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Red hot pokers
Red hot pokers
Red hot pokers
Red hot pokers
Red hot pokers (Kniphofia)
Also known as : Kniphofia, Tritoma, Knofflers
Lifespan
Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Plant Type
Herb/Vine
info

Key Facts About Red hot pokers

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Feedback
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Attributes of Red hot pokers

Planting Time
Spring, Summer, Fall
Harvest Time
Fall
Plant Height
1.5 m
Spread
1 m
Leaf type
Evergreen
Ideal Temperature
10 - 32 ℃

Scientific Classification of Red hot pokers

distribution

Distribution of Red hot pokers

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Feedback
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Distribution Map of Red hot pokers

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
habit
care detail

How to Grow and Care for Red hot pokers

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Feedback
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how to grow and care
More Info About Caring for Red hot pokers
species

Exploring the Red hot pokers Plants

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8 most common species:
Kniphofia uvaria
Red hot poker
Referring to its red hue and its flower formation, the red hot poker has flowering spikes of pale yellow, apricot, orange, and red that bloom in summer. The blooming flowers contain an abundance of nectar, attracting hummingbirds, bees, and butterflies. Because of its invasiveness, it is currently considered an environmental weed in portions of south-eastern Australia.
Kniphofia caulescens
Red-hot poker
Red-hot poker is favored for the sizeable flower heads it produces from the end of summer to early autumn. The bright buds transition from red at the base to orange and then to a pale yellow at the tip. Red-hot poker are very popular to bees due to their high pollen content.
Kniphofia uvaria 'Flamenco'
Red hot poker 'Flamenco'
Red hot poker 'Flamenco' is a red-hot poker named for the vibrant Crimson of a Flamenco dancer’s dress. Flowers of this cultivar shade from a creamy yellow at their base to dark red tips, contrasting with the pure red flowers of the parent plant. Flowers grow from thick stems rising to a height of 90 cm, which is much shorter than the original plant.
Kniphofia 'Elvira'
Red hot pokers 'Elvira'
Red hot pokers 'Elvira' is distinguished by its bright orange flowers and dark green leaves. This cultivar was hybridized using the offspring of Kniphofia uvaria, and is named for Elvira, the wife of the hybridizer, Paul Stringer.
Kniphofia 'Buttercup'
Red hot pokers 'Buttercup'
Red hot pokers 'Buttercup' is a striking perennial known for its elongated, cone-shaped flower spikes that boast a vibrant yellow hue, similar to a buttercup. These fiery blossoms sit atop sturdy, upright stems, with a lush base of grass-like foliage. Thriving in well-drained soils and full sun, red hot pokers 'Buttercup' adds a splash of color to borders and beds while being drought resistant, reflecting its adaptability and resilience.
Kniphofia 'Royal Standard'
Red hot pokers 'Royal Standard'
Red hot pokers 'Royal Standard' is a red hot poker cultivar that is truly the royal standard of this genus. It is unique for the bicolor blooms of scarlet red and yellow which stand out amongst nearby vegetation. It is on the smaller scale for this genus, reaching a maximum height of 90 cm while most varieties shoot past 1 m. This genus does not have a standard blooming season, so varieties bloom at different parts of the year, with 'Royal Standard' blooming only in mid to late spring.
Kniphofia triangularis subsp. triangularis
Torch lily
Often crowning gardens with its robust, spike-like inflorescences, torch lily delivers a vibrant botanical spectacle, emitting a radiant glow of tangerine and crimson. This perennial workhorse is popular among gardeners for its sun-loving nature and low maintenance needs. Amplifying its appeal, its nectary blossoms make a luring feast for hummingbirds, fostering an animated and ecology-supportive garden.
Kniphofia uvaria 'Little Maid'
Red hot poker 'Little Maid'
Red hot poker 'Little Maid' is named little maid since it is a dwarf cultivar of the Red hot poker, growing just 60 cm tall in contrast to the 1.5 m of the parent plant. This distinctive hybrid has a long brush of white-colored flowers rather than the red blooms of its parent.

