maclellandii
Long leaf fig
Many long leaf fig species have elongated leaves, but this particular species, Ficus maclellandii, is commonly referred to as the long leaf fig. In the horticultural context, the long leaf fig is most present in the form of a cultivar called 'Alii' and can be cultivated as a houseplant.
Shaggy leaf fig
Ficus villosa
Shaggy leaf fig
Ficus villosa, known as the shaggy leaf fig or villous fig, is a species of Ficus native to South East Asia from India to Indonesia and the Philippines.
Weeping fig 'Exotica'
Ficus benjamina 'Exotica'
Weeping fig 'Exotica'
Weeping fig 'Exotica' have been cultivated in many regions for their fruits, particularly the common fig, F. carica. Most of the species have edible fruits, although the common fig is the only one of commercial value. Weeping fig 'Exotica' are also important food sources for wildlife in the tropics, including monkeys, bats, and insects.
Rubber plant 'Doescheri'
Ficus elastica 'Doescheri'
Rubber plant 'Doescheri'
Rubber plant 'Doescheri' stands out from the crowd because of its unique leaves. This Ficus cultivar boasts cream variegation splotches on its narrow green leaves - distinctly different than the parent plant's broader, solid green foliage. Its attractive coloration means that rubber plant 'Doescheri' is predominantly chosen as a houseplant,
Rubber plant 'Black Knight'
Ficus elastica 'Black Knight'
Rubber plant 'Black Knight'
The rubber plant 'Black Knight' is low maintenance and can survive both a lack of water and light. This cultivar has unknown parentage. The rubber plant 'Black Knight' was named for its black-green, rubbery leaves. Gardeners often keep the rubber plant 'Black Knight' as an indoor plant for its unique leave coloration and low care demands.
Taiwan ficus
Ficus microcarpa var. crassifolia
Taiwan ficus
Since taiwan ficus is a dense shrub it makes an excellent hedge, although its rounded waxy leaves give it plenty of appeal as a specimen tree. Its unusual fruit grows directly from the trunk and branches. This variety of fig is also a popular bonsai plant. Its dense growth makes it a useful shade tree.
Weeping fig 'Variegata'
Ficus benjamina 'Variegata'
Weeping fig 'Variegata'
Weeping fig 'Variegata' is named for its two-colored or variegated leaves. These are a diverting mixture of green and white that gives the plant significant ornamental appeal, especially compared to its plainer green-leafed parent. This dwarf hybrid is well-suited to indoor container growth.
Ruby rubber tree
Ficus elastica 'Ruby'
Ruby rubber tree
The ruby rubber tree is a particularly colorful variety of Ficus. Sporting variegated leaves with splashes of red and orangish-yellow, these plants are quite eye-catching. To retain their flashy hues, these plants also require a little more sunlight than your typical Ficus. Regardless, they are still very easy to care for, generally low-maintenance, and quite popular as a houseplant.
Lanyu fig
Ficus pedunculosa
Lanyu fig
You'll find lanyu fig growing in the forests of Southeast Asia, specifically Micronesia and Melanesia. The tree has spiral leaf arrangements and its leaves have lots of internal hairs. This tree is a member of the fig family, sometimes grown as a prized bonsai tree.
Kachere
Ficus cyathistipula
Kachere
Kachere symbolize fulfilling dreams and aspirations and are commonly called the river's gift in their native western and northern African climes. Although their fruit is prized, the sap of kachere trees contains latex, which can be harmful to those who are allergic.
Umbrella tree fig
Ficus umbellata
Umbrella tree fig
The umbrella tree fig is a popular houseplant in Japan and is beginning to gain traction in the United States. This particular houseplant has lovely large, heart-shaped leaves resembling umbrellas, hence its name, and can be trickier to care for than other Ficus species.
Weeping Fig 'Barok'
Ficus benjamina 'Barok'
Weeping Fig 'Barok'
The name of weeping Fig 'Barok', or 'Baroque', is a reference to its unique, ornamental twisting arc-shaped leaves. This attractive foliage distinguishes it from its parent plant, part of the Benjamin family. The leaves are glossy and thick, adding to the dramatic appearance of this plant. Its flowers are insignificant.
Rubber Tree 'Tricolor'
Ficus elastica 'Tricolor'
Rubber Tree 'Tricolor'
Rubber Tree 'Tricolor' is cultivated from the Fig trees genus and easily distinguishable by the shiny round leaves . The leaves emerge pink and gradually change to dark green with white and greyish variegation. The cultivar is a popular houseplant prized for its unique foliage.
Rubber plant 'Abidjan'
Ficus elastica 'Abidjan'
Rubber plant 'Abidjan'
Rubber plant 'Abidjan' is a beautiful Rubber plant cultivar characterized by its distinctive, glossy, leather-like leaves that emerge red-purple. As the leaves mature, they become more greenish but exceptionally dark. The leaves may exhibit a characteristic red veining. The cultivar was named after the capital of Ivory Coast.
Weeping fig 'Danielle'
Ficus benjamina 'Danielle'
Weeping fig 'Danielle'
Weeping fig 'Danielle' is by far the most popular indoor hybrid of the weeping fig. It grows to 1 m, in marked contrast to the parent tree's 18 m. Several weeping fig hybrids have been given girl's names like Danielle and Naomi, although the particular reason for this is unclear.
Formosan fig tree
Ficus formosana
Formosan fig tree
Formosan fig tree is a resilient, evergreen tree indigenous to Asia. Its glossy, dark green leaves and gracefully spreading canopy thrive in the warm, humid climates it prefers. Notable for its aerial roots and smooth, gray bark, formosan fig tree is often found clambering on other trees or cliffs, exhibiting remarkable adaptability. A symbol of vigorous growth, it's also cherished for ornamental purposes.
Common fig 'Brown Turkey'
Ficus carica 'Brown Turkey'
Common fig 'Brown Turkey'
Common fig 'Brown Turkey' is an ancient cultivar of the common fig, also known as the ‘negro largo’ or long black because of its sizeable purple-brown-colored fruit. This hybrid produces abundant fruit and grows up to 6 m high - shorter than its parent which reaches heights of 10 m. Note that the 'Turkey' referenced in the name likely refers to its native territory rather than the bird.
Formosan creeping fig
Ficus vaccinioides
Formosan creeping fig
Formosan creeping fig is a popular choice for indoor gardens as it grows slowly and requires minimal maintenance. Its delicate leaves and cascading vines add a charming touch to any space. Beware, though, as it can be toxic to pets if ingested.
Ficus Ginseng
Ficus microcarpa 'Ginseng'
Ficus Ginseng
Ficus Ginseng is distinct for its thick, bulbous roots, which resemble ginseng roots. It is easy to grow and grows fast, making it a popular plant for bonsai.
popular genus

