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Willows
Willows
Willows
Willows
Willows (Salix)
Also known as : Sallows
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Perennial
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Key Facts About Willows

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Distribution of Willows

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Distribution Map of Willows

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Exploring the Willows Plants

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8 most common species:
Salix caprea
Goat willow
Goat willow (Salix caprea) is a small deciduous tree or large shrub also known as pussy willow. Goat willow is native to Europe and western and central Asia. This species is not considered a good source of timber, as its wood is brittle. Salix caprea means "goat." This species is susceptible to disease mediated by insects and microbes.
Salix alba
White willow
The cultivation of white willow dates back to the era of Hippocrates and Pliny the Elder. The wood of the white willow (Salix alba) is lightweight but durable, making it a popular material for products, including baskets and cricket bats. Chemicals in the bark, known as tannins, have also been used in the production of leather.
Salix cinerea
Grey willow
Grey willow (Salix cinerea) is a deciduous tree that will grow from 5 to 10 m tall. It is considered invasive. Produces catkin-like flowers in spring before leaves return in spring. Seeds ripen from spring to summer and require pollination by bees. Mature fluffy seeds are dispersed by wind. Prefers moist well-drained soil.
Salix babylonica
Weeping willow
Weeping willow (Salix babylonica) is a willow tree that originates in China. Now, it grows widely around the globe due to being traded on the Silk Road. This tree is planted ornamentally in parks and gardens.
Salix nigra
Black willow
Black willow (Salix nigra) is a fast-growing tree that may reach heights of 43 m. These willows are important as early spring food sources for wildlife, for erosion control, and are sometimes used for ornamental planting in particularly wet soils. The soft lumber from the black willow is used to produce wooden shipping boxes.
Salix babylonica var. matsudana
Weeping willow
Weeping willow (Salix babylonica var. matsudana) is a willow tree native to China. Historically, the tree was traded along the Silk Road. Weeping willow is widely cultivated ornamentally throughout China, elsewhere in Asia, and in the United States. Besides Salix babylonica var. matsudana there are many other variants of this type of willow.
Salix integra
Dappled willow
Dappled willow (Salix integra) is often planted for its compact nature and luminous foliage. It makes a great unconventional privacy screen, border, and hedge. Drooping, showy branches make a great accent in landscaping for water features such as ponds, streams, and water gardens. It's also a food source for a number of bee species.
Salix discolor
Pussy willow
Pussy willow (Salix discolor) is a deciduous shrub that will grow in full sun to partial shade in medium to wet soil. It blooms in spring with yellow greenish catkins. The blooms resemble the pads on a cat's paw which is how it gets its name. Interestingly male plants produce the more desirable silky pearl gray catkins and female plants produce smaller less attractive blooms. Due to its preference for moist soils this plant is usually found around ponds streams and lakes.