All Species of Red hot pokers

Red hot poker
Kniphofia uvaria
Red hot poker
Referring to its red hue and its flower formation, the red hot poker has flowering spikes of pale yellow, apricot, orange, and red that bloom in summer. The blooming flowers contain an abundance of nectar, attracting hummingbirds, bees, and butterflies. Because of its invasiveness, it is currently considered an environmental weed in portions of south-eastern Australia.
Red-hot poker
Kniphofia caulescens
Red-hot poker
Red-hot poker is favored for the sizeable flower heads it produces from the end of summer to early autumn. The bright buds transition from red at the base to orange and then to a pale yellow at the tip. Red-hot poker are very popular to bees due to their high pollen content.
Red hot poker 'Flamenco'
Kniphofia uvaria 'Flamenco'
Red hot poker 'Flamenco'
Red hot poker 'Flamenco' is a red-hot poker named for the vibrant Crimson of a Flamenco dancer’s dress. Flowers of this cultivar shade from a creamy yellow at their base to dark red tips, contrasting with the pure red flowers of the parent plant. Flowers grow from thick stems rising to a height of 90 cm, which is much shorter than the original plant.
Red hot pokers 'Elvira'
Kniphofia 'Elvira'
Red hot pokers 'Elvira'
Red hot pokers 'Elvira' is distinguished by its bright orange flowers and dark green leaves. This cultivar was hybridized using the offspring of Kniphofia uvaria, and is named for Elvira, the wife of the hybridizer, Paul Stringer.
Red hot pokers 'Buttercup'
Kniphofia 'Buttercup'
Red hot pokers 'Buttercup'
Red hot pokers 'Buttercup' is a striking perennial known for its elongated, cone-shaped flower spikes that boast a vibrant yellow hue, similar to a buttercup. These fiery blossoms sit atop sturdy, upright stems, with a lush base of grass-like foliage. Thriving in well-drained soils and full sun, red hot pokers 'Buttercup' adds a splash of color to borders and beds while being drought resistant, reflecting its adaptability and resilience.
Red hot pokers 'Royal Standard'
Kniphofia 'Royal Standard'
Red hot pokers 'Royal Standard'
Red hot pokers 'Royal Standard' is a red hot poker cultivar that is truly the royal standard of this genus. It is unique for the bicolor blooms of scarlet red and yellow which stand out amongst nearby vegetation. It is on the smaller scale for this genus, reaching a maximum height of 90 cm while most varieties shoot past 1 m. This genus does not have a standard blooming season, so varieties bloom at different parts of the year, with 'Royal Standard' blooming only in mid to late spring.
Torch lily
Kniphofia triangularis subsp. triangularis
Torch lily
Often crowning gardens with its robust, spike-like inflorescences, torch lily delivers a vibrant botanical spectacle, emitting a radiant glow of tangerine and crimson. This perennial workhorse is popular among gardeners for its sun-loving nature and low maintenance needs. Amplifying its appeal, its nectary blossoms make a luring feast for hummingbirds, fostering an animated and ecology-supportive garden.
Red hot poker 'Little Maid'
Kniphofia uvaria 'Little Maid'
Red hot poker 'Little Maid'
Red hot poker 'Little Maid' is named little maid since it is a dwarf cultivar of the Red hot poker, growing just 60 cm tall in contrast to the 1.5 m of the parent plant. This distinctive hybrid has a long brush of white-colored flowers rather than the red blooms of its parent.
Red hot pokers 'Jenny Bloom'
Kniphofia 'Jenny Bloom'
Red hot pokers 'Jenny Bloom'
There is something endearing about the muted tones of the red hot pokers 'Jenny Bloom'. This spired flower has a coral pink hue that fades to cream, for a soft tinge to any garden. Adored by butterflies, it is a graceful addition to any flower bed.
Red hot poker 'Mango Popsicle'
Kniphofia uvaria 'Mango Popsicle'
Red hot poker 'Mango Popsicle'
Red hot poker 'Mango Popsicle' offers a vibrant display with torch-like, mango-colored blooms that attract hummingbirds and butterflies. These perennial spikes rise above clumps of grass-like foliage in summer, providing a striking contrast in sunny, well-drained gardens. The 'Mango Popsicle' variety is notably hardy, withstanding both dry spells and cold snaps, making it a resilient addition to diverse landscapes.
Red hot pokers 'Bees' Sunset'
Kniphofia 'Bees' Sunset'
Red hot pokers 'Bees' Sunset'