More Popular Genus

feedback
Feedback
feedback
Dracaena
Dracaena
Dracaena are popular house plants that are easy to grow. They can tolerate low-light conditions and require little watering. Their leaves range from variegated to dark green. Their characteristic traits include woody stems that grow slowly but offer a striking appearance for small spaces such as apartments or offices.
Ficus
Fig trees
Fig trees have been cultivated in many regions for their fruits, particularly the common fig, F. carica. Most of the species have edible fruits, although the common fig is the only one of commercial value. Fig trees are also important food sources for wildlife in the tropics, including monkeys, bats, and insects.
Rubus
Brambles
Brambles are members of the rose family, and there are hundreds of different types to be found throughout the European countryside. They have been culturally significant for centuries; Christian folklore stories hold that when the devil was thrown from heaven, he landed on a bramble bush. Their vigorous growth habit can tangle into native plants and take over.
Acer
Maples
The popular tree family known as maples change the color of their leaves in the fall. Many cultural traditions encourage people to watch the colors change, such as momijigari in Japan. Maples popular options for bonsai art. Alternately, their sap is used to create maple syrup.
Prunus
Prunus
Prunus is a genus of flowering fruit trees that includes almonds, cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines, and apricots. These are often known as "stone fruits" because their pits are large seeds or "stones." When prunus trees are damaged, they exhibit "gummosis," a condition in which the tree's gum (similar to sap) is secreted to the bark to help heal external wounds.
Solanum
Nightshades
Nightshades is a large and diverse genus of plants, with more than 1500 different types worldwide. This genus incorporates both important staple food crops like tomato, potato, and eggplant, but also dangerous poisonous plants from the nightshade family. The name was coined by Pliny the Elder almost two thousand years ago.
Rosa
Roses
Most species of roses are shrubs or climbing plants that have showy flowers and sharp thorns. They are commonly cultivated for cut flowers or as ornamental plants in gardens due to their attractive appearance, pleasant fragrance, and cultural significance in many countries. The rose hips (fruits) can also be used in jams and teas.
Quercus
Oaks
Oaks are among the world's longest-lived trees, sometimes growing for over 1,000 years! The oldest known oak tree is in the southern United States and is over 1,500 years old. Oaks produce an exceedingly popular type of wood which is used to make different products, from furniture and flooring to wine barrels and even cosmetic creams.
close
product icon
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants and unlimited guides at your fingertips...
Your Ultimate Guide to Plants
Identify grow and nurture the better way!
product icon
17,000 local species +400,000 global species studied
product icon
Nearly 5 years of research
product icon
80+ scholars in botany and gardening
ad
ad
Botanist in your pocket
Scan the QR code with your phone camera to download the app
About
Key Facts
Toxicity
Distribution
How To Care
All Species
More Genus
Fig trees
Fig trees
Fig trees
Fig trees
Fig trees
Fig trees
Fig trees
Ficus
Lifespan
Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Plant Type
Shrub
icon
Instantly identify plants with a snap
Snap a photo for instant plant ID, gaining quick insights on disease prevention, treatment, toxicity, care, uses, and symbolism, etc.
Download the App for Free
info

