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Violets
Violets
Violets
Violets
Violets (Viola)
Also known as : Common Blue Violet, Meadow Violet, Wild Blue Violet, Wood Violet
Heart-shaped leaves and delicate blossoms are popular characteristics shared by most violets. The fragrance of the flowers is interesting, as it contains a compound that inhibits olfactory receptors. This functions as a defense mechanism against herbivores. Nevertheless, certain extracts from violets are often used in perfumes.
Lifespan
Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Plant Type
Herb/Vine
info

Key Facts About Violets

Attributes of Violets

Plant Height
20 cm
Spread
50 cm
Flower Size
2.5 cm
Flower Color
White
Yellow
Purple
Leaf type
Semi-evergreen

Scientific Classification of Violets

distribution

Distribution of Violets

Distribution Map of Violets

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
habit
care detail

How to Grow and Care for Violets

how to grow and care
Violets is a versatile genus of flowering plants primarily requiring moderate light, temperatures and well-drained soil. These plants are fond of cool conditions and a mix of direct sunlight and partial shade. They seek consistent moisture but avoid waterlogging. Key challenges include pests such as aphids and leafhoppers, and diseases like powdery mildew. Violetss may become dormant in hot summers and require mulching in severe winters for protection. Seasonal care varies but includes deadheading flowers in spring and autumn replanting for continuous blooms.
More Info About Caring for Violets
species

Exploring the Violets Plants

8 most common species:
Viola odorata
Sweet violet
Sweet violet is a mainstay in European gardening and cuisine. Its sweet smell has engendered a long tradition of use in the perfume industry. The leaves and flowers are edible and can be mixed with salads or made into syrup. In the wild, sweet violet is often found near woodland edges, forest clearings, and other shaded areas.
Viola sororia
Common blue violet
The common blue violet is an attractive wildflower known for its blue to purplish white hues. It is common in North America, where it is sometimes associated with a weed. The plant is popular as an ornamental, and it is a state flower in several states in the US. Its flowers and leaves are edible and safe to be planted near pets.
Viola mandshurica
Manchurian violet
Manchurian violet is a cultivated plant used as a border in gardens, where its produces double-petal flowers similar in appearance to Parma violets. Surprisingly, some first-year plants produce seeds before their flowers.
Viola cornuta
Horned violet
Native to northern Spain, the horned violet (Viola cornuta) is an evergreen perennial flower that gets its name from its long nectar spur. Blooms in cooler weather and has a light fragrance. Grows best in moist, well-drained soil in sun or partial shade.
Viola riviniana
Common dog-violet
Common dog-violet (Viola riviniana) is a perennial flower that is native to Eurasia and Africa. It is an important source of food for the larvae of many butterfly species. In spring it produces bluish-purple flowers but, unlike other violets, it does not have a scent.
Viola grypoceras
Tachitsubo sumire
Insects, particularly the ceratina megastigmata, pollinate the hermaphrodite perennial viola grypoceras. Its yellow blooms might cause diarrhea if consumed in excessive quantities. They make great border plants because of their colorful flowers.
Viola rostrata
Longspur violet
Longspur violet is a perennial flower native to North American forests. The longspur violet gets its common name from the long nectar spur on the flower. It prefers to grow in shade with moist soil.
Viola adunca
Early blue violet
Early blue violet (Viola adunca) has purple veins running through its petals. Bees can see these veins in the ultraviolet spectrum, and use them as nectar guides. The species disperses its seed with the help of pods that burst when ripe. Seeds are then explosively thrown in every direction.