In addition to heat and drought tolerance, the red hot pokers 'Bees' Sunset' offers disease resistance and has won the Award of Garden Merit for its sturdiness. However, the red hot pokers 'Bees' Sunset' is bicolored, changing color as it matures, leading to its name of 'Bees' Sunset' due to its rich yellow and orange hues. Growing vertically, this plant can be used to provide accents to gardens.
Red hot pokers 'Bees' Lemon'
Kniphofia 'Bees' Lemon'
Red hot pokers 'Bees' Lemon'
With buds of green, the red hot pokers 'Bees' Lemon' develops a lemon gown. Delightful as a splash of sunlight, it contrasts beautifully with reds and oranges, for a nice sunset hue. It draws in bumblebees (thus the name) as well as butterflies for a lively garden.
Red hot pokers 'Bees Sunset'
Kniphofia 'Bees Sunset'
Red hot pokers 'Bees Sunset'
Bring the sunset to your garden with red hot pokers 'Bees Sunset'. These gorgeous flowers encircle a bronze stem, draping down in a bi-coloring of yellow to a delicious deep peach hue. Gardeners love this beautiful flower for the outstanding splash of color it adds to their garden landscape.
Red hot pokers 'Timothy'
Kniphofia 'Timothy'
Red hot pokers 'Timothy'
Bring the coral hues of the ocean to your garden with the red hot pokers 'Timothy'. With tiny trumpet-shaped flowers in a cylindrical cluster, the flair at the opening gives it a fancy look. The papaya shading, from darker reddish-peach to a creamy color are a beacon to hummingbirds and other pollinators as well as any visitors you want to impress with this tropical tinge to your landscape.
Red hot pokers 'Toffee Nosed'
Kniphofia 'Toffee Nosed'
Red hot pokers 'Toffee Nosed'
Looking at red hot pokers 'Toffee Nosed', it’s easy to see where it got its name. This red hot pokers cultivar is anything but red hot. Instead, it sports calm toffee-brown tips on each flower spike. Lower down the spike, the flowers are a delightful apricot color. These calm colors are quite unusual compared to the extravagant color schemes of other plants in this genus.
Lemon Poker
Kniphofia citrina
Lemon Poker
Lemon Poker is a captivating plant with unique features. This stunning perennial boasts tall, torch-like flower spikes that are a vibrant shade of yellow, making it a standout in any garden. Not only does it attract a wide array of pollinators, but it also adds a splash of color to the landscape. Additionally, lemon Poker has medicinal properties and is used in traditional herbal remedies. Its interesting name originates from the Greek words "knipho" meaning "to burn" and "phos" meaning "light," referring to its fiery flower color. With its attractive appearance and herbal benefits, lemon Poker is truly a remarkable plant.
Kniphofia buchananii
Kniphofia buchananii
Kniphofia buchananii
Kniphofia buchananii is a striking perennial herb known for its fiery flower spikes that bring a burst of red, orange, and yellow to gardens. Its grass-like foliage forms dense clumps, from which emerge tall, sturdy flowering stems. The tubular blooms are a magnet for hummingbirds and butterflies, and they rise above the foliage, creating a vibrant vertical accent. Adapted to full sun and well-drained soils, kniphofia buchananii provides bold color contrasts and thrives with minimal maintenance, embodying the rugged beauty of its native African grasslands.
Greater red-hot poker
Kniphofia praecox
Greater red-hot poker
Greater red-hot poker, often admired in ornamental gardens, boasts a striking display of fiery, tubular flowers. These vibrant blooms, arranged on tall, poker-like spikes, shift from red at the top to yellowish at the bottom. Its narrow, arching leaves create a lush, grassy base. Thriving in full sun, greater red-hot poker is well-adapted to dry conditions, its flower spikes serving as beacons to hummingbirds and pollinators alike.
Kniphofia parviflora
Kniphofia parviflora
Kniphofia parviflora
You will find kniphofia parviflora growing wild in the grasslands of the Southern part of South Africa. This solitary plant in the Hot Poker family produces stems of yellow flowers that attract butterflies. The plant is occasionally grown ornamentally and makes for a pleasantly scented garden addition.
Common red hot poker
Kniphofia linearifolia
Common red hot poker
Common red hot poker features slender, upright foliage, and vivid, torch-like flower spikes that transition from red at the top to yellow at the base. It thrives in well-drained soils, often in sunny, open areas, where its striking blooms attract pollinators like birds and bees. This perennial's adaptability to varied conditions reflects its resilience and adds to its garden appeal.
popular genus