Key Facts About Fig trees

feedback
Feedback
feedback

Attributes of Fig trees

Planting Time
Spring, Early summer, Early fall, Mid fall
Leaf type
Evergreen
Ideal Temperature
10 - 41 ℃

Scientific Classification of Fig trees

toxic

Fig trees and Their Toxicity

feedback
Feedback
feedback
* The judgment on toxicity and danger is for reference only. We DO NOT GUARANTEE any accuracy of such judgment. Therefore, you SHALL NOT rely on such judgment. It is IMPORTANT TO SEEK PROFESSIONAL ADVICE in advance when necessary.
icon
Identify toxic plants in your garden
Find out what’s toxic and what’s safe for your loved one.
Download the App for Free
Slightly Toxic to Humans
Toxic to Dogs
close
Who Is Most at Risk of Plant Poisoning?
Your pets like cats and dogs can be poisoned by them as well!
1
Do not let your lovely pets eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
2
It’s better to kill those growing around your house. Wear long-sleeved shirts, pants and gloves with sharp tools to dig it out completely;
3
Clean the tools with rubbing alcohol or soap and water but do not do that with bare hands;
4
Clean your hands and skin once exposed to plants with soap and water;
5
Consider using barrier creams that contain bentoquatam to prevent poison oak, ivy and sumac rashes;
6
Dump it in special trash cans in sealed garbage packages, and do not let your pets reach it;Do not let your lovely pets eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
7
If you take your pets to hike with you in the wild, please don’t let them eat any plants that you don’t know;
8
Once your pets eat, touch or inhale anything from toxic plants and act abnormally, please call the doctors for help ASAP!
pets
Pets
Some pets are less likely than children to eat and touch just about everything. This is good, as a pet owner. However, you know your pet best, and it is up to you to keep them safe. There are plenty of poisonous weeds that can grow within the confines of your lawn, which might make your dogs or cats ill or worse if they eat them. Try to have an idea of what toxic plants grow in your area and keep them under control and your pets away from them.
pets
Common Toxic Houseplants
Common Toxic Houseplants
When it comes to decorating a house, there is nothing more refreshing than adding some beautiful houseplants. Some common house plants can also be toxic.

Aloe

aloe
Aloe is famous for its sunburn-soothing properties and its gorgeous desert design. However, many people do not realize that the latex the aloe vera plant produces can be mildly toxic to pets and children.

The latex contains a chemical compound known as saponin. Which when ingested, can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and low blood sugar. This, if left unchecked, can lead to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. The proper response is to contact poison control or a veterinarian to know what to do in your particular circumstance if either your child or pet consumes aloe.

The latex of the plant is similar to the sap of the tree. It is inside the leaf, but sticks mainly toward the edges. If aloe gel is prepared properly it should be safe for use, but be sure to apply it only topically when treating burns.

Philodendron

Philodendron
Philodendron, also known as sweetheart vine, has become a resident at many houses and even businesses. They are glossy green and the leaves elegantly split, displaying interesting designs. Behind this beauty there is a needle-like toxin called calcium oxalate crystals.

These crystals are held within the plant and only affect you, your pets, or your loved ones if the plant tissue is broken. If ingested, the crystals can cause severe swelling, difficulty breathing, stomach pain, burning and pain. If they are accidentally caught on the skin, they can cause skin irritation.

If anyone accidentally ingests philodendron and they find it difficult to breathe or their tongue starts to swell up, it is important to seek medical attention immediately to avoid suffocation. If you have very young children or pets who have a tendency to tear at plants, keep them away from any philodendrons.

Peace Lily

Peace Lily
Peace lilies produce stunningly white flowers that bring to mind peace and serenity. This is one reason they are invited into our homes and given a place to stay. However, similar to philodendrons, the peace lily contains oxalate crystals known as raphides.

The raphides, once ingested, will cause swelling and burning sensations and can also cause skin irritation. Both pets and humans can get these symptoms so it is important to keep these plants from anyone who is likely to tear or chew it. Symptoms can become dire if the raphides cause the tongue and throat to swell to a point where the person or pet is having difficulty breathing. Seek proper medical attention if this is the case.

Snake Plant

Snake Plant
The snake plant is an interesting and popular house plant. Its stark architecture and wavy coloring has made it a fan favorite. This plant too, however, is toxic when ingested or if the sap touches your skin.

Snake plant sap will cause rashes if it comes into contact with your skin. In addition, it will cause diarrhea and vomiting when ingested. Again these symptoms are very serious and would be best avoided by keeping snake plants out of reach or by choosing a different houseplant.
Common Toxic Garden Plants
Common Toxic Garden Plants

Daffodil

Daffodil
Daffodils are a strikingly colorful flower. This can sometimes bring them much attention not from just onlooking adults but children as well. Since kids are more drawn to colorful objects, they may have a higher chance of just grabbing the flower and eating it. Adults have also been known to accidentally grab daffodil bulbs instead of onions.