All Species of Willows

Goat willow
Salix caprea
Goat willow
Goat willow (Salix caprea) is a small deciduous tree or large shrub also known as pussy willow. Goat willow is native to Europe and western and central Asia. This species is not considered a good source of timber, as its wood is brittle. Salix caprea means "goat." This species is susceptible to disease mediated by insects and microbes.
White willow
Salix alba
White willow
The cultivation of white willow dates back to the era of Hippocrates and Pliny the Elder. The wood of the white willow (Salix alba) is lightweight but durable, making it a popular material for products, including baskets and cricket bats. Chemicals in the bark, known as tannins, have also been used in the production of leather.
Grey willow
Salix cinerea
Grey willow
Grey willow (Salix cinerea) is a deciduous tree that will grow from 5 to 10 m tall. It is considered invasive. Produces catkin-like flowers in spring before leaves return in spring. Seeds ripen from spring to summer and require pollination by bees. Mature fluffy seeds are dispersed by wind. Prefers moist well-drained soil.
Weeping willow
Salix babylonica
Weeping willow
Weeping willow (Salix babylonica) is a willow tree that originates in China. Now, it grows widely around the globe due to being traded on the Silk Road. This tree is planted ornamentally in parks and gardens.
Black willow
Salix nigra
Black willow
Black willow (Salix nigra) is a fast-growing tree that may reach heights of 43 m. These willows are important as early spring food sources for wildlife, for erosion control, and are sometimes used for ornamental planting in particularly wet soils. The soft lumber from the black willow is used to produce wooden shipping boxes.
Weeping willow
Salix babylonica var. matsudana
Weeping willow
Weeping willow (Salix babylonica var. matsudana) is a willow tree native to China. Historically, the tree was traded along the Silk Road. Weeping willow is widely cultivated ornamentally throughout China, elsewhere in Asia, and in the United States. Besides Salix babylonica var. matsudana there are many other variants of this type of willow.
Dappled willow
Salix integra
Dappled willow
Dappled willow (Salix integra) is often planted for its compact nature and luminous foliage. It makes a great unconventional privacy screen, border, and hedge. Drooping, showy branches make a great accent in landscaping for water features such as ponds, streams, and water gardens. It's also a food source for a number of bee species.
Pussy willow
Salix discolor
Pussy willow
Pussy willow (Salix discolor) is a deciduous shrub that will grow in full sun to partial shade in medium to wet soil. It blooms in spring with yellow greenish catkins. The blooms resemble the pads on a cat's paw which is how it gets its name. Interestingly male plants produce the more desirable silky pearl gray catkins and female plants produce smaller less attractive blooms. Due to its preference for moist soils this plant is usually found around ponds streams and lakes.
Arroyo willow
Salix lasiolepis
Arroyo willow
Arroyo willow (Salix lasiolepis) is a willow tree native to the western coast of North America. Its pollen is a major source of allergies. Native Americans have traditionally used parts of arroyo willow to make rope and weave baskets.
Narrowleaf willow
Salix exigua
Narrowleaf willow
Narrowleaf willow (Salix exigua) is a deciduous willow shrub species native to the United States and Mexico. Narrowleaf willow is planted as an ornamental tree, and it attracts bees. Indigenous peoples of North America used its wood to make flexible poles.
Bebb's willow
Salix bebbiana
Bebb's willow
Bebb's willow (Salix bebbiana) is a multi-stemmed deciduous tree that will grow to 8 m tall. The bark is reddish-brown with narrow leaves tapered at both ends. Catkin flowers bloom spring to summer and are yellowish with red tips. This tree is also called Beaked Willow because it produces capsule-shaped fruits with long beaks. This species best in partial shade but can grow in full sunlight in moist soil.
Purple willow
Salix purpurea
Purple willow
Purple willow (Salix purpurea) grows natively in parts of Europe, North America, and Asia. Its young shoots are purplish initially but turn light gray to grayish-brown with age. The twigs and stems of this variety of willow are bendable and very useful for creating baskets and furniture. A dense root system also helps in controlling bank erosion.
Coastal plain willow
Salix caroliniana
Coastal plain willow
The coastal plain willow (Salix caroliniana) is a willow species that can grow up to 6 m tall. Small yellow flowers erupt from pliable stems en masse during spring and attract various pollinating insects like butterflies and bees. The branches are beneficial in the construction of fencing, basketry, and other crafts. Coastal plain willow thrives in boggy areas and can tolerate some salt but not full inundation.
Basket willow
Salix viminalis
Basket willow