More Popular Genus

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Dracaena
Dracaena
Dracaena are popular house plants that are easy to grow. They can tolerate low-light conditions and require little watering. Their leaves range from variegated to dark green. Their characteristic traits include woody stems that grow slowly but offer a striking appearance for small spaces such as apartments or offices.
Ficus
Fig trees
Fig trees have been cultivated in many regions for their fruits, particularly the common fig, F. carica. Most of the species have edible fruits, although the common fig is the only one of commercial value. Fig trees are also important food sources for wildlife in the tropics, including monkeys, bats, and insects.
Rubus
Brambles
Brambles are members of the rose family, and there are hundreds of different types to be found throughout the European countryside. They have been culturally significant for centuries; Christian folklore stories hold that when the devil was thrown from heaven, he landed on a bramble bush. Their vigorous growth habit can tangle into native plants and take over.
Acer
Maples
The popular tree family known as maples change the color of their leaves in the fall. Many cultural traditions encourage people to watch the colors change, such as momijigari in Japan. Maples popular options for bonsai art. Alternately, their sap is used to create maple syrup.
Prunus
Prunus
Prunus is a genus of flowering fruit trees that includes almonds, cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines, and apricots. These are often known as "stone fruits" because their pits are large seeds or "stones." When prunus trees are damaged, they exhibit "gummosis," a condition in which the tree's gum (similar to sap) is secreted to the bark to help heal external wounds.
Solanum
Nightshades
Nightshades is a large and diverse genus of plants, with more than 1500 different types worldwide. This genus incorporates both important staple food crops like tomato, potato, and eggplant, but also dangerous poisonous plants from the nightshade family. The name was coined by Pliny the Elder almost two thousand years ago.
Rosa
Roses
Most species of roses are shrubs or climbing plants that have showy flowers and sharp thorns. They are commonly cultivated for cut flowers or as ornamental plants in gardens due to their attractive appearance, pleasant fragrance, and cultural significance in many countries. The rose hips (fruits) can also be used in jams and teas.
Quercus
Oaks
Oaks are among the world's longest-lived trees, sometimes growing for over 1,000 years! The oldest known oak tree is in the southern United States and is over 1,500 years old. Oaks produce an exceedingly popular type of wood which is used to make different products, from furniture and flooring to wine barrels and even cosmetic creams.
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Red hot pokers
Red hot pokers
Red hot pokers
Red hot pokers
Red hot pokers
Red hot pokers
Red hot pokers
Kniphofia
Also known as: Kniphofia, Tritoma, Knofflers
Lifespan
Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Plant Type
Herb/Vine
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info

Key Facts About Red hot pokers

feedback
Feedback
feedback

Attributes of Red hot pokers

Planting Time
Spring, Summer, Fall
Harvest Time
Fall
Plant Height
1.5 m
Spread
1 m
Leaf type
Evergreen
Ideal Temperature
10 - 32 ℃