Why are these mistakes so dangerous? Daffodils contain lycorine, which can induce nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It also contains oxalates which can cause swelling and pain. The symptoms can be worse in animals, because if your pets eat daffodils they may experience drowsiness, low blood pressure or even liver damage.

Make sure to call poison control when these symptoms set in. The vomiting and diarrhea have been known to go away after 3 hours, but it is better to be safe than sorry. Ingesting liquids to keep hydration up can be important. If the patient is having difficulty breathing, seek medical attention immediately.

Hydrangea

Hydrangea
Hydrangeas are unique, with their soft blue and pink flowers. They are a great addition to any garden, but should not be snacked on—not that you would want to. Hydrangeas can be especially nasty because they contain compounds known as glycosides. These will release hydrogen cyanide into the bloodstream when consumed. This will block your body’s ability to uptake oxygen to the cells in your body.

The way to combat this kind of poisoning is through getting IVs from the vet or doctor. It is important to contact your medical professional immediately since the symptoms can be fatal within minutes or hours.

Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons
Rhododendron, the state flower of Washington, is also toxic. The multitudinous, pink flowers can be quite dangerous. All parts of this plant are toxic, the leaves and seeds more so than the flowers. However, even the nectar of the flower is toxic and in the Mediterranean, where rhododendrons grow in more dense quantities, the honey from bees who gather rhododendron nectar can be poisonous.

Normally kids and pets do not eat enough to experience the full poisoning effect. However, just eating two leaves is enough to be considered dangerous. The grayanotoxin glycosides within the rhododendron can cause vomiting, diarrhea and irregular heartbeats. Things can get very serious when too much rhododendron is consumed and can lead to necessary medical intervention.

Start by calling poison control first if you suspect anyone has been munching on rhododendrons. The experts there will be able to help guide you through the necessary processes to cure your loved one.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb
Yummy rhubarb has a nasty side to it. While the stems are used in many recipes, including for rhubarb strawberry pie, the leaves are toxic. They contain oxalic acid which is known to blister the mouth, cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and kidney stones. The leaves are known to be more toxic to pets than humans, but in either case, it is important to contact poison control immediately to figure out necessary steps to cure the patient.
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard

Bittersweet Nightshade

Bittersweet Nightshade
Nightshade is an invasive, noxious weed that is extremely poisonous. It has been found along the East and West Coast of the U.S. It makes its home in areas with disturbed soil. This could be near your garden or areas that have recently had bushes/trees put in.

These plants are dark green with purple flowers that develop into bright red berries. The whole plant is toxic and should be avoided by pets and children alike. If ingested it can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The colorful berries are especially enticing to young children. If you see any plants that look similar to tomato or pepper plants that you did not plant in your yard, it is best to just pull them immediately.

Call poison control immediately if you think someone has fallen victim to nightshade.

Buttercups

Buttercups
Buttercups are found throughout the United States, especially in wet areas. The shiny, yellow flowers will pop up in the springtime, accompanying their dandelion friends. However, unlike dandelions, buttercups are not edible.

Buttercups will release a compound called protoanemonin. This toxin is known to cause vomiting, diarrhea, bloody stool, hypersalivation, depression, blisters, and more. These symptoms will affect both humans and animals. The sap may also cause irritation when it comes into contact with skin. These yellow flowers are dangerous and children should be observed cautiously when around them.

Foxgloves

Foxgloves
Foxgloves are beautiful plants that build towers out of vivid purple bell-shaped blossoms. They are very pretty to look at, but they contain a compound known as digoxin. This chemical is used in certain medicines to help people with certain heart conditions. However, the medicine is made by specialists, whereas someone eating foxgloves will receive unregulated amounts of the chemical.

This toxin can make you vomit and lower your heartbeat. This often causes dizziness and faintness. It is extremely important to call poison control immediately to know what to do in the case of foxglove poisoning. Some people have confused the young leaves of foxglove with borage, making adult foragers at risk as well as kids and pets.
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
Now that you know where to start with toxic plant identification, let us discuss how to either tend to the poisonous plants you decide to keep or get rid of them that plague your yard.

How to Tend to Poisonous Plants

Many plants that are toxic when ingested are also skin irritants. The philodendron is a good example of this. When the sap comes into contact with skin, it can cause a rash to form. To help protect yourself when tending to toxic plants, it is important to wear some sort of gloves.
Tend
Latex gloves may be the best solution due to their disposability. Regular gloves could potentially keep the poisonous sap on their surface. If the gloves aren’t cleaned then you could accidentally touch the irritant or pass it to someone else.