Salix viminalis has the ability to grow in highly-polluted soils and absorb heavy metals and store them in its leaves. Therefore is a very useful plant with the potential to help clean an ecosystem. The common name basket willow comes from the use of its flexible twigs in basketry.
Crack willow
Salix fragilis
Crack willow
Crack willow gets its unusual name from its branches and twigs, which break very easily. This is an evolutionary adaptation since these twigs root very easily, helping the tree to propagate, crack willow is widespread as an introduced species and is considered to be invasive in countries including New Zealand, Australia, and South Africa.
Scouler Willow
Salix scouleriana
Scouler Willow
Scouler Willow (Salix scouleriana) is a shrub which sometimes grows as a small tree and has a deep and widespread root system. Scouler Willow is native to western North America. This species is also known as the fire willow, Nuttall willow, mountain willow, and black willow.
Sitka willow
Salix sitchensis
Sitka willow
Sitka willow is a species of willow tree that is native to the northwestern United States up through the state of Alaska. It is commonly found in wetland areas and can grow in the form of a slender tree or bush.
Sandbar willow
Salix interior
Sandbar willow
Salix interior has two types of growth form. It can grow to be a tree with a single trunk, or it can form a bunch of woody stems. Like all willows, Salix interior is a favorite food of beavers and, without their assistance, this weedy willow would be difficult to control.
Bay Willow
Salix pentandra
Bay Willow
Bay Willow (Salix pentandra) is a deciduous shrub that can grow to be 6 to 12 m tall with a canopy of 4.5 to 8 m wide. Glossy bay Willow leaves are considered attractive and make this species a desirable ornamental tree. It blooms in early spring and summer. Its catkin flowers are green and yellow. This species attracts bees and other insects with its nectar.
Peach-Leaved Willow
Salix amygdaloides
Peach-Leaved Willow
A small deciduous tree, peach-Leaved Willow is a species of willow native to the United States and southern Canada. The leaves are similar to those of the almond and peach trees, giving the willow its common name.
Goodding's willow
Salix gooddingii
Goodding's willow
Growing as either a shrub or a tree, the goodding's willow (Salix gooddingii) is a deciduous plant native to the watery areas in the southwestern US and northern Mexico. It is an important source of shade and cover for the wildlife and livestock of the region. The North American beaver often relies on this tree for both food and den-building materials.
Missouri river willow
Salix eriocephala
Missouri river willow
A very common and widespread species throughout temperate North America, the missouri river willow hosts larvae of the Mourning Cloak butterfly (Nymphalis antiopa). This tree (or a larger shrub) grows fairly fast, but unfortunately, it is not known for its longevity. Its branches are often used for baskets, thanks to their toughness and flexibility.
Almond willow
Salix triandra
Almond willow
Almond willow has a variety of different uses, including basket weaving. In Russia, the plant is a useful source of nectar for honeybees, and the species is also being investigated as a potential biomass source in the production of biofuel. The name Almond willow was given due to the plant's resemblance of the Almond plant.
Red Willow
Salix laevigata
Red Willow
Red Willow (Salix laevigata) is a deciduous tree that will grow from 8 to 17 m tall with a spreading canopy of 4.5 to 11 m wide. The bark of the tree is reddish-brown. It blooms from spring to fall with inconspicuous yellow flowers. Leaves change color from green to gold in fall. It produces a brown capsuled fruit in summer that ripens in fall. Birds feast on the seeds, while bees, butterflies and other pollinators are attracted to the flowers.
Apple-leaved willow
Salix hastata
Apple-leaved willow
Apple-leaved willow is a hardy plant that can cope with many environmental conditions, making it a popular ornamental in rock gardens. It is a very tall shrub that can reach up to 4 m in height. Many mammals and birds feed on this plant. It is known for its colonizing habit since it quickly moves into the areas that have been scoured by water or burned by fires.
Prairie willow
Salix humilis
Prairie willow
Prairie willow is a small shrub with bright green foliage. It is highly drought-tolerant. This shrub can be propagated by planting a cut-off stem in soil, where it will quickly grow roots.
Shining willow
Salix lucida
Shining willow
Shining willow got its name from its glossy green leaves on the upper side, while the underside is slightly hairy. This small tree or shrub (4 to 11 m tall) grows naturally in the wetlands of northern and western North America. It hosts caterpillars of various butterfly species such as Acadian hairstreak.
Eared willow
Salix aurita
Eared willow
The eared willow (Salix aurita) is a fragrant species of willow found in sunny areas throughout Europe. These plants are an important species for pollinators, especially bees. However, they have a very extensive root system that can deplete nutrients in the soil.