Scientific Classification of Red hot pokers

distribution

Distribution of Red hot pokers

feedback
Feedback
feedback

Distribution Map of Red hot pokers

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
care detail

How to Grow and Care for Red hot pokers

feedback
Feedback
feedback
More Info About Caring for Red hot pokers
species

Exploring the Red hot pokers Plants

feedback
Feedback
feedback
8 most common species:
Kniphofia uvaria
Red hot poker
Referring to its red hue and its flower formation, the red hot poker has flowering spikes of pale yellow, apricot, orange, and red that bloom in summer. The blooming flowers contain an abundance of nectar, attracting hummingbirds, bees, and butterflies. Because of its invasiveness, it is currently considered an environmental weed in portions of south-eastern Australia.
Kniphofia caulescens
Red-hot poker
Red-hot poker is favored for the sizeable flower heads it produces from the end of summer to early autumn. The bright buds transition from red at the base to orange and then to a pale yellow at the tip. Red-hot poker are very popular to bees due to their high pollen content.
Kniphofia uvaria 'Flamenco'
Red hot poker 'Flamenco'
Red hot poker 'Flamenco' is a red-hot poker named for the vibrant Crimson of a Flamenco dancer’s dress. Flowers of this cultivar shade from a creamy yellow at their base to dark red tips, contrasting with the pure red flowers of the parent plant. Flowers grow from thick stems rising to a height of 90 cm, which is much shorter than the original plant.
Kniphofia 'Elvira'
Red hot pokers 'Elvira'
Red hot pokers 'Elvira' is distinguished by its bright orange flowers and dark green leaves. This cultivar was hybridized using the offspring of Kniphofia uvaria, and is named for Elvira, the wife of the hybridizer, Paul Stringer.
Show More Species

All Species of Red hot pokers

popular genus

More Popular Genus

feedback
Feedback
feedback
Dracaena
Dracaena
Dracaena are popular house plants that are easy to grow. They can tolerate low-light conditions and require little watering. Their leaves range from variegated to dark green. Their characteristic traits include woody stems that grow slowly but offer a striking appearance for small spaces such as apartments or offices.
Ficus
Fig trees
Fig trees have been cultivated in many regions for their fruits, particularly the common fig, F. carica. Most of the species have edible fruits, although the common fig is the only one of commercial value. Fig trees are also important food sources for wildlife in the tropics, including monkeys, bats, and insects.
Rubus
Brambles
Brambles are members of the rose family, and there are hundreds of different types to be found throughout the European countryside. They have been culturally significant for centuries; Christian folklore stories hold that when the devil was thrown from heaven, he landed on a bramble bush. Their vigorous growth habit can tangle into native plants and take over.
Acer
Maples
The popular tree family known as maples change the color of their leaves in the fall. Many cultural traditions encourage people to watch the colors change, such as momijigari in Japan. Maples popular options for bonsai art. Alternately, their sap is used to create maple syrup.
Prunus
Prunus
Prunus is a genus of flowering fruit trees that includes almonds, cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines, and apricots. These are often known as "stone fruits" because their pits are large seeds or "stones." When prunus trees are damaged, they exhibit "gummosis," a condition in which the tree's gum (similar to sap) is secreted to the bark to help heal external wounds.
Solanum
Nightshades
Nightshades is a large and diverse genus of plants, with more than 1500 different types worldwide. This genus incorporates both important staple food crops like tomato, potato, and eggplant, but also dangerous poisonous plants from the nightshade family. The name was coined by Pliny the Elder almost two thousand years ago.
Rosa
Roses
Most species of roses are shrubs or climbing plants that have showy flowers and sharp thorns. They are commonly cultivated for cut flowers or as ornamental plants in gardens due to their attractive appearance, pleasant fragrance, and cultural significance in many countries. The rose hips (fruits) can also be used in jams and teas.
Quercus
Oaks
Oaks are among the world's longest-lived trees, sometimes growing for over 1,000 years! The oldest known oak tree is in the southern United States and is over 1,500 years old. Oaks produce an exceedingly popular type of wood which is used to make different products, from furniture and flooring to wine barrels and even cosmetic creams.
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