In addition you will want to plan where to keep your deadly beauties. If you have a toxic indoor plant try to keep it up high or out of reach of children and pets. This will keep accidents few and far between. Another idea is keeping your plants in areas that are usually inaccessible to children or pets. Areas such as an office, study room, or guest bedroom could be good locations. If applicable, you could also set up a terrarium for your little plant baby, making it more difficult for curious hands or paws to access.
tend2
If you plan to have outdoor plants, location will be key. You will want to put plants in an area that will be inaccessible to children, pets and even wild animals. You will probably want to avoid planting the plants in the front of your house if kids walk by on a regular basis, just to be cautious. Having the plants behind a fence will be best, but use your discretion when choosing a spot.

How to Get Rid of Poisonous Plants

plants
The easiest but possibly most controversial way to get rid of poisonous plants is by using herbicides. This can be especially easy if you own a grass lawn and use an herbicide that targets broadleaf (non-grass) species. You can find many herbicides meant for yard use by simply searching the term online. Once you have purchased the herbicide you will want to make sure to follow the label posted on the container. If you follow the instructions precisely, then everything should run smoothly for you.

If you don’t plan on using herbicides, there are a few organic methods you can use to try to get rid of toxic plants. You can manually pull the plants out of the ground. This is probably one of the most difficult methods because there is no assurance that you will get the whole plant out this way.

You can also try pouring boiling hot water or spraying white vinegar on the target plants. This may take more time than using a synthetic herbicide, but you can feel a little better about using these products.

You can also try to use wood chips to cover a certain area where you do not want anything to grow. This will not stop all the weeds, but the few that make it through can be easily picked by hand.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
close
Who Is Most at Risk of Plant Poisoning?
Everyone should keep the following in mind to prevent being poisoned:
1
Do not eat any parts, nor contact with the sap of toxic or unknown plants;
2
If you need to kill it, wear long-sleeved shirts, pants and gloves with sharp tools to dig it out completely;
3
Clean the tools with rubbing alcohol or soap and water but do not do that with bare hands;
4
Clean your hands and skin once exposed to plants with soap and water;
5
Consider using barrier creams that contain bentoquatam to prevent poison oak, ivy and sumac rashes;
6
Dump it in special trash cans in sealed garbage packages;
7
Wear properly when you hiking or working in the wilderness. Long pants, long sleeves, gloves, hiking shoes, etc., that protect you from being hurt by any plants;
8
Once you or your family aren’t feeling well after eating, touching or inhaling anything from toxic plants, please call your doctor for help ASAP!
Outdoor Workers
Outdoor Workers and Recreationalists
Those who enjoy the outdoors either as a hobby or as part of their work will rarely see a plant and decide to munch on it (although the scenario is not unheard of). However, they do tend to deal with moving through and brushing aside plants. These people are more at risk of being poisoned by touching toxic plants than by ingesting them.
Outdoor Workers
Foragers
Foragers
Foraging for food and medicinal plants is a desirable skill among people who want to feel at one with the land. This hobby can be very useful and enjoyable, but if done wrong , it can lead to disastrous effects. People who forage are picking and grabbing plants with the full intention of using those plants, most of the time to ingest them.
Foragers
Children
Children
While outdoor workers are more likely to touch poison and foragers are more likely to ingest poison, children can easily do both. These bundles of joy just love to run around and explore the world. They enjoy touching things and occasionally shoving random stuff in their mouth; this is a terrible combination with toxic plants in the mix.
If you let your children run about, it is important to know what are the local toxic plants that they could accidentally get into. Try to educate the children and steer them away from where the toxic plants are located.
Children
Common Toxic Houseplants
Common Toxic Houseplants
When it comes to decorating a house, there is nothing more refreshing than adding some beautiful houseplants. Some common house plants can also be toxic.

Aloe

aloe
Aloe is famous for its sunburn-soothing properties and its gorgeous desert design. However, many people do not realize that the latex the aloe vera plant produces can be mildly toxic to pets and children.

The latex contains a chemical compound known as saponin. Which when ingested, can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and low blood sugar. This, if left unchecked, can lead to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. The proper response is to contact poison control or a veterinarian to know what to do in your particular circumstance if either your child or pet consumes aloe.

The latex of the plant is similar to the sap of the tree. It is inside the leaf, but sticks mainly toward the edges. If aloe gel is prepared properly it should be safe for use, but be sure to apply it only topically when treating burns.

Philodendron

Philodendron
Philodendron, also known as sweetheart vine, has become a resident at many houses and even businesses. They are glossy green and the leaves elegantly split, displaying interesting designs. Behind this beauty there is a needle-like toxin called calcium oxalate crystals.

These crystals are held within the plant and only affect you, your pets, or your loved ones if the plant tissue is broken. If ingested, the crystals can cause severe swelling, difficulty breathing, stomach pain, burning and pain. If they are accidentally caught on the skin, they can cause skin irritation.