All Species of Violets

Sweet violet
Viola odorata
Sweet violet
Sweet violet is a mainstay in European gardening and cuisine. Its sweet smell has engendered a long tradition of use in the perfume industry. The leaves and flowers are edible and can be mixed with salads or made into syrup. In the wild, sweet violet is often found near woodland edges, forest clearings, and other shaded areas.
Common blue violet
Viola sororia
Common blue violet
The common blue violet is an attractive wildflower known for its blue to purplish white hues. It is common in North America, where it is sometimes associated with a weed. The plant is popular as an ornamental, and it is a state flower in several states in the US. Its flowers and leaves are edible and safe to be planted near pets.
Manchurian violet
Viola mandshurica
Manchurian violet
Manchurian violet is a cultivated plant used as a border in gardens, where its produces double-petal flowers similar in appearance to Parma violets. Surprisingly, some first-year plants produce seeds before their flowers.
Horned violet
Viola cornuta
Horned violet
Native to northern Spain, the horned violet (Viola cornuta) is an evergreen perennial flower that gets its name from its long nectar spur. Blooms in cooler weather and has a light fragrance. Grows best in moist, well-drained soil in sun or partial shade.
Common dog-violet
Viola riviniana
Common dog-violet
Common dog-violet (Viola riviniana) is a perennial flower that is native to Eurasia and Africa. It is an important source of food for the larvae of many butterfly species. In spring it produces bluish-purple flowers but, unlike other violets, it does not have a scent.
Tachitsubo sumire
Viola grypoceras
Tachitsubo sumire
Insects, particularly the ceratina megastigmata, pollinate the hermaphrodite perennial viola grypoceras. Its yellow blooms might cause diarrhea if consumed in excessive quantities. They make great border plants because of their colorful flowers.
Longspur violet
Viola rostrata
Longspur violet
Longspur violet is a perennial flower native to North American forests. The longspur violet gets its common name from the long nectar spur on the flower. It prefers to grow in shade with moist soil.
Early blue violet
Viola adunca
Early blue violet
Early blue violet (Viola adunca) has purple veins running through its petals. Bees can see these veins in the ultraviolet spectrum, and use them as nectar guides. The species disperses its seed with the help of pods that burst when ripe. Seeds are then explosively thrown in every direction.
White violet
Viola alba
White violet
The occurring in Central Europe subspecies Viola alba subsp. alba of the white violet becomes 3 to 10 cm high. The foothills are not rooted, they rise in front and usually bloom in the first year. The stipules of the White Violet are linear-lanceolate, pointed, 4- to 6-times as long as wide and hairy fringed. The petiole is spiky hairy.
Wild pansy
Viola bicolor
Wild pansy
The wild pansy is the only native violet of the genus Viola in North America. This flowering garden plant can be distinguished from other pansy varieties by its longer petals than sepals. It is also the only annual Viola plant with cleistogamous flowers which means the flowers do not open as they self-pollinate.
Showy violet
Viola betonicifolia
Showy violet
The showy violet is an evergreen perennial with pale purple to violet flowers. It’s generally harvested from the wild and can be grown as an ornamental in gardens or as a potted herb. This species is considered self-pollinating but may attract insects from time to time. It commonly grows on grassy hillsides and mountain slopes.
Arrowleaf Violet
Viola sagittata
Arrowleaf Violet
Commonly referred to as the arrowleaf Violet, the Viola sagittata is native to eastern North America. This is a perennial wildflower that has a rosette of basal leaves with flowering stalks. Purple flowers are produced in the spring. It's found in a variety of natural habitats which include woodlands, glades, sandy or rocky soil.
Daylily atlanta mystic
Viola chaerophylloides
Daylily atlanta mystic
Viola chaerophylloides has a striking white flower, and this herbaceous and perennial plant can grow up to 20 cm tall. It can grow on rocks and grasslands but prefers limestone soils.
Downy Yellow Violet
Viola pubescens
Downy Yellow Violet
Downy Yellow Violet (Viola pubescens) produces two types of flowers. It produces Chasmogamous, which have open petals circling around reproductive parts of the flower, in the spring. In the summer, it produces Cleistogamous, which are permanently closed blooms. This species is widespread throughout North America.