Sharp-leaved willow
Salix acutifolia
Sharp-leaved willow
The sharp-leaved willow is full of honey, so it attracts bees in small gardens. The specific epithet, acutifolia, from the Latin name, Salix acutifolia, means "sharp-leaved." It has been used as a medicine and food source and is cultivated in North America and Middle Asia. Its inner bark and young shoots are favored food sources for birds.
Dune willow
Salix hookeriana
Dune willow
The leaves are up to 11 cm long, generally oval in shape, wavy along the edges, and hairy to woolly in texture with shiny upper surfaces. The inflorescence is a catkin of flowers up to 9 cm long, with the female catkins growing longer as the fruits develop.
Sand dune willow
Salix cordata
Sand dune willow
Sand dune willow (Salix cordata) is a perennial shrub species also known as the furry willow or the heartleaf willow. Sand dune willow grows to be 91 to 366 cm tall. This species is native to North America and grows on sand dunes and riverbanks.
Lemmon's willow
Salix lemmonii
Lemmon's willow
Lemmon's willow (Salix lemmonii) is named after American botanist J.G. Lemmon. Native to North America From Colorado to California to Canada, it can be found growing in moist, wet environments within coniferous forests. Lemmon's willow is used for stabilizing eroded areas.
Netleaf willow
Salix reticulata
Netleaf willow
Netleaf willow (Salix reticulata) is a low-lying deciduous shrub that specializes in cold and alpine environments. It is found in wet, rocky regions of Europe, Asia, and North America and is regularly seen north of the Arctic Circle. Netleaf willow is very slow-growing and most examples will not climb more than 5 cm above the ground.
Dwarf willow
Salix herbacea
Dwarf willow
Dwarf willow is a small creeping tree that grows in subarctic and arctic environments. It is one of the smallest cultivated woody plants, and distributes across cooler climates around the North Atlantic Ocean, where it is used in cold-weather gardens.
Arctic willow
Salix arctica
Arctic willow
Arctic willow (Salix arctica) is a slow-growing perennial that can grow from 5 to 13 cm tall. It thrives in arctic conditions and prefers full sun. It blooms in summer and is either male with yellow catkins or female with red catkins. It is foraged by wildlife and is an important food source for a variety of insects.
Bog willow
Salix pedicellaris
Bog willow
Salix pedicellaris, the bog willow, is a species of willow. It grows as a shrub.
Large gray willow
Salix atrocinerea
Large gray willow
Large gray willow is a versatile tree with a lifespan of up to 100 years. It is a popular choice for windbreaks and can also be used for basket weaving. Bees and other insects are attracted to its pollen, making it a valuable source of food for wildlife.
Giant pussy willow
Salix chaenomeloides
Giant pussy willow
Salix chaenomeloides is a species of willow native to Japan, Korea and China. It is a deciduous tree, reaching a height of 10–20 m.
Willows 'Tortuosa'
Salix matsudana 'Tortuosa'
Willows 'Tortuosa'
'Tortuosa' is Latin for 'winding or crooked' and describes the leaves of willows 'Tortuosa', which are uniquely twisted in marked contrast to the straight leaves of the parent tree. These peculiar leaves make this a popular feature tree, and its tolerance of drought furthers its appeal.
Salix fulvopubescens
Salix fulvopubescens
Salix fulvopubescens
Salix fulvopubescens is a deciduous shrub that thrives in moist environments, often found near streams and wetlands. Its branches display a distinctive fluffiness due to the dense, soft hairs, giving a golden pubescent texture. This plant flourishes with lance-shaped leaves and catkins that emerge before the foliage, signaling the arrival of spring. Adapted for surviving in damp soils, salix fulvopubescens's robust root system helps stabilize riverbanks, contributing to its natural habitat.
Salix rorida
Salix rorida
Salix rorida
Salix rorida is a species of willow native to Japan, northern China, Korea and the Russian Far East. It is a deciduous tree, reaching a height of 10 m.
Apple-leaved willow 'Wehrhahnii'
Salix hastata 'Wehrhahnii'
Apple-leaved willow 'Wehrhahnii'
Apple-leaved willow 'Wehrhahnii' is a deciduous shrub, typically found near wetlands, with gracefully arching branches. Its lance-shaped leaves cluster vibrantly in spring, with a notable bluish-green hue. In early summer, apple-leaved willow 'Wehrhahnii' exhibits charming catkins, which are especially attractive to pollinators. The plant's preference for moist soils reflects its robust adaptability to riparian habitats.
White willow 'Britzensis'
Salix alba var. vitellina 'Britzensis'
White willow 'Britzensis'
White willow 'Britzensis' is a dwarf White willow that grows to just 1.8 m rather than the 30 m its parent may reach. This tree has been hybridized for ornamental gardens largely because of its bark, which is a deep orange-red and stands out extremely well in stark winter gardens. The cultivar was developed in 1878 in Britz, Germany, and is named for this location.
Salix matsudana 'Tortusoa'