If anyone accidentally ingests philodendron and they find it difficult to breathe or their tongue starts to swell up, it is important to seek medical attention immediately to avoid suffocation. If you have very young children or pets who have a tendency to tear at plants, keep them away from any philodendrons.

Peace Lily

Peace Lily
Peace lilies produce stunningly white flowers that bring to mind peace and serenity. This is one reason they are invited into our homes and given a place to stay. However, similar to philodendrons, the peace lily contains oxalate crystals known as raphides.

The raphides, once ingested, will cause swelling and burning sensations and can also cause skin irritation. Both pets and humans can get these symptoms so it is important to keep these plants from anyone who is likely to tear or chew it. Symptoms can become dire if the raphides cause the tongue and throat to swell to a point where the person or pet is having difficulty breathing. Seek proper medical attention if this is the case.

Snake Plant

Snake Plant
The snake plant is an interesting and popular house plant. Its stark architecture and wavy coloring has made it a fan favorite. This plant too, however, is toxic when ingested or if the sap touches your skin.

Snake plant sap will cause rashes if it comes into contact with your skin. In addition, it will cause diarrhea and vomiting when ingested. Again these symptoms are very serious and would be best avoided by keeping snake plants out of reach or by choosing a different houseplant.
Common Toxic Garden Plants
Common Toxic Garden Plants

Daffodil

Daffodil
Daffodils are a strikingly colorful flower. This can sometimes bring them much attention not from just onlooking adults but children as well. Since kids are more drawn to colorful objects, they may have a higher chance of just grabbing the flower and eating it. Adults have also been known to accidentally grab daffodil bulbs instead of onions.

Why are these mistakes so dangerous? Daffodils contain lycorine, which can induce nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It also contains oxalates which can cause swelling and pain. The symptoms can be worse in animals, because if your pets eat daffodils they may experience drowsiness, low blood pressure or even liver damage.

Make sure to call poison control when these symptoms set in. The vomiting and diarrhea have been known to go away after 3 hours, but it is better to be safe than sorry. Ingesting liquids to keep hydration up can be important. If the patient is having difficulty breathing, seek medical attention immediately.

Hydrangea

Hydrangea
Hydrangeas are unique, with their soft blue and pink flowers. They are a great addition to any garden, but should not be snacked on—not that you would want to. Hydrangeas can be especially nasty because they contain compounds known as glycosides. These will release hydrogen cyanide into the bloodstream when consumed. This will block your body’s ability to uptake oxygen to the cells in your body.

The way to combat this kind of poisoning is through getting IVs from the vet or doctor. It is important to contact your medical professional immediately since the symptoms can be fatal within minutes or hours.

Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons
Rhododendron, the state flower of Washington, is also toxic. The multitudinous, pink flowers can be quite dangerous. All parts of this plant are toxic, the leaves and seeds more so than the flowers. However, even the nectar of the flower is toxic and in the Mediterranean, where rhododendrons grow in more dense quantities, the honey from bees who gather rhododendron nectar can be poisonous.

Normally kids and pets do not eat enough to experience the full poisoning effect. However, just eating two leaves is enough to be considered dangerous. The grayanotoxin glycosides within the rhododendron can cause vomiting, diarrhea and irregular heartbeats. Things can get very serious when too much rhododendron is consumed and can lead to necessary medical intervention.

Start by calling poison control first if you suspect anyone has been munching on rhododendrons. The experts there will be able to help guide you through the necessary processes to cure your loved one.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb
Yummy rhubarb has a nasty side to it. While the stems are used in many recipes, including for rhubarb strawberry pie, the leaves are toxic. They contain oxalic acid which is known to blister the mouth, cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and kidney stones. The leaves are known to be more toxic to pets than humans, but in either case, it is important to contact poison control immediately to figure out necessary steps to cure the patient.
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard
Common Toxic Weeds in the Yard

Bittersweet Nightshade

Bittersweet Nightshade
Nightshade is an invasive, noxious weed that is extremely poisonous. It has been found along the East and West Coast of the U.S. It makes its home in areas with disturbed soil. This could be near your garden or areas that have recently had bushes/trees put in.

These plants are dark green with purple flowers that develop into bright red berries. The whole plant is toxic and should be avoided by pets and children alike. If ingested it can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The colorful berries are especially enticing to young children. If you see any plants that look similar to tomato or pepper plants that you did not plant in your yard, it is best to just pull them immediately.

Call poison control immediately if you think someone has fallen victim to nightshade.

Buttercups

Buttercups
Buttercups are found throughout the United States, especially in wet areas. The shiny, yellow flowers will pop up in the springtime, accompanying their dandelion friends. However, unlike dandelions, buttercups are not edible.

Buttercups will release a compound called protoanemonin. This toxin is known to cause vomiting, diarrhea, bloody stool, hypersalivation, depression, blisters, and more. These symptoms will affect both humans and animals. The sap may also cause irritation when it comes into contact with skin. These yellow flowers are dangerous and children should be observed cautiously when around them.