Long-spurred violet
Viola calcarata
Long-spurred violet
Long-spurred violet is a herbaceous flowering plant. The Alpine plant is found in meadows and pastures at altitudes of 1500 to 2800 m. It is cultivated for its distinctive purple flowers, unique due to heterophylly, where upper leaves are different from each other. It is attractive to butterflies and may be susceptible to slugs, snails, and aphids.
Birdfoot Violet
Viola pedata
Birdfoot Violet
Birdfoot Violet (Viola pedata) is an evergreen perennial that is the host plant for Great Spangled Fritillary butterflies. Blooms in late spring with large purple flowers that have prominent yellow stamens. It is commonly found growing in rocky or dry open woods. Thrives in full sun and well-drained, unfertilized soil. A good choice for a rock garden.
Heath dog-violet
Viola canina
Heath dog-violet
The heath dog-violet is a genus of common violet that can be hard to differentiate from the sweet violet. Though the two plants are similar in appearance, sweet violet is scented (the ancients used it for perfume) and dog violet is not.
Marsh violet
Viola palustris
Marsh violet
The marsh violet has been cultivated for centuries, dating back to ancient Greece, where the violet was the symbol of Athens. These versatile flowers adapt to their environment, whether shady and cool or marshy. Violets are said to have been the favorite flower of Napoleon Bonaparte.
Common violet
Viola arcuata
Common violet
Common violet is an herbaceous plant widely distributed in wet grasslands and lowland places in Asia. It forms stolons or carpet-growing root systems. The young leaves and flower buds of this plant can be eaten raw or cooked. The plant is also processed into teas and some locals use it for medicinal purposes.
Mountain pansy
Viola lutea
Mountain pansy
The mountain pansy is a perennial flower that has been the main progenitor for the well-known Garden pansy (V. × wittrockiana), a very popular flower hybrid. The most interesting subspecies of the mountain pansy are calaminaria and westfalica, which occur in very specific habitats—the first one occurs on zinc waste and the other on copper ore waste.
Halberd-leaf Yellow Violet
Viola hastata
Halberd-leaf Yellow Violet
The halberd-leaf Yellow Violet (Viola hastata) flower can be found in deciduous dry woods with rich soil in the United States. It blossoms in spring with yellow and purple blooms attracting a variety of birds.
Russian violet
Viola suavis
Russian violet
Russian violet is a herbaceous perennial that loves the sun and thrives in environments where it can be protected from frost and snow. This plant is often used for borders and alongside walls in rockeries. It has a pleasant scent and is known for its heart-shaped leaves.
Evergreen violet
Viola sempervirens
Evergreen violet
The evergreen violet (Viola sempervirens) grows in forests along North America's West Coast from California to Alaska. Its leaves can be cooked into soups or made into tea. Care should be taken, however, because the flowers can cause digestion problems.
Hairy violet
Viola hirta
Hairy violet
Hairy violet is a perennial herb noted for its blunt sepals when compared to other violets. It thrives in calcareous soils. Hairy violet is named for its hairiness, with the underside of the leaves, stem, and capsule all bearing fine hairs.
Primrose-leaf violet
Viola primulifolia
Primrose-leaf violet
Primrose-leaf violet (Viola primulifolia) is indigenous to eastern North America. When the plant's seed capsule is fully ripe, it splits into three parts and ejects the seed with explosive force.
Missouri violet
Viola missouriensis
Missouri violet
As it is the most common species of violet found within its native range, missouri violet is celebrated as a sign of spring. Due to many similarities, sometimes it is very difficult to differentiate from a close-related species, the common blue violet (V. sororia).
Long-stem violet
Viola acuminata
Long-stem violet
Heart-shaped leaves and delicate blossoms are popular characteristics shared by most long-stem violet. The fragrance of the flowers is interesting, as it contains a compound that inhibits olfactory receptors. This functions as a defense mechanism against herbivores. Nevertheless, certain extracts from long-stem violet are often used in perfumes.
Johnny jump up
Viola pedunculata
Johnny jump up
Johnny jump up is a wildflower native to western North America. It is used as an ornamental plant and will attract a range of insects to the garden. Though its scientific name, Viola pedunculata, identifies it as a type of violet, johnny jump up's flowers are bright yellow.
Sagebrush violet
Viola vallicola
Sagebrush violet
Sagebrush violet is found in moist meadows, foothills, and woodlands of western and central North America. Like all plants of the Viola genus, sagebrush violet has edible flowers and leaves.
Dwarf pansy
Viola kitaibeliana
Dwarf pansy
Dwarf pansy is an annual with a preference for moist, disturbed soils such as grazing lands and field edges. It is a tiny plant compared to other pansies and violets, with a small, yellow-centered white flower with purplish highlights.
Japanese violet
Viola prionantha
Japanese violet
Japanese violet (Viola prionantha) is an attractive perennial wildflower that is sometimes grown ornamentally for its attractive purple or violet flowers. This delicate plant is best grown in moist well-drained soils in a sheltered shady location since it does not thrive when exposed to bright sunlight or strong winds.
Small white violet
Viola macloskeyi
Small white violet
Small white violet is a flower that grows fast and spreads by its stolons, which make the plant suitable for ground covering in gardens. It naturally grows in wet and moist locations, so it requires similar growing conditions when cultivated at home. Reportedly, the Cherokee tribe used this violet as a pest-repellent in cornfields.
Mountain violet
Viola cunninghamii
Mountain violet
Heart-shaped leaves and delicate blossoms are popular characteristics shared by most mountain violet. The fragrance of the flowers is interesting, as it contains a compound that inhibits olfactory receptors. This functions as a defense mechanism against herbivores. Nevertheless, certain extracts from mountain violet are often used in perfumes.
Forest violet
Viola filicaulis
Forest violet
Heart-shaped leaves and delicate blossoms are popular characteristics shared by most forest violet. The fragrance of the flowers is interesting, as it contains a compound that inhibits olfactory receptors. This functions as a defense mechanism against herbivores. Nevertheless, certain extracts from forest violet are often used in perfumes.
Pale dog violet
Viola lactea
Pale dog violet
Some consider pale dog violet to be an inferior violet species, because it is not scented. It hybridizes well with the Common Dog Violet, but due to its scarcity, it is protected by law to preserve biodiversity. This perennial can produce cleistogamous flowers, which can fertilise themselves without the help of pollinators.
Teesdale violet
Viola rupestris
Teesdale violet
Teesdale violet gets its common name from a river valley in its native United Kingdom and its pretty violet flower. This small but attractive flower is occasionally grown ornamentally. The plant is sometimes confused with the similar species Viola riviniana ssp. minor but has a different shaped lower flower petal.
Northern bog violet
Viola nephrophylla
Northern bog violet
Viola nephrophylla was named by Edward Lee Greene in 1896 from specimens he collected near Montrose, Colorado. The species name, nephrophylla, is from the Greek for "kidney shaped leaves".
Early blue violet
Viola palmata
Early blue violet
Heart-shaped leaves and delicate blossoms are popular characteristics shared by most early blue violet. The fragrance of the flowers is interesting, as it contains a compound that inhibits olfactory receptors. This functions as a defense mechanism against herbivores. Nevertheless, certain extracts from early blue violet are often used in perfumes.
Viola portalesia
Viola portalesia
Viola portalesia
Heart-shaped leaves and delicate blossoms are popular characteristics shared by most viola portalesia. The fragrance of the flowers is interesting, as it contains a compound that inhibits olfactory receptors. This functions as a defense mechanism against herbivores. Nevertheless, certain extracts from viola portalesia are often used in perfumes.
Volcanic violet
Viola volcanica
Volcanic violet
Volcanic violet (Viola volcanica) is a short-lived perennial succulent that is cultivated in gardens and grown as a houseplant. The volcanic violet gets its name from the volcanic soils on which it grows in the wild. This species has edible flowers and leaves. These plants are considered relatively difficult to keep alive in cultivation.
Violets 'Bunny Ears'
Viola × wittrockiana 'Bunny Ears'
Violets 'Bunny Ears'
Heart-shaped leaves and delicate blossoms are popular characteristics shared by most violets 'Bunny Ears'. The fragrance of the flowers is interesting, as it contains a compound that inhibits olfactory receptors. This functions as a defense mechanism against herbivores. Nevertheless, certain extracts from violets 'Bunny Ears' are often used in perfumes.
Viola tokubuchiana
Viola variegata
Viola tokubuchiana
Heart-shaped leaves and delicate blossoms are popular characteristics shared by most viola tokubuchiana. The fragrance of the flowers is interesting, as it contains a compound that inhibits olfactory receptors. This functions as a defense mechanism against herbivores. Nevertheless, certain extracts from viola tokubuchiana are often used in perfumes.
Violets 'Heartthrob'
Viola × koreana 'Heartthrob'
Violets 'Heartthrob'
Violets 'Heartthrob' is a charming plant that is a favorite for ground covers. It is commonly found in woodlands and is a great addition to any garden. Its heart-shaped leaves and pink-purple blooms make it a beautiful choice for borders or containers.
Horned violet 'Celestial Blue Moon'
Viola cornuta 'Celestial Blue Moon'
Horned violet 'Celestial Blue Moon'
Horned violet 'Celestial Blue Moon' has showy white and blue-violet flowers that are far more spectacular than the single-colored, slim-petaled flowers of the horned violet, its parent plant. This cultivar is also noted for its hardiness and early flowering, which make it a favorite of gardeners when combined with its beauty.
Horned violet 'Etain'
Viola cornuta 'Etain'
Horned violet 'Etain'
Horned violet 'Etain' is a rare hybrid Viola cultivar that produces fragrant lemon-yellow blossoms with contrasting purple edges. They look similar to classical pansy plants, but horned violet 'Etain' is hardier and loves shade. Gardeners often use this plant for bedding since it’s a creeping perennial that comes back each year. It’s also well known for attracting fritillary butterflies and bees.
Horned violet 'Halo Lilac'
Viola cornuta 'Halo Lilac'
Horned violet 'Halo Lilac'
Horned violet 'Halo Lilac' is admired for its profusion of white and purple colored blooms. Although the exact genealogy of this plant remains unspecified, many horned violet cultivars tend to result from crossing V. cornuta and V. wittrockiana. The name "Halo Lilac" was given because the purple coloration forms a halo-shape on the outer edge of the plant's petals.
Horned violet 'Jackanapes'
Viola cornuta 'Jackanapes'
Horned violet 'Jackanapes'
Horned violet 'Jackanapes' has flowers that are wildly different in color than the pale blue of the parent plant. Instead, this vibrant and unusual violet has two-colored purple and yellow flowers. A 'jackanapes' is an impudent or foolish person, and there's no denying the scene-stealing impudence and character that this perennial brings to late-spring gardens.
Violets 'Moonlight'
Viola 'Moonlight'
Violets 'Moonlight'
Violets 'Moonlight' is a spreading and compact Violet cultivar that has elegant white to pale yellow flowers. These delicate blossoms are borne on long stems and they appear in early spring and late summer. This cultivar has received the prestigious Award of Garden Merit by the British Royal Horticultural society.
Horned violet 'Sorbet Coconut Swirl'
Viola cornuta 'Sorbet Coconut Swirl'
Horned violet 'Sorbet Coconut Swirl'
Horned violet 'Sorbet Coconut Swirl' is from the Viola genus and was specifically bred to be more tolerant of extreme weather than other viola plants. It can withstand high temperatures during the summer and extreme cold during the winter. The pansy blooms have white petals surrounded by purple-tinged edges. Gardeners often add this hardy perennial to areas that are considered difficult for other plants.
Spreading violet
Viola diffusa
Spreading violet
Heart-shaped leaves and delicate blossoms are popular characteristics shared by most spreading violet. The fragrance of the flowers is interesting, as it contains a compound that inhibits olfactory receptors. This functions as a defense mechanism against herbivores. Nevertheless, certain extracts from spreading violet are often used in perfumes.
Kisumire violet
Viola orientalis
Kisumire violet
Heart-shaped leaves and delicate blossoms are popular characteristics shared by most kisumire violet. The fragrance of the flowers is interesting, as it contains a compound that inhibits olfactory receptors. This functions as a defense mechanism against herbivores. Nevertheless, certain extracts from kisumire violet are often used in perfumes.
Viola magnifica
Viola magnifica
Viola magnifica
Heart-shaped leaves and delicate blossoms are popular characteristics shared by most viola magnifica. The fragrance of the flowers is interesting, as it contains a compound that inhibits olfactory receptors. This functions as a defense mechanism against herbivores. Nevertheless, certain extracts from viola magnifica are often used in perfumes.