Salix matsudana 'Tortusoa'
Salix matsudana 'Tortusoa'
Salix matsudana 'Tortusoa', known for its distinctive twisted branches and narrow, lance-shaped leaves, paints a whimsical silhouette against the landscape. It thrives particularly well near water, drawing from the moisture to support its characteristic contorted growth. The tree's hearty adaptability to various soils secures its place as a captivating ornamental choice for gardens.
Weeping pussywillow
Salix caprea 'Pendula'
Weeping pussywillow
Weeping pussywillow is a dwarf hybrid that grows to less than 3 meters in contrast to the 10 meters the parent achieves. It has a ‘weeping’ or ‘pendulous’ growth form, with attractively dangling branches that are described by its name. Its yellow flowers are followed by soft furry catkins that offer plenty of visual and tactile appeal. Its attractive shape makes it an excellent specimen shrub or tree.
Willows 'Chrysocoma'
Salix × sepulcralis 'Chrysocoma'
Willows 'Chrysocoma'
The willows 'Chrysocoma' combines both the vibrant color and weeping habit of its parent plants. Its parents are the Salix x fragilis f. vitellina and S. babylonica. A large weeping willow with a curtain of golden-green foliage, the willows 'Chrysocoma' offers visual interest to wetland areas throughout the year.
Corkscrew willow
Salix babylonica var. pekinensis 'Tortuosa'
Corkscrew willow
Corkscrew willow is a willow tree known for its contorted and twisted branches that form stunning spiral shapes. The narrow leaves also come out twisted. It is a cultivar of Salix babylonica, named from the Italian word "tortuosa," which means winding. Gardeners plant this tree for its amazing winter ornamental appeal.
Rose-gold pussy willow 'Melanostachys'
Salix gracilistyla 'Melanostachys'
Rose-gold pussy willow 'Melanostachys'
Rose-gold pussy willow 'Melanostachys' has a name that refers to its dark pigmentation, with purple stems and black catkins that differ dramatically from the brown branches and greeny white catkins of the parent plant. This unique color makes this a popular ornamental shrub with glossy green leaves that add to its eye-catching appeal.
European violet-willow 'Aglaia'
Salix daphnoides 'Aglaia'
European violet-willow 'Aglaia'
European violet-willow 'Aglaia' is a cultivated plant from the willow family bred for its color in the winter and spring. The male catkins, slim cylindrical flower spikes, boast a light grey in the winter, gradually turning yellow in the spring. The red-colored new shoots also differentiate european violet-willow 'Aglaia' from other plants in the genus.
Willow
Salix bicolor
Willow
Salix bicolor can reach a height of 30 to 50 cm. This plant usually develop into a large shrub, but may grow as a multi branched tree of up to 4 m height. Branches are glabrous. brown-reddish or chestnut. Leaves are yellow-green, glabrous, elliptical or lanceolate with acute apex. They are 5 to 8 cm long and 2 to 3 cm wide.
Crispa Babylon weeping willow
Salix babylonica 'Crispa'
Crispa Babylon weeping willow
Crispa Babylon weeping willow is a most distinctive hybrid of the weeping willow. Where the parent tree has elegant dangling branches, this tree has unusual leaves that curl around themselves, offering dramatic ornamental appeal. These curled leaves are the reason for the common name "Ramshorn willow." This dwarf variety grows to just 2 m.
White willow 'Britzensis'
Salix alba 'Britzensis'
White willow 'Britzensis'
White willow 'Britzensis' (Salix alba 'Britzensis') is an attractive, fast-growing, male cultivar of white willow (Salix alba). These plants are favored for the red and orange new stem growth that comes in the winter months. Because of this, it is usually pruned regularly to showcase its best colors. It grows well along the water or in moist soils.
Dappled willow 'Hakuro'
Salix integra 'Hakuro'
Dappled willow 'Hakuro'
Dappled willow 'Hakuro' is a hybrid dappled willow that is notable for its blushing pink blossoms which stand out from the white flowers of the parent plant. This popular ornamental plant is prized by gardeners for its flowers and for its striking mixed white and green mottled leaves.
White willow 'Yelverton'
Salix alba var. vitellina 'Yelverton'
White willow 'Yelverton'
White willow 'Yelverton' is a striking cultivar of white willow renowned for its vibrant yellow stems that add winter color to gardens. It grows as a medium-sized decidurnal tree with broad, lance-shaped leaves. Thriving in moist soils and full sun, white willow 'Yelverton' tends to develop a robust, rounded crown, offering both shade in summer and visual interest in dormant seasons.
Goat willow 'Kilmarnock'
Salix caprea 'Kilmarnock'
Goat willow 'Kilmarnock'
The goat willow 'Kilmarnock' is more versatile and compact than the large pussy willow plant. Formed into a domed bush that is shaped like a large mushroom, this cultivar appears like a very small tree. This cultivar was created in the 19th century by Thomas Lang of Kilmarnock, and this is how it received its name.
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More Popular Genus

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Dracaena
Dracaena
Dracaena are popular house plants that are easy to grow. They can tolerate low-light conditions and require little watering. Their leaves range from variegated to dark green. Their characteristic traits include woody stems that grow slowly but offer a striking appearance for small spaces such as apartments or offices.
Ficus
Fig trees
Fig trees have been cultivated in many regions for their fruits, particularly the common fig, F. carica. Most of the species have edible fruits, although the common fig is the only one of commercial value. Fig trees are also important food sources for wildlife in the tropics, including monkeys, bats, and insects.
Rubus
Brambles
Brambles are members of the rose family, and there are hundreds of different types to be found throughout the European countryside. They have been culturally significant for centuries; Christian folklore stories hold that when the devil was thrown from heaven, he landed on a bramble bush. Their vigorous growth habit can tangle into native plants and take over.
Acer
Maples
The popular tree family known as maples change the color of their leaves in the fall. Many cultural traditions encourage people to watch the colors change, such as momijigari in Japan. Maples popular options for bonsai art. Alternately, their sap is used to create maple syrup.
Prunus
Prunus
Prunus is a genus of flowering fruit trees that includes almonds, cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines, and apricots. These are often known as "stone fruits" because their pits are large seeds or "stones." When prunus trees are damaged, they exhibit "gummosis," a condition in which the tree's gum (similar to sap) is secreted to the bark to help heal external wounds.
Solanum
Nightshades
Nightshades is a large and diverse genus of plants, with more than 1500 different types worldwide. This genus incorporates both important staple food crops like tomato, potato, and eggplant, but also dangerous poisonous plants from the nightshade family. The name was coined by Pliny the Elder almost two thousand years ago.
Rosa
Roses
Most species of roses are shrubs or climbing plants that have showy flowers and sharp thorns. They are commonly cultivated for cut flowers or as ornamental plants in gardens due to their attractive appearance, pleasant fragrance, and cultural significance in many countries. The rose hips (fruits) can also be used in jams and teas.
Quercus
Oaks
Oaks are among the world's longest-lived trees, sometimes growing for over 1,000 years! The oldest known oak tree is in the southern United States and is over 1,500 years old. Oaks produce an exceedingly popular type of wood which is used to make different products, from furniture and flooring to wine barrels and even cosmetic creams.
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About
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Willows
Willows
Willows
Willows
Willows
Willows
Willows
Salix
Also known as: Sallows
Lifespan
Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Plant Type
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Key Facts About Willows

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Attributes of Willows

Plant Height
20 m
Spread
10 m
Flower Color
Yellow
Green
Leaf type
Deciduous
Ideal Temperature
5 - 32 ℃

Scientific Classification of Willows

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Distribution of Willows

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Distribution Map of Willows

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Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
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How to Grow and Care for Willows

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More Info About Caring for Willows
species

Exploring the Willows Plants

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8 most common species:
Salix caprea
Goat willow
Goat willow (Salix caprea) is a small deciduous tree or large shrub also known as pussy willow. Goat willow is native to Europe and western and central Asia. This species is not considered a good source of timber, as its wood is brittle. Salix caprea means "goat." This species is susceptible to disease mediated by insects and microbes.
Salix alba
White willow
The cultivation of white willow dates back to the era of Hippocrates and Pliny the Elder. The wood of the white willow (Salix alba) is lightweight but durable, making it a popular material for products, including baskets and cricket bats. Chemicals in the bark, known as tannins, have also been used in the production of leather.
Salix cinerea
Grey willow
Grey willow (Salix cinerea) is a deciduous tree that will grow from 5 to 10 m tall. It is considered invasive. Produces catkin-like flowers in spring before leaves return in spring. Seeds ripen from spring to summer and require pollination by bees. Mature fluffy seeds are dispersed by wind. Prefers moist well-drained soil.
Salix babylonica
Weeping willow
Weeping willow (Salix babylonica) is a willow tree that originates in China. Now, it grows widely around the globe due to being traded on the Silk Road. This tree is planted ornamentally in parks and gardens.
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Dracaena
Dracaena
Dracaena are popular house plants that are easy to grow. They can tolerate low-light conditions and require little watering. Their leaves range from variegated to dark green. Their characteristic traits include woody stems that grow slowly but offer a striking appearance for small spaces such as apartments or offices.
Ficus
Fig trees
Fig trees have been cultivated in many regions for their fruits, particularly the common fig, F. carica. Most of the species have edible fruits, although the common fig is the only one of commercial value. Fig trees are also important food sources for wildlife in the tropics, including monkeys, bats, and insects.
Rubus
Brambles
Brambles are members of the rose family, and there are hundreds of different types to be found throughout the European countryside. They have been culturally significant for centuries; Christian folklore stories hold that when the devil was thrown from heaven, he landed on a bramble bush. Their vigorous growth habit can tangle into native plants and take over.
Acer
Maples
The popular tree family known as maples change the color of their leaves in the fall. Many cultural traditions encourage people to watch the colors change, such as momijigari in Japan. Maples popular options for bonsai art. Alternately, their sap is used to create maple syrup.
Prunus
Prunus
Prunus is a genus of flowering fruit trees that includes almonds, cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines, and apricots. These are often known as "stone fruits" because their pits are large seeds or "stones." When prunus trees are damaged, they exhibit "gummosis," a condition in which the tree's gum (similar to sap) is secreted to the bark to help heal external wounds.
Solanum
Nightshades
Nightshades is a large and diverse genus of plants, with more than 1500 different types worldwide. This genus incorporates both important staple food crops like tomato, potato, and eggplant, but also dangerous poisonous plants from the nightshade family. The name was coined by Pliny the Elder almost two thousand years ago.
Rosa
Roses
Most species of roses are shrubs or climbing plants that have showy flowers and sharp thorns. They are commonly cultivated for cut flowers or as ornamental plants in gardens due to their attractive appearance, pleasant fragrance, and cultural significance in many countries. The rose hips (fruits) can also be used in jams and teas.
Quercus
Oaks
Oaks are among the world's longest-lived trees, sometimes growing for over 1,000 years! The oldest known oak tree is in the southern United States and is over 1,500 years old. Oaks produce an exceedingly popular type of wood which is used to make different products, from furniture and flooring to wine barrels and even cosmetic creams.
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