Foxgloves

Foxgloves
Foxgloves are beautiful plants that build towers out of vivid purple bell-shaped blossoms. They are very pretty to look at, but they contain a compound known as digoxin. This chemical is used in certain medicines to help people with certain heart conditions. However, the medicine is made by specialists, whereas someone eating foxgloves will receive unregulated amounts of the chemical.

This toxin can make you vomit and lower your heartbeat. This often causes dizziness and faintness. It is extremely important to call poison control immediately to know what to do in the case of foxglove poisoning. Some people have confused the young leaves of foxglove with borage, making adult foragers at risk as well as kids and pets.
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
How to Tend to or Get Rid of Toxic Plants
Now that you know where to start with toxic plant identification, let us discuss how to either tend to the poisonous plants you decide to keep or get rid of them that plague your yard.

How to Tend to Poisonous Plants

Many plants that are toxic when ingested are also skin irritants. The philodendron is a good example of this. When the sap comes into contact with skin, it can cause a rash to form. To help protect yourself when tending to toxic plants, it is important to wear some sort of gloves.
Tend
Latex gloves may be the best solution due to their disposability. Regular gloves could potentially keep the poisonous sap on their surface. If the gloves aren’t cleaned then you could accidentally touch the irritant or pass it to someone else.

In addition you will want to plan where to keep your deadly beauties. If you have a toxic indoor plant try to keep it up high or out of reach of children and pets. This will keep accidents few and far between. Another idea is keeping your plants in areas that are usually inaccessible to children or pets. Areas such as an office, study room, or guest bedroom could be good locations. If applicable, you could also set up a terrarium for your little plant baby, making it more difficult for curious hands or paws to access.
tend2
If you plan to have outdoor plants, location will be key. You will want to put plants in an area that will be inaccessible to children, pets and even wild animals. You will probably want to avoid planting the plants in the front of your house if kids walk by on a regular basis, just to be cautious. Having the plants behind a fence will be best, but use your discretion when choosing a spot.

How to Get Rid of Poisonous Plants

plants
The easiest but possibly most controversial way to get rid of poisonous plants is by using herbicides. This can be especially easy if you own a grass lawn and use an herbicide that targets broadleaf (non-grass) species. You can find many herbicides meant for yard use by simply searching the term online. Once you have purchased the herbicide you will want to make sure to follow the label posted on the container. If you follow the instructions precisely, then everything should run smoothly for you.

If you don’t plan on using herbicides, there are a few organic methods you can use to try to get rid of toxic plants. You can manually pull the plants out of the ground. This is probably one of the most difficult methods because there is no assurance that you will get the whole plant out this way.

You can also try pouring boiling hot water or spraying white vinegar on the target plants. This may take more time than using a synthetic herbicide, but you can feel a little better about using these products.

You can also try to use wood chips to cover a certain area where you do not want anything to grow. This will not stop all the weeds, but the few that make it through can be easily picked by hand.
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
distribution

Distribution of Fig trees

feedback
Feedback
feedback

Distribution Map of Fig trees

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
care detail

How to Grow and Care for Fig trees

feedback
Feedback
feedback
More Info About Caring for Fig trees
species

Exploring the Fig trees Plants

feedback
Feedback
feedback
8 most common species:
Ficus benjamina
Weeping fig
Weeping fig (Ficus benjamina) is an evergreen tree native to Asia and Australia. It is one of the most popular houseplants in the world, known for its elegant, glossy leaves. However, people with allergies should avoid weeping fig, considering that it is a major source of indoor allergens. All parts of the plant are poisonous except the fruits.
Ficus elastica
Rubber tree
Rubber tree (Ficus elastica) is a large tree with wide, oval, glossy leaves. Its milky white latex was used for making rubber before Pará rubber tree came into use, hence the name. Rubber tree is an ornamental species, often grown as a houseplant in cooler climates.
Ficus lyrata
Fiddle-leaf fig
As its name implies, the fiddle-leaf fig has leaves that are shaped like a violin. Wildly popular as a houseplant, the Ficus lyrata makes an architectural statement with its unique and lush leaves. However, please be aware that this plant is finicky and can be hard to keep alive.
Ficus microcarpa
Indian Laurel
Indian Laurel (Ficus microcarpa) is a fig tree originating in China. The indian Laurel attracts the fig wasp pollinator. In some east Asian cultures, it is believed the indian Laurel is a meeting place for spirits.
Show More Species