Viola phalacrocarpa
Viola phalacrocarpa
Viola phalacrocarpa
Heart-shaped leaves and delicate blossoms are popular characteristics shared by most viola phalacrocarpa. The fragrance of the flowers is interesting, as it contains a compound that inhibits olfactory receptors. This functions as a defense mechanism against herbivores. Nevertheless, certain extracts from viola phalacrocarpa are often used in perfumes.
Viola albida
Viola albida
Viola albida
Heart-shaped leaves and delicate blossoms are popular characteristics shared by most viola albida. The fragrance of the flowers is interesting, as it contains a compound that inhibits olfactory receptors. This functions as a defense mechanism against herbivores. Nevertheless, certain extracts from viola albida are often used in perfumes.
Formosan violet
Viola formosana
Formosan violet
Heart-shaped leaves and delicate blossoms are popular characteristics shared by most formosan violet. The fragrance of the flowers is interesting, as it contains a compound that inhibits olfactory receptors. This functions as a defense mechanism against herbivores. Nevertheless, certain extracts from formosan violet are often used in perfumes.
Horned violet 'Molly Sanderson'
Viola cornuta 'Molly Sanderson'
Horned violet 'Molly Sanderson'
Considered the only truly black violet, horned violet 'Molly Sanderson' has an extremely unique coloration. Hybridized from other viola variations, this cultivar was named after the prestigious Irish gardener. Horned violet 'Molly Sanderson' is an award-winning variant due to its extremely long-living blooms (from spring till fall), striking darkness, and evergreen foliage.
Horned violet 'Belmont Blue'
Viola cornuta 'Belmont Blue'
Horned violet 'Belmont Blue'
Horned violet 'Belmont Blue' is a spreading perennial offering lavender-blue and violet-blue flowers with purple veins and a light yellow eye. Foliage is evergreen and bright green in color. This is a cultivar of Viola cornuta also known as 'Boughton Blue,' named after the daughter of horticulturist Albert Mott of Sunningdale, Berkshire. Gardeners choose this plant for its attractive looks and lovely fragrance.
Horned violet 'Halo Violet'
Viola cornuta 'Halo Violet'
Horned violet 'Halo Violet'
Horned violet 'Halo Violet' is a Horned violet cultivar that is renowned for its stunning fragrant flowers that bloom from early spring to late fall. The petals are violet-blue with darker edges that create a violet halo (hence the name). Gardeners love this violet for its hardiness and tolerance to heat.
Violets 'Red Wing'
Viola 'Red Wing'
Violets 'Red Wing'
Violets 'Red Wing' is a Violet cultivar bred for its stunning and large, bicolor flowers, as well as its uniform, non-stretching growth habit, and densely packed flowers thanks to the improved plant branching. The cultivar is distinguished by its large, yellow and purple-red blooms with spectacular autumn interest.
Horned violet 'Alba Group'
Viola cornuta 'Alba Group'
Horned violet 'Alba Group'
The horned violet 'Alba Group' is a simple and elegant horned violet with white flowers, hence its name, which means ‘white’ in Latin. A favorite with landscape designers and at flower shows because of its reliability and pure blooms, this versatile plant can be used in boxes, containers, edging and as a low ground cover in larger beds.
Sweet violet 'Hungarian Beauty'
Viola odorata 'Hungarian Beauty'
Sweet violet 'Hungarian Beauty'
Sweet violet 'Hungarian Beauty' is a Sweet violet cultivar that was bred for its white flowers that are flushed with soft purple-blue tones. Compared to the parent plant, this cultivar has significantly paler petals, which give the flower an elegant and delicate look.
Violets 'Denim'
Viola 'Denim'
Violets 'Denim'
Violets 'Denim' is a Violet cultivar with large, purple-blue flowers with a velvety texture and prominent yellow "eyes" in the flower centers. This cultivar is also prized for its uniform growth habit, which makes this Violet a good groundcover. However, violets 'Denim' is equally as stunning in garden beds, containers, or window boxes.
Cut-leaf violet
Viola dissecta
Cut-leaf violet
Heart-shaped leaves and delicate blossoms are popular characteristics shared by most cut-leaf violet. The fragrance of the flowers is interesting, as it contains a compound that inhibits olfactory receptors. This functions as a defense mechanism against herbivores. Nevertheless, certain extracts from cut-leaf violet are often used in perfumes.
popular genus

More Popular Genus

Dracaena
Dracaena
Dracaena are popular house plants that are easy to grow. They can tolerate low-light conditions and require little watering. Their leaves range from variegated to dark green. Their characteristic traits include woody stems that grow slowly but offer a striking appearance for small spaces such as apartments or offices.
Ficus
Fig trees
Fig trees have been cultivated in many regions for their fruits, particularly the common fig, F. carica. Most of the species have edible fruits, although the common fig is the only one of commercial value. Fig trees are also important food sources for wildlife in the tropics, including monkeys, bats, and insects.
Rubus
Brambles
Brambles are members of the rose family, and there are hundreds of different types to be found throughout the European countryside. They have been culturally significant for centuries; Christian folklore stories hold that when the devil was thrown from heaven, he landed on a bramble bush. Their vigorous growth habit can tangle into native plants and take over.
Acer
Maples
The popular tree family known as maples change the color of their leaves in the fall. Many cultural traditions encourage people to watch the colors change, such as momijigari in Japan. Maples popular options for bonsai art. Alternately, their sap is used to create maple syrup.
Prunus
Prunus
Prunus is a genus of flowering fruit trees that includes almonds, cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines, and apricots. These are often known as "stone fruits" because their pits are large seeds or "stones." When prunus trees are damaged, they exhibit "gummosis," a condition in which the tree's gum (similar to sap) is secreted to the bark to help heal external wounds.
Solanum
Nightshades
Nightshades is a large and diverse genus of plants, with more than 1500 different types worldwide. This genus incorporates both important staple food crops like tomato, potato, and eggplant, but also dangerous poisonous plants from the nightshade family. The name was coined by Pliny the Elder almost two thousand years ago.
Rosa
Roses
Most species of roses are shrubs or climbing plants that have showy flowers and sharp thorns. They are commonly cultivated for cut flowers or as ornamental plants in gardens due to their attractive appearance, pleasant fragrance, and cultural significance in many countries. The rose hips (fruits) can also be used in jams and teas.
Quercus
Oaks
Oaks are among the world's longest-lived trees, sometimes growing for over 1,000 years! The oldest known oak tree is in the southern United States and is over 1,500 years old. Oaks produce an exceedingly popular type of wood which is used to make different products, from furniture and flooring to wine barrels and even cosmetic creams.
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About
Key Facts
Distribution
How To Care
All Species
More Genus
Violets
Violets
Violets
Violets
Violets
Violets
Violets
Viola
Also known as: Common Blue Violet, Meadow Violet, Wild Blue Violet, Wood Violet
Heart-shaped leaves and delicate blossoms are popular characteristics shared by most violets. The fragrance of the flowers is interesting, as it contains a compound that inhibits olfactory receptors. This functions as a defense mechanism against herbivores. Nevertheless, certain extracts from violets are often used in perfumes.
Lifespan
Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Plant Type
Herb/Vine
info

Key Facts About Violets

Attributes of Violets

Plant Height
20 cm
Spread
50 cm
Flower Size
2.5 cm
Flower Color
White
Yellow
Purple
Leaf type
Semi-evergreen

Scientific Classification of Violets

distribution

Distribution of Violets

Distribution Map of Violets

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
care detail

How to Grow and Care for Violets

Violets is a versatile genus of flowering plants primarily requiring moderate light, temperatures and well-drained soil. These plants are fond of cool conditions and a mix of direct sunlight and partial shade. They seek consistent moisture but avoid waterlogging. Key challenges include pests such as aphids and leafhoppers, and diseases like powdery mildew. Violetss may become dormant in hot summers and require mulching in severe winters for protection. Seasonal care varies but includes deadheading flowers in spring and autumn replanting for continuous blooms.
More Info About Caring for Violets
species

Exploring the Violets Plants

8 most common species:
Viola odorata
Sweet violet
Sweet violet is a mainstay in European gardening and cuisine. Its sweet smell has engendered a long tradition of use in the perfume industry. The leaves and flowers are edible and can be mixed with salads or made into syrup. In the wild, sweet violet is often found near woodland edges, forest clearings, and other shaded areas.
Viola sororia
Common blue violet
The common blue violet is an attractive wildflower known for its blue to purplish white hues. It is common in North America, where it is sometimes associated with a weed. The plant is popular as an ornamental, and it is a state flower in several states in the US. Its flowers and leaves are edible and safe to be planted near pets.
Viola mandshurica
Manchurian violet
Manchurian violet is a cultivated plant used as a border in gardens, where its produces double-petal flowers similar in appearance to Parma violets. Surprisingly, some first-year plants produce seeds before their flowers.
Viola cornuta
Horned violet
Native to northern Spain, the horned violet (Viola cornuta) is an evergreen perennial flower that gets its name from its long nectar spur. Blooms in cooler weather and has a light fragrance. Grows best in moist, well-drained soil in sun or partial shade.
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All Species of Violets

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More Popular Genus

Dracaena
Dracaena
Dracaena are popular house plants that are easy to grow. They can tolerate low-light conditions and require little watering. Their leaves range from variegated to dark green. Their characteristic traits include woody stems that grow slowly but offer a striking appearance for small spaces such as apartments or offices.
Ficus
Fig trees
Fig trees have been cultivated in many regions for their fruits, particularly the common fig, F. carica. Most of the species have edible fruits, although the common fig is the only one of commercial value. Fig trees are also important food sources for wildlife in the tropics, including monkeys, bats, and insects.
Rubus
Brambles
Brambles are members of the rose family, and there are hundreds of different types to be found throughout the European countryside. They have been culturally significant for centuries; Christian folklore stories hold that when the devil was thrown from heaven, he landed on a bramble bush. Their vigorous growth habit can tangle into native plants and take over.
Acer
Maples
The popular tree family known as maples change the color of their leaves in the fall. Many cultural traditions encourage people to watch the colors change, such as momijigari in Japan. Maples popular options for bonsai art. Alternately, their sap is used to create maple syrup.
Prunus
Prunus
Prunus is a genus of flowering fruit trees that includes almonds, cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines, and apricots. These are often known as "stone fruits" because their pits are large seeds or "stones." When prunus trees are damaged, they exhibit "gummosis," a condition in which the tree's gum (similar to sap) is secreted to the bark to help heal external wounds.
Solanum
Nightshades
Nightshades is a large and diverse genus of plants, with more than 1500 different types worldwide. This genus incorporates both important staple food crops like tomato, potato, and eggplant, but also dangerous poisonous plants from the nightshade family. The name was coined by Pliny the Elder almost two thousand years ago.
Rosa
Roses
Most species of roses are shrubs or climbing plants that have showy flowers and sharp thorns. They are commonly cultivated for cut flowers or as ornamental plants in gardens due to their attractive appearance, pleasant fragrance, and cultural significance in many countries. The rose hips (fruits) can also be used in jams and teas.
Quercus
Oaks
Oaks are among the world's longest-lived trees, sometimes growing for over 1,000 years! The oldest known oak tree is in the southern United States and is over 1,500 years old. Oaks produce an exceedingly popular type of wood which is used to make different products, from furniture and flooring to wine barrels and even cosmetic creams.
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