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About
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Key Facts
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Pines
Pines
Pines
Pines
Pines (Pinus)
Pinus (the scientific name for true pines) is a well-known conifer genus whose wood is used extensively in the construction of homes, furniture, buildings, and other structures. Its commercial value exceeds many other types of timber. Turpentine and pine resin derived from pines are also valuable resources that are used throughout the construction and industrial fields.
Lifespan
Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Plant Type
Tree
info

Key Facts About Pines

Attributes of Pines

Plant Height
10 m
Spread
8 m
Leaf type
Evergreen

Scientific Classification of Pines

distribution

Distribution of Pines

Distribution Map of Pines

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
habit
care detail

How to Grow and Care for Pines

how to grow and care
The pines genus requires basic care to thrive, with moderate light, regular watering, well-drained soil, and cooler temperatures being essential. Pines faces challenges such as pest infestations, particularly from pine beetles, and diseases like root rot. These trees are also sensitive to air pollution and overly wet soil. Seasonal considerations involve providing plenty of water in summer, and closely monitoring for pests and diseases during spring and autumn. Winter coddling is not typically required due to pines's high cold tolerance.
More Info About Caring for Pines
species

Exploring the Pines Plants

8 most common species:
Pinus strobus
Eastern white pine
Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) is a long-lived evergreen tree native to mixed forests of temperate zones in eastern North America. It is considered one of the tallest trees in its native area. Eastern white pine has a straight-grained lightweight wood, highly valued in construction.
Pinus sylvestris
Scots pine
Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is a native Eurasian pine plant that grows on nutrient-poor, dry, rocky soils. Given the name, it should come as no surprise that scots pine is the national tree of Scotland. It is also important within the forestry industry due to its use for wood pulp and timber.
Pinus pinea
Italian tone pine
Italian tone pine (italian tone pine) is an evergreen tree whose rounded, umbrella-like canopy provides plenty of shade. It thrives in full sun and is drought-tolerant. Its pine cones produce the popular and delicious pine nuts, a valuable food crop that can be harvested, dried and eaten.
Pinus thunbergii
Japanese black pine
Japanese black pine is a pine tree that is especially able to tolerate sand and salt spray, compared to average pine trees, making it-well suited for coastal landscaping. However, these trees will grow larger inland than they will near the coast.
Pinus halepensis
Aleppo pine
Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis) is a species of tree that is native to the Mediterranean. It was once commonly tapped for its resin, which was used to make airtight seals on caskets of wine, preventing the wine from spoiling while also imparting a unique resinous flavor and aroma.
Pinus taeda
Loblolly pine
Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) is the second-most common tree in the United States after the red maple. The loblolly pine has the largest sequenced genome with 22 billion base pairs. Its genome is 7 times larger than the human genome.
Pinus nigra
Austrian pine
Austrian pine (Pinus nigra) is an evergreen conifer that is native to Mediterranean Europe but has become naturalized in other countries, where it is planted for ornamental purposes and as a windbreak. The trees can grow up to 55 m tall and are very long-lived, with some specimens surviving up to 500 years.
Pinus echinata
Shortleaf pine
Shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata) is a pine tree species native to the eastern United States. Its numbers have been declining in the last 30 years. An effort is underway to reestablish shortleaf pine growth, as it is important to the lumber industry. In addition, shortleaf pine plays a role in ecosystem diversity.

All Species of Pines

Eastern white pine
Pinus strobus
Eastern white pine
Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) is a long-lived evergreen tree native to mixed forests of temperate zones in eastern North America. It is considered one of the tallest trees in its native area. Eastern white pine has a straight-grained lightweight wood, highly valued in construction.
Scots pine
Pinus sylvestris
Scots pine
Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is a native Eurasian pine plant that grows on nutrient-poor, dry, rocky soils. Given the name, it should come as no surprise that scots pine is the national tree of Scotland. It is also important within the forestry industry due to its use for wood pulp and timber.
Italian tone pine
Pinus pinea
Italian tone pine
Italian tone pine (italian tone pine) is an evergreen tree whose rounded, umbrella-like canopy provides plenty of shade. It thrives in full sun and is drought-tolerant. Its pine cones produce the popular and delicious pine nuts, a valuable food crop that can be harvested, dried and eaten.
Japanese black pine
Pinus thunbergii
Japanese black pine
Japanese black pine is a pine tree that is especially able to tolerate sand and salt spray, compared to average pine trees, making it-well suited for coastal landscaping. However, these trees will grow larger inland than they will near the coast.
Aleppo pine
Pinus halepensis
Aleppo pine
Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis) is a species of tree that is native to the Mediterranean. It was once commonly tapped for its resin, which was used to make airtight seals on caskets of wine, preventing the wine from spoiling while also imparting a unique resinous flavor and aroma.
Loblolly pine
Pinus taeda
Loblolly pine
Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) is the second-most common tree in the United States after the red maple. The loblolly pine has the largest sequenced genome with 22 billion base pairs. Its genome is 7 times larger than the human genome.
Austrian pine
Pinus nigra
Austrian pine
Austrian pine (Pinus nigra) is an evergreen conifer that is native to Mediterranean Europe but has become naturalized in other countries, where it is planted for ornamental purposes and as a windbreak. The trees can grow up to 55 m tall and are very long-lived, with some specimens surviving up to 500 years.
Shortleaf pine
Pinus echinata
Shortleaf pine
Shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata) is a pine tree species native to the eastern United States. Its numbers have been declining in the last 30 years. An effort is underway to reestablish shortleaf pine growth, as it is important to the lumber industry. In addition, shortleaf pine plays a role in ecosystem diversity.
Red pine
Pinus resinosa
Red pine
Red pine (Pinus resinosa) is a coniferous pine species native to North America. Red pine is also known as the Norway Pine and is the state tree of Minnesota in the United States.
Mugo pine
Pinus mugo
Mugo pine
Mugo pine (Pinus mugo) is a pine tree species native to Europe. These relatively small pine trees are popular in landscaping due to their convenient size. Mugo pine gives off an aromatic pine smell.
Maritime pine
Pinus pinaster
Maritime pine
Maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) is a tall pine tree with habitats centered around the Mediterranean Basin, and particularly on the Iberian Peninsula. It can reach up to 35 m tall and produces cones with large wings. It roots in acidic, sandy, and even nutrient-poor soils where few commercially useful trees grow. Maritime pine is commonly harvested for timber.
Pitch pine
Pinus rigida
Pitch pine
"Rigida" in the species name of pitch pine (Pinus rigida) refers to its extraordinarily stiff needles. The Iroquois traditionally used its pitch to treat burns, cuts, and boils. In the past, builders used this tree a lot for building ships and railways because the wood's high resin content made it resistant to decay.
Ponderosa pine
Pinus ponderosa
Ponderosa pine
The ponderosa pine tree is one of the most common pine trees. It grows straight and tall, up to 76 m, with a deep root that makes it resistant to wind and drought. These trees can live for hundreds of years and are often used for their wood.
Monterey pine
Pinus radiata
Monterey pine
Monterey pine (Pinus radiata) is a coniferous evergreen tree that has adapted to survive fires. Fragrant, yellow flowers bloom in winter on male trees, while female trees produce purple flowers. Monterey pine provides food and habitat for birds, butterflies and a variety of insects. Monterey pine grows in full sun and is cultivated for its wood.
Japanese white pine
Pinus parviflora
Japanese white pine
Prized for its attractive pyramidal growth form and low-maintenance qualities, the japanese white pine is a popular ornamental tree, particularly in urban landscaping. Being a slow grower, it is favored in small gardens. With numerous cultivars available, the japanese white pine is also a popular bonsai specimen.
Longleaf pine
Pinus palustris
Longleaf pine
When in its early stages of development, until it is 5-12 years old, a longleaf pine doesn't look like a tree at all, but just a clump of grass. It takes 100 to 150 years to reach maturity and may live for up to 500 years. It is highly resistant to wildfire, and its dark needle-like leaves are often twisted and 20 to 46 cm in long.
Virginia pine
Pinus virginiana
Virginia pine
Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana) is an evergreen perennial shrub that grows best in full sun. Virginia pine is drought tolerant and requires well-drained soil. It provides natural cover for dry, barren sites. It grows best in pure groups of its own species rather than in groups of mixed plant species.
Sand pine
Pinus clausa
Sand pine
Sand pine (Pinus clausa) is a native southeastern United States pine tree. Sand pine can grow in hot, sandy conditions with minimal upkeep and is cultivated in places like Florida for eco-conservation. It provides a protective habitat for small lizards in Florida.
Swiss stone pine
Pinus cembra
Swiss stone pine
The cones of the swiss stone pine (Pinus cembra) produce the popular pine nuts, which are rich in oil and eaten raw or cooked. Turpentine is obtained from the needles, and the by-product, rosin, is used on violinists' bows and ballerinas' shoes.
Slash pine
Pinus elliottii
Slash pine
Slash pine is named for the slashes of swampy ground in which it grows. This fast-growing conifer is used for reforestation projects, turpentine, and other crude rosins. It is also known as Swamp Pine and Southern Florida Pine.
Sugar Pine
Pinus lambertiana
Sugar Pine
Dubbed by David Douglas, its discoverer, as the most regal among all the pines, sugar Pine is the highest and largest among its species. Aside from being grown for timber, Native Americans used the sweet-tasting sap of this tree as a culinary ingredient. Birds, butterflies, and moths are drawn to this tree which is native to North America's Pacific regions.
Lodgepole pine
Pinus contorta
Lodgepole pine
Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) is indigenous to western North America. It’s a species known for its longevity—botanists have found trees that are older than 600 years. It was a favorite source of timber for Native Americans. The primary way they used it (as its name suggests) was to build lodgepoles.
Pinyon pine
Pinus edulis
Pinyon pine
A well-known tree of southwestern North America, the pinyon pine is a state tree of New Mexico (USA), and the most common tree in Colorado (USA) where it makes 22% of state forests. The seeds are dispersed by the famous Pinyon jay (Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus). Many other birds, such as the Montezuma quail (Cyrtonyx montezumae) eat pinyon pine seeds. It's an extremely drought-tolerant tree.
Rocky Mountain Bristlecone Pine
Pinus aristata
Rocky Mountain Bristlecone Pine
Rocky Mountain Bristlecone Pine (Pinus aristata) is one of three closely related species known collectively as bristlecone pines. In 1992 a rocky Mountain Bristlecone Pine estimated to be 2,480 years old was discovered on Black Mountain in Colorado. “Aristata” in the Latin name means “prickliness.”
Japanese red pine
Pinus densiflora
Japanese red pine
The evergreen and conifer japanese red pine has thin, reddish bark and can grow up to 30 m tall. It has plumes of green needles, and as it grows older, the appearance may look like a flattened crown. The pine supports the larvae of the imperial moth that appear from spring to fall.
Towani Pine
Pinus sabiniana
Towani Pine
Towani Pine (Pinus sabiniana) is so-named because it grows at altitudes up to 1200 m in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada and Coast Ranges of its native California and Oregon. This tree is important to the moth Chionodes sabinianus since it provides the only food source for the caterpillars. Towani Pine can grow well in areas of both low and high rainfall.
Himalayan pine
Pinus wallichiana
Himalayan pine
Himalayan pine is a conifer tree commonly grown in parks and big gardens. It is favored for its unique appearance and ability to tolerate areas with significant air pollution. You can typically find this tree in rocky mountains and alongside glaciers. It is a source of high-quality turpentine.
Chinese red pine
Pinus massoniana
Chinese red pine
Chinese red pine is an evergreen pine tree native to China. Its wood is sometimes used for construction and the resins are made into artificial vanilla flavoring. This tree is generally not cultivated outside of China.
Jack pine
Pinus banksiana
Jack pine
The jack pine is native to eastern North America. The pine cones are generally 5 cm and curved at the tip. The moderately hard and heavy wood from this tree is used for lumber, pulpwood, telephone poles, mine timbers, railroad ties, and more.
Jeffrey pine
Pinus jeffreyi
Jeffrey pine
Jeffrey pine is a tall, long-lived North American conifer, distributed throughout California, in southwestern Oregon, western Nevada, and northern Baja California. When broken or crushed, the bark and twigs of jeffrey pine release a sweet, vanilla-like scent. Pinus jeffreyi is one of the primary hosts of dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium spp.), which can cause severe damage to jeffrey pine seedlings.
Western white pine
Pinus monticola
Western white pine
Western white pine or silver pine is a large tree with large pine cones. It grows naturally in the mountains of western United States and is related to the somewhat smaller Eastern White Pine, Pinus monticola, which grows on the eastern side of the United States.
Singleleaf Pinyon
Pinus monophylla
Singleleaf Pinyon
Singleleaf Pinyon (*Pinus monophylla*) is an evergreen tree that will grow from 4.5 to 9 m tall, growing slowly. It has attractive gray-green foliage, and the needles are very ornamental, making the tree prized for its beautiful foliage. It grows in full sun with low moisture and well-drained soil, but cannot tolerate standing water. Singleleaf Pinyon makes a great windbreak, hedge, or street tree in urban areas.
Coulter Pine
Pinus coulteri
Coulter Pine
Named after botanist Thomas Coulter, the coulter Pine is native to the western United States. This somewhat sparse-looking Pinus coulteri grows large pine cones and is popular as an ornamental tree. Native Americans once ate the large seeds.
Torrey pine
Pinus torreyana
Torrey pine
Torrey pine, or Pinus torreyana, is a rare and endangered species of pine. It only grows in three places: Coastal northern San Diego, Santa Rosa Island, and in the Torrey Pines State Natural reserve.
Mexican pinyon
Pinus cembroides
Mexican pinyon
Mexican pinyon (Pinus cembroides) is an evergreen pine tree that grows from 15 to 20 m tall with an attractive conical shape. It produces reddish-brown cones in spring. Cones mature in fall with edible seeds or pine nuts, which are consumed by both humans and animals. It thrives in full sun, requires low irrigation, and is drought tolerant.
Bunge's pine
Pinus bungeana
Bunge's pine
Known as the symbol of longevity, the bunge's pine is a beautiful conifer highly prized in landscaping. Its popularity comes from its attractive bark that has the ability to peel, revealing numerous colors. Unfortunately, this slow-grower will not start exfoliating until it is at least ten years old. This pine is also used for soil erosion control.
Knobcone pine
Pinus attenuata
Knobcone pine
Knobcone pine (Pinus attenuata) is indigenous to the western United States. It's a host of the dwarf mistletoe plant. It doesn't release seeds from its pine cones until temperatures exceed 350 degrees. Of course, the only way that will happen is if there's a raging forest fire.
Mexican weeping pine
Pinus patula
Mexican weeping pine
Mexican weeping pine, or Pinus patula, is native to Mexico. It is often planted for reforestation purposes. It is somewhat drought-tolerant. This tree can handle short dips of temperatures below freezing, but not for long periods of time.
Table mountain pine
Pinus pungens
Table mountain pine
Pinus pungens (the scientific name for true table mountain pine) is a well-known conifer genus whose wood is used extensively in the construction of homes, furniture, buildings, and other structures. Its commercial value exceeds many other types of timber. Turpentine and pine resin derived from table mountain pine are also valuable resources that are used throughout the construction and industrial fields.
Spruce pine
Pinus glabra
Spruce pine
This pine is a straight-growing, medium-sized species, attaining heights of 20 to 40 m. The leaves are needle-like, in bundles of two, 5 to 8 cm long, slender (1 mm thick), and glossy dark green. The small, slender cones are 4 to 6 cm long, with weak prickles on the scales that are soon shed.
Great basin bristlecone pine
Pinus longaeva
Great basin bristlecone pine
The great basin bristlecone pine tree is the oldest living tree on the planet. It can live for thousands of years in the higher mountains of North America, as evidenced by the Prometheus tree, a great basin bristlecone pine tree that was formerly recorded as the oldest tree. Clark's nutcrackers, a local bird, feed on the seeds of these trees.
Whitebark pine
Pinus albicaulis
Whitebark pine
The whitebark pine is found in the western United States and Canada, mostly in the mountains, and is scientifically known as Pinus albicaulis. It usually marks the treeline in forests because of its vast height. The plant has been declared endangered by the IUCN.
Armand's pine
Pinus armandii
Armand's pine
Armand's pine has a high economic value, with the wood being used for building. It is a popular ornamental and architectural tree and is considered a symbol of immortality and longevity in Chinese culture. Adrien René Franchet is responsible for the plant's first description, written in 1884. Its common name Armand's pine honors the French missionary Père David Armand.
Korean pine
Pinus koraiensis
Korean pine
The korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) is a valuable pine tree very adaptable to a wide range of environments and is ideal for an urban setting. This tree is a source of pine nuts that are edible and sold commercially. The wood is very versatile, perfect for furniture making and construction. It is generally used for building railroads, bridges, and paper production.
Chinese pine
Pinus tabuliformis
Chinese pine
Chinese pine is an evergreen found in China (hence the common name) and Korea that is a good source of timber, tannin, dye, and turpentine. The specific epithet means “table-shaped” and refers to this pine’s flattened, table-like crown.
Siberian stone pine
Pinus sibirica
Siberian stone pine
Siberian stone pine (Pinus sibirica) is a famously long-lived pine with some specimens recorded as living over 800 years. It is also an important commercial tree and its wood is widely used for furniture, construction, and musical instruments. Its resin is a source of turpentine and the tree is grown ornamental in larger gardens and parks.
Black pine
Pinus nigra subsp. nigra
Black pine
The Austrian pine (Pinus nigra subsp. Nigra) is a tree from the pine family (Pinaceae). The conifer occurs naturally in Austria, Central Italy, the Balkans and Anatolia. The plant can withstand the wind and is often planted in coastal areas as a natural windbreak. The Austrian pine is also planted in calcareous dunes to retain the sand. The height is around 33 mr.
False white pine
Pinus pseudostrobus
False white pine
It grows between 1300 to 3250 m. From 26° to 15° north latitude, from Sinaloa, Mexico to El Salvador and Honduras. It occurs within a rainfalls regime mostly in summer. A stand of about 15 fully mature Mexican pines is in Imperial County, California, at the Palo Verde County Park, in a narrow strip of land between Hwy 78 and the Colorado River.
Japanese white pine 'Miyajima'
Pinus parviflora 'Miyajima'
Japanese white pine 'Miyajima'
Japanese white pine 'Miyajima' is a beautiful and rare ornamental tree that is perfect for gardens. This tree is a prized specimen for collectors and has a unique weeping habit with gracefully curved branches.
Lodgepole pine 'Chief Joseph'
Pinus contorta 'Chief Joseph'
Lodgepole pine 'Chief Joseph'
Lodgepole pine 'Chief Joseph' is a Lodgepole pine cultivar, distinguished by its gorgeous winter foliage when the needles turn golden-yellow. The cultivar is also selected for its dwarf growth habit. Lodgepole pine 'Chief Joseph' was named in honor of Chief Joseph, the chief of the Wallow Valley Nez Perce tribe.
Eastern white pine 'Blue Shag'
Pinus strobus 'Blue Shag'
Eastern white pine 'Blue Shag'
Eastern white pine 'Blue Shag' is distinct for its small, globose form and short, blue-green needles. A cultivar of Pinus strobus, it gets its name from those needles, which are soft to the touch and appear in bundles of five. As a dwarf cultivar, eastern white pine 'Blue Shag' does not exceed 1.2 m in height.
Mugo pine 'Mughus'
Pinus mugo 'Mughus'
Mugo pine 'Mughus'
Mugo pine 'Mughus' (Pinus mugo 'Mughus') is a much more compact and slow-growing version of Mugo pine (Pinus mugo). These pines are perfect for creating seamless landscapes as they hug the ground and maintain their shape better than other members of the species. They are relatively easy to care for and can live for 70 years or more!
Scots pine 'Aurea'
Pinus sylvestris 'Aurea'
Scots pine 'Aurea'
Pinus sylvestris 'Aurea' (the scientific name for true scots pine 'Aurea') is a well-known conifer genus whose wood is used extensively in the construction of homes, furniture, buildings, and other structures. Its commercial value exceeds many other types of timber. Turpentine and pine resin derived from scots pine 'Aurea' are also valuable resources that are used throughout the construction and industrial fields.
Japanese white pine 'Hagoromo Seedling'
Pinus parviflora 'Hagoromo Seedling'
Japanese white pine 'Hagoromo Seedling'
Japanese white pine 'Hagoromo Seedling' is a slow-growing dwarf Japanese white pine that grows to a height of 45 cm after ten years, in marked contrast to the parent tree which grows up to25 m tall. The tree's distinctive blue-green needles are attractively different from the dull green color of the parent tree. This cultivar was selected by a Japanese man with the surname Hagoromo.
Scots pine 'Beuvronensis'
Pinus sylvestris 'Beuvronensis'
Scots pine 'Beuvronensis'
Scots pine 'Beuvronensis' is a dwarf shrub hybrid of Scots pine, which grows to a maximum height of 1.2 m, a dramatic contrast to the towering parent plant which grows to a whopping 35 m. This slow-growing cultivar was named on its discovery in France over a century ago. It rewards patient gardeners with an attractive dome-shaped ball of blue-green needles.
Japanese white pine 'Glauca'
Pinus parviflora 'Glauca'
Japanese white pine 'Glauca'
Japanese white pine 'Glauca' (Pinus parviflora 'Glauca') gets its name from the Latin word for bluish-grey, and indeed, this Japanese white pine has characteristic blue needles. This cultivar has a long heritage, named in 1909 by Ludwig Beissner. This small tree high grows up to 5 m tall.
Mugo pine 'Humpy'
Pinus mugo 'Humpy'
Mugo pine 'Humpy'
Mugo pine 'Humpy' is best suited for full sun conditions. Beloved by gardeners, this pine cultivar won the Award of Garden Merit. The meaning of its cultivar name is unknown. Although slow-growing, due to its versatility, gardeners can utilize the mugo pine 'Humpy' in wet or acidic sites, as long as they are well drained.
Mugo pine 'Carstens'
Pinus mugo 'Carstens'
Mugo pine 'Carstens'
Mugo pine 'Carstens' (Pinus mugo 'Carstens') is a dwarf cultivar of Mugo pine (Pinus mugo) that was discovered by Erwin Carstens in Germany; it is commonly misnamed as 'Carsten's Wintergold.' These plants feature green pines in the summer which eventually turn gold during the winter; they also develop shorter needles at the ends of each branch, creating a crowning effect.
Eastern white pine 'Densa'
Pinus strobus 'Densa'
Eastern white pine 'Densa'
Eastern white pine 'Densa' (Pinus strobus 'Densa') is a dwarf cultivar of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) but is much slower-growing with an irregular growth pattern. These plants have short pines with a smoky-blue tint. They grow dense clusters of branches, making them popular to use as hedges or other garden borders.
Austrian pine 'Green Tower'
Pinus nigra 'Green Tower'
Austrian pine 'Green Tower'
The austrian pine 'Green Tower' is a species of Austrian pine. This cultivar is easy to care for and does not need to be pruned. Compared to other pine trees, austrian pine 'Green Tower' is able to survive better in chalky earth. It keeps its gray-green needles year-round and has a life expectancy of 40 years. The name is a clear reference to its tower-like shape, though it rarely exceeds 6 m in height.
Austrian pine 'Komet'
Pinus nigra 'Komet'
Austrian pine 'Komet'
Austrian pine 'Komet' is a dwarf variety of Austrian pine. Besides its size, this cultivar is distinguished by its upswept branches pointing to the sky and its upright, columnar growth habit. The foliage is blue-green, adorned with silvery needles at the ends of the branches. During the spring, this conifer is embellished with numerous cones that stand up like candles.
Eastern white pine 'Tiny Kurls'
Pinus strobus 'Tiny Kurls'
Eastern white pine 'Tiny Kurls'
Eastern white pine 'Tiny Kurls' is a dwarf white pine that is almost unrecognizable from the parent plant. This low-growing, 1.8 m, tree has exceptionally long and curled (hence the name) green-white needles. By contrast, there are long-living examples of the parent tree that grow to over 50 m. It is a unique talking point of a feature tree for ornamental gardens.
Dwarf siberian pine 'Glauca'
Pinus pumila 'Glauca'
Dwarf siberian pine 'Glauca'
This award-winning cultivar is unique because of its blue-gray clusters of needles, short stature, and colorful purple-to-red cones. Though its cultivation origin is unknown, dwarf siberian pine 'Glauca' was named after the Greek word "Glaucus," meaning "silver, shiny, green-gray bluish." Gardeners prize this small tree for its extremely long life, ease of care, and distinctive colors.
Mugo pine 'Winter Gold'
Pinus mugo 'Winter Gold'
Mugo pine 'Winter Gold'
Pinus mugo 'Winter Gold' (the scientific name for true mugo pine 'Winter Gold') is a well-known conifer genus whose wood is used extensively in the construction of homes, furniture, buildings, and other structures. Its commercial value exceeds many other types of timber. Turpentine and pine resin derived from mugo pine 'Winter Gold' are also valuable resources that are used throughout the construction and industrial fields.
Mugo pine 'Ophir'
Pinus mugo 'Ophir'
Mugo pine 'Ophir'
The mugo pine 'Ophir' is a dwarf variant of the mugo pine, selected because it grows very slowly. This trait makes it a good choice for gardeners with limited space, for planting in rock gardens, or for containers. It has fine, yellow-green needles which are bright and attractive year round.
Scots pine 'Gold Coin'
Pinus sylvestris 'Gold Coin'
Scots pine 'Gold Coin'
Selected primarily for the winter interest it provides, scots pine 'Gold Coin' is a Scots pine cultivar with upright, irregular, rounded growth habit and spectacular, golden-yellow foliage in winter, which is the most prominent characteristic of this evergreen tree. As the temperature rises, the foliage becomes greenish again.
Eastern white pine 'Pendula'
Pinus strobus 'Pendula'
Eastern white pine 'Pendula'
The eastern white pine 'Pendula' generates green or blue-green needles in clusters. Compared to its parent Pinus strobus, this is a semi-dwarf variety that will grow to heights of 1.8 to 4.5 m. Unlike some pine trees, the eastern white pine 'Pendula' has branches that grow in a drooping, pendular manner.
Mugo pine 'Mops'
Pinus mugo 'Mops'
Mugo pine 'Mops'
Mugo pine 'Mops' is a dwarf cultivar of the mugo pine that grows to a maximum of 1 m in contrast to its parent which can grow up to 6 m tall. Mugo pine 'Mops' grows into a characteristic rounded bole that is as wide as it is tall, and is a slow-growing but eye-catching garden feature tree.
Mugo pine 'Slowmound'
Pinus mugo 'Slowmound'
Mugo pine 'Slowmound'
A compact variety of Mugo pine, mugo pine 'Slowmound' has short needles that give the plant a tidy appearance that gardeners like. Slowmound is a name derived from two of the variety's unique characteristics: that it is slow-growing and that it stays in a dense mound.
Khasi pine
Pinus kesiya
Khasi pine
Pinus kesiya is a tree reaching up to 30–35 m tall with a straight, cylindrical trunk. The bark is thick and dark brown, with deep longitudinal fissures. The branches are robust, red brown from the second year, the branchlets horizontal to drooping. The leaves are needle-like, dark green, usually 3 per fascicle, 15–20 cm long, the fascicle sheath 1–2 cm long and persistent. The cones are ovoid, 5–9 cm long, often curved downwards, sometimes slightly distorted; the scales of second-year cones are dense, the umbo a little convex, sometimes acutely spinous. The scales have transverse and longitudinal ridges across the middle of the scale surface. The seeds are winged, 6–7 mm long with a 1.5–2.5 cm wing. Pollination is in mid spring, with the cones maturing 18–20 months after. Khasi pine usually grows in pure stands or mixed with broad-leaved trees, but does not form open pine forests.
Taiwan red pine
Pinus taiwanensis
Taiwan red pine
Pinus taiwanensis, the Taiwan red pine, is a species of conifer in the family Pinaceae. It is found only in China. It is a close relative of Pinus luchuensis of Japan and Pinus hwangshanensis of China, sometimes considered as a subspecies of the former. Sometimes Pinus hwangshanensis from China are also referred to as P. taiwanensis. Taiwan red pine is a large tree, with a straight trunk up to 35 m (115 ft) tall and 80 cm (2.6 ft) in diameter. Needles are in bundles of two. Cones are 6–7 cm (2.4–2.8 in) long. It is a common species in the Central Mountain Range at altitudes of 750–3,000 m (2,500–9,800 ft), often in pure stands.
Chir pine
Pinus roxburghii
Chir pine
Pinus roxburghii is a large tree reaching 30–50 m (98–164 ft) with a trunk diameter of up to 2 m (6.6 ft), exceptionally 3 m (10 ft). The bark is red-brown, thick and deeply fissured at the base of the trunk, thinner and flaky in the upper crown. The leaves are needle-like, in fascicles of three, very slender, 20–35 cm (7.9–13.8 in) long, and distinctly yellowish green. The cones are ovoid conic, 12–24 cm (4.7–9.4 in) long and 5–8 cm (2.0–3.1 in) broad at the base when closed, green at first, ripening glossy chestnut-brown when 24 months old. They open slowly over the next year or so, or after being heated by a forest fire, to release the seeds, opening to 9–18 cm (3.5–7.1 in) broad. The seeds are 8–9 mm (0.31–0.35 in) long, with a 40 mm (1.6 in) wing, and are wind-dispersed.
popular genus

More Popular Genus

Dracaena
Dracaena
Dracaena are popular house plants that are easy to grow. They can tolerate low-light conditions and require little watering. Their leaves range from variegated to dark green. Their characteristic traits include woody stems that grow slowly but offer a striking appearance for small spaces such as apartments or offices.
Ficus
Fig trees
Fig trees have been cultivated in many regions for their fruits, particularly the common fig, F. carica. Most of the species have edible fruits, although the common fig is the only one of commercial value. Fig trees are also important food sources for wildlife in the tropics, including monkeys, bats, and insects.
Rubus
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Acer
Maples
The popular tree family known as maples change the color of their leaves in the fall. Many cultural traditions encourage people to watch the colors change, such as momijigari in Japan. Maples popular options for bonsai art. Alternately, their sap is used to create maple syrup.
Prunus
Prunus
Prunus is a genus of flowering fruit trees that includes almonds, cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines, and apricots. These are often known as "stone fruits" because their pits are large seeds or "stones." When prunus trees are damaged, they exhibit "gummosis," a condition in which the tree's gum (similar to sap) is secreted to the bark to help heal external wounds.
Solanum
Nightshades
Nightshades is a large and diverse genus of plants, with more than 1500 different types worldwide. This genus incorporates both important staple food crops like tomato, potato, and eggplant, but also dangerous poisonous plants from the nightshade family. The name was coined by Pliny the Elder almost two thousand years ago.
Rosa
Roses
Most species of roses are shrubs or climbing plants that have showy flowers and sharp thorns. They are commonly cultivated for cut flowers or as ornamental plants in gardens due to their attractive appearance, pleasant fragrance, and cultural significance in many countries. The rose hips (fruits) can also be used in jams and teas.
Quercus
Oaks
Oaks are among the world's longest-lived trees, sometimes growing for over 1,000 years! The oldest known oak tree is in the southern United States and is over 1,500 years old. Oaks produce an exceedingly popular type of wood which is used to make different products, from furniture and flooring to wine barrels and even cosmetic creams.
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Key Facts
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Pines
Pines
Pines
Pines
Pines
Pines
Pines
Pinus
Pinus (the scientific name for true pines) is a well-known conifer genus whose wood is used extensively in the construction of homes, furniture, buildings, and other structures. Its commercial value exceeds many other types of timber. Turpentine and pine resin derived from pines are also valuable resources that are used throughout the construction and industrial fields.
Lifespan
Lifespan
Perennial
Plant Type
Plant Type
Tree
info

Key Facts About Pines

Attributes of Pines

Plant Height
10 m
Spread
8 m
Leaf type
Evergreen

Scientific Classification of Pines

distribution

Distribution of Pines

Distribution Map of Pines

distribution map
Native
Cultivated
Invasive
Potentially invasive
Exotic
No species reported
care detail

How to Grow and Care for Pines

The pines genus requires basic care to thrive, with moderate light, regular watering, well-drained soil, and cooler temperatures being essential. Pines faces challenges such as pest infestations, particularly from pine beetles, and diseases like root rot. These trees are also sensitive to air pollution and overly wet soil. Seasonal considerations involve providing plenty of water in summer, and closely monitoring for pests and diseases during spring and autumn. Winter coddling is not typically required due to pines's high cold tolerance.
More Info About Caring for Pines
species

Exploring the Pines Plants

8 most common species:
Pinus strobus
Eastern white pine
Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) is a long-lived evergreen tree native to mixed forests of temperate zones in eastern North America. It is considered one of the tallest trees in its native area. Eastern white pine has a straight-grained lightweight wood, highly valued in construction.
Pinus sylvestris
Scots pine
Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is a native Eurasian pine plant that grows on nutrient-poor, dry, rocky soils. Given the name, it should come as no surprise that scots pine is the national tree of Scotland. It is also important within the forestry industry due to its use for wood pulp and timber.
Pinus pinea
Italian tone pine
Italian tone pine (italian tone pine) is an evergreen tree whose rounded, umbrella-like canopy provides plenty of shade. It thrives in full sun and is drought-tolerant. Its pine cones produce the popular and delicious pine nuts, a valuable food crop that can be harvested, dried and eaten.
Pinus thunbergii
Japanese black pine
Japanese black pine is a pine tree that is especially able to tolerate sand and salt spray, compared to average pine trees, making it-well suited for coastal landscaping. However, these trees will grow larger inland than they will near the coast.
Show More Species

All Species of Pines

popular genus

More Popular Genus

Dracaena
Dracaena
Dracaena are popular house plants that are easy to grow. They can tolerate low-light conditions and require little watering. Their leaves range from variegated to dark green. Their characteristic traits include woody stems that grow slowly but offer a striking appearance for small spaces such as apartments or offices.
Ficus
Fig trees
Fig trees have been cultivated in many regions for their fruits, particularly the common fig, F. carica. Most of the species have edible fruits, although the common fig is the only one of commercial value. Fig trees are also important food sources for wildlife in the tropics, including monkeys, bats, and insects.
Rubus
Brambles
Brambles are members of the rose family, and there are hundreds of different types to be found throughout the European countryside. They have been culturally significant for centuries; Christian folklore stories hold that when the devil was thrown from heaven, he landed on a bramble bush. Their vigorous growth habit can tangle into native plants and take over.
Acer
Maples
The popular tree family known as maples change the color of their leaves in the fall. Many cultural traditions encourage people to watch the colors change, such as momijigari in Japan. Maples popular options for bonsai art. Alternately, their sap is used to create maple syrup.
Prunus
Prunus
Prunus is a genus of flowering fruit trees that includes almonds, cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines, and apricots. These are often known as "stone fruits" because their pits are large seeds or "stones." When prunus trees are damaged, they exhibit "gummosis," a condition in which the tree's gum (similar to sap) is secreted to the bark to help heal external wounds.
Solanum
Nightshades
Nightshades is a large and diverse genus of plants, with more than 1500 different types worldwide. This genus incorporates both important staple food crops like tomato, potato, and eggplant, but also dangerous poisonous plants from the nightshade family. The name was coined by Pliny the Elder almost two thousand years ago.
Rosa
Roses
Most species of roses are shrubs or climbing plants that have showy flowers and sharp thorns. They are commonly cultivated for cut flowers or as ornamental plants in gardens due to their attractive appearance, pleasant fragrance, and cultural significance in many countries. The rose hips (fruits) can also be used in jams and teas.
Quercus
Oaks
Oaks are among the world's longest-lived trees, sometimes growing for over 1,000 years! The oldest known oak tree is in the southern United States and is over 1,500 years old. Oaks produce an exceedingly popular type of wood which is used to make different products, from furniture and flooring to wine barrels and even cosmetic creams.
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Your Ultimate Guide to Plants
Identify grow and nurture the better way!
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17,000 local species +400,000 global species studied
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80+ scholars in botany and gardening
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