All Species of Fig trees

popular genus

More Popular Genus

feedback
Feedback
feedback
Dracaena
Dracaena
Dracaena are popular house plants that are easy to grow. They can tolerate low-light conditions and require little watering. Their leaves range from variegated to dark green. Their characteristic traits include woody stems that grow slowly but offer a striking appearance for small spaces such as apartments or offices.
Ficus
Fig trees
Fig trees have been cultivated in many regions for their fruits, particularly the common fig, F. carica. Most of the species have edible fruits, although the common fig is the only one of commercial value. Fig trees are also important food sources for wildlife in the tropics, including monkeys, bats, and insects.
Rubus
Brambles
Brambles are members of the rose family, and there are hundreds of different types to be found throughout the European countryside. They have been culturally significant for centuries; Christian folklore stories hold that when the devil was thrown from heaven, he landed on a bramble bush. Their vigorous growth habit can tangle into native plants and take over.
Acer
Maples
The popular tree family known as maples change the color of their leaves in the fall. Many cultural traditions encourage people to watch the colors change, such as momijigari in Japan. Maples popular options for bonsai art. Alternately, their sap is used to create maple syrup.
Prunus
Prunus
Prunus is a genus of flowering fruit trees that includes almonds, cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines, and apricots. These are often known as "stone fruits" because their pits are large seeds or "stones." When prunus trees are damaged, they exhibit "gummosis," a condition in which the tree's gum (similar to sap) is secreted to the bark to help heal external wounds.
Solanum
Nightshades
Nightshades is a large and diverse genus of plants, with more than 1500 different types worldwide. This genus incorporates both important staple food crops like tomato, potato, and eggplant, but also dangerous poisonous plants from the nightshade family. The name was coined by Pliny the Elder almost two thousand years ago.
Rosa
Roses
Most species of roses are shrubs or climbing plants that have showy flowers and sharp thorns. They are commonly cultivated for cut flowers or as ornamental plants in gardens due to their attractive appearance, pleasant fragrance, and cultural significance in many countries. The rose hips (fruits) can also be used in jams and teas.
Quercus
Oaks
Oaks are among the world's longest-lived trees, sometimes growing for over 1,000 years! The oldest known oak tree is in the southern United States and is over 1,500 years old. Oaks produce an exceedingly popular type of wood which is used to make different products, from furniture and flooring to wine barrels and even cosmetic creams.
product icon close
Your Ultimate Guide to Plants
Identify grow and nurture the better way!
product icon
17,000 local species +400,000 global species studied
product icon
Nearly 5 years of research
product icon
80+ scholars in botany and gardening
ad
product icon close
Continue reading in our app - it's better
A database of 400000+ plants
unlimited guides at your fingertips...
Cookie Management Tool
In addition to managing cookies through your browser or device, you can change your cookie settings below.
Necessary Cookies
Necessary cookies enable core functionality. The website cannot function properly without these cookies, and can only be disabled by changing your browser preferences.
Analytical Cookies
Analytical cookies help us to improve our application/website by collecting and reporting information on its usage.
Cookie Name Source Purpose Lifespan
_ga Google Analytics These cookies are set because of our use of Google Analytics. They are used to collect information about your use of our application/website. The cookies collect specific information, such as your IP address, data related to your device and other information about your use of the application/website. Please note that the data processing is essentially carried out by Google LLC and Google may use your data collected by the cookies for own purposes, e.g. profiling and will combine it with other data such as your Google Account. For more information about how Google processes your data and Google’s approach to privacy as well as implemented safeguards for your data, please see here. 1 Year
_pta PictureThis Analytics We use these cookies to collect information about how you use our site, monitor site performance, and improve our site performance, our services, and your experience. 1 Year
Cookie Name
_ga
Source
Google Analytics
Purpose
These cookies are set because of our use of Google Analytics. They are used to collect information about your use of our application/website. The cookies collect specific information, such as your IP address, data related to your device and other information about your use of the application/website. Please note that the data processing is essentially carried out by Google LLC and Google may use your data collected by the cookies for own purposes, e.g. profiling and will combine it with other data such as your Google Account. For more information about how Google processes your data and Google’s approach to privacy as well as implemented safeguards for your data, please see here.
Lifespan
1 Year

Cookie Name
_pta
Source
PictureThis Analytics
Purpose
We use these cookies to collect information about how you use our site, monitor site performance, and improve our site performance, our services, and your experience.
Lifespan
1 Year
Marketing Cookies
Marketing cookies are used by advertising companies to serve ads that are relevant to your interests.
Cookie Name Source Purpose Lifespan
_fbp Facebook Pixel A conversion pixel tracking that we use for retargeting campaigns. Learn more here. 1 Year
_adj Adjust This cookie provides mobile analytics and attribution services that enable us to measure and analyze the effectiveness of marketing campaigns, certain events and actions within the Application. Learn more here. 1 Year
Cookie Name
_fbp
Source
Facebook Pixel
Purpose
A conversion pixel tracking that we use for retargeting campaigns. Learn more here.
Lifespan
1 Year

Cookie Name
_adj
Source
Adjust
Purpose
This cookie provides mobile analytics and attribution services that enable us to measure and analyze the effectiveness of marketing campaigns, certain events and actions within the Application. Learn more here.
Lifespan
1 Year
This page looks better in the app